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The record-union. [volume] (Sacramento, Calif.) 1891-1903, September 04, 1894, Image 2

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ISSCED BY THE
SACRAMENTO PUBLISHING COMPANY,
Office, Third Street, between. J and K.
THB DAILY RECORD-UNION
For one year...... _ S6 00
For Bii months _ 3 00
ior three months ........"" 1 50
fcubscriLeib ». rved by carriers at Fifteen
C«nts per week. In all Interior cities and
towns the paper can be had of the principal :
rwloaic&l Dealers, Newsmen and Agent*.
THE WEEKLY UNION
If the cheapest and most desirable Home
Kewe and Literary Journal published on the
Pacific Coast.
Tie Wbekjlt Uniow p^year $1 50
••*" These publication are sent either by
Mail or Express u> agents or single sub
scribers with charges prepaid. Ail Potitnuot
ers are agent*.
The best advertising mediums on the Pacilic
Coast.
Entered at the Postcffice at Sacramento a*
Mcußd-claM matter.
*^ =--3—-. ■■,'-'
Record-Unlou—Telephone No. 4.9.
For Editorial Rooms, ring one bt 11.
lor Busiuees Office, ring three bells.
The Record-Union and Wekkxy
Union are the only papers on the Coast,
outside of San Francisco, that re
ceive the full Associated Press Dis
patches from all parts of the world. Oat
tide ©/ San Francisco, they have no com
petitors, either in influence or home and
fewercu circulation throughout ihe State.
TVeathor Forecast.
Northern California—Fair weather; sta
tionary temperature.
THE IDA WELLS CRUSADE.
Ida B. Wella is a colored woman of in
tellect and an eloquent tongue. She went
to England some time ago and lectured
on the lynching of colored men in the
South and on lynching generally in this
country. She succeeded in organizing
there a good many anti-lynching clubs.
In the abstract, that was well. We ueed
reform in the direction in which she is
working. It is to our discredit that this
Is true. But it is humiliating to have
English clubs resolve and petition con
cerning it.
But Ida B. Wells has now returned
snd has created a good deal of trouble al
ready and sot the press* the land over into
a ferment. She has begun a lecturing
and organizing tour here, her whole at
tention being directed southerly. Her
enthusiasm has carried her and her clubs
into bitterness of speech against the
South, and as a result this apparent ran
cor has stirred up the Southern people
and press until the old-time sectional
talk is beginning to be resumed.
It is charged that Miss Wells U not fair;
that she not only mistakes and misun
derstands conditions, but that she exag-
geratos to the very verge of falsehood.
Miss Wells contends that oue of her aims
is to create a sentiment that will lend
aid to the effort to lead the colored
people of the South to a higher moral
plane.
On this line we quite agree with the
Columbus Dispatch, that it is in order to
ask our Southern brethren if indeed they
have done their duty in this regard ?
Have they given the helping hand that
they might have extended? Have they
been sufficiently concerned about the
elevation of the colored people into a
better moral atmosphere ?
But Miss Wells in her ardor has gone to
the extent of charging that in the South
the ravishing of women charged to ne
groes, would, were there no difference in
color, be in a great majority of cases con
sidered but adultery. In this she has
cruelly assailed Southern women, and
when she does that she touches the
Southern man upon the raw.
Ida Wells is handicapping herself, out
ting oil' the possibility of good her mis
sion might accomplish. She charges the
sluggish movement of civilizing influ
ences among the negroes in the South
wholly to tho acts and iuiluence of the
whites, and, as we find her reported, has
not taken into consideration at all the
failure of the negro in so far as there has
been opportunity afforded him to become
self-helpful and to take steps forward and
upward.
But, passing that, as a matter of fact
there is a change of sentiment going on
in the South regarding the lynching of
negroes. A year ago the New Orleans
limeS'Democrat, several Florida journals,
and some of the papers of the Carolinas,
entered protests against the practice and
told the people that the thing must step;
that tl" South could no longer iuvite the
odium of such acts. It required a groat
deal of courage to say as muob, but to
day we read of a mass meeting of whites
recently held at 2s ew Iberia, Louisiana,
protesting against the lynching of a negro
boy at that place. In Tennessee and Mis
sissippi there is decided new opposition to
the lynching sentiment, and in Virginia
it would be very diiiicuit'new to organize
a lynching party.
The New Orleans TinwDeiHOcrat ad
mits that in many sections the people be
lieve that the safest rule in tile poorly
policed regions is the lynch rule. It adds
that a campaign of education will be re
quired to convince the majority to the
contrary. The LouisvLie douricr-Jour-
nal declares that it is unnecessary to de
nounce lynching as a wrong; "the wrong
is admitted." But, exclaims this and
other Southern journals:
It is not accessary to inflame the races
against each other by a recital of brutal
crime*. The remedy for lynouiug is not n*ce
conflict, but a strong public sentiment in favor
ot the punishment of ail crimes, however
outrageous, by process of law. The dtfondcrg
of mob law have been losing ground. It is
iiuposaibiu to measure th« extent, to which
la* Wells has ie tar fled this work by her out
rageous attacks on the Southern women, hue
is a mischievous agitator, who can do the
negroes of the south no good.
