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Savannah morning news. [volume] (Savannah) 1868-1887, January 25, 1881, Image 2

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NO. 3 WHITAKER STREET,
,'KORNING SEWn BCILDDSO).
J. *. EfTILL, Proprietor.
W. T. THOnPSOH. Kiltor.
TUESDAY. JANUARY 25. 1881.
TAPPING THE WISES.
la the United State* House of Represen
tative* yesterday, under the call of States,
several bills were Introduced, among them
one by Mr. Stephens, of Georgia, calling for
information touching Internationa] action
towards restoring silver to its full use sa
money; bv Mr. Smith of Georgia, to admit
free of duty bagging for baling cotton, jute
butts and aft other articles used in the manu
factures of such bagging, and by Mr. Ack
lia of Louisiana, to regulate the collection
of custom duties on sugars. Committees
■were then called for reports, and after the
expiration of the morning hour, Mr. Cox,
Chairman of the Census Committee, re
ported back the re&pportiocmcnt bill, and
Mr. Sherwlc, of Illinois, presented a mi
nority report. Both reports were ordered
printed. The majority bill provides for Sll
members, and the minority for 319. The
House then went into committee of the
whole on the poet office appropriation bCL
After discussion thereon the committee
rose and soon after the House adjourned.
In the Sens la, after some unimportant busi
ness, Mr. Logan moved to lav aside all other
business and take up the bill to retire Gen.
Grant. A long discussion followed, which
resulted in a defeat of Logan's motion. The
Senate then took up the Indian land in sev
eralty bill, thodiacu'eion of which occupied
the remainder of the day.
Five Inches of snow fell in Mobile Monday
night. In New Orleans It snowed all Sun
day night and yesterday. It was the heavi
est fall of snow known in that city since
IS5*.
Great excitement has been caused in
British Honduras by the public execution
In Guatemala of Rev. Father Gillet, a Jesuit
Priest,who was visiting that country for his
health. He was executed under the laws of
Guatemala, which prohibits Jesuits landing
in the country under pain of death.
A frightful railroad accident has occurred
at Puerto Cories, Guatemala. A train
jumped the track on the Amour mountain,
and was precipitated down the mountain
side seventy feet. Nearly all on board were
either killed or fatally injured.
Mr. John O’Connor Power, Home Ruler,
in an ad dress on Saturday to Irishmen, said
the opponents of the coercion bill would
use every means in their power to prevent
the bill being read for the first time yester
day.
It Is stated that the Italia Irridenta are
secretly raising funds for the purpose of in
vading the Austrian Tyrol. The Italian Gov
ernment has assured the A astro Hungarian
Minister or Foreign Affairs that it would
prosecute the Irridenlist leaders if. st the
coming meeting, they used offensive lan
guage towards Austria. Menotti Garibaldi
has accepted the Presidency of the Trieste
committee of action, and declares it is the
duty of everj Italian to devote his life to
the holy cause of Trent and Trieste.
The Supreme Court of the United Slates
yesterday rendered a decision In the case of
H. C. G. Hartman vs. Samuel A. Greenhow,
City Treasurer of Rchmond, Va The
question at issue is the validity of an act of
the State Legislature in regard to taxes
upon the funding bonds cf Virginia. The
court holds the act in question unconstitu
tional, and the judgment of the court be
low is reversed.
The New York stock market was irregular
and unsettled yesterday. It opened strong,
but subsequently experienced a decline.
Later in the day, however, a slight reaction
set in, which continued until the close.
Transactions aggregated 476,000 shares.
Havana dates are to the 15th icst.
News had been received that a loan of
£350,000 for the Cuban Central Rail
road had just been taken in London.
Grinding had commenced on many of
the sugar estates. Messrs. Vega A Cos.,
of Cardenas, in their weekly circular,
say; “As far as the quality of the new
sugars is concerned, we are fully con
vinced, judging from samples of the
new arrivals, that it will be satisfr ctory,
especially in regard to test.” Concern
ing the tobacco crop, we read that plan
ters at Las Lai as, as well as Ilanchuelo
in the Villas, complain of the continua
tion of drouth, which threatens to ruin
their fields. On the other hand, report.-?
continue quite cheering from the whole
“ Vuelta Abajo,” from which locality a
correspondent of the Price <* Current
writes that the crop will turn out as
large as any ever harvested in that local
ity, unless some unforeseen and adverse
circumstance should occur.
The Whittaker Farce.—The Phila
delphia American, & leading Republican
paper, in alluding to the postponement
of the Whittaker court-martial until the
3d of February, has the rare candor to
aay : “We would suggest an indefinite
postponement from that date, so that
the whole miserable business might be
in time forgotten. No evidence yet pro
duced leads to the idea that Cadet
Whittaker was the victim of any actual
outrage, and it really seems like a waste
of time and money to prove that he
mutilated his own ears.”
The Washington Poet thinks the most
fitting recognition that General Garfield
could bestow on his political brethren in
the South would be the appointment of
a representative Southern Republican to
a Cabinet office. The colored Republi
cans, says the Poet, constitute the bulk
of the party in that section. They are
its soul and its body. Without them it
could not exist. If General Garfield is
1 disposed to do justice to Southern lie
’ publicans, he will not ignore the demand
of the blacks for a place in his Cabinet
The American Colonisation Society
teems to live pretty closely up to its in
comc. At its sixty-fourth annual meet
ing in Washington last Tuesday it had a
balance in the treasury of exactly seven
teen cents. And yet it has settled 21,253
negroes in Liberia, and some of the
most eminent American statesmen, South
As well as North, were members of it
In a New Year Day’s article the Lon
don 7Yme*aaid: “We seem to be enter
_ng upon a year in which the ordinary
date of things is reversed, in which
Dives and Lazarus will have exchanged
daces, and in which the rich, not the
>oor, will be the proper objects of com
passion. ”
Philadelphia and New York, the two
jrgest cities in the Union, are just now
lecoming excited on account of the
•revalence of the small-pox. For some
one put the disease seems to have had
foothold in the former city, and within
be last few days has assumed something
f an epidemic form in the latter.
Good authorities estimate that the
atire consolidation plant of the three
degraph companies could be duplicated
* $15,000,000. The companies unite
l a basis of $80,000,000, and the busi
es of the country will be taxed to
ake dividends on this vast sum.
More than one-tenth of the inhabitants
the United States live in eleven cities
New York, Philadelphia, Brooklyn,
licago, Boston, St Louis, Baltimore,
odnnati. Ban Francisco, New Orleans
and Cleveland— whose aggregate popula
m is 5,038,790.
A Cwttro Ud
Mr A C. Goddin, at Vicksburg, Mis
(iaaappi. has been in Columbus for about
two months pa*- engaged In building a
“cotton condenser and doubter,” which
! has invented. He claims for hi* ma
-1 chine that seed cotton can, by it, be
taken from the field and prepared for
spinning, thus saving the coat of
baling, and dispensing with the
“picker” and “opener” in a cot
ton factory, both of which are
very expensive. A reporter of the Co
lumbus Enquirer-Sun has seen this ma
chine at work, and says it will do all its
inventor claims for it. A sixty saw gin
is used, and the cotton passes from the
gin direct into the condenser and doubler,
and after all the sand and trash has been
removed from the cotton by a revolution
of this machine, it falls out in the form
of a double “lap roll,” and is ready for
the carding machine.
