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The record-union. [volume] (Sacramento, Calif.) 1891-1903, August 15, 1893, Image 6

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6
SILVER PURCHASING ACT.
Unconditional Repeal Meets With
a Check in the Senate.
SENATOR VOORHBES PUTS IN THE
FIRST ENTERING WEDGE
15y Introducing a Bill for Increased
Currency, rtpcommendintr the Issue
Of National IJank Notes to tho Par
Value of Bonds Deposited—Senator
Vost PimfllTTTH Ills Allegiance to
Bimetallism.
Br^fial to the Kf.cokd-Union.
Washikoton, Aug. 14.— While the mo
notonous debate over tho question of free
coinage or repeal is progressing in tho
House, with no prospoct of a vote until
two weeks from to-day, the indications
are that the Senate will devote its first
legislative action entirely to another
remedy for the financial situation—that of
permitting national banks to issue cur
rency to tho full par value of their United
States bonds on deposit in the Treasury.
Thus the two bodies will be working
somewhat at cross purposes, and out of
the complications to ensue no ono can
know what will finally evolve.
Tho developments in the sonate to-day
v ere decidedly discouraging to thoso who
hoped for an unconditional repeal of the
Bherman law. The introduction by Sen
ator Yoorhccs of an increased currency
bill, and its reference to the committee of
Which he is Chairman, indicates that tho
Finance Committee most first seek re
lief in recommending tho issue of na
tional bank notes to the par value of
bonds deposited, and that tho question of
free coinago and the repeal of the Sher
man Act will be relegated to the future
for more leisure consideration.
Later in the day, when Senator Vest
reaffirmed hia allegiance to bimetallism,
and spoke against the unconditional re
peal of tho Sherman Act, tho repealing
men found a greater cause for disappoint
ment.
When the Senato mot an avalanche of
petitions were presented and referred.
JSomo prayed for the repeal of the pur
chasing clause of the Sherman law; quite,
as many were against repeal; several
wars for the freer use of silver as a legal
tender iv tho United states, and some
wero for free coinage of silver at a ratio of
16 to 1.
Perkins (Republican) of California
made his debut in tho Senate with tho
presentation of various memorials from
the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce
for the enactment of a substitute for the
purchasing clause of the Sherman Act;
for the annexation of tho Hawaiian
Islands and iv favor of tho
Canal.
At tbia point a national bank note bill
was introduced by Senator Yoorhees,
Chairman of the Finance Committee,
npanying the bill was a letter from
Secretary Carlisle, saying in part: "The
enactment of such a law would enable
national banks to issue ami put in circu
lation at finer, on bonds already do
i with the Treasury, aboutsl9,ooo,
--000 in currency in addition to the amount
i.ow authorized; and this, in my opinion,
would afford ■ very considerable measure
of relief to the country under existing
circumstances. I therefore recommend
tho passage of tho bill."
Mitchell (Republican) of Oregon gave
notice- of an amendment to be offered to
a joint resolution to maintain the parity
of gold aud silver.
Tho amendment, alter a long preamble,
declare* it to be the sense of On
that no change be mads in (he tariff laws
during the 1 ifty-third Congress.
\ eat 1 'en:, of Miss- uri introduced abill
for the » mage of silver bullion in the
iry, saying it was s,.ut him from
>ew " ork and met his partial approval, it
provides, after setting aside in coin and
bullion as a reserve such amount of sil
ver bullion purchased under the Act of
July. 1890. a* shall equ i at the coinage
•value the aggregate sum of Treasury
notes authorized by that Act, all the re
mainder of such bullion to be dj
available for the issue of silver certifi
cates; such remainder of the surplus
bullion to be coiner, into standard
dollars, and such dollars shall be vi
the redemption of silver certificates as
is now required by law; provided this is
not to be deemed to alter or amend any
1 ro vision of the Act ol July, 1890.
The second section provides that na
tional banking associations bo emituM to
:■ i Rive circulating notes of their value at
par of United states bonds, the di
however, nol to exceed tho amount of
'■ stock ;; . id in.
Stewart sent to the i terk'a d -
read an article from the Now York
i ■ . in aded "' .i\ eUs J n c Silver."
Alter a portion of tho article v.
jection to further reading was made by
Hoar and Flawley, and iho artici
ordered printed as a document, Stewart
remarking that the , aas tae iirsi
grea^paper in tjje city of New Yoi :
bad said a word against the annibi
and destruction of half the money in the
owed that cither ihe sen
timent oi New \ eric on the subject ol sil
ver was changing, or the . n\;,s a
■ rave paper.
Hoar gave notice lint to-morrow he
would call up the resolution as to the
Montana Senatorial case, ana would,
after wednesday, press li to a conclusion,
itor Taiuier of Illinois introduced
10 piW Hie ier the erection oi a Uov
ernment building at I bicagooa the [.res
ent 1\ - i. finished in
Houihs, at a cost ol (
Senator Hill of New \.>rk introduced
a resolution declaring that the si
Senate is that nothing but financial
. B - atlou should be undertaken iinring
the i•: - Nton. Laid on the :..