Governor Northen of Georgia alleges
that Miss Wells has beeu sent over from
England charged with a mission by
English linauciors deeply interested in
Western bonds, to heap slander upon the
South, and thus divert tending immigra
tion from the South to the West to aug
meut the bondholders' security. That is
simply absurd and, aa the New York Sun
well «ays, "there is not the slightest
ground of laot upon which to rest such an
assertion."
Th« whole difficulty is that Miss Wells
treats of iynohing as exclusively South
ern, while in fact it is not confined to the
Mouth. Tfa«r« ar» very few Stt>Ce« in
which there are not the courts of Judge
Lynch—more ihe shame to ub that it is
so. That they are more frequently found
: in the South is due in some degree to the
exceeding large criminal element among
the negroes, and that there is among
them such a number given to brutal
crimes. Sensible law-abiding colored
men know this to be true and deplore it.
j It is to be attributed, of course, to the
j slowness with which the negro race in
the South mounts to a higher moral level
and the slight encouragement given him.
The South is sensitive; it is not there
fore to be led by irritating it; to bitterly
assail Southern whites is not tho way to
induce them to unite with you, Miss
Wells, in your mission. Neither wili the
South be moved by club denunciatory
resolutions passed in England. You will
not gain a foot of advance by defaming
Southern women. You will not drive
any Southern community, but most of
them may be led. To enkindle sectional
bitterness of feeliug is almost a crime; to
reform by abuse is an impossibility.
Lynching is a reproach; it is murder
by tho mob; it is brutal, savage and never
to be justified or condoned. The orderly
processes of the law must have their way;
the iaws against crime must be enforced,
and the education of the people away
from savagery must be pushed on. Miss
Wells is laboring in a right direction,
but her method appears to be inllamina
tory, and id therefore weak; she cannot
speak too harshly of lynching anywhere;
but she will accomplish nothing by in
temperate assaults. She is right when
sho sayo that the institutions of society
cannot stand the strain lynching puts
upon their powers of endurance; but to
enforce conviction of this truth and to
encourage respect for law aud to discour
age lawlessness it is not necessary to in
liame the South by a&daiiiug its women
and embittering its men.
INDEPENDENT AUDITORS.
They have an independent audit sys
tem in (ireat Britaiu that protects stock
holders. Under tne law all joint stuck
companies have an auditor appointed by
and directly responsible to the stock
holders, lv some cases the auditors are
appointed by law. Those auditors have
at all times access to all books and papers
of a stock company. When there is a
vacancy in an auditorship that the stock
holdera cannot be convened to fill at
once, the Governmental Board of Trade
makes the appointment on petilion of as
many shareholders.
The auditor serves for but one year, to
avoid liability of his being corrupted,
but he is eligible to re-election. An
auditor cannot be a stockholder 01 an
oiiicer or employe of the company or of
its Board of Directors, ilis daties are
prescribed by law, and are very ex -
plioit. Whatever proposition the direc
tors make to the stockholders the audi
tor examines into and reports uuou to
the shareholders to whom alone he is re
sponsible.
Of course such a position is oue of
dignity and great importance, and is
given only to men of high competency
and business integrity. In a work on
the system by F. W. Pixley, au eminent
auditor, he says, after describing the op
position an auditor will encounter from
directors who have neglected their duties
or prepared false accounts: "The direct
ors are in his power if he is iirm, as they
would be placed in an embarrassing po
sition if they attempted to face the meet
ing of the stockholders without the au
ditor's certificate."
The system works well throughout the
United Kingdom, we are told, and is now
being introduced freely into the United
| States by companies in which English
capital is largely invested.
In England the business of "independ
ent auditing" is undertaken largely by
iirins of auditors, who train up men for
this business, ana these fir ins undertake
the auditorshipH for many companies, so
that it is not necessary that there shall be
a separate auditor for each company. By
this means heavy cost is saved and the
auditing for lesser corporations is done at
a low figure.
For several years one of these auditing
tirms has had a branch house in the
United States, and the testimony is that
it has had all it could attend to, many
companies falling into the system with
j out Isgal compulsion.
MONGOOSE NOT WANTED.
W. K. \ anderbilt's Importation, for
Ills Farm.
Are we to have an animal past iv our
country like the rabbit is in Australia?
In conversation with a Record-Union
reporter yesterday, William Land said:
"I see by oue of the Sau Francisco papers
that W. K. Vandorbllt ha» received b}
steamor several mongooses, or Indian
ichneumons, which he proposes to turn
loose 011 his South Carolina farm. Ue
no doubt thinks he is doing a good thing
to get rid of the snakes, but I question if
the day will not come when he will
heartily repent of it. Iv India, where
many thousands of the natives die every
yeariroru the bites of poisonous snakes,
the mongoose is v positive boon to the
people.
"Iv this oountry, however, it is differ
ent, and toe animal is more likely to
prove a curse, as it did in .Jamaica. I
have seen many of them, and they are
the most fearless, ferocious little animals
I ever saw. Thoy will tackle not only
rats, but cats and even dogs and men, and
as they can bite terribly and are almost
ac quick as lightning, they are very
formidable antagonists. The cobra di
capello is the most venomous of suakes,
but tue mongoose, with his lightning-like
movements, easily avoids his deadly
fangs, and seizing him by the throat,
kilis him instantly."