It is churned further by the inventor
that his condenser is much superior to
the Clement attachment, from which it
differs in the carder and capacity. That
attachment ha* a carder in the gin, but
can only turn out about 500 pounds
of cotton per day. This conden
ser uses a much larger gin,
can easily prepare ten thousand
pounds per day, and feed from twenty to
twenty-five carding machines. It would
therefore, require quite a number of
Clement attachments to do the work
easily done by the Goddin condenser.
Ia brief, it is claimed that the advan
tages offered by this invention are that it
is not only an improvement on the
Clement attachment, but it does
away with the costly “picker”
and “ooener,” saving the labor of the
hand* necessary to run them, prepares
the raw material for making strong and
first class quality of yarn and cloth, dis
penses with the labor of the lint room
and the baling press and the power
necessary to run them, and saves the cost
of bagging and tie*.
If this machine should prove to be all
that is assertedof it, it will be of immense
benefit to the South. As our Columbus
contemporary truly says, pressing cot
ton injures the fibres, and the fact that
New England has to use compressed cot
ton alone gives our factories great ad
vantage over those of that section, and
since reed cotton will not bear transporta
tion, if the invention of Mr. Goddin
works successfully,these advantages will
be largely increased. A few of there
condensers placed at convenient points
throughout the cotton belt would en
able the termers to prepare their cot
ton from the seed for the spinners,
and this would not only add materially to
the value of the staple, but would soon
insure the South its proper position as
the great cotton manufacturing centre
of the country. We 6ee by the En
quirer Sun that Mr. Goddin proposes to
manufacture bis machines in Columbus,
and that he will be ready at all times to
exhibit their practical workings.
The Philadelphia Record regards the
attitude of the national banks in opposi
tion to xbe funding act, intended to re
duce the rate of interest upon a large
part of the public debt, as unfortunate.
It says the people are not indisposed to
continue in the hands of the banks a
practical monopoly of the business of
supplying the people with paper money.
The value of the national banking
system is fully recognized. But if its
advantages are to be purchased at the
cost of maintaining a high rate of interest
upon government securities the price
must be considered too dear. Proper
reduction in the rate of bank taxation
should be conceded as a matter of
justice; the business of banking is op
pressively burdened. But the servants
of the people must not be allowed to be
come their masters. The rate of interest
upon government bonds should be the
lowest that the national credit will com
mand, and untrammelled by aDy con
sideration of policy not making for the
financial advantage of the whole j>eop>.
The Washington Star says: "If the
House of Representatives shall order the
investigation contemplated by Mr.
Springer’s resolution into the affairs of
the telegraph companies, the people will
be made acquainted with a'l the stock
gambling schemes and the other secrets
of manipulation by which millions of
dollars have been made outside of the
legitimate use of the telegraph lines.
That is, this exposure will follow if the
investigation shall be thorough and
searching. The inside history of the
manipulation of telegraph companies
would convince the country, no doubt,
that the people cannot expect accommo
dation or even consideration from the
present organizations that control the
wires. These wires are used mainly to
help a few millionaires grow richer —
that is all.”
A question that is greatly interesting
the French press is that of cremation.
The pros and cons have been discussed
in all the Parisian newspapers, having
been suggested by the organization of a
society similar to that existing at Milan.
It is announced that before six months
have passed furnaces will be built and
all necessary arrangements be made for
the reduction into ashes of the great
number of dead who appear upon the
mortuary lists of that city. The Figaro
complains that Paris is now a great
bone-yard, and that the crowding of the
cemeteries makes the establishment of
crematories an administrative necessity.
The remarkable prudence of the Ber
lin treaty powers in guarding against
the chances of the allies becoming re
sponsible for a war on behalf of Greeoe,
is probably due to the fact that the
royal family of Greece is related to that
of England, and that the British Govern
men! has all along assumed a very pa
ternal attitude toward Greece, as though
the safety of that kingdom were in some
degree the especial charge of England.
It is quite apparent that Germany, France,
and Italy will under no circumstances
allow themselves to be involved in war
with Turkey on behalf of Greece.
Next year the State of California will
discontinue the contract system of con
vict labor, and work convicts on State
account exclusively. Arrangements are
making to establish brick-yards and jute
Dag factories. All the State prisons are
overcrowded, and new buildings will
have to be put up. The San Quentin
prison alone costs $256,000 a year. Crime
is an expensive thing, but so long as tax
payers do not unite to secure a prompt
and faithful execution of the laws, they
will have to foot the enormous bills
which lawlessness entails.
An abstract of the gross produce of
the revenue of Great Britain and Ireland
for the past year shows that it exceeded
the previous year by £600,000. There
was a decrease of nearly a million in
customs and excise, but there was an in
crease of stamps of £946,000, and the
poet office and teiegragh service showed
an Increase of nearly £450,009, besides
an increase In interest on advances of
£900,000. The land tax and house duty
gave an increase of £75,000.
Smashing Chin*
The action of the Brooklyn {New
York) Board of Aldermen in passing an
ordinance prohibiting the issuing of
licenses for laundries to aay but Ameri
can citizens runs tlr Chinees problem
into the washtub. The cause of the
ordinance, as it is stated, is that certain
Chinamen who have taken up Utter resi
dence in Brooklyn have been quite suo
ceesful in establishing several laundries
in that city, to the great disgust of thoae
who wanted, very naturally, to keep the
business in their own hands. But the
Chinamen are not disposed to have their
laundries broken up so summarily.
They have appealed to Chen Lan Pin,
the Chinese Minister at Washington, to
counsel them in the matter, and he has
given them some elaborate advice, hav
ing evidently taken legal opinion
on the subject He tells them they have
certain rights vested in them as residents
which cannnot be invalidated if they
conform to the laws; that the Brooklyn
officials have no authority to specify
what particular nationality or creed is a
qualification necessary to persons to
whom licenses are given, and that the
licenses they now have protect them in
their calling until the term for which
such license is given expires. The time
for action will come when they apply in
the spring for a renewal of their licenses.
If licenses should then be refused, they
are advised to apply to the Supreme
Court for a mandamus, and thus com
pel the Brooklyn authorities to issue a
license on the tender of the usual license
money. The Chinamen, it is said, have
adopted this advice, but some of them,
who belong to a club they have formed
in New York, propose to break the force
of such opposition as the Brooklyn offi
cials have manifested by applying for
American citizenship. Mayor Howell,
of Brooklyn, agreea with the Chinese
Ambassador in his views of the subject,
and has given notice that he will not pay
any attention to the restriction in the
ordinance in relation to the laundry
business.
Protection Does Not Insnre Pros
perity.
Protection does not go far in bringing
prosperity to a country where there is
no ready money. A foreign correspond
ent writes: “Misery is very great in
Germany. Selling prices and land rents
are falling frightfully low. The result
is that debtors on mortgage cannot pay
the interest of their debts, and are dis
possessed and their properties frequently
sold at half the value they had some
time ago. This depreciation cannot be
attributed to foreign competition, as the
importation of corn and other produce
has been taxed. It is generally believed
that the fall in prices is due to the scar
city of cash. Germany wanted to have
the gold standard liLe England; but gold
does not remain in the country, and
circulation being slow, everthing decays,
and agriculture languishes still more
than manufactures and industry.”