\• si Qi d ;■ I tress O n his
itfoa if. :avor of bimetallism a
jree coinage of gold and silver. He
■ Sberma
and homeless dog," without a kennel to
hide i . . head, but declared he
■ ■ without a
guarantee of silver a^ s money n, .
Vest noatinaed: "Cleveland accepted
the n 'i on a platform
mocratfc party to bin t.t ■
, ■»'> Ido not undertake to say no«
that the IV ideal is ■■;■; osed to bimetal
lism^ r would not give executive sanction
to a measure to coin silver at a commer
cial ratio with goid: but I do undertake
that the President's message is tiio
most significant foe what ;z (aiJtad to say.
1 understand, with the grea.est r
for ti;e President, and without the •
est doubt of his honesty of purpoa
W&eu to say one word in :
in bimetallism, ho certainly meant that
tlis consideration of the question of the
free coinage of silver at any ratio is .so
Impracticable that it does not need expci
i tive no:ioe." As to the assertion that sil
ver should be deoiottetizod because it
fluctuated in value while gold was stai le,
he read an extract from what he called
"a remarkable pamphlet," written by
Monteitfa Douglass, a business man of
London, before the i I the Indian I
mints, pleading with the people of Great
Britain in iavor of bimetallism as the
onlj sure foumlation for financial exist
•■■. ami declaring that silver really
; fluctuated much less than goiU. It was
nor the overproduction of silver that
brought down its value. It was legisla
tion: legislation in Germany and in the j
United State*. How ooald it be expei
that silver would retain its value wb
those two great nations took away I
monetary use of silver. With tho re-I
sources and population of the Uni
I States it was only necessary for the
I I'nite i -Status to lix a policy and stand by
it. The trouble to-day was mused by the I
open and sedulous inculcation of the idea
that ihe country was about to go to a gold
standard, and that the silver money of
the country would be worth] ss.
Vest spoke of the unfortunate condition
of the miners of the West, and said I
I knew what these peupie endured —leav-
ing tho comfort of civilisation, and going
out with rifle in one band and a pick in
the other, blazing the pathway of civiliza
tion in the canyons of the Rocky Mount
ains. They built upthesilver mining in
dustry on a faith pledged them by the
| people of tho United States in its Consti
tution and laws—that the | rodoct of those
: mines be considered as a money metal,
and we are now asked, through the unan
, cial "four hundred of -New Voile 7' and
j the commercial classes of England, to
betray those people, and say to them:
"Find something else to do; we want
gold, gold, gold !"
"No, Mr. President," said Vest, "I will
not do it."
In conclusion Vest repelled the idea of I
there being a necessity f>ir an iuter
national agreement on the subject of sil
ver.
At tho close of his speech Hoar ob
tained the floor, and the Senate adjourned. I
IN THE lioi.-i:.
Washington, Aug. li.—ln tho House,
after tho appointment of the committees
to enroll bills, tho silver debate was re- i
sumed.
i .1:11 nor (Dem.1 of Louisiana spoke in
favor of free coinage.
Lawton (Dem.) of Ohio followed in
favor of tho repeal of tho purchasing
clause.
Boatnerwaa followed by Layton (Dem.)
of Ohio on conditional repeal; by Patter
ion Item,) of Tennessee on the same
line.
Simpson I Pop.; of Kansas read a speech i
made by the gentleman from Tennessee !
during the first session of tho Fifty
second Congress, advocating the free
coinage of silver, and asked him to recon
cile those views with those he held to
day.
Patterson replied that he had modified
his views.
Snodgrass (.Dem.) of Tennessee asked
Patterson if, when Grover Cleveland was
a candidate for ronomination, he
aonj was not a strong advocate of the
nomination of 11 ill.
Patterson declined to talk on this sub
t, but said ho was with Cleveland for j
| sound currency, economic government
and fair and just and equal taxation. [Ap
plause.
Bailey (Democrat) of Texas followed in
a speech advocating tiie Bland free coin
age substitute for the Wilson repeal b
i'endlcton (Democrat) of West Virginia
was satisfied that tho only way parity
could be brought about between gold and
silver was for the country to come to an i
accord with other commercial nations of
the world.
Warner [Democrat) of New York would I
v ite for the coinage ot gold and silver on
a parity, but these metals must be of tho
samo intrinsic value.
Tho iJouso then adjourned.
NBWLANDB Is CONFIDENT.
New Vukk, Aug. 14 — "Nothing has;
happened since Congress convened that i
baa in the least shaken my confidence in j
; tho ability of tho silver men to prevent
tho repeal of the .Sherman silver law, nn- |
less a favorable substitute is ottered in its
place," said Congressman Francis G.
Nevviands of Nevada 10-day. "I knew
about what our strength was before Con- \
gress convened, and the opinions lex-
I pressed when on the way to Washington
remain unchanged. Yon can depend
upon It, when tho present silver law la
repealed a substitute favorable to tlio
silver interests, will bo passed,"
AN'i I-SIIA i;u KES's PROGRAMME.
Washington, Aug. n.— A meeting of I
committee appointed last week to ar
range on behalf of the anti-silver men for
a discussion of the silver question in the |
>use baa been called by Representative
ttayner, Chairman, ;or to-morrow night
.it the Arlington Hotel. The purposes of
call axe the appointment of a -
committee to take charge of iho various
. mures of tho present contest and to com
plete the organization of the anti-silver
I lorces, when it i» expected the result of
the poll of the Bouse upon the pending
measure will be ready for announced, ut.