The mongoose was introduced into the
Island of Jamaica by a gentleman who
thought to benelit the oountry and put a
stop tw ihe ravages of the sugarcane rat.
The mongoose not only killed the rats,
but he killed the fowls of the people aa
well, lie sucked the turtles' eggs and
the hens' eggs, and anally became such a
pest that the people booted the gentleman
who introduced him, and added mon
goose to his name.
If these animals become plentiful in
thus country we may bid farewell to our
chickens, our turkeys and ducks and to
our wild game. Their eggs will be de
stroyed, and they themselves will be de
voured. It is sinoerely to be hoped that
Mr. Yauderbilt will reflect before he
turns his importation loose in the coun
t:-v- ,-
S4IBA*JPA.BI&LA and Iron. Itet it from
the sole a«ent, McMorry, 531 M. *t. *
>lakuikl> ladies try Seguro. Take nu
substitute, face fcfn«rai aotice column. *
SACRAMENTO DAILY RECOBD-UXIQy, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 1894.
TO-NIGHT THE STATE FAIR OPENS.
The Big Pavilion Well Filled With
Handsome Exhibits.
Cassnsa's Band Will Be Heard—An
Assurance of a Brilliant
Season of HaciDK.
The doors of the State Agricultural So
ciety's great exposition building wili be
thrown open to the public this evening,
aud the annual fair will be started.
The last two days have worked won
ders in the interior of the building. Al
though carpenters and decorators are still
at work, the exhibits have approached so
near completion that the character of the
show can be salely determined.!
It will be a very attractive one in every
respect, and those, who have been accus
tomed to saying that there is a marked
similarity in all lairs will lind much that
is new in thin one. Some ol the local
business houses have exceeded all prev
ious etlbrts in the way of decorative art,
while the foreign exhibits constitute a
novelty that may never again be wit
nessed La ihis country.
For those who did not attend the Chi
cago uor^au Francisco lairs, the Oriental.
French, German, Russian, Irish and
other lortign exhibits wili possess grtat
iinerest.
The paintings are now mostly in pia> c,
and Superintendent Stan ton has them so
arrauged as to give the besi possible elfect.
There is a decided difference in the
foreign and domestic schools, the loriner
being ttio bolder aud more striking,
while tue latter charm by their nnob
trusiveness and close adherence to detail.
To-night the famous Cassasa Hand of
fiity star musicians will bu beard lor tlie
first Lime iv this city, and the uiusio
alone will be well worth tlie prico ol ad
mission.
TLe county exhibits promise to be uu
ubually lino, aud it will puzzle tlie
judges bow to award the handsome cash
prizes that have been offered.
Although thore have been several
en aaieries iv operation in tho State lor
some years past, comparatively lew per
sons have any idea of how they are run.
Those who visit the pavilion "this week
aud next, however, wili be afforded an
opportunity ol this kind, us one of these
wholesale butter-making factories Will be
in operation in Machinery Ha;!.
the Park ali ia bustle and activity.
Livestock for exhibition is hourly arriv
ing, aud nearly every train brings in
horses that are to compute In the several
racing event .
Superintendent Banooak baa a force of
competent men at work putting the fin
ishing touches on the racetrack, aud
horsemen say it will bo in splouuid con
dition.
There are quite a number of strangers
already Iv the city, and to-day something
approaching a rush may bo looked for,
although the main body of visitors will
not show up until the races begin on
Thursday.
lleferriug to the fair, the San Francisco
/W says: "The races this year promise
to oe of unusual interest, as the best lot
of horses ever brought together iv Cali
fornia s\ ill contest. The ruuniug brigade
is unusually strong, aud some grea
formaneea are expected. Tbr two-year
old division is particularly good, sucb
cracks as Key Alphouso, Flashlight and
Piquante being among the youngsters
slated to start."
GOT THE DOG.
An Kxcltiug ClMMta in the Neighbor
hood or the Depot*
There was lots of fun about the depot
yesterday, aud a dog was the cause of
it all.
It seems that Division Superintfcud< ut
Wright received by express a valuable
boar-houud, but while the animal was
fastened in Wells-Fargo's ofiice in Uie
depot he slipped his collar and escaped.
The police were requested to kee;« a
lookout for the dog, and linally oiiicer
Talbot aud Special Fitzgerald got sit, rh; ol
it aud tried to capture it, but the canine
with swinish proclivities wouldn't let
them approach him. They ran the dog
up Front street and over the Volo bridge,
where it doubled on them and Hew back
through the depot like a blue streak.
Tai but left Fitzgerald to "pipe oil" the
fugitive while he went to a hackman to
get a huchiug-strap. Then there was
another race. The dog struck out across
the nursery grounds toward I street,with
Fitzgerald in hot pursuit. Talbot ha.l a
poor »tart, but was bringing up tho roar
with giant strides, and people who did not
know what was up supposed Fitzgerald
to be a murderer or something of the sort
whom the uniformed rank man was
trying to capture.
Everybody shouted, and this spurred
on the special oiiicer. The race was au
exciting one until the dog—which was
not familiar with the locality—got mixed
up with the strands of a barbed-wire
feace. Whiie he was In this predicament
Fitzgerald camo upon him, aud the
frightened brute was made a prisoner
and taken back in triumph.
Tne only wonder is that someone did
not shoot Fitzgerald so that Talbot could
catch him.