The situation in Germany and the
United States, remarks the Philadelphia
Record, has a good many points of cor
respondence. Both countries are recov
ering from the exhaustion of war; both
are struggling with financial difficulties;
both are cursed with protective tariffa
Thanks to our cheap lands and honest
farmers, to our hidden stores of silver,
gold and petroleum, and to our practical
monopoly of cottOH production, we have
been enabled to sell enough of raw ma
terial not only to put money in the
purses of our people, enabling them to
support subsidized industries, but to
make substantial progress in reducing
the national debt. Germany has no such
resources, and her protective policy is
fast working its legitimate results-the
destruction of her commerce and the
impoverishment of her farmers.
Silk Culture.
One of the most prosperous and prom
ising of recently established American
industries is the manufacture of silk.
During the past year the production of
silk fabrics exceeded thirty million dol
lars in value, and it is steadily increasing
all the time. Not only is the quality of
the domestic fabric improving, but the
prejudice against it in favor of foreign
goods is being broken down. At pres
ent the American manufacturer is
obliged to import the raw material from
Italy and the East, and is thus at a dis
advantage; but the movement for the
promotion of silk culture at home is
growing, and in the course of time it
may be expected that our silks will be
American throughout
No section of the country offers greater
facilities for silk culture than our own
State, where the wild mulberry abounds
and where the species known as the
morut multicaulu grows to great per
fection. The breeding and feeding of
silk worms is very light work, and can
be performed by women and children.
Our climate is admirably adapted to the
habits and development of the silk
worm, and there is no reason why every
farmer’s family should not have a co
coonery and produce bales of cocoons
for silk manufactories of the country, as
we produce ba’es of cotton for the world.
The South Carolina Census.—lt is
understood, says & Washington letter,
that Senator Edmunds was mainly in*
strumental in having a recount of the
population of South Carolina. He took
it into his head that it was impossible
for the State to have increased so much
in population, and in consequence of his
representations to the President the re
count was ordered. Colonel Butter
field, the chief census supervisor for
Vermont, was put in charge, with four
assistants, including Mr. J. B. Alster, of
Maryland, and all o f them had served in
the Union army. The result of the
thorough investigation made by these
gentlemen established the accuracy of
the census of 1880; indeed it was found
(bat in several districts the population
was larger than had been stated. As
there was a difference, however, of six
or seven months between the two enu
merations General Walker says the in
crease may very well be ascribed to
natural causes. It is hoped that Senator
Edmunds will now be satisfied, as the
work has been conducted under the
supervision of a citizen of his own State.
The Bubz Canal. —The receipts from
shipping in December amounted to
3,960,000f., against 2,749,121f. in 1879
and 2,459,955f. in 1878. The following
is an account of the ships and receipts
for each entire year since the opening of
the canal:
Yean. Stupe. Receipts.
1870 m. 5.139,fe7f
1871 765 8,998,738/
1873 1,083 18.407 t 391f
1873 1,173 .897,351f
1874 1.364 34.859.35 H
1875 1.494 38.886.302f
1876 1.437 39.974,9081
1877 1,663 39.774,4 H
1878 1,591 51,098,tt9f
After Wife Beaters.— Mr. Henry
Bergh has drawn up a bill for presenta
tion to the New York Legislature pro
viding severe corporal punishment for
any male person who shall hereafter will
fully beat his wife or any other female.
The lashes are to be administered by the
Sheriff or a deputy, in as private a man
ner as possible, and in the presence of a
physician.
History Repeat* Itself.
A letter has been shown the Philadel
phia Jteoord bearing date of Belfast, Ire
land, January 2, 1829, which contains
internal evidence that the present condi
tion of things in Ireland is only a repeti
tion of that of over fifty years ago.
Aside from some private matters, the let
ter is as follows: “This country, bad as
it was when you left it, is every day
growing worse. Not that food ia either
worse to procure or employment scarcer,
but the heartburning persecution that ia
practiced by all the different branches of
the aristocracy, clerical and lay, con
trasted with the rising light in the minds
of tbs mass and the struggle of the op
pressor to save something whereon to
found fresh corruption m case of
convulsion; rallying all the vices
and ignorance to be found in or
encouraged by fanaticism or des
peration ; spirit shops multiplying and
each vieing with the other who can col
lect the greatest congregation for politi
cal or unhallowed controversy, in the
sacred name of religion, enough to dis
tract the contemplative on looker if he
forgets for a moment the hand at the
helm, which brings order out of confu
sion and steers through the tempest
without missing one point of its reckon
ing. The child has come to the birth,
but there is not strength enough to bring
forth. Could America send a smart
little armament to the west of Ireland,
effect a landing, and proclaim the soil
and the conscience free and vest the ex
clusive claim of the cultivator to the soil
on his improvements upon it, in alli
ance with America;- Ireland could
not only maintain her own inde
pendence but be an additional security to
that of America herself against annoy
ance from any European power, and
prevent the necessity of trade crippling
tariffs and many other inconveniences of
which mercantile monopoly is too apt
to avail itself, regardless of national
benefit. More Irish life and labor have
been wasted to ruin America by the
aristocracy of these three islands than
would run a canal from the Sharon to
the Lome for the facility of mutual
commerce. The independence of Ire
land would be to American trade in the
North of Europe what Gibraltar is to the
British in the Mediterranean trade,
England conquered Ireland by the gift
of her soil to its adherents. Ireland
must be freed by the recovery of her
soil for her people."
A Crashing Blow.
Philadelphia Sorth American.
For a long time past there has been
no doubt as to how the war between
Chili and Peru would end. Very soon
after hostilities were begun, it became
evident that the Peruvians were over
matched. Though on paper they had a
larger army than their opponents, when
the time came for putting it in the field
it was not there. Only a small part of
the nominal force was found available,
while, owiDg to the dearth of executive
ability, it was impossible to make
the most of the material at hand.
The Bolivians, on whose behalf the Peru
vian Government had taken up the cud
gels, and who were expected to render
substantial assistance, were quite un
equal to the occasion. They could not
even defend their own territory, and
were quite incapable of acting upon the
agerfssive, or of effectively co-operating
with the:r allies in movements against
the common enemy. So the Chilians had
everything their own way. On land they
have scarcely encountered any serious
check since the campaign opened, and
had they been able to follow up their
successes with proper energy, the Peru
vians must have collapsed long ago.
Their only victories have been won at
sea. Under the command of its able
and gallant Captain, it looked at one
time as though the Huascar would of'' it
self bold the Chilians at bay, and even
change the fortunes of the fight.
But at last the Huascar was taken,and
since its capture the Peruvians have had
no luck at all. Their circumstances
have steadily gone from bad to worse,
until within the last few months they
have been vainly battling for a cause as
hopelessly lost as was that of France
after Sedan. Now it seems as though
the beginning of the end had come.
After Ue fashion of the defeated, the
Peruvians had fallen back upon tbeir
capital. Driven from every other point
of vantage, they rallied their broken
forces behind the walls of Lima, and
prepared with the energy of despair to
make a final effort to retrieve their ruined
fortunes. The dispatches indicate that this
attempt has been made and that once more
failure has been the result. Having to
some extent reorganized and recruited
their army, the Peruvian Generals seem
to have decided upon the adoption of
aggressive tactics. In their retreat the
Chilians had been close on their heels.
They were advancing upon Lima, and
as that city could not sustain a long
siege, the Peruvians could not afford to
remain inactive. Unless they wished to
be caught like a rat in a trap, they had
do alternative but to give the enemy bat
tle, and of this necessity the Chilian vic
tory at Chorillos has been the conse
quence.
