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The record-union. [volume] (Sacramento, Calif.) 1891-1903, September 18, 1896, Image 2

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DAILY RECORD-UNION
ISSUED BY THE
iACEAMEHTO POBLISHINS COMPANY
Qffloea Third Street, between J and K.
Weather Forecast.
Northern California—Cloudy and threat
ening weather, with conditions favorable
for showers; hicru northwesterly winds.
WHAT IT ALL MEANS.
The election of William McKinley to
toe Chief Magistracy means, as he has
himself put it, to preserve the national
honor, maintain the rule of law and
aeoure the rights of the people and the
people themselves from the infamy of
classification.
It means, as has well been said, to
save the republic from the grip of the
nest of communists lying behind the
unhappy group that is pushing Mr. Bry
an to the fore. He may be uncon
seaaue-ef the danger residing in his own
propositions and the platform upon
which he stands. If so, he is to be writ
ten down deluded or ignorant. But he
la neither, for he has gone so far as to
3ay that If elected every thought in
ant}' plank of the Chicago platform
afasJl be made effective.
That means to make the Federal arm
draw back before State Executive in
competency or viciousness; to substi
tute State failure for the right of the
people to Federal protection in move
ment from one State to another; to pack
mad stuff the Supreme Court for a pur
nose, aad that purpose to force a con
struction of the Constitution that is for
eign to it; it means to paralyze the
courts and prevent them from staying
the arm of him who is about to do his
neighbor an Irreparable Injury.
It means to substitute the rule of pas
sion and envy for the orderly measures
of the law; it means, as the platform in
so many words says, to set aside the
guarantee of the sacredness of con
tract; it proposes to attempt to do what
France tried and failed to accomplish,
to lift values by the boot-straps of leg
islation, and to punish whoever will not
accept the valuation for his property
thai an Act of the Legislature of tha
country puts upon It
It means that values are to be in
flated tor one year to go tumbling the
next, never to be reinstated; it means,
as Mr. McKinley well put It, untold
*inajacial l-oss, destroyed confidence, Im
paired obligations, impoverishment of
produoer and worker alike, and to in
flict a deadly blow upon trade.
Because decent Americans oppose
such things and stand forward against
the vain theorizing of the new school of
•economists they are forsooth plutocrats,
money hogs, aristocrats, shylocte, and
the slaves of the money power. In this
alase then, are the 9,000,000 depositors
in awing* banks, the millions of lnvest
f*ps In building and loan societies;
•-very man who has something put by;
evesy wornar. who carries a oank book
nionthly to swell her deposit that is
aaaod out to her gain, or invested in
promotion of industry.
It means every citizen who holds a
■ JhJfted States bond, who has put his
niooey into railways, the great modern
iFtezlee and stimulants of civilization
ad commerce. It means the men who
:ia*e something as the result of their
toll and provident habits; it means
those who have the courage to cling to
the teachings of the fathers, and who
believe that It Is better to open the mills
than the mints.
It means every man who believes that
law, order and prosperity are Insepar
able. It means every old and young
man who has the effrontery to be a
"Black Republican," and has faith in
the ability of his party to meet and con
quer any exigency that may confront
the Nation—but there is a mighty host
cd such people, thank Heaven.
A WAY OUT.
it is not necessary to put the country
to the terrible test of adopting free
cotnage of stiver at 10 to L It is not
necessary to wait until we can secure
international agreement to settle the
. liver question. We believe that there
tl a way out between these two, name
ly, to send all our surplus silver held by
the Oo vera merit to coinage at once; to
make all our silver coinage legal tender
for |60; to order that there be no coin
age erf gold or issue of paper based on
g?oM ra denominations less than $20;
*o «rder that Cor convenience a $20 sil
ver note Issue. By this means we will
augment the volume of our silver money
to our full steed and make it the money
for domestic use; drive no gold out of
the country, but have It ln plenty for
foreign purchases and exchanges; affect
no contracts, threaten no line of trade,
oseate ao stress in the treasury', not
diaturb business nor shake confidence.
It will, in faot, settle the silver question.
There is nothing in the Republican
platform to prevent or antagonize car
rying out such plan. There is aothing
In reason that oa» be advanced against
it that has a stable foundation.