LABOR DAY PICNIC.
1C Was a Wei! Attended aud Pleasant
Affair.
There was a great crowd of people at
the Labor Day picnic held at East Park
yesterday for the benefit of the families of
men who had been left without employ
ment as the result of the late disastrous
raiiroad strike.
There was dancing and various other
amusements in progress all the after
noon and up to a late hour iast night.
The iausic in the forenoon was furnished
by the Artillery Band, led by J. J. Bauer,
aud in the afternoon by a string orchestra,
Jed by K. lierlinger.
Oue of the features of the afternoon was
a burro race, which was won by Jack Har
ris. Another was the singing of a popu
lar song by Harris* rive-year-old sou.
There was an abundance of refresh
ments on the grounds, the tables being
under the management of a committee
consisting ol Mrs. H. F. Diliman, Mrs.
B. Kreuzberger, Mrs. H. N. Bauman,
Mrs. C. M. lsler, Mrs. J. R. Hughes,
Mrs. D. C. Rhodes, Mrs. C. W. Osborn
and Miss H. Wall.
The other committee were as follows:
Arrangements— H. 2f. Bauman, Chair
man; J. W. Hillhouse, Secretary: P.
Pogeis, Treasurer; (ieorge Warner, J.
Harris, J. R. Hughes, F. Y. Madeley.
Fred Aluies, J. J. De
Grace, W. Magennia, W. J. Cuinuiings,
F. J. Hawkins, Joe Deis, James Mullen.
Reception—(ioorge A. Long, 11. Gode
gast, S. Emanuel, F. W. Boyntou, Will
iam Reed.
Floor Directors—E. I. Woodman, A.
Turner.
DEATH AT LAST.
E. G. Bl«*slnz Called to Join the SUeut
Majority.
After lingering iv » comatose condition
for several day*, E. G. Blessing, one of
the proprietors of the Capital Hotel, died
yesterday morning?.
Mr. Blessing was an old resident of Bao
rainento, having arrived her* la 1854
after spending a couple of years in min
ing in El Dorado County. He engaged
in blaoksmitbing and wagon-making,
from which business he retired in lbt>9
with quite a little fortune, which he in*
vested in the Capital Hotel property and
became one of the owners and proprietors,
Deceased was successful as a hotel
keeper, and very popular with people all
over the State. He had several times
visited his old home in the East, and
leaves considerable farm property there.
Mr. Blessing leaves two sisters and a
brother in Missouri and a s'ster in Ken
tucky. His ouly relative* in this State
are tarro a«ph«w»~-L. 0* Mm tt*4 A kid
Lyons of this city and A. T. Ross of San
Francisco, lie was a native of Ghent,
Carroll County, Kentucky, and 60 years
of age.
The funeral will take place on Wednes
day at 2 p. m., from the Seventh-street M.
E. Church.
SOCIAL AND PERSONAL.
Miss Lulu Kirn kas returned from San
Francisco.
L. A. Kidder is back from Summit
Soda Springs.
Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Loreuz have re
turned from the mountains.
Editor E. E. Leake of the Woodland
Democrat is at the Capital Hotel.
Mrs. P. Cady has recently returned
from au extended vacation trip.
Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Somers of San
Francisco are at the Golden Eagle.
W. A. Anderson and City Attorney
Brown went to Auburn yesterday.
T. J. McFarland. editor of the Tele
graph, came down from Folsom yester
day.
Miss Laura Phillips, Miss Lilla Stone
and Mrs. Chris Schmid have gone to
Lake Tahoe for a few days.
Mrs. John T. Whitney' and Misses
Gertrude and Beatrice Whitney of Rock
lin, who have been for the month of
August at Santa Cruz, are now iv San
Francisco and stopping at the Grand.
Cyrus K. Miller, son of Frank Miller,
and Samuel Simmons, son ol L>r. <;. L.
Simmons, returned from tlie East yester
day. Mr. Millar is attending the An
napolia Naval School, aud is hore on a
three weeks' vacation.
Arrivals at the Capital Hotel yesterday:
V\. 1". Cruiieniilier, city; Ed E. Leake,
R. 11. Beamer, Woodland: George Smith,
Courtlaiul; S, ii. Wunehoad, Miss- M.
Johnson, San Francisco; W. rs. .Servosts,
Piacerviile; Almou Wheeler, San Jose.;;
Mr. and Mis. George P. Rommel, son
in-law and daughter ol Secretary ol fetaie
E. G. Waite, start to-day on their journey
to .New York, where Mr. Rommel goes to
tako charge of a larsjo business. He was
formerly turnkey at tho Foiaoin State
Prison. They tako with them the best
wishes of their many friends lor their
iiiinre prosperity.
Arrivals at tttti Golden Eagle Hotel yes
terday ; W. ii. Humphrey, city; J. Fred
Nohlingmau, P. ii. Bradbury, T. E.
Keating, W. J. .Somers and wile, I. C.
ferry, W. Vance, James Patterson, I. N.
I Hastings, Walter E. Faber, Miss Hattie
Faber, Fred IJotles, J. E. McFadden, San
Francisco: F. S. Winsiow, Chicago; J. E.
Walker, Buffalo, N. V., >. 11. Gunn,
: Herman Kind, B. V. Keevea, A. i<.