■:it the estimates of the majority
lavor of repeal vary from twenty-two
to fort}.
- n.., represent America's vijsws.
rox, Aug. li.— iv the Commons
lay Robert Everett (Liberal
. . ■- . view of the bill lor the [j
. .1 silver at a ratio of 24 to I, in
duced in tho Senate of the Un:
. lara the time opportune tor
j threat Britain and iho , nited State* to
b a durable par basis for gold aud
ilver. Gladstone repl . ■ bill r. -
red to in no way represented the
■ i s of the United States (roveruinent.
Us intioduction, therefore, cuuld not
form .. suitable opportunity for conaniu
ition witli the American Uoverntnent I
apart from iho quesli ;i whether the pas- j
. .■ of sura a bail bj Congress would
justify the opening of communication.
si, VEB PI :. 11481
Washington, Aug. It—The offers of
»er were 3U6.0U0 ounce*, sixty th u
sand were pu .i. The pur
chases this month are 1,536,000 ova- -.
Xtttioßal i lowers.
Comparatively few countries hare really !
a national ii' «; r. i lited si
i e.xaiii . , . „1 ij ie
S. I :■'.;.re
iia> no mtiooal flower noiv; the Bona
partas, when they were rulers m Franco,
adopted :i,o i . >lot :i- to At flower, and the
kings of Fnnce had the puriiie lily as
uiuir>. Euglaud's iiowt-r is ;i rose. S^tot
..uui's a thistle, ireiaini'.s ■ sh&mrock:
; \\ ales bus do Sower. Titan, the torips .it
1.real Britain have adopted tho pn
as ihcir tlower, becaiue the great leader
01 modern toryisui, Beaeonsneld, wa^
fond ol primroeoa. Kmperor William I.
oftieraMoyim fond of eorn-Sowera or
- billions, and while ho liveJ
ipg, thfy w ere the national tlower of
Germany. Switseriand'a tluwer is tbe
little edelweiss, which grows almost on
tlio hi{;iiest i>arU of the Alps. Xn other
; oottntry moom to have any especial na
tional ilower. la fact, the Mow,
Kngl&sd, Ireland an-i Scotland wore
originaUy iamily badges of kings, and
have only comparatively recently been
I treated as national flowers.
s vcka-mekto dah^y KECPim-maox. tfesday, august 15, i893.-srx pages.
£304j°l £?ehUtft Vctxthev.
lighest of ail in Leavening Power.—Latest U. S. Gov't Repcrt
ABSOULfTEiy PURE
THE EASTERN STAR
Columlms Cbaptor Celebrates Its First ■
Anniversary Last Nleht.
Columbus ' 'haptar, < irderof the Knstorn i
Star, celebrated the anniversary of its in
stitution last night, a large a- emblage
taking Darl long whom were a large I
Dumber of the members of Naomi Chap
tor.
Mrs. Mary 6. Dann, Worthy Matron,
read an address, giving the history of the
order from its inception to the present, ■
« hich was replete with useful and inter
esting information. She aiso gave a
Bketeh of tlio progress of Columbus |
ter during the past year.
The work was exemplitied on a candi
date in a manner that elicited many en
comiums from visitors. After the work
was over the company adjourned to the
banquet room, w i a banquet
.-iTi'ici as gladdened the vision of those
who looked on it. and when they sat ;
down at the tables they found it was belter
than it looked. A most enjoyable reunion ;
was hud, interspersed with remarks Iroin j
members and visitors, and the company
broke up at a late hour.
Ladi one present received a tasteful
souvenir in the shape of a five-pointed \
star, tiio emblem oi the order, with the
different points of the appropi late is
and the loiters O. K. s. in the center,
which Mrs. Dunn had procured for the
occasion.
WEATHER AND CROPS.
Summary of the Reports Received for ;
the I'aat Week.
Tlie crop report, as furnished by Di
rector Barwick for the past week, is as
follows:
The average tempernturo during the !
week Piuling August i lth was: For San
b'raucisoo, 60 ; Eureka, 54°; Red lilntV, ;
B0 : Sacramento, 7o; Fresno, 84°, and Los
Angeles, Tti^.
As compared with tiie normal temper
ature there was a deficiency of heat'at
rancisco of i , Eureka 2', Ked Bluff
.; , Sacramento nominal. Fresno shows ;
an excess of heat above the normal •■
and Los Angelos ! , which has had
a tendency to rapidly ripen all kinds of
fruits In the two great valleys and along
the foothills.
The Observer at Red Biufl telegraphs
as follows: "Sonny*weather, but cooler
than tiie average. All crops are in lino
condition. Pears are being shipped in
carload lots."
The Observer at Fresno telegraphs as
follows: "Large shipment of green
grapes are going East, but there is im :
market as yet for wine grapes. Raisin
grapes are sugaring rapidly."
The Observer at Los Angeles telegraphs !
as follows: "Peach drying is in operation.
Threshing continues ami grain is stored.
awaiting better prices."