THE WAGE-EARNERS WILL SUFFER
Atkinson, the distinguished political
economist and statistician, wel says:
The whole oaae of the silver miners'
jarty rests upon the assumption that
•<joh a use or demand for silver coin
■an be forced by aots of legal tender
as bo raise the market value of silver
bullion from Its present price of 06
to 68 cents aa ounce to $1 29% an
iunoe, or from a ratio by weight of
thirty-one or thirty-two pounds of sil
ver, which can bo bought with a bar
of gold weighing one pound, to such
a ratio that the same bar of gold will
buy only sixteen pounds.
And then Mr. Atkinson wants some
one to point to him how It is possible
to accomplish this by law. Where and
when was it or any thing like it ever done?
Further on he charges, and logically,
thai Bryan goes back on his record as a
free trader by advocating the most
obnoxious method known to men to
increase prices, uamely, by legislative
lrflation, thus benefiting a few pro
ducers of a commodity by charging the
coat to the whole vast body of con
tainers, and this without regard to the
effect of such action upon the rate of
-wages. _
The COiuSta. "Sun" is Democratic. It
c « T er ww anything else. It was born
SACRAMENTO DAILY RECORD-UNION, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1896.
so. It has been its breeding and feed
ing. But the "Sun" is not afraid of
its convictions nor to announce them.
It frankly says "we cannot indorse
that part of the Chicago platform
which denounces the action of the Gov
ernment in the Chicago strike." The
language of that plank, it adds, was
aimed at. effort to suppress mob vio
lence. There Is many another Demo
crat in the land who finds this se
cession plank sticking in his craw. But
the few genuine Democrats who were
in the Chicago Convention along with
others submitted to the insertion of
the obnoxious plank, because without
it the revolutionary, trouble-making
and brewing, the half-breed com
munistic element could not be held in.
So the traitorous expression went in,
and Bryan has gone upon the stump
and defended it and made it worse by
amplification, until now the party be
hind him is practically pledged to
break down the authority and power
of self-preservation in the nation, and
set up the rule that if there is insur
rection in a State, and though mails
may be impeded in passage, and inter
state commerce be obstructed, never
theless until the Governor of the State
or its Legislature requests him to do
so, the President shall not interfere.
Senator Burrows hits the nail on the
head when he said it was not the Coin
age Act of '73, but the folly of '1)2 that
brought the country to its present dis
tressful condition. We went from pro
tection to free trade—practically—and
from prosperity to want at the same
time as a natural sequence. The same
situation was upon us in 1816, as Sena
tor Burrows points out. Then the
country labored under a free trade pol
icy and paralysis of industry. It was
of that period which Henry Clay, the
"Grand Man Eloquent," said: "If I was
called upon to name seven years of the
most widespread disaster which this
country ever saw, it would be the seven
years immediately preceding the tariff
of 1824."
In 1890 California produced 16,358,
--447 pounds of wool. To-day wool is
42 cents lower than in 1892, and the
production ls lamentably reduced. In
the London market wool of the same
quality has advanced 0 per cent, since
wool was put on the free list. Prom
1867 to the repeal of the McKinley law
wool in London, averaged 51 cents
lower than wool of the same quality
under protection in the United States.
The difference in favor of American
wool has all been sponged out, and
the consequence is a fall of 42 per
cent, here and an advance of 9 per
cent in London. Do wool growers
need protection?
In one of his speeches lately Mr.
Bryan said "we can change our tariff
laws any time." Indeed, Randall and
Mills and Springer thought so, but in
their day found it anything but an
easy task. Mr. Bryan says "you can't
force the tariff question into this cam
paign." But it is in it, and largely so,
too. The platform on which Bryan
stands puts it into the campaign by
its denouncement of protection. It will
be found that the American people
have put it into the campaign when the
ballots are counted in November.
The Alameda "Encdaal," one of the
best and most reliable and cleanly of
California papers, has just entered upon
its twenty-eighth year. May it see Its
hundredth birthday and more.
EVERYBODY'S COLUMN.
Under this hearting the "Record-Union"
will publish short letters from corre
spondents on topics of interest to tba
general public. The matter in these com
munication! will be understood to repre
sent only the views of the writers. All
communications must be accompanied by
the name of the writer, not for publica
tion unless so desired, but as a guarantee
ftf good faith.-Eds.
The Silver Question.