Smith, New York; T. E. Hunt, Oakland;
I). W. l>uukle, Keuo.
BRIEF NOTES.
The State Library Trustees met yostor
day aud audited a number ol bills.
Henry C. 817*0, Constable of Frauk
lin township, baa appointed H. B. Morse
. deputy.
Li. S. Peirson, a compositor, reported
yesterday that someone iiad rubbed him
oi Li* gold waicb.
Mayor Steiainaa baa appointed Pate*
Kearnea a- ag „. i a | policeman, to act
duriUK the State i'.iir.
Xne Ularkaburi .1 team del'oated
reeportu vi Preeport on suuday
at'iornoou, tuo score boinj.- iv to 7.
Edward John bUliott, a satire oi Eag
laud, wua uduiitted to dUseusiiip yester
day by (superior Judge Johnson, 1
lestftnony or 11. I>. Lay will audi(. tslier
bum.
ilenri Botilk), the new proprietor of the
tram .le Prance at 4J.1 W
gave an opening dinner last erasing to
members ol the press, it was an i
Nl>read.
Deouty Sheiiit liendrieks yenterday
brought in from the llag^in much a man
named S. Kalinbeyer, who is ohaiged
with having stolen a uuinuer ol sacks
ifuni tha ranch.
On Sunday evening Weather Übsoiver
OSI a. siiver-headod cuuo iroiu
his buggy on X street. IJi^ name is eu
gravad on the bead. The tinder will re
ceive his thai, im by ruiurniujj 11 to the
posioihce building.
Admission Day.
Sacramento Parlor, Nativs .Sons, will
not go to .Sau Jose to parlici pate in the
oeh braliou of Admission Day there. The
moinbeis will, however, have a. little time
ol ihuir own at home. Tiiere will bo
aiusicsl and literary exercises aud other
i'tialures.
Democratic Meeting.
There will be a ratification meetine of
the Detnociatic party on Saturday even
ing at the Flaza, when James Hudd, the
Gubernatorial nominee, William Jeter
aud others will speak.
Robbed of Eight Dollars.
A man named <Jeorge TTall reported at
the police station last night that ho was
robbed of $8 by two men iv a lumber
yard on Front street, between N and I >.
Apottinaris
MTHE QUEEN OF TABLE WATERS."
"HAS RESTORED TO
HEAL TH A GREA T NUMBER
OF DYSPEPTICS WHO OWE
TO IT A REPAST THE MORE
EVERY DAY AND AN INDI
GESTION THE LESS AT
EVERY REPAST."
Professor Oiday.
SPECIAL HOTICES._
DR. F. M. SHIELDS, Dentist, has removed
his office to 415 J street, bot. Fourth and Fifth.
UK. WLLDON, Dentist, has opened an offiot
at itOtS J street.
HEW TO-DAY.
TjiRANK D. RYAN,
Republican Nominee for
DI.-SIRICT ATTORNEY.
" ————__—__——^___^____
fACOB HEINTZ,
o
People's Tarty Nominee for
SHERIFF.
JO&N P. BRI3BKL,
intsann ingumbkntj,
Noniiueo of Reorganized Democratic
Tarty lor
CONSTABLE.
WA. WALL,
. (&. of V. building, Ninth and I street*),
Candidate for
CONSTABLE, SACRAMENTO TOWNSHIP.
MtTURASTDE FRANCE.
BANQUET AND WEDDING PARTIES A
specialty. Oysters in every style. 427 X
ktieel. Family entrance on kilUi street.
Mcais 50 cents al a carte.
MKNRI BOULy, Proprleter.
INTERNATIONAL TEMPLE OF ART.
OPEN DAILY FROM 10 A. Al. TO 10
9. X, Admission, 26 cents. Don't fall to
sea
HANANNU MASAKICHI,
The 96,000 btutue. Its equal oaf sever been
seen In Sacramento. The latest European
aud American craze, LIVI.NU PICTU^is,
alsoSuchprowskl's 920,000 Painting, «»lhe
Qroieries, Wiact, Liquors, Cigars, Etc., Etc
C^RO WELL. & tAMBERT, AUCTIONEERS,
j will sen oa WfiUNKSfIAY, September
jth, at 10 o'clock a. m., at tne oorntr of Fwen
ty-nrst and M streets, the stock of Groceries,
consisting of a line ox Liquors, Staple Chro>
eerie*, Crockery, Cigars, Soales, ttkowoases,
Ice Chest. Delivery Wagon and all other goods
con tallied in said store.
*»•- sal a Posi utc. No LlrniU
•fl^IT IS NOT HOW MUCH YOU EARN
But how you spend your earnings, which makes the difference between AN INDEPENDENT
MAN aud A MAX IN DEBT
THIS SALE T
IT'S MONEY IN YOUR PURSE
BIG REDUCTIONS IN CLOTHING. BUY CLOTHING NOW.
MeS4 S9^ n7Jua lUliz Fc 1?a21037 itS 'redUced fr°m $7 43 tO B«>^ SOc Knee P ant , Sale price. 29c a pair.