The higiiest temperatures were 105 c at
Upper i-ikc. Lake County, and San Ardo, j
Monterey County. Tlie lowest was .. .
at San Ardo.
SOCIAL AND PERSONAL.
Mrs. Augran of <jalt 13 visiting friends
here.
Edwin I. Smith has returned from
Shasta Springs.
Warden Aull came down from Folsom
prison yesterday.
A. -I. Rhoads is homo again from hia
trip to San Francisco.
:>lrs. M. S. Hammer and daughter Cora
have gone to San '■ 'rancisco.
Dr. M. \V. Wilson of Dutch Flat is I
stopping at the Capital Hotel.
F. A. Fee, formerly of this city, is now I
District Attorney for Madera.
Ex-Trustee Mclaughlin and family
have returned from Santa Cruz.
1- rank Hogeboom and wife and family
loft yesterday for Pacific Grove.
Hiram W. Johnson, the attorney, has
returned from Knight's Landing.
.Mrs. Samuel Katzenstein and children
have gone to Sau Francisco on a visit.
Sol llunyou came up from CourUand
yesterday, and is at the Capital Hotel.
Mr. and Mrs. Chris. Schmid will leavo
for Catliirs, Wash., on Wednesday, by
steamer.
A. .(. Healey of the A- ■, accompanied !
by his wife and child, has gono to l'a
cilic Oro\ c.
(Jeorgo 11. Cutler and wife left iast
week for San Francisco, Santa Cruz and
I'aciiic (irove.
William Cole, a well-known resident
of Nevada >. ity, and son of Dan T. Cole,
is in tne city.
Mrs. Sarah Van Meter is visiting her
sister. Mrs. lloskins, in Grizzly Flat, El
Dorado County.
Mrs. E. V. Devine and Miss Winifred
<;. Devine have gone for a month's visit
to Santa Barbara.
Mrs. Perrin Stanton and daughter
Bertie have returned from a visit, to
Shasta Soda Springs.
Colonel 1.. P. Moulton, the Colnsa
farmer, came down to the city yesterday
and is at the Capital Hotel.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles 1". <Jardnor and
Miss Lottie Parker left yeßterday for a
two weeks' stay at Pacihc Urove, Mon
terey.
Charles P. Hall, the well-known the
atrical manager who formerly had charge
of the local theaters, is in town n newing
old acquaintances.
J. R. McConnell and family have re
turned from a trip to tlio mountains
they visited friends at Lander
Colfax and Chicago Park.
S. P. Uonberger, the well-known
newspaper man, now at Oleta, Amador
County, has mlly recovered his health,
which for a time was quite poor.
Miss MariaStauffer, Mrs. C. \. Yoerk
Mi-s Lulu Yoerk, Mr-. O. A. Lovdal and
two children, Miss Mabel Lovdal and J
11. Neiison of this city are in Santa Cruz!
Arrivals at t : , Eagle Hotel
rday: J. C. Eubanka, John Phair
i-'red A. limes. A. K. w Qoox, !.. C. .linn'
Mr. and Mr-. .]. I.iebes. Mrs. N. Phil
lips, San Francisco; i.. c. Moret
San L*andro; Jf. M. Albery, !■;.
- :i.i, Cdusa; E. C. Webtx r, folo
H.I. Stjuire, Oakland; J. ]„ Uebbron!
Salinas: V. A. Uarnett and wife, Pem
broke, Ky.; Miss Mamie Thompson
iiopkinsville, Ky.
♦ — ■ .
Mike owrallo.v's Ja«.
About 2 o'clock yesterday morning Po
lice Captain Simmons and Officer Lowell
found Mike O'Maliey at Second and X
streets in a badly dilapidated condition,
both physically and mentally.
He said lie had been beaten and robbed |
npMßak\n£
m liSLJiPowcler:
The only Pure Cream of Tartar Powder.-No Ammonia; No Alum.
Used in Millions of Homes— 40 Years the Standard.
; at second and I. streets, but could give no
intelligent account of tho affair. He bad
?w on his person, however, which had
I escaped the garrctors.
Why Deer Are Scarce.
A party of four or five young men who
; lately returned from a camping trip in
the mountains boast of having killed
thirteen deer.
- that deer shall lie killed
only for food, but crows and buzzards
j were nut counted in by the lawmakers.
Tehama < uimty Fair.
lay next the Tehama County
'■ .an- will ..pen at Ked Blun and will con
clude cm the i:ith. The outlook for a suo
'■' isful fair i i said to be excellent
MARRIED SIXTY' TEARS AGO.
i Tiio.v Receive in Such Clothes as They
Wore When Married.
i A year ago last spring Mrs. Henry &
i Shetland ol Uibson Township, Suaque
ii:<':ii,t County, i'a., said to her husband ;
Henry, we ought to raise some nax this
year. ii u . aged farmer hadn't raised
a crop oi nax in thirty-nine years, so ho
. usked:
||What for, Elizabeth?"