Eds. "Kecord-Union": I was very
much surprised to see in Saturday's
"Bee," in an article by "Parson W.,"
a letter from the Assistant Treasurer
at San Francisco stating that silver
dollars are exchangeable for silver cer
tiiicates only.
Knowing, as I did, that it had been
the invarlbale custom of that office to
redeem silver with gold, I Immediately
wrote to C. P. Berry, the Assistant
Treasurer of the United States at San
FYanclßCO, asking him if that had not
been, the policy of his office, and, if
discontinued, when. His reply was
that It had been the custom of his
office from its organization, so far as
he knew, to give any person any kind
cf United States money he desired for
any kind of United States money he
presented; that this custom led to
the redemption of silver, silver certifi
cates and national bank notes In gold
when so requested. But that in Au
gust of this year he had discontinued
this custom.
He also stated that while the people
of this coast preferred gold and silver,
that in the East it was the reverse;
that there gold and silver is not the
medium of exchange among the people,
they preferring paper money or cur
rency.
Hence my statement that the Gov
ernment redeems silver with gold was
not "absolutely false," as "Parson W."
was pleased to term it. And, as a
matter of fact, while Mr. Berry claims
tfhat he discontinued this policy in
August, 1 have good information show
ing tliat he exchanged gold for some
12,000 in silver during the fore part
of this month.
And I will also say that if he has
discontinued this policy it will be but
a short time before my friend, "Parson
W.," w ill realize that I was right when
I said that that policy was what made
the silver dollar worth 100 cents. Let
that policy be discontinued for the pe
riod of sixty days, and unless we have
prompt assurance of a speedy return
to that policy you will find that our
Sliver dollar wdil not be worth lIKJ
cents: that it will not be worth two
Mexican dollars, and that it will not
be exchangeable everywhere the same
as gold.
Let It but be known that the Govern
ment refuses to freely exchange gold
for silver, and the people will imme
diately lose confidence In our silver
coins; and then add to this free and
unlimited coinage of silver, and we
win ilnd to our cost that the Mexican
dollar will be worth more than our
dollar, Instead of our dollar being
worth two Mexican dollars, as it has
been ln the past.
And now, "Mr. Parson W.," let me
ask you a question or two, and I trust
that you will come out like a man and
answer them squarely.
My first question is: If we have free
and- unlimited coinage of silver, will
not that same Mexican dollar be worth
more than our silver dollar?
My second question is: While for our
products, etc., we to day charge our
Mexican neighbors twice as much in
Mexican silver as in our own silver
coins, with free and unlimited coinage
of silver will we reduce the price of our
goods one-half, to our Mexican neigh
bor, or will we apply the same policy
to our own citizens, £.nd charge them
twice as much in silver?
Or, to make it plainer, so that you
cannot fail to understand it, I will
state It in this way:
First —Does free and unlimited coin
age of silver mean that this country
will coin all silver presented to It?
Second—lf it does, and as the Mexi
can dollar is larger than ours and can
readily be recoined into our money, will
it not be worth more than our free
coinage dollar, or rather, will not our
dollar be worth less than it?
Third—As we now charge our Mex
ican neighbor $2 for a certain quantity
of goods and our own people only $1
for the same goods, because the Mex
ican's dollar is worth only half as much
as our dollar, with free and unlimited
coinage of silver, which policy will we
adopt, charge our own people $2 in sil
ver for these goods or let the Mexican
have them for $1 ln Mexican silver?
Think this over. By free and unlim
ited coinage of silver will we double
the purchasing power of all the silver
coin in Mexico, China, Central and
South America and India and some
other countries, aa well as double the
purchasing power of all the silver
bullion the entire world can produce
from thi9 day forth; or will we simply
say to our own people, "Your silver
dollar is now no better than the Mex
ican dollar, so we will have to charge
you as much as we do him."
And now, "Parson W.," let me say
a word in conclusion: Don't get ex
cited. Don't call me "v liar," "a thief,"
"an Ignoramus." Don't resort to ridi
cule, to vituperations and abuse, as
ycur predecessors who have taken up
the "silver question" have In every In
stance found themselves compelled to
do, but come out like an honest man,
answer the questions propounded to
you, and give us one single reason why
we should have free and unlimited
cclnage of silver. A. E. MILLER.
MET WITH SUCCESS.
Organization of the Army and Navy
Republican League.