»°%% n e -asi BOSuits>forages 3 to 18 yearB salo
single «ni double-breasted coat*; materials all wool '
cashmere*, cheviot, and worsteds; strictly tailor- Boye' $2. $2 5O and $2 73 Suits, for ages 3 to 13 years
made. Sale price, $8 88 a suit. Sale price, $1 49 a suit w « jrc
Men's Nobby Sack Suit-*, wth eitner square or round-uut n .<= • c- .
coats, good linings, well-made. Former price, SIO. y^ 4a° " > B° r ageS BtO J1 yea '3.' worth $2 (must
I£. S. ELKUS, - - - - 922 and 924 J Street
AMUSEMENTS.
CLUNIE OPERA HOUSE.
J. H. Tui>o Manager
Cotuuieuciutc Monday, Soptomber 3d,
ami Saturday Mad nee.
pykes' oi'KitA Company in
THE MASCOTT.
Evening Price*—2oc, :!oe, 50c. Matinee
Prioe—luc-, 20c. 30c. Now open.
OF INTEREST
TO
Record-Uulou Subscribers.
A File
OR
Harper's
Weekly
(During the War)
is
worth
$100.
Over 1,000 of the stirring
Harper Weekly war pictures, by
Thos. Nast and other iamous Harper
war artists, taken right on the held,
were used to illustrate
HARPER'S
Pictorial History
. OF THE
Civil ~\JJ&LT.
This great book has sold for years
at $16 to $$0 in two big volumes.
The pages are 16^x11$ inches.
There are 832 pages. Lots of maps
and sketches, and one big colored
map 23x33 inches.
People wanted them, but couldn't
afford $16 and kept asking for the
oid "Harper's Weekly during the I
War." After the pictures had been
put into th'S big, new, complete his
tory, the old Weekly plates were de
bt; oyed and now tho^e files are scarce.
But the big history was so inter
esting, and, being compiled from all
the official records, was so com
plete and valuable that thousands
bought it.
Now it is all cut up and everybody
is getting it and being surprised.
It is made into 26 big parts, 32
big pages in each, and printed on
nice supercalendered paper—better
than ever before—and has a hand
some buff cover with emblematic de
sign on each part.
The parts have seUl as high as $1
each, but can be got for only 3 cents
each if you know how. The
pictures alone are worth more than
that, but the story and copies of
many official documents and state
papers of priceless historic value, all
go in with the pictures.
How!!!?
Well, you want to first get part
No. 1 and see the table of contents
and see that there is ten times as
much value as you thought, or even
saw before for the money.
JZ^ 5* Given to all subscrib
ers of the Record-Union
and Weekly Union for 8
cents per number. Only
$2 08 for th* complete
work.
TOBACCO,
CIGARS andCIGARETTES
EASTERN AND KEY WEST ONLY.
Get a Good Cigar for Your Money.
A. COOLOT.
CANDIDATES.
rpHuS. JENKINS
J. (F&K8B1TI IN( I 3H.JNT),
Regular Republican Nominee lor
BUFEBVISOB, FIFTH DiaTKICl'.
UI T. JOHNSON,
Regular liepublican Nominee lor
SHERIFF.
AUCTIONS.
AUCTIONSALE
Tuesday, September 4, 1894.
BELL & CO., AUCTIONEKBS, WILL
Bell, by order of Superior Court, the entire
sto/k o: Guns, Watches, l>iainoii(i>. Musical
Instruments, Sate und Fixture- (invt Furni
■- ireofMrv>M.Stein, deoeased, X street, i-i:th
ana s.xh, I , , September 4, i
Sato to commence at 10 o'clock a. m. bold
, In lots to suit purchasers.
Sale Positive. Terms Cash.
I iliL-L, & CO., Auctioneers.
FOR SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION,
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1804,
\ T 2 O'CLOCK P. M., AT THK Col k..
111 >a.-rainenio, Caliturnia. the i-i
-tcre>t 01 W. EL Strong Company in the (amoua
BONITA ORCHARD,
'l> geLt.tr with the horses, (arming machinery
aim tools used in the conduct oi the ?ame.
Bonitu Oiu!;a;d \s situated tiaar Palermo, in
iiutte County, California, it contains (itir is
aerern,
Alo. the interest of the W. U. Strontf Com
pany in Tracts 89 and 111 of the Orancevale
■ imct in Sacramento County, California
TERMS CASH, 10 per cent, at time of ale ;
i *ud balance upon con:irniati«.n of sule i>y the I
BuperlorCo r . s. B. SMITH
«- . rA^ siKat c w- Company.
VVhkk. HUOHBB oc .^n hock, Attorneys lur
Assignee. uua, 24,38, S] se-:, a, 11,11,17,1 -
SUMMEB EEBORTS.
HO! FOR KLAMATH SPRINGS 1
rpHEY ARE TWENTY MILES FROM
J Ager. on the California and Oregon route.
Stagf ride delightful, no dust. Large stona
I hotel; accommodations first-class. Terms,
flO to $12 per week, uood hunting and fish
ing; scenury grand, i'.ot iron and suipuur
water and the famous :-I(.i Mud Uathsiorali
blood and skin diseases, for stomach troubles,
rheumatism, alcoholi-uu, eto. A faw w«elis at
these springs will worit wonders aud build op
any wrecked constitution. For more particu
lars address GKO. B. STILES, Lessee (for
merly of Webber Lake), Beswlck, Siskiyou
County, Cal.