"Well, you know, Henry," replied tho
good old wife, "if we live mi a year from
j ..uiio we'll nave been married sixty years,
ana 1 thought it would be nice to give a
party then and receive our guests iv the
same kind of linen clothiug we wore
. w« stood up to be married dow □
in i onnecticut in 1833. We've got all
1 old llax tools stored away, and
U you'll raise some llax, Henry, I'll spin
and weave it and make a nice home-made
suit lor each of us."
Farmer Sbelland was B<i and his wife 85
at the time. Both were rugged and
: healthy, and when the old farmer had
j thought the matter over lor a moment ho
exclaimed: "15y George, Klizabeth, I'll
do it!"
A few days afterward, says a corre
spondentof the New York Sun, the old
farmer prepared a piece of rich ground
i back <n tho bam aud sowed a natch of
j flax. The aged couple watched its'grovvtU
every day with anxiety. The ere- was
ilent. and when it got ripe in tnc fall
tanner Shetland gathered it, beat the
see i from tlie tops, and BDrea I the straw
on the grass to rot. In November he tied
it up iv bundles and packed it away in
the barn.
On a beautiful sap morning in March
Farmer Midland brought out the l!ax and
blood it up ou the south side oi the barn.
: ihe wind was in tho north, and in
or ■<> tho llax was as dry as a bona : ben
the old farmer broke it, swingled it aud
I turned ii over to his aged wile, who im
mediately nod u;> lier iiead.simt herself in
tiie kit. hen and Uetchellod the llax till all
tho tow was separated from a. 'I he next
ho got the old spinning wheel from
i the garret, oiled it in. and began to make
it bu/.z musically. Farmer Shelland came
in smiling and happy while his wile was
spinning.
"I'd rather hear that wheel than a
piano, Elizabeth," he said. "It is like old
times."
'*3o it is, Henry; but I can't make the
wheel go as hat as 1 used to."
In a leu days the old lady had spun all
tho llax and reeled it into skeins. The
next thm- sin.' did waa to boil tiie skeins
in a weak lye of wood ashes to bleach the
| yarn, and when that was dono Farmer
Shetland rinsed the skeins in the brook
till all the lye was out. .Mrs. Shetland
began at once to weave the yarn iv the
old loom and by the the first Of Junosho
I had woven it all into cloth.
Within three weeks the old lady cut
I and made a 1 rock and apron for hersell
and a whole suit for her husband, and on
i June 26th the aged couple, dressed in
their homespun linen garments, cele
brated tne sixtieth anniversary of their
marriage in a company of three-score rel
atives and friends.
DID NOT KNOW HIS DANGER.
A Cossack Who Scrubbed aa Untamed
liner in :i t age.
A\ hen Pezon, the lion tamer, was at
Moscow with lus, menagerie he had occa
sion to employ a moujik, a tine specimen
j oi a Cossack, to clean out tho cage of the
; wild beasts, says tho Million. Tho Cob-
I sack did not understand ;; word ol
! French, and tho terms of contract were
settled iv dumb show, J;_v way of in
structing him in bis new duties Pezon
went through a sort of pantomime with
tho broom, sponge and water bucket.
moujik watched him closely, and ap
peared fully to understand the details oi
the lesson given. Next morning, armed
with a broom, a bucket and a sponge, he
opened tho first cage he came to and
quietly stepped in, as he hau seen hia
master stop on tho previous day, into two
cages of harmless brutes: but this one
happened to be tenanted by a a .
but untamed tiger that lay stretched on
the floor fast asleep. At the noise made
by opening aud closing tho door the
creature raised ks bead and turned iv
green eyes lull on the man, who, all un
conscious i bis danger, stood in a corner
I dipping bis big sponge into tho bucket.
At that moment Pezon came out of his
caravan, aud was struck dumb by the
, terrible sight that met his gaze. What
! could ho do to warn the man of his
danger? A sound, a movement on his
1 in might enrage the great beast, and
hasten its attack on the defenseless Cos
sack. So Pezon stood, awaiting develop
ments, ready to rush to the scene when
the crisis came. The moujik, sponge in
hand, coolly approached the tiger and
made ready to rub him down with the
stolidity of a military bootjack polishing
his captain's boots. The sudden a]
I tion of cold water to its hide evidently
! produced a very agreeable effect on the
j tiger, for it began to purr, stretched oat
iws, rolled ovoron its back and com
: placently offered every part of its
! the vigorous treatment oi tho m
I who went on scrubbing with might aii'i
main. All the while Pezon stood there
with his eyes wide open, and as if nailed
to the spot. When he had finished his
job tho Cossack left the cage as quietly aa
he had entered it, and it required tin
energetic and extensive gestures on
art of the lion tamer to prevent bil
i p iting the experiment on a second
wild beast.
16 idea of tho slaughter of elephants
can be secured from tho fact ttiat in
Zanzibar alono some ."><«i,u>" pounds ol
ivory are n arketed every season from tht
tusks oflU.lKJo elephants.
A full-blooded Southern African negrr
is remarkable for his extraordinary
length of arm, the- Aymara In. nan oi
I Peru for the surprising shortness of the
I corresponding member.
j iLiyc ilonparpil.
oc^ooobodobocHDoooooo^
* SUMMER WRAPS, m
OTOOOOCXMDOOOOCKXJOOOCHDOOOOO^
iiie summer season is on the wane, and we must prepare for
the fall arrivals in CLOAKS and JACKETS. If possible, we intend
clearing our stock entirely of summer garments before the heavier
ones arrive. To (Jo this, remarkable concessions iv priced are neces
sary, and they have been made unsparingly.