This may be regarded as virtually end
ing the war. The Chilians have follow
ed up their victory by taking Lima, and
with the capital in their hands, they be
come the masters of the country, and are
in a position to dictate what
terms they please to the con
quered enemy. Such a juncture
as this calls for the friendly interven
tion of the neutral Powers, and especial
ly of the United States. It is no longer
any question of mediation, for if the re
ports transmitted are worthy of credit,
the overthrow of the Peruvians is utter
and irretrievable, and the conquerors
may reasonably insist upon their right to
demand unconditional surrender. But
we should make it our business to take
care that the terms of peace to which the
defeated may be called upon to subscribe
are not so unreasonably onerous as to be
inconsistent with the continuance of
Peru as a free and independent nation.
It is cot to the general advantage that
Peru should be turned into a Chilian
tributary.
Dense Fog and Railroad Acci
dents —The dense fog which prevailed
in the lake region Wednesday night
caused numerous accidents. In Chicagb
the brightest street lamps were almost
invisible across the streets. The Mil
waukee express train from Chicago at
9:25 p. m. ran into the Libertyville ex
press, and telescoping the palace car of
the latter, Mrs. A. B. Cook, of Chicago,
was severely scalded, and three others
were slightly injured. A similar acci
dent occurred on the Lake Shore Road,
the rear car of an a-commodation train
being run into by a freight train. Wm.
Gravitt, road carpenter, and Mrs. Gen.
Paacall were injured. Two hours later
the Pacific express on the same road
collided with a freight train at Otis,
fifty miles east of Chicago, smashing
several freight cars and damaging the
express engine. Wm. Piper, a switch
man on the Lake Shore Road, was run
over and killed by a train. J. J. Laugh
lin, while intoxicated in Chicago, wan
dered upon the ice on the lake, fell into
an air hdle, and was only saved from
drowning by his mittens freezing to the
ice, which held him up nearly an hour,
when he was discovered and rescued.
A number of English coal mines are
being worked under the ocean. In
Northumberland the net available quan
tity of coal under the sea is estimated at
403,000,000 tons, and on the Durham
coast under the sea, including a breadth
of three and a half miles, with an area
of seventy one square miles, 734,500,000
tons. The latter mine is in a vein of an
aggregate thickness of thirty feet, dis
tributed In six seams. Engineers are
considering how it can be worked suc
cessfully in the future.
The most humorous bit of “Boycot
ting” yet heard of is the case of an under
taker in the countv of Dowa, who has
been “Boyootted’” every man In the
neighborhood having entered into a sol
emn engagement not to ride in the blag
gard’e hearse!
4 liftakcn Xoreweat—A Propound
Memorial of Dishonor.
Boston, Dec. 27, 1880.
Dear Bib— Only three persons have
ever been chosen .President of the United
States who have received a degree in
course at Harvard University. These
are John Adams, John Quincy Adame,
and President Hayes, who took our de
gree of L. L. B. in regular coarse.
In Memorial Hal), at Cambridge, are
fine portraits of the Adamses, one by
Copley, and one, in part, by Stuart.
We have thought it would be a good
thing to obtain a good portrait of Presi
dent Hayes for the same hall, while he
is yet President.
With this view we propose a subscrip
tion among the alumni, not to exceed in
any case ten dollars, so that the invita
tion to him to sit for his picture may
come from a large number of his fellow
graduates.
Will you join in that subscription t
Please address either of the undersigned.
Truly yours, W. amort,
Amo? A. Lawrence,
Edward E. Hale,
John Lowell,
Joseph H. Choate.
New York, Januaiy 21,1881.
Gentlemen—l have received your
communication of the 27th ult, inviting
me to join m a subscription to procure a
portrait of Mr. Rutherford B. Hayes to
place in the Memorial Hall of Harvard
University at Cambridge, along with the
portraits of John Adams and John
Quincy Adams. Presidents of the Uoited
States and graduates of the University.
I decline to join in such a subscrip
tion. lam not willing to do anything
that may be designed or construed as a
compliment to Mr. Hayes, or that may
recognize his tenure of the executive of
fice at Washington as anything other
than an event of dishonor. He was not
choeen President He was defeated in the
election; and then a band of conspira
tors, Mr. Hayes himself conspiring and
conniving with them, setting aside the
Constitution and the law, and making
use of forgery, perjury, and false count
ing, secured "for him possession of the
Presidency to which another man had
been elected; and when he had got p° 9 -
session of it, his most sedulous care was
to repay with offices and emoluments
those authors, managers, and agents of
the conspiracy to whom be had been
chiefly indebted for its infamous success.
Sooner than honorably commemorate
such an event or do public homage to
such a man, I beg you, gentlemen, with
your own hands first to destroy the por
traits of John Adams and John Quincy
Adams in Memorai Hall, and then to
raze to the ground the hall itself.
How great an insult you are propcs : ng
to the two illustrious Presidents of the
name of Adams is made manifest by the
following words from the son of the one
and the grandson of the other:
“I think Mr. Hayes was elected by
fraud, and I do not mean to have it said
that at the next election I had forgotten
it. Ido not say that Mr. Ilayes com
mitted the fraud, but it was committed
by his party. I have no enmity to Mr.
Hayes, but after the fraud by which he
became President I could not vote for
any person put up for President on the
Republican side who did not disavow
the fraud committed. I would not sup
port any member of that party who had
any sort of mixture with that fraud. I
feel that the counting out is just as much
a fraud now as at the time it was per
petrated.”
1 remain your very obedient servant,
Charles A. Dana.
IT. Amory, A. A. Ist ic re nee,
Edward E. Hale, John Isntctt, Joseph
H. Choate.
A village moral philosopher found
more than his match one morning in a
small boy who was smoking a large
cigar and attending diligently to busi
ness. Professor Morality stopped,
shocked, and asked the S. B if he knew
what he was doing. “Smokin’ a power
ful five-center won abet” “Don’t you
know you’re poisoning yourself ?’’ “No,
I don’t.” “Well, you are; that cigar
cod tains enough nicotine to kill a cat.”
“I’m not a cat.” “I know; it doesn’t
kill suddenly, but poisons the blood.
You may drop dead on your way home.”
“I’m not goin’ home.” “Boy, you are
destroying both body and soul;throw
away that cigar.” “I das’nt, some other
bov would pick it up and be pizened.”
“Throw it away and I’ll buy you three
nice apples.” “Don’t like’em.” “Ora
pocket full of peanuts.” This was going
too far even for philosophical patience,
and answering foolish qaestiona
the boy was wasting valuable
time and letting his cigar go out. So be
fired up, took a long and strong puff
and said; “I bet a boy the cigars that
he couldn’t tech his tongue to a lamp
post and then sing right off, ‘Babies on
our Block.’ He teched, and there’s a
crowd up there tryin’ to thaw him loose.
Yer can t scare me with pizen, and I
don’t go much on advice, but if you’ve
got any spare time yer might go up
there and tell that ere boy that a chunk
of natural philosophy is worth more’n a
world of experiments. Solong.” And
rather than put temptation aDd danger in
another boy’s way, as the philosopher
had advised, the brave boy took aii the
poison himself, and doubtless got home
alive without a load of apples or pea
nuts to lug.