" IVY LODGE,"
Santa Cruz, (at.
j QELKCT PRIVATE BOARDING. BEAU
; 10 tiful grounds, sunny rooms, large library,
jnusic rooms, etc. Fine table. Four acres lv
Irults and berries. Easy walk to the beach
or Postofiice. On oar line. Terms from $10
op, according to rooms.
VK-. !, !'. v< \N V
REWARD!
The SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY
hereby offers to paj
FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS
As a reward for information or evidence
leading to the arrest aud conviction of
one or more of the criminals wh§
caused the derailment of west bound
mail and passenger train, No. 4 at a
point about three miles west of Sacra
mento about noon this date, JULY n.
1894, ia which wreck three or more |
persons weie killed.
(Signed) A. N. TOWNE,
Second Vice-Presideot aid General
Manager
Cheap for Cash or on Installments.
THE FINEST LINE OF
BABY CARRIAGES
8«e them before you buy. A. J. POM-
Mi£K. corner .Ninth and J strMls.
PROPOSALS.
SEALED PROPOSALS WILL BE RE- j
ceivect at this ofUee until
Monday, October 1, 1*94, at 13 M.,
For furnishing vaper and other material fat
the State Print)nsj Office, lor the year begin- j
nlug the first Mon-iny in < 'ctober. IM*4, and !
ending the first MoiHkiy ,11 O<vob< r, ls>yO,
: -md lor paper and material lor manafaciurtnjz
■ atate Text Books. Bidden will turnish :t:lt
I samptoa, with price per pound, and also the
name* of the makers whoso, stock they pr*>
I pose to supply. Bidders to comply with pro- j
; vision* of Mcc:i<;n 3 <>t «n Act approved 1
I ruary 2fi. lsss, aud Bectlons 532 ami 3t!35
i of tlie Political < 0.!>.•. IHe board reserves the
right to reject aay and all bid.-;, and to actept
all or any portion of any bid. Schedule lur
uishtid on application to this office.
A. J. JOHNSTON,
_^^_^ Superui ten dent Slate Printing.
THE GREAT REDUCTION IN PRICES
! The Tailor,
riOR THK LAST THIRTY DAYS IB CON-
V tlnuUnf. We hara sold orer SOQ pair ol
; PANTS for**, worth fro:n $5 to *7. Fins
BolUfbr^lo. Don't mis-* your chance for
■ the ntxt thirty in s, as -oic-ioi our gooUs art
; toid regardlos-i of co^t.
600 J Street. Corner Bi:xtti,
BACRAMENTO.
1 ■
KAILBOAB TIME TABLE.
SOUTHERN. PAW COMPANT
PA< IFIO SYSTEM.]
AUGUST i, 1894.
Trains leave and are Dae to Arrirs at
Sacrameuto:
LEAVE TRAINS RUN DAILY. ARRIV«
*kor) ! iFrora)
10:50 P' Ashland nnd Portland j 620 \
6:45 A Callstosa and N»pa _... 11:15 A,
,- -toga aiiJ Napa «:10 P
10:^5 A Uemmg, Ei Paso and East *:S0 P
5:15 PColfax '
/:lu P Knights Ldins&Orovihe 7;45 X
b-.-iO 1- Lo.s Anfelea...... lo:_5 A
11:40 A Oedeti und East—Sol
I 2-40 A.
10:00 P Com,-.,1 Atlantic "Express"
o/«n fo£<*d«n and East 0:45 A.
a:'Jo 1 Orovllie via Uusev'ie J'n'c 1015 a
> A Red Bluff via Woodland '750 F
5.05 P,Red Blufl via Marysvill* lo:15.i
10.:ji; a Redding Tin Willows 3:55 P
8:00 A San Francisco ria Benicial 11:15 a
6.1 o A .^su Francisco via Benicia «:4O P
6:40 A Sun Fraaoisco ia Uen;ol»' 10: riO P
'^00 } sco via fientcla 8:10 P
♦10:00 A .siu Francisco Ila steamer j ; t>:00 a
j IO:2SASan Fran, via Liveriuore a:5i)P
10: Jo A Sail Jose ,: P
10:25 A Santa Barbara _ 5-,0 P
•6:46 A Santa Losu ... 11-15 A.
"3.0 > p Santa Rosa '^ *8:10 P
Stockton and Quit 5:30 P
10. J;A S • CktOII ;ind Gait .• k>;j© P
B:30 P Stockton and Gait 10 25 A
11: !0 A Trnokee and Rcho 2-40 A
10:00 P True* uo c-45 V
A Vallejo '" i]-i5 a
3:00 P Vallejo ' a:10 P
•4:10 i' Folsoni*odPlao*rTille...l" *ll:05 A
■ ■-iiMnu Placerrllla "2:40 P
•Sanday exoepttd, FStoaday tAntod. '
A—(• or ni<,r:iins. P—For afternoon.
RICiIARD GRAY, Gen. Trafllo Manager.
T. H.jiOuDMAN. -J.-H. Passenger Aiit-at.
1 , ~~ ziZ—i_r
T PURELY A FAMILY AFFAIR.
TOne doz. Pint Jars ia a box, 50c p«r
dost*.
One doz. Quart Jars in a box, 60c per
doz'v.
'T One doz. Haif Gallon Jan in a box,
* Hoc per dozen.
T XEjPIS.