Messrs. Woodward and McElroy of
Oakland, ex-soldiers of the civil war,
who have been ln this city organizing a
Republican Army and Navy League, re
port that they have met with great suc
cess. Nearly all the ex-soldiers and
sailors whom they have met have
signed the roll, and the club ls now
ready for organization.
All who have signed and every ex
soldier, sailor and marine, with thelr
sons who are of voting age, and veter
ans of the Mexican war, regardless of
former party affiliations, will meet this
(Friday) evening, September 18th, at 8
o'clock, at 815 J street, for the purpose
of organizing the league and electing
officers.
A charter has already been obtained
from the headquarters in San Fran
cisco, and at to-night's meeting the ob
jects and aims of the league will be fully
explained by Colonel McElroy and Ma
jor Woodward. It la to be a permanent
organization, and at the present
THESES J4OT fl WOJVIriH WITHIN REACH
Of HALES that hasn't good reason to be interested in the daily Dress Goods selling now. Gathering
the styles as we do direct from the whole world of makers nips the waste of many an expense that
small retailers have to pay and add to their selling prices. Placing as we do the biggest orders
as retailers that many manufacturers get, helps still more toward the economy of your buying here.
When buying, you are sure also that ALL-WOOL is ALL-WOOL or your money back.
ITS A JOY TO TRUE HOUSEWIVES
To go through our Linen stock. The cream of the best makes is here, and LINEN is LINEN at
HALE'S —no tow, no trash, no cotton admixtures.
OUR STORES WILL BE OPEN EVENINGS TO=DAY AND TO=MORROW.
Specials for To-day and To-morrow.
Ribbons.
All-Silk Satin and Gros Grain Ribbons
in PrlKht colors :ind pretty shades. Nos.
.-. ; and 9 widths, from 1 to 1% inches.
Worth from Cv 4 c to yard.
SPECIAL PRICE, 5c YARD.
All-Silk Satin and Gros Grain Ribbon
in pretty shades. Nos. 12. 16 and 22.
Also, a lot of All-Silk Fancy Hat Rib
bons. Worth fully 40c yard and all good
styles. SPECIAL PRICE, 10c YARD.
Laces.
Having secured some extraordinary
values in White and Ecru Oriental
Laces, we are going to give our cus
tomers—as usual—the benefit. This
large lot we purchased at less than
makers' costs. They ara worth from
lac to Soc a yard, and run from 4 to 8
inches wide.
SPECIAL PRICE, 10c YARD.
Bedspreads.
White Honeycomb Bedspreads in
pretty Marseilles patterns. They are
full double-bed size and worth SI 25 each.
SPECIAL PRICE, 83c EACH.
Towels.
Linen Huck Towels, fringed. Now
note the size—l9x4o inches, and they're
good weight.
SPECIAL PRICE, 12Kc EACH.
Crash.
18-lnch Brown lwlll Lln*n Crash. All
pure fliix, with fancy red border. A
standard quality.
SPECIAL PRICE, t l-lo YARD.
Horse Blankets-
Tan-Color Horse Blankets in extra
size, with leather straps and buckles,
first-class stock well put together.
SPECIAL PRIOE. $1 50 EACH.
HALE BROS. & CO., 825 to 835 X St
time the work In hand until
election day will be to aid in roll
ing up as large a majority as possible
for that able statesman and soldier,
William McKinley.
Nothing Wrecks the Constitution.
More effectually than fever and ague.
That nerve-destroying malady, when once
it takes firmrro o t, subverts every func
tion, exhausts the physical energies, im
poverishes the blood and clouds the men
tal faculties. No effectual resistance can
be offered to its destructive career by the
use of the pernicious drug, quinine. Hos
tetter's Stomach Bitters will, however,
be found all sufficient either for Its eradi
cation or prevention. Those conditions of
the system, such as a bilious, constipated
habit, or lack of vitality, which are fa
vorable to the contraction of the disease,
are speedily reformed by this pure and
efficient alterative and invigorant, whioh
not only regulates the system, but gives a
healthful Impulse to the various organs,
whose activity is the best guarantee ot
health. Thoroughness of action is the
chief characteristic of this leading spe
oific and prevwtive. which is eminently
adapted for family use.
I FALL HATS. |
Newest shapes, newest shades $
> and lowest prices in Men's c
> Headgear. i
< > The only place selling Men's 1
It Hats exclusively. c
{►FRED TROUT, I
<► 802 U SXREET. A
I HORSE
MEDICINE.