It seems that a boy who uses firearms
in play, to frighten his little sister, or
brother, or playmate, never misses his
mark. An old rusty gun usee for this
purpose is always sure to be loaded, and
as certain to go off. A gun or pistol is a
great favorite with children, and hand
ling it looks heroic. It so appeared to
Frederick Ehredt, of Guilford township,
near Galena, 111., who woke up one
morning and tried to get his brother
George out of bed. George was sleepy
and would not get up. Frederick went
for a gun which was in one corner of the
room, and threatened his brother George
to shoot him if he did not bounce out.
George didn’t bounce; he thought he
knew the gun was not loaded,
as well as his brother did. Frtde
rick cocked the gun, took aim and
fired, giving hia brother heroic treat
ment for laziness. The loud report was
astounding to Frederick, but George did
not hear it, neither did he get up and
now he sleeps soundly under the sod in
the little church yard in the valley.
Frederick sleeps alone, if he sleeps at
all for thinking of how he playfully be
came a fratricide. It is a remarkable
fact that these fatal accidents with fire
arms are not warnings. Every boy ap
pears to think that his particular gun
will prove an exception to the rule that
firearms in the hands of children are un
failingly loaded, never miss fire, and al •
ways kill.
Trichinosis in its Most Horrible
Form.—Several months ago a man named
George Lawrence, who lived with his
family on the farm of Thomas Simpson,
nine miles west of SpriDgfield, Illinois,
and worked as a farm hand, was given a
diseased pig by Mr. Simpson. After
keeping the animal several weeks he kill
ed it. Soon after he and his wife and
ehildren became very sick, and Dr.
Price, of Springfield, pronounced their
disease to be from the effects of eatiDg the
diseased pork. The limbs of Mr. and
Mrs. Lawrence were terribly swollen
These of the latter burst in several places.
Mortification set in, and in a few days
days she died, after suffering the most
intense agony. Mr. Lawrence is now ly
ing at the point of death. His body is
swollen to almost twice its usual size.
His skin is described as presenting a white
appearance and being as hard as stone.
He is unable to move without enduring
excruciating agony, and when touched
on any part of the body screams from
pain. The children had eaten but little
of the meat, and so far have escaped its
effect. Drs. Price, of Springfield, and
Warren, of New Berlin, sent some por
tions of the meat to Philadelphia for
analysis, and the experts report it to be
alive with trichinae.
The money order system of Great
Britain has just been simplified, and,
therefore, greatly improved. Every
money order office in the kingdom is sup -
plied with the new postal orders, which
are| a printed check, each having on its
face a specific amount in plain letters.
The checks are of various denomina
tions and fractions, so that almost any
amount likely to be wanted can be ob
tained. The purchaser calls for a check
of the denomination he wants, pays for
it, and the transaction is done with. The
price of the money orders has been re
duced about one-third. This system
saves to the applicant the trouble and de
lay of filling out a blank application and
then waiting his turn, in a crowd per
haps, to reach the pigeon-hole through
which the order Bare supplied.
SOITED AT LAST,
la EifUuUM of Bfrmaaa'i fl*
krat4 Bird Trim.
Hermann's bird trick, vhicL baa de
lighted and mystified many audiences, is
thus explained by one who claims to hare
solved the riddle: They who hare seen
the trick performed will remember that
a small class box about 9x4 inches was
exhibited, containing a number of
canaries. This was placed on the side
table, and a cage of ordinary sice and
appearance was passed among the
audience, who were thus enabled to see
that it was “perfectly empty.” The
cage was then suspended from two wires,
which were fastened to a couple of up
right brass rods fixed in the centre table.
Two large silk pocket handkerchiefs
were placed over the cage and box, and
Hermann, standing at a small table, fired
a pistol, instantly withdtew the pocket
handkerchiefs, and showed the glass box
empty and the cage fall of canaries. For
a long time it is said this tries was a puz
zler, but the following was found to be
its explanation: The ordinfuy-looking
cage had, in reality, a false top, or,
rather a false bottom to the top. The
roof of the cage was peaked, and be
tween its ridge and the bottom of the
eaves was what may be called a garret.
Before being brought on the stage, the
same number of canaries were therein
confined as the box contained. The
wires which held the cage suspended
were connected with a battery outside.
The glass b>x was also peculiarly con
structei The sides were secured by
brass mitre joints, but the bottom and
top were held together by wires
concealed by these joints, and could
at will be slid down until the top formed
the bottom, and the bottom hung below,
sustained by the corner wires, like the
standard of a what not. When the box
is placed on the table it rests on a spring
trap, and the momont the pistol is
fired Hermann presses the spring, the
trap descends, with it falls the sliding
top and bottom of the box. and the ca
naries are thus forced out of their quar
ters. The spring is relieved, the box re
ceives again its top and bottom in their
places, and the canaries are left in the
table. Cos instantaneously with this ma
noeuvre, the watchful attendant presses
the bottom of the battery, the floor of
the cage “garget” gives way, and the
released birds flutter down into the
cage.
THE FRETFUL PORCUPINE.
How the Plates Atnase Themselves
In b Nevada Town.
irmitmwcea (Kiev.) Silver State.
Yesterday some Piutes caught a porcu
pine on Winnemucca Mountain and
brought the bristlg animal to town.
They offered to bet all the money they
could raise that there was not a dog in
town that could whip him. Finding no
takers, they let the thorny animal loose
on the street, near the marble-works,
where a large dog got sight of him and
gave him chase. Porcupines are
not very fast runners, and the
dog caught up with this one.
but he would relish his beefsteak
much better to-day if he had not. Dogs
do not see porcupines very often, and do
not know the danger of attacking them.
As this was the flrst of the species the
dog had seen, he grabbed him. He did
not bold on to him very long, though,
as the porcupine's bristly armor pene
trated the dog’s mouth, and when he at
tempted to get hold sank deep in the
lining of his mouth, and caused him to
howl with pain and beat a hasty retreat,
leaving his armored adversary in posses
sion of the field. Few dogs that have
any experience in fightiDg porcupines
care to renew the contest, and it is not
probable that the Newfoundland which
attacked that one yesterday will prove
an exception to the rule.
Marriage in Ireland.
Joseph T. Pirn, in a letter to the Pali
Mall Gazette, disposes of one of the stock
arguments brought against the Irish peo
ple by English writers, namtly, that
although they are improvident to the
verge of pauperism, they marry early
and have large families.* He contends
that the idea that the Irish have a mania
for early marriages is one of the most
prevalent delusions of the day. Legisla
tion ought to be based on knowledge of
facts, not on fanciful ideas. A reference
to the “Statesman’s Year Book” will
show that, according to official figures,
the marriage rate is lower in Ireland
than in any of the principal States of
Europe, ana the birth rate lower than in
any save France. He is aware that the
registration of marriages and births is
not altogether accurate in Ireland; but
the census returns cannot be called
in question. They show that in 1871
the proportion of the population that
was married was smaller in Ireland
than in either England or Scotland, that
the Irish do not marry at so early an age
as the English and Scotch do, and that
the percentage of natural increase of the
population between 1861 and 1871 was
only 8.1 in Ireland against 16.4 in Eng
land. The official figures show that on
the last day of 1878 there were in receipt
of poor relief 30 out of every 1,000 of
the population in England, in Scot
land, and only 16 in Ireland; and that it
eost for the maintenance of paupers in
1878 6s. 2}d. per head of the population
in England, ss. s}d. in Scotland, and
only 3s. Bd. in Ireland. It is a question
how far the restrictions on outdoor re
lief in Ireland account for these differ
ences, and also for the discontent and
disaffection which have followed on the
distress in the West of Ireland.