AT $3— Tan Capes with triple cape collar. Former
price, $5.
AT $4—Tan and Mode Butterfly Capes, very neatly
trimmed. Former price, $8.
AT $4 SO—Heliotrope Triple Capes, handsomely em
broidered. Former price, $7 SO.
AT $s—Ox-blood Red Capes-with triple cape collars,
neatly trimmed with black soutasehe braid.
Former price, $3 50.
AT $5— Tan Capes with watteau tight-fitting back,
both back and front handsomely braided. For
mer' price, $9.
AT $G—Handsome Capes in greens and heliotropes,
with plaited satin collar in black and trimmed
with black satin ribbon. Former price, $9 30.
AT $B—An Elegant Cape in mode, ■with butterfly
plaited cape collar, made of excellent material
and trimmed with three shades of braid. For
mer price, $13.
Tp Linos of Jackets of Exceptional Value at tlie Price.
AT S3 63—Tan-colored Jackets, in solid colors and
checks, high puff shoulders and fuil sleeves.
Former price, $6 80.
AT $s—Navy Blue and Brown Jackets, with triple
cape and large sleeves. Former price, $9.
WASSERMAN, DAVIS & CO.
Corner Fifth and J Streets, Sacramento.
AGENTS FOR BUTTERICK PATTERN 9.
TT^T/Trr T GIRLG WHO USE
Ei^SAPOLIO
WED" ' * ' v—' ' *
■ ■ .1., ii V— ARE QUICKLY MARRIED.
J^Try it in Your Next House Cleaning.<^J
CCT! * SIiSHED!""* CliT!
WE MAKE IT IN NO PARTICULAR LINE, HUT WE CUT PRICES IN ALL LINES
And Cut Prices means a slash that astonishes the natives.
■ Our Full .Stock is ceniag in daily, ami we musl have rooa — Oar summer stock musl »>,.
COME IN 110 raw THE DISPLAY. COME IN AND iiET DOS PEHSS. COKE H AND VISIT US AT THE
; MECHANICAL CLOTHING STORE, * 11. MARKS, PROPRIETOR,
111 and !1<; X Street, between Fourth and Fifth, Sacramento.
t.—_ _ . .
—THE—
WEEKLY 11,
Containing all the news rtf the
Record-Union, has the largest
circulation of any paper on the
Pacific Slope, its readers being
found in every town and harn
let,with a constantly increasing
!ist in the Eastern States and
Europe. Special attention paid
to the publication of truthful
j statements o* the resources of
California and the entire coast,
best methods of agriculture,
fruit and vine growing.
ajx postsiastkrs ajlis agext*
i
!
TERMSi
I DAILY RECORD-UNION
one year $6 OO
WEEKLY UNION 1 60 i
▲ DDRE39I
| Sacramento Publishing Company,
84CRAMENTO.
i
I&<tUVot& fimr (Table.
SOCTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY
[PACIFIC SYSTEM.]
JULY j 5 , iB-j3.
Trains I,eave and are Due to Arrive at
Sacramento:
LEAVE TRAINS RUN DAILY. ARRIVE !
(For) i (From i
1U:5O 1* Aslilatul and l'ortlimd iS:4OA
r:00 AiCallstoga and N'apa 11:20 A
:-t'.ira ;<llil Naps -^:H1 P
10:25 A Dem Ing, El Paso and Ea^t ?:(;") r
5:00 P i liiux 10:05 A
T:l(i P Knights L'ding&Orovllle 7:05 A
5:55 r Lot Ang ill 8 ' lii:2.j A
ll:io a i '.Mt.ii and East—Second
Class 5:45 P
:i:o<i PCentral Atlantic Express
for (Jgden and Eail 8:35 A
8:05 P OrovlUe vi;i i. < 10:15 A
H:3OA Hed Bluff vi :l Woodlan I G5O P
3:u.i P Red Hliuf via Maryavllle 10:15 V
10:30 A Redding via Willows .. 3:55 P
S:OOASan Francisco via Uenicla 10:30 P
7:00 A Han Francisco via Benlcia h:to !'
3:00 PSan Franc!«co '.la Benlcia s:io P
6:05 !'.<an Francisco via Benlcia 11:20 A
*10:00 A SanFranolcco vtaatramer c; no A
10:25 A|Sftn Fran, via Li\i rn.uir 2:50 P
in. !5 A San . oee 50 I 1
.r>:f.."< P Santa Barbara „ 10:2 i A
•7:00 A Mautn Kosa 11:20 A
3:00 l Santa Rosa »8:10 P
- !0 A Stockton and Gall ; :05 P
10: 5 A Sti ekion an I (Jail 2:ftO P
■ l Stockton and I (all . l>i :< \
11:40 A Prnokee and Keno 5:45 P
:':(>" I and Reno
:]:i(il Valluio 11:20 A
7:00 A ■allcjo 8:10 P
•4:10 P Foltom and Flacerville 9:50 \
•11:50 A i ilaom
*5:55 A|Fol»om.. | 'fclS P
ted. (.Monday excepte l.