There is no reason why
horse medicine should not be
just as good as man medi
cine. We make no discrimi
nation between horse and
man when it cornea to medi
cine. The horse requires
more, and as the quantity in
creases the pri ce proportion
ately decreases. We make a
Horse Liniment that is un
surpassed for bowed ten
dons, stiffness, etc.
PRICE PER PINT, SI £3. B
ING & ALLEE, I
CUT - RATE I
712 J STREET, SACBAMENTO. I
1 Perfect W Borden:
: infant Eagle Brand s
• F(KKI Condensed Milk %
• "Infant Health," Is a little book of •
■ great value that is sent Freb on appli- •
■ cation. •
• N. Y. Condensed Milk Co. 3
J 71 Hudson Street, Hew York •
"NOTICE TO CREDITORS.—ESTATE
of JAMES BITHELL, deceased. Notice
la hereby given by the undersigned, Mary
K. Blthell, administratrix of the estate of
James Blthell, deceased, to the creditors
of, and all persons having claims againtt
the said decease/!, to exhibit them, with
the necessary vouchers, within ten
months after the lirst publication of this
notice, to the said administratrix, Mary
E. Blthell, at the office of Holl & Dunn,
920 Fifth street, ln the city of Sacramento
and State of California, the same being the
place for the transaction of the buainass
of the Baid estate.
MARY E. BITHELL,
Administratrix of the estate of James
TTlthafT. deceased.
Dated, August 27, 1896.
Holl & Dunn, Attorneys for Administra
trix. au2B-5tF
DRESS GOODS.
Mohair Suitings.
37-inch All-Wool Black Mohair Suit
ings ln fancy brocade weaves, has a rich
silky look.
SPECIAL PRICE, 4oc YARD.
Black Serge.
48-inch Ail-Wool Black Surah Twill
Serge in firm weave and foule finish.
Regular $1 yard goods.
SPECIAL AT 69c YARD.
Boucle.
41-inch Black All-Wool Boucle. in
handsome rough effect, very stylish and
SPECIAL VALUE AT 90c YARD.
Amazon Cloth.
47-inch Black All-Wool French Ama
zon Cloth, a good, heavy quality, suita
ble for wraps or full suits. Regular $1
value, SPECIAL AT 65c YARD.
Hen's Boots.
Men's Strong, Well-Made Veal Kip
Working Boots, with double sole and
saddle-side seams. Their equal has never
sold regular under $2 25 to $2 50 pair.
SPECIAL PRICE, Jl 50 PAIR.
Ladies' Shoes.
A large line of Ladles' Narrow Pointed
Kid Button Shoes, with patent tips and
good weight flexible soles. Sizes, Sto 8,
In EE width only.
SPECIAL AT fl PAIR.
Hen's Belts.
Men's Tan-Color Leather Belts, 2%
inches wide. The regular price of which
has been SOc.
SPECIAL PRICE, 84c EACH.
1 I
(# Made by Sacramento Girls. Doable sewed and felled, #)
TTTYV nirj fast black sateen. Equal to most shtrts sold at 75c
•) LI ii I H j'kj andsi Our price, V©
iollltilo 50c. Cm^^&^%
OPP. PLAZA J Q'j
TfiE GHflflGE HflflGE, flO. 7.
PRICE, $20 50.
$20 50
The celebrated ORANGE RANGE is known the worid over. There are over joo ia an
ia this city, Has a 20-inch oven. Takes 22-inch wood, and weighs 300 pounds, and is a
beauty. Every one warranted. Uses wood, coal or coke.
SEND FOR OUR 1896 CATALOGUE.
L. L. LEWIS 5* CO.,
502-504 J and 1009 FiftlT. Street.
Notice of Award of Contract, No, 321
PURSUANT TO LAW AND TO THE
resolution of the Board of Trustees of the
city of Sacramento, adopted Septemtx r
14. 1896, directing this notice, notice is
hereby given ttiat the said Board of Trus
tees, in open session, on the 14th day of
September, 1896, opened, examined and
publicly declared all sealed proposals of
fered for the following work, to wit:
That Twelfth street in this city, from
the south line of O street to the north line
of P street; from the south line of P street
to the north line of Q street, and from the
south line of Q street to the north line of
R street, be improved by gra*ding and
macadamising, constructing redwood
curbing with round corners at the alley
intersections, and filling ln behind the
same with earth for a width of eight (8)
feet, and laying granite crosswalks at the
alley intersections, rejected all of said
bids except that next hereinafter men
tioned, and thereafter, on the 14th
day of September, 18&6, awarded the con
tract for said work to the lowest regular
responsible bidder, to wit: to William F.