The Language of Gloves.—The
following is said to be the language of
gloves: “Yes” is said by letting one
glove fall; the gloves are rolled in the
right hand to say “No.” If you would
have it understood that you have become
indifferent, partly unglove your left
hand. To indicate that you desire to be
followed, strike your left shoulder with
the gloves. “I do not love vou any
more,” is pronounced by striking the
gloves several times against the chin. For
“I hate you,” turn the gloves inside out.
“I should wish to be beside you,” is said
ty smoothiug the gloves gently. To ask
ir you are loved, the left hand is glo7ed,
leaving the thumb uncovered. If you
wish to make the charming confession,
"I love you,” both gloves are let fall at
once. To give a warning, “Be atten
tive—we are observed,” the gloves are
turned round the fingers. If you would
show that you are displeased, strike the
back of your hand against your gloves;
"furious,” you take them away.
The largest lump of ambergris ever
known was in the possession of the King
of Tidore, and purchased of His Majesty
by the Dutch East India Company. It
weighed 182 pounds. Another enormous
piece of 130 pounds weight was found
inside a whale near the Windward
Islands, and sold for $2,500. The true
ambergris, which is a morbid secretion
of the spermaceti whale, gives out a
fragrant smell when a hot needle is
thrust into it, and it also melts like fat,
but tbe counterfeit often Bold instead of
the real thing does not present these
features. Men engaged in whale fishing
are on the lookout for ambergris, ana
usually find most of it in the toipid,sick,
or very lean fish, consequently it would
appear to be, what all medical practi
tioners say it i6, the product of a
diseased liver.
fttttfrs.
Thrt-Ktand Best Ht-dlvine ever Made.
Acoftmbiaation cl Hops, Buchu, Marv
el ra kite and Dandelion, with *ii tbs best and
most e%ura. tire properties of nil other Bitters,
makee\the greatest Bleed Purifier, Liver
Resul\ ator, anj life and Hralth Keitoring
No disease sa possibly long exist •There Hop
Bitters are uswdjao varied aad perfect are their
GperatiuaMHM
They givt -i~ UAis *sd riger t: tie tgsl ssi isSsm.
To all whose e%aployn>ents cause Irregular!
ty of the urinary orpins, or wbo re
quire an arvdmild Stimulant,
Hop Bitters are without intox-
C ;<o mrSier whateflrtfr ß or symptoms
are what the disease or V eDt U use Hop Bit
ten. Don’t wait until youa r sick but U you
only feel ted or miserable,R use lkto , u one®.
It may sareyourlife.lt basis* e<i hundreds.
sutler,but use and ante them^L 10 aao rIOP B
Remember, Hop Bitters is ,I J°Vpxi
drunken nostrum, but the
Medicine erer made; the *‘l,s V rKXEN D
and BCl*2” and no person or famflyNA
should he without them. waii| JSBB
0.1,3. is at absolute aid ir-estlfcto cure! Ei
fc.ri/ruakenes-, uwj of opium, tobacco and I
tzngj* “iyusKry |3
BocheetirJi.Y and Toronto, Ont.l
aplß-Tu,Th,B,w*TeUy ll
jag SMtortH&rattitig,
e. c.
FIRST GRAND HOP
Of the above Club will oe given at
IRISH JASPER GREENS’ HALL
OS WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 9tm, 1881.
'TUCKETS ft. admitting gentleman and ladies,
JL refreshments included, to be had from the
following Committee: P. H. Oearon, Chair
man; J. J. Hannon. *. Walsh, J Joyce, J. J
O'Xetii. 8 J. Beytagh, T. J. Barrett.
JanSs ltATeiat
LAND PLASTER
For tale low from wharf. Apply to
KETCHUM & CO.
jartß-tf
Residences For Sale.
SEVERAL desirable residences, large and
small, in pleasant part* of the city. For
oil particulars call on
R. M. DEMKRK,
janßV3t No. g Commercial Block.
VASELINE.
PURE VASELINE. POMADE VASELINE,
VASELINE CAMPHOR ICE, VASELINE
COLD CREAM. VASELINE SOAP’, at
1. C. STRONG’S Drug Store,
]an2s-tf Cor. Boil and Perry street lans.
(Boofls.
B. F. McKENNA
137 BROUGHTON STREET. BETWEEN
BULL AND WHITAKER.
GREAT REDUCTION IN PRICES OF
WINTER GOODS
FRENCH NOVELTY PLAIDS. Double Width,
old price ft 50 per yard, now 75c.
FRENCH NOVELTY PLAIDS, old price 50c.,
now 35c.
Colored BBOCADED DRESS GOODS, old
prices 40c. and 50c., now 25c.
Colored BROCADED DRESS GOODS, old
prices 30c. and 36c., now 20c.
Colored BROCADED DRESS GOODS, old
price 25c., bow 15c.
ENGLISH CASHMERES, old price 15c., now
10c.
Other DRESS GOODS greatly reduced.
Blankets & Flannels
AT A GREAT REDUCTION.
LADIES’ CLOAKS &D9LHANS
AT A SACRIFICE,
SCO dote ns CHILDREN'S FANCY HOSIERY,
including tbe best French and English
makes, at reduced prices.
300 dote ns Ladies', Gentlemen's and Children's
Wool and Merino UNDERVESTS at re
duced prices.
Domestics,Shirtings,Sheetings
The “TOWER'' REINFORCED SHIRT at sl.
The “SPECIAL” REINFORCED SHIRT at 75c,
The best Shirts in the world at the prices.
COSSETS, CORSETS.
Popular styles aad new models, a great
variety, from 39c. np.
B. F. McKENNA,
187 BROUGHTON STREET.
janS-N&Teitf
Positive Facts & No Humbug
TN passing down 152 BROUGHTON STREET
1 we saw MR. JACOB COHEN displaying
the finest stock of Babies’ and Ladies’ CLOAKS
at figures to astonish every one, his stock of
LACE and SILK TIEB. FICHUS, LINEN.LACE
and SILK HANDKERCHIEF 4 *, his immense
stock of CORSETS', KID GLOVES, JEWELRY,
rich and rare. For presents let everybody get
a pair.
His HOSIERY DEPARTMENT Is cheap, but
his DBESS GOODS in ail grades are the cheap
est in Savannah.
His BLACK 8 ILK at 75c. is better than any
dollar Bflk found elsewhere.
TOWELS and TABLE DAMASK cannot be
equalled.
TIDIES, LACK SPREADS aad SHAMS.
Also DOLLS for the little ones.
In fact, the choicest selection of goods, too
numerous to mention. Convince yourself at
152 BROUGHTON STREET.
JACOB COHEN
decao-tf
.furniture, &r.
THE HOLIDAYS
AHE OVER.
WE have on hand a large lot of goods suita
ble for every day use, such as
LADIES’ DESKS, CABINETS,
WHATNOTS, COMB CASES,
Brackets, Easels, Music Stands.
CHAMBER SUITS of all descriptions.
PARLORSUITS appropriate for the humblest
cottager in the land or the bloated bond
holder.
Our stock of CARPETS is simply full to over
flowing. RUGS, MATS, OILCLOTHS. CRUMB
CLOTHS, WINDOW SHADES, LAMBRE
QUINS.
Give us a call, and anything you don't see
ask for it.
We have a corps of competent workmen,
and guarantee satisfaction.
E. A. BCHWARZ,
125 AND 127 BROUGHTON STREET.
janll-Tutf
Duteuluffs Jf arsaparilla.