A- Formornlnff. !' Foraftemooo
RICHARD GRAY, Gen. Traffic Manager.
T. ii. (.< >i >OMAN, (, ■;, P \.j, m.
rUDSOH EXCURSIONS TO WORLD'S
»J Fair.—Ju'is.in 4Co. have succeeded [n re
taining their special privileges and the great
route lor the world a Fair and thi
vruh lowest rate ticket. No crowding to -■-
cure large numbers, leave Sacramento F.v-
EHY THUBJSDAY. No cl . I ago.
m manager in charge. Address .Il'li
.siiN ,V CO., 824 Market strett. Sim Fran
ci oo.orcallonC-J. ELLIS. depot,Saeramento.
fruits, iJrobure, (L-tc.
GREGORY BROS. CU~,
120, 189, 120 and 188 J street,
Wnoieaale Dealers In
FRUIT AND PRODUCE.
iseoti for the Davit f;rr-fn Fruit I'ack
in_- Miu'..;'] ■. .-• .;<.r-.
Tin SANTA I'AVLA LEMONS.
W. M. WOOD & CO.,
AGENTS.
\TTHOLKSALE DEALERS IN CALI
>V :■ .on .md Nevada Fruit Fr<>
floee, Reno Creamerj and A. L. \V. liutter,
oit-aii. ii.:r.- svnd perteel flavor.
117 to 125 .1 Rtreet.
iJcntiotru.
F. P. TEBBETB,
DENTIST, f>li SIXTH ST..j#ISbS»V
between I nn<J .1. wc«r ~,<i ■^Trl^BSssfc
ODDoatte Conerecßttonal i 'li:ircii.^~*-m3_U
_j£^,j&%pl/V. '3?~aK^r and X btretits.
I " '
f|"HI LAB MONTHLY ( « v
A meeting of im Oaledoclan A-s.^tiSj
er Hall V W&l
I HIS Tuesday) EVENING, the 1
Inst., in a o'clock "^33^
It- IB*NC] DAVID RElD.Chief.
rpHE LADIES' COSMOPOLITAN SOCIETY
X — Regular meeting al Red Men's Hull
IUKSDA^ KM-:\im,. August 15th, tit 8
"V 1"' flora KNOX, President.
BtA G VRRiaoM, H. S. lt»
] IJNIOB COURT. PRIDE OF THBf J
'} Capital City, No. 65, \ o V of \..*tmJf
fvAiv^S 80* (Wednesday) «T
fSb B *t^Snll2n^ IHaU-XtaUl*'
„ „ H. W". M. OUG, C. R.
Pirn. HutacH, Secretary. lt«
Wltnevtxl lloticca.
pERSONAL-MB& . WOULD TOO
A_ please send me your address. Vousiioke
t^ tue nt the Postofflee the other <li»\, i,ut I
OilflP . .. hiRNESI l>. /, j
riiur; giving awai of a watch
1 and organ, which was to have taken 1
•'.''," lV, l> '" OraM Valley, is postponaa to BEP>
rEiiJBER 16th. It*
I ) LAl>! NQ( (F THE I'AST, PRESENT AND
1 t ruture Ly Ml:s. I. C. ANDREWS, the pi o
ui er fortune-teller an 1 claiivoyant. l^:.'l Bev
entii street, i>. tween I. and M. jyM-lm*
HARRY \V. RIVETT. STEAM CARPET
meaning, corner Twelfth and v streets,
uirpet cutung, sewing and refitting. Furnl
ickedfor shipment. Second-nand car
yet« and furniture bought ana for sale. Tele
jPonte».
W rANTED M.600.000D KEALESTATE
security, iur lour years; also j>^:oo,
wv!' c, sl Ui P" cent- Uul Ol' address K. C.
- 1 ,7' f B?fSf tatei au(l hisuranceagent, room
o, 1. v. O.K. Temple. aul6-3t«
\<,-A.\n-.D-A NURSE UIliL. APPLY
" "I 701 N street. uuis-:.t
JAPANESE CLEAN BOYWANTSSII
tion to do co..king and honsework "or
yy'r':,-?." lhL' t-u""'- Address UEOKOK
UATAKE, 'JO3 D stn iuilo-3t»
DOBER, INDUSTRIOUS BUSINESS U \N
kj UI-.HCS employment Address C this
aul4-at»
BUSINESS MAN WITH HORSE AND
1 ) buggy desires bills to collect or other em
pi.jyuiciu; best of references. v,.,uu
aul4-2t'
ITTS OFFER TO QKNERAL AGENTS
TV aud canvassrn exclusive territory free
newspaper advertising, :i chance to delivM
goods hefore paying lor them, immune piofltl
and a permanent buslneM. Address OON
SOLIDATiOj. Lynn. Maas. TTd
goBt—sontxt>.
r OST A BREAST-PLATE AND TCG3
lj fora single harness. Finder leave
at A. A. \a.\ VOORIIIES'and be rewarded.
illll6 ~t 4
LOST-GOLD pin, SHAPE OF WATCH
Bl bar with bangle and 1
•1 it. Return to this office and be re
warded. anl4-2t«
I OST—AUGUST 18TH, \ LADY'S GOLD
JU watch and fob; "Clara" engraved oncaso.