Bryant, at the prices named for said work
ln his proposal on file.
M. J. DESMOND,
Clerk of Board of Trustees of Sacramento
City.
Sacramento, September 16, 1896. sIC-2t
SEND THE WEEKLY UNION TO TOUR
friends ln the East.
I "Bike" Suits.
Mr»n's Bicycle Suits of gray checked
Cheviot, and they are all wool. The
pants are golf style. As good in qual
ity as you ever saw retail at $10.
SPECIAL PRICE, S6 SUIT.
Men's Bicycle Suits of dark brown
checked Cheviot in all wool. Former
price, $10.
SPECIAL PRICE, $6 SUIT.
Men's White Bicycle Pants in all sizes.
SPECIAL AT SI PAIR.
Overalls.
Men's Blue Denim Overalls in heavy
weight and copper riveted. Sizes, 30 to
40 waist. SPECIAL AT 39c PAIR.
Men's Underwear.
Men's Camel's Hair Color Undershirts
and Drawers, in medium heavy weight
and all sizes.
SPECIAL VALUE, 50c EACH.
Clocks.
Fine Full-Nickeled Alarm Clocks,
every one a good timepiece and worth
double, SPECIAL PRICE, 5Sc EACH.
Photo Franies.
Photo Frames', size BHxT'Vi Inches.
Made of handsome translucent celluloid,
prettily hand-painted ln flower designs.
SPECIAL VALUE, 25c EACH.
Toilet Soaps.
Nice Clear Gem Glycerine Toilet Soap
that's worth double.
SPECIAL, 3 CAKES FOR 10c.
Oatmeal Toilet Soap, good, large
cakes, nicely perfumed. Worth double.
SPECIAL PRICE, 3 CAKES FOR 10c
Always in the Lead!
FALL GOODS NOW ARRIVING.
PINTS TO ORDER' $ SUITS TO ORDE ?
$5 OO Jfilk $15 OO
600 mM 17 50
7 00 20 00
800 Hjh 25 00
900 \ ( 1 30 00
10 00 35 00
JOE POHEIM. the Tailor. 603-606 K.
If <i 18 6 nOD-pOISODOI
rtiaedy for Gonorrhoea
'-i-vl. S pc r m a to r i hp .
mmtw id l to 1 Whitei, unnatural di-
JtSSCy Guaranteed B charges, or »nr infiamm.-i
-bC| cat w strUtor*. tion, irritation or ulcern
r" 'jjfrtveiu tion of mucous men.
THEEvANe 0«MM« Co. —. Jfoa-*.trin«eLt.
YfJQ: »,:,NMTI,O JBBfl by Dr »rsrt»t*.
' ''>" t'ipre«», prepaid f< f
*i.<"'. ur 3 bottles, $2.75.
* v B» Circular i>ent on request
SEND THE WEEKLY UNION TO YOUi«
friends in the East.
MEN'S CLOTHING.
More men each season appreciate thi
fact that we offer all that the custom
tailor does in cloths, cut, make and
trimmings. They also appreciate the
savings we help them to.
The Fall Suits are well on the mova
now. Can't help it with prices so low
and qualities so high. Our lines at $h\
$12 50 and (15 a suit are especially
strong.
Hosiery Novelties.
We have the choicest styles known
to the market in Ladies* Fine Colored
Hosiery. Plaids and checks predomi
nate.
Ladles' very fine Colored Checked
Golf and Bicycle Hose. Prloe SI 50 a
pair.
Ladies' fine grade Scotch Plaid Hose.
Price, 75c pair.
Ladies' Black Cotton Hose, with col
ored checks. Some very attractive ef«
fects. Price, 50c pair.
lew Veiliogs.
The prettiest designs of the season are
yours to choose from. We call special
attention to the following lines:
White Veiling with black dots and
fancy braided edge. Price, 50c yard.
Black Veiling with white dots and
fanoy braided edge. Price, 50c yard.

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