DEUTESi HOFF’S
CONCENTRATED EXTRACT OF
SARSAPARILLA!
/AUEEN’B DELIGHT, YELLOW DOCK aad
W IODIDE OF POTASH. Pronounced by the
ggptotojm the best Blood Purifier in use.
G. M. HEIDT & CO., Druggists,
janU-tf SAVANNAH, GA.
CLOT S l ur <3r
—AT—
Greater Bed actions Than Ever Before
Ij* HEIDT. from this date until the end of
• the winter season, in order to dear oat
the balance of bis stock of Men's and Boys’
WINTER CLOTHING, will sell at such reduced
prices aa will convince ewerv customer that
they can buy Clothing in hfc store for less than
anywhere else in the city. The stock is good
and will be offered at such prices as cannot be
surpassed. The stock of HATS is large, em
bracing every fashionable style for men and
boy* at popular prices. “King of Shirts" $l 00
and 81 fe. The “Acme,” a splendid Shirt, In
white and colored, laundried, for fl 00, and
Genta’ Furnisn<ng Goods of every description.
Headquarters for Good Clothing, 139 Congress
street. jan24-tf
KIKSLIHC’S NURSERY
■ihpi'B BLUFF anin
TkLANTS, BOSKS and CUT FLGWEB& AH
XT orders left at Savannah News Depot, cor
ner 801 l and York streets, promptly filled
teUMf GOTTAV* SOHISSfo, Prop*
I ' • - v-W.tV.Kg.. „•
SAVANNAH ' THEATRE,
A RARE DRAMATIC TREAT.
FOR THREE NIGHTS AND WEDNEBDAT
MATINEE, January 25th, 28th and 27th.
The Greateet Living Emotional Artiste.
CHABLOTTE THOMPSON,
Supported by
A Powerful Company.
TUESDAY EVENING. January 25th. J. K.
Tillotson’s new American Comedy Drama—
“TUß PLANTER’S WIFK M
WEDNESDAY MATINEE, January Kth, at t
v. M, —BAST LYNNE.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT, January 86th, Char
lotte Bronte's-JANE BYBB.
THURSDAY, January 27—A SPLENDID
BILL.
Reserved seats now on sale at Brea's Ticket
Office. No extra charge for reserved scats.
jan34tf
(Trorfeerg, &r.
fm GOODS.
JUST OPENED ALNKW LOT OF
FANCY GOODS
FOB THX —
HOLIDAYS.
A full stock of CHINA DINNER. TEA and
CHAMBER SETS. Sets of
TABLE GLASSWARE
RODGERS’ TABLE CUTLERY. SILVER
PLATED WARE, ete., at
CROCKERY HOUSE
JAS. S. SILVA,
dec2l-tf 140 BROUGHTON STREET,
Jrrds
BUIST AND FEKRY’S
FRESH
FLOWER UNO GARDEN SEEDS
Just arrived and for sale at
SCHWIEREN & MENDEL’S
DBl'G STORE,
CORNER BULL AND STATS STREETS.
jan22-tf
I
x>
WAONER'S
*
I
Opposite Pulaski Heese.
nr>v2s-tf
FRESH FLOWER SEED.
THE kind we always sell with so much satis
faction to our customers. No old seed
kept on hand.
G. M. HEIDT & CO., Druggists.
janl7 tf
lianas and Organs,
SI ,000 REWARD
For the discovery of tbs Manufacturer, Deal
er. Agent, or Pirate, North or South, !n
America, Europe, or New Jersey, who
seiis Reliable Pianos and Organa
cheaper than they can
be bought at
LUDDEN & BATES’
90CTHEEX MUSIC HOUSE.
zxfsdrfes
OUR NEW DOUBLE STORE,
The final Plana and Organ Depot of
the South.
TIT E are mad. Somebody hold uaor there
Vf will be trouble. This buying Pianos and
Organs in New York and New Jersey, when
they a&D be had cheaper at home, has got to
be stopped. What are we here fort What is
o-Or Mammoth Double Store for? What do we
carry a stock of SOO Pianos and Organs for?
Wbd*4? we keep an army of Salesmen. Clarita
Booktowpft*, Tuners, Travelers, Draymen and
Porters for? What do si run eight Branch
Houses fior* What do we advertise In Over 500
fun of ttl Not much. LuddenA
Bates' Southern Music House was established
to supply Southern buyers with ano* and Or
gans. Its mission must And shall be fulfilled.
‘•Come Let Us Benson Together.**
Buyers send Sorth after instruments because
they think they can buy them cheaper, but
there's prheretbey make a big mistake. We
compete with the world.and New Jersey in par
ticular. Ttemattfioean t lire who can
us. We keep'the nwy beat instruments. WeseOl
them cheaper Lev o*e else cm. We rive
in Stools, Covers and Books W# warrant them
for six years. WeseifooalS days trtaL We
sell them on easy term*. We do anything and
everything th&t any on® else and oee or can do.
We will sell you a Plano or an Organ posi
tively cheaper tharajrou can get it at the North.
We are mad, andw<l mean it. We will do it if
we have to rive it to vou.
Happy New Teat! New Schedule. New
Price*. New Terms. New Instruments. Send
for January, 1981, Catalogues and Price Lists,
and note our New Year Offers. Piano and Or
gan arar renewed. Paper bullets. Convincing
arguments. Facts that cut like knives. Victory
th~ time for Southern banners. Come up
buytn. there's room for aIL Address
LUDDEN A BATES, Savannah, Go.
janU-MAThAwtf
Mllwpiii BLjKiMßMiajhWteULi.l I .T. r!. fajWy . sfe OT
KHABE § PIANOS.
2
GABLER i PIANOS.
o
ESTEY I ORGANS.
BEST INSTRUMENTS MADE, retaining their
weet and singing qualities of tone under
the severest tests. Sold on easy installments.
Several Pianos to rent. Tuning and repairing
at lowest rates. Moving with anew Patent
Piano Truck careful and prompt.
SCHREINER’S MUSIC HOUSE
janl9-WAStf
gltiars. ~
SEW CIGAR STORK
BULL ST., COR. CONGRESS ST. LANE
THE undersigned has opened anew store
with a choice and well selected stock of
Imported, Key West and Domestic Cigars,
Smoking and Chewing Tobaccos, Cigarettes,
and a complete variety of Smoker*’ Articles,
which be will offer at moderate prices,
JanlS-lm J. O. DsCASTRO,
Ahouldtr grafts.
Shoulder Braces
I NOR Ladies’, Gents' and Children's wear, of
’ the most approved patterns. In store
and for sale by
G. M. HEIDT & CO., Druggists.
janlT-tf
FOR COUGHS AND COLDS.
Hnrrrs expectorant.
. I BULL’S COUGH SYRUP.
WISTAR’S BALSAM.
HALE’S HONEY and TAR.
FISA’S CURE.
BUTLER’S GLYCERINE ROCK AND RYE.
A * BUTLER’S DRUG ENPOMIL.fi.
}ta tf
SIOOO Reward
For any case of Blind. Blooding, Itching. Ulcer
ated, or Protruding PILE* that Do Blm*>
li
Watitet!. -
WANTED, a good sail bc£jt _
WANTED, a first-rate £
—— ~
ANTED, a competent b U
_
two doors east of Drayton. .