The finder will be rewarded on Uavin
"K-'lfii: H. JOSrS, 1327 Lstreet, a
©a Set ov Kent.
rpO LET-THREE NICELY FURNISHED
1 rooms (or housekeeping. Applj lliuN
street. aul6-3t
mo LET—A SIX-ROOM HOUSE WITH
X allmodern Improvements, 8310 N -
Inquire of SILLER BROa, builders, 1614
Tim ie.■niii street.
mO LET—THE KINESTOI
1 thwesl corner I
rly painted; will
give a lease for two or three years; good loca
tion. Apply to CROSS, 1018 Fourth s
rj ! and K.
HOUSE TO LET—AT 11 1 „i"
Apply at FABIAN BROS.', Ninth and J
streets.
TIM) LET- HOUSE OF FOUR" BO IMS. Vi1-
-1 pIyatGOLDEN RULE MARKET, T. ith
and N st reets.
FIVE ROOMS, PANTRY AN
nt closet and gas; rent, 914. Apply
161b Tenth street.
4,0r ijnlc.
FOR BALE-FIVE ACRES, ONE MILE
Irom railroad depot; house, barn, living
water, irrigating facilities, 350 choice
lruit trees, horses, wagon, ;.(! Implements,
bouse iioi.l furniture, for«l,30o; bargain. Uea*
son lor selling, inquire of CARL STKO
:; i T' ,i s;;. . „ - acramento. aui
SALE OK EXCHANGE—A RANCH
J 1 01 :jimi acres, with good lm]
for sate cheap tor cash,orwill exchai
desirable city property, either with or with
out Improvements. For li:riher pan
call or address 1228 0 street, Sacramento,
anll-lw*
Ij* >i; SAL!; TW( > SETS tIF \.
X; narnessanda ■ o, a wagon, in
quire L'u^:' li street.
SAU "'N Fl IR SALE, 1)(HN<; GOOD
ness. Apply l^'o X stn 1;. auO
J7IOR SALE CHEAP —A GOOD HORSE 2,
. suitable for driving or riding. Apply 1612
O strei t.
I Ml; SALE—A FIRST-CLASS BTRAB
Co. new combination pool and bil
table, with all necessary trimmings, etc., for
For furtner particulars inquire of
COURT EXCHANGE, 030 1 t.. Sacramento.
J[IOR SALE—A KINK TROTTING Bl
nearly new; price. *l •". Inquire at J I.
LOCKH W'-T S STABLE, Elovenl 1
1 and K.
F7IOR SALE—TEN SHARES STOCK OP
■•The 1 larten ISo <i <It re [nri I
pony." Inqulreof DR. ( 11 VS. S. il IRT.at
the institute, 6JG Ninth street, cut nor F.
To T AKE
the ~TIIE"
woridsjShortl Direct
Fair route
TO CHICAGO
VIA THE
Union ■# Faeific
AND
NORTHWESTERN LINE.
This pnpul.ll route leads in what the pnblto
SLK SPEED, COMFORT, SAFETY.
TWO DAILY TRAINS, both affording
excellent
TI-irouK*~> Car Service,
Fir>it-el;.iss riml second-Cte—, are an important
feature of it» superior equlpanent.
The EUROPKAN MAIL, leavin
ramenlo :it v f. m. dally, carries I'ullman
Palace Drawing-room Sleeping Can TO 1 Hi-
CAGO WITHOUT CHANGE; al^o, DINING
CARS, on which meals are served regularly,
equal in exceUeuce to those of any tlmi-class
hotel, aud at reasonable rates.
The ATLANTIC EXPRESS. leaving Kae
rameato tit l(':50 a. M. daily, carries a I'u 1
ltuffet Sleeping Car and the pojnilar Becond-
Cla>m Sle*per» arranged on the same plan
as Palace Sleeping Cars, and furnished with
sscs, bPd'llrii;, curtains and all neces
sary toilet aitlcles. Thenc cars arecai
well lighted ana ventilated, aud are provided
with lavatories and closet*.
For Quick Time, Scenic Attractions and all the
Conveniences of Traveling,
THIS t-irslEl EXCELS.
TICKETS VTA THIS LINK WIL.. BE GOOD
VIA SALT LAKE lITY AND DENVER
As travel will be heavy throughout t!
son, secure your choice ol accummolati.
applying In advance, either In person or by
letter to
K. A. lIOLBROOK, Gonpral Trnffla
Agent, C. ana N. \V. Ry., No. 3 NoW
Montiiomorj- Ktreet, San Ftmnclaoo-
U. W. HITCHCOCK, General A«on«l
U. P. Ry.. No. 1 Montgomery itreet,
San Kriincl'.oo, or «ny agent of the
__SOUTHEKS PACIFIC COMPANY.
GOBDffIBfIOS
IMPORTING TftlLORS^
SSO O STREET.
GREAT REDUCTION FOR NEXT PIXTtf
'luvs in < rices of SUMMER (;o ■!>>;
*»-hirst-class workmen. Fit always guari
I an teed.

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