TAt 20<;, 25c, SOo. 35c. 40c and 50c
p< r ouiM. Our New Crop 50c Te;is
•quals otllars' 75c.
I X COFFEES.
At 15c. 20c, 2oc. 30c and 85c per
T- !. Our Mocbaand Java Blend
makes a periect Cup of Cotfae.
rp Perhaps You Don't Know We Sell
CROCKERY. (UNAWARE,
T GLASSWARE AND TINWARE
35c less on each dollar than others do.
rp
Great American Importing Tea
rp COMPANY,
617 J Street Sacramento.
T Those who come to our stores buy
cheaper than those who stay away.
SWICE OF SALE OF REAL ESTATE,
\TOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVKN BY THP;
i.l undersigned, ttioguurdian of the persons
aud estates of JOHN EITEI and SOLOMON
SITEL, miners, that un 'or ami pursuant to
an order ol th« Hup^rlor Court ol the County
of Sacraui«ito. srtate ol California, made on
the 4th day oi May, 1801, in Ihe matter of
the estates of gild minors, she will, on or
aftez the 15th DAY Ot SKPTEMBEH. 1894,
■all at private sale, for cask, in gol.l coin of
the United states, sabfect :o conflrmation by
said court, lo the hiijhe»t bidder, the follow
iuji described real estate, viz:
Parts of lots 6 and 7, in the block boandtd
by I and J, and 'J hird and Fourth strceu, in
the City ot Saoramento, Oounty of Sacra
mento, Btate of Caliiornia, particularly de
scribed as follows:
Commencing at a point on the ninth side of
J etrpet, said city, 140 feet wesr of the west
line of Fourth street, thence north 160 feet to
the alley; iheuce west alone the alley 17 leet;
t;i'jnc:e soutta 50 fret; taeuce west 3 feet
thence south 100 f«et to the nortn line of J
street; thcr.u* east aO leet to the place of be-
BlnDltti, tctfetner with th« improvements
thereon.
Oilers or bids for said property will bars,
eelved at the *raca of .lohnrm A Johnson No
504 J suest, Sacramento, Cal., or by the said
guardian at her residence, No. 17 06 J street
Bacmmenu>, Cal., aa£ suoh bids must be la
writing.
Dated August 29,1894.
ABBIK J. EI TEL, Guardiau
i«H.Ns«s & JoHXaoy. Attorneys. aujO-td
MICE OF SALIOF BONDST
PURSUANT TO A RESsJOJjUTION OF THE
L Board ol 1 Directors of Modesto Irri«a-ioa
District, dulygi-.en and made on the 216t
iayoi August, 1894. notice is hereby jtiveu
that-aid Board of Directors will soil to the
Bigbect and beat bl ider the bouda oi said Irvi
;i district lo the a:nouni of cltfuty-two
U. v :iid five ljuudrttl dollars {Sf'S'4 500,
bo., :ng interest at the rate of 6 percent p«r
annum, payable semi-auatiAliy, on m , - Si
da;, of-iauiiaryand July of each year on the
presen ut on o 1 tiie tet^rest coupons at ths
ou.ee of ie l-e iturerot said .wsiriet
Said bwuJ» are issued t»y the Board of Ui
rector* of Uodeato Irrigation District iiian
cordancs with and by the authority of au Act
of the Legislature of the atate of California
entitled Mv Act to provide for the or^a'iizft
tiou and government o f irri-atoa d-3- iota,
and to provide lor the acquisition oi water
and other prop rry. and tor the distribution
ot water thereby ior irrigation purposes."
Approved March 7. 187?.
Said bonus will be sold for cast,, and :or not
less than 90 per centum of the l.«ce value
thereof.
beaitd proposals and bidg lor tIM purcbaaa
of stud bonds will be received by ttic said
iJoaru of Directors «i» their office, in Iha City
6f Modesto, County oi btauisiaus. State of
Caii ornla, aud may be 1 .» or In
With C. S. Abbott, the Been <«r - ■•( -.iid board
at Modesto, Oal., at any time after ttie date of
this uutioeaud un:ii 8:.'50 o*«Io«Ji i j. m. on the
J6TH DAY OF - I at which
time and j-l.ice the fM • temada.
i bonus will Ut eachot'thetienon»ina!ion
of #5«O, a»d will b* aocoliable m loriu and
will conronu ir; ail respects U) the reg uro
bm sta of said \ct.
The Board of birectois ra^erTe the right to
reject any or at! bl-ls.
Bids must be «ealc.l anU addressed to th«
Secretary of said board, and Indorsed "rro
posals tor Modesto Irrigation Dli riot Bouda "
Done by order of tb« Bonrd of Di.ectors of
Modetsto Irrieatlou DiaVrk-t, August il Isqa
W. H.^WN LEY. Prosidtat
C. 8. Abbott. Secretary. au23-21t
nnnmmmmmnnnmmmni
H. S. CROCKER COMPANY
aiauuaiiiiiUiiiiiiuuiiiiiituii
WM^^ 5 YOUR Anting?
Cmr\'t VS/EI OO l-rv
With our Superior Facilities. P.-omnt *»«.
tloo, Fair Prices and Honest Work Att*°*
mnnnmmmmmmnfmmin
- 208- 210 J STREET -
i iiuuiuuiirauiwiiiiiiumiuiiu

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