W p ain sewing, also
TV menu cicely made, at l*
jamg-lt (
W ANTED, tea or a dozen *ble-u^ w T 'H
▼J to make banka and ckir oot!?i'Sl
a rice plantation opposite ta*-o* E ,
Ga. Apply to J H. JOHNSTON. W ■
jan24-tf J
wANTED, every stranger v. .
TV to know that the finest Vie*. „ ,
in the South are for sale at ii
posits the Screven Hou-e, • Keadau.^
Views of Southern Sceterv. • i '-vr s
viidoil
WANTED, Pianos and Orjrans
repair. Rates reav>nable Secret "fil
instruments. T. B TURNfcit, li,
between Bull and Whitaker
T TEIK.'-’ WANTED -
11 persons who lost relative*
revolution 0f1535 will hear of
advantage by comtnunu v,!-? ■
care of this oidC^
£ot S7
BENT, singly or eD suite.
1 unfurnishet, iarjre piassLt
southern exposure, priv-lece 0 f u,,
Very desirable locality Te-rr. 'V ■
dress fOUTH ROOM-, Nev.-scT: ■
ryx) RENT, a desirable two story'
1 on basement, No. 69 York strre- NBB
104 Liberty street
for 92U. (
I|V>R SALE, a comf-rtable tvTTrrrpTr'H
lng bouse, mrui ro-f. on Little j “■ ■
street. Nice front j avem-nt. port: tof . M
raved, outhouse* and water in nrd ,‘^H
to JOSEPH MANSION, ccmer West
and New- streets. I
TNOR SALE.—Go to 21 Bud otreet.~or&iir I
T the Screven House, for
Photographs. Copying and ■
quarters for % lews ot Souti,err, 1 ■
J. N. WILSON. Phot .graphs, I
jan24-N&Teitf * I
■pOR BALE r -10. Lota for *sie I
JL Henry, Duffy and New Houston ■
For terms apply to R. B. REPPaRD Soy M
Bay street. ■
T.X)H SALE, a fine bred Milch Cow on ft, I
U point of caiTicg. Apply to W. a hav ■
foot East Broad street. I
SALE. YELL/JW PINE and CTPRftjj ■
LUMBEB, by tbe cargo.
jaalt-tf D. C. BACON 4oj I
rpHE largest stock SEASONED FLOORiyij I
in the city. Call and examine our stock,
augftrtf BACON £ BROOKS. I
"C'OR BALE.—Tbe undersigeei, agent for I
IT Herring A Cos , has several second hand ■
Safes for sale. Orders for new saf.s tilled with ■
promptness at low prices, J. B. OLiVERog B
Agent, 133 Broughton street. jit? t’ ' I
I|X>R SALE, a fire counter perfectly new H
paneled and bracketed, with gilded besdt H
and a walnut top. 21 fc-et long :n or e piece, 19 ■
inches wide, 2 inches thick, and both end,' a fl
inches wice, with drainer. Also 20 office or fl
barroom chairs. Apply H 2 St. Julian street. I
Muri-tf I
Cost and iound.
LOST, a white Bull Puppy, wi h b’ack gpou ■
cm the head. A liberal reward will be paid fl
by retwmina it to 107 Congress street ;scS4 tf ■
fflisffHanrtms,
THE cosiest Saloon in tbe city, estotidlj
adapted to the wants of the ladies, where
tea, coffee, chocolate, oysters and ice cream we
served day and evening. FURBER. the Ou
fectioner, 130 Broughton steat j&nwlt
JOSEPH JENKS, Je . Wolverhampton, Eaj
land, manufacturer of COTTON TICS for
the American market. Correspondence solicit
ed. Highest references given. Address until
10th February, No. 49 Chambers at eeu Sew
York city. jauaum
Jfrtrrrt
SCHEDULE FOB JANUARY.
MONDAYS. TUESDAYS.
THURSDAYS AND FRIDAY'.
OUTW’D. | INWARD.
LEAVE ' AERTVE { LEAVE LEAVE
BAV.U>yAE SAVANKAB. ISLE OF HOPE MOVr& IHT,
4:40 p. a. j 8:38 a. m j 8:10 a m.| 7:3sTe
Monday morning train for Übntgomery otif
at 6:25 a. x
Wednesdays additional train will leave dtv
10:35 a m. Returning leave Montgomery 4:
r. m . Hie of Hope 5 A),
SATURDAYS AND SUNDAYS.
leave J AEBJVK LEA VC LXATI
SAVaVNAR SAVANNAS ISLE OF HOPE MO:rT6 BT.
10 25 a. a- 5:53 a. M. 8:10 a. M 7:35 c E
•*: I* M.; l-ao P. M 12:50 P. M. 12:15 F. E
b-fj P M 5:50 p. M p, x 445 p, M,
•Sundays this is the last outward train.
Saturday night last train 7:00 o’clock, instead
of 6: tO.
EDW. J. THOMAS,
jaol-tf Superintendent.
COAST LINE RA.ILKOAD OFFICE, 1
Savannah, October 80. 1890. i
ON and after MONDAY, November Ist, 3530,
tbe following suburban schedule will b
obeerveci:
leave J leave leave
SAVANNAH. 1 THUNDERBOLT. BONAVENTUSE
7Sa.m. r:00 a. m. 8:30 a e
10:35 a. H. , U:SO p. m. * In* p. U
8:85 p. 1L 4:50 p.m. S:00 p. E
6:35 P. M- j 7.-06 p. m. 7:15 p. U.
SUNBAY SCHEDULE.
Cars leave Bolton street at 6:30, 10:00 and
12:00 o'clock in tbe morning, and is the even
ing every half hour from 2:35 until 6:00 p. E
Last car leaves Thunderbolt at 7:05 rm.
FRANK T.amaß,
oct3otf Superintendent
—■————^■—
3lolfls.
TheHarsballfloai
WITH ITS
BPACTOUS VESTIBULE.
EXTENSIVE AND
Elegant Verandah.
Affording ladles a fine view of the promenade,
Airy and Well Ventilated Rooms
—AitJU
UNRIVALED TABLE
B FAB EXCELLENCE THE
Leading Hotel of Savannah
JOHN B RES NAN,
OOtlt-tf Manager-
CITY HOTEL,
OPPOSITE CAPITOL, TALLAHASSEE FLA.
WM. P. SLUSSER, Proprietor.
L BTEINFELD, late Hoffman House, New
York, Manager. janlt)-3t
ftnns.
BREECH LOADERS.
WE HAVE nr BTOCK A GOOD ASSORT
MENT OF
ENGLISH BREECH LOADERS. 840 to fOO-
W.IC. SCOTTS BREECH LOADERS, *75
$l5O.
BOYS’ SINGLE BREECH LOADERS.
BOYS’ SINGLE MUZZLE LOADERS.
150 assorted ENGLISH DOUBLE BARREL
QUNB.
We will take orders for either
COLTS OR PARKER GENS,
And furnish at manufacturers’ pricee.
W have a full assortment of HUNTING
COATS and SHOES, LEGGY'S and BAGS, for
sale at lowest prices.
PALMER BROS.,
14S AND 150 CONGRESS STREET,
SAVANNAH, .... GEORGIA#
deoe-am
“for saIST
FA H£ACflmd* FUI.KS
OU ble for Planters and Timber
men. Haying purchased the above T yy,
stock from first hands, we are
pared to sell on reasonable terrta Apply. l ®
MOR-AN A R:tilLF.
jMritf Ji§w itK**.
LAKttBHT IN THK SOUTH.

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