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Savannah morning news. [volume] (Savannah) 1868-1887, May 04, 1881, Image 2

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NO. 3 WHITAKER STREET,
(morning news butumno).
J. H. EMTiLL. Proprtnor.
W. T. THOMPSON, KMHor.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 1881.
The sentiment of the Pacific coast ap
pears to be most decidedly in favor of
the ratification of the Chinese treaty now
pending in the Senate. When the terms
of the treaty were first made public it
met with considerable criticism and some
condemnation from the Pacific coast
people. The recent influx of large num
bers of Chinese has apparently overcome
the opposition, and now the expressions
of opinion are very generally in behalf
of the adoption of the treaty. Two ves
sels landed last week at San Francisco
with nearly two thousand Chinese immi
grants on board. The discovery that
small-pox existed among the Chinese
caused considerable alarm and indigna
tion. Tne Washington Star says the in
dications are that this treaty will be con
sidered and ratified in the Senate this
week, as it is purposed to make it the
first executive business. The limitation
it puts upon Chinese immigration can
not be enforced, of course, until all the
forms of ratification and adoption shall
have been complied with.
The prospect of a repudiation split in
the Democratic party in Arkansas is ex
citing much rejoicing among Northern
Republicans, who are, as usual, quick to
urge a Republican alliance with the re
pudiators. They don’t call themselves
Readjusters in Arkansas, but they pro
pose to sail under the name of Indepen
dents, although repudiation is to be the
vital issue there as it is in Virginia and
Tennessee, where those who are working
for repudiation are getting active and ma
terial aid from the National Republican
party. In Missouri and Mississippi the
Republican party proposes to ally itself
with the rag baby, and wherever else it
is in the minority it readily gives a help
ing hand to those doctrines which its
Presidential platforms always most vio
lently condemn.
At the last Cabinet meeting the Mexi
can mission was under discussion, and
the various candidates, the present Min
ister, Morgan, General Hurlburt, of Illi
nois, “My Dear Pitkin,” of Louisiana,
General Fremont and J. F. Cahill, of St.
Louis, passed under review. It is stated
that, though no decisive action was
taken, the current of opinion was in fa
vor of sending to Mexico an active, eIS
cient man, thoroughly conversant with
the importance of establishing most in
timate commercial relations between the
United States and Mexico. Mr. Cahill's
qualifications for the post were com
mented on with much favor by the
Cabinet, and there is a strong impression
that he will be appointed. Gen. Fre
mont has arrived at the capital to look
after his interests.
The State Department has discovered
considerable fraud perpetrated under
cover of our naturalization laws. Here
is a sample: One Rojas, a Cuban, came
to this country some years ago, and, an
□ouncing his intention to become a citi
zen, took out his first naturalization
papers. He went back at once to Cuba
and lived there continuously for five
years. Returning to this country, he at
once qualified as an American citizen.
His Cuban estate having been confiscat
ed by the Spanish Government, he has
appeared before the Spanish Claims Com
mission and asked for damages as an
American citizen. Secretary Blaine
claims that he has a right to go behind
Rojas’ naturalization papers and show
that they were improperly and fraudu
lently obtained.
A Heavy Investment. —It is an
nounced that Mr. Sayre, of the Bethle
hem (Pa.) steel works, has made arrange
ments for the investment of $1,000,000
in new steel works at Birmingham, Ala.,
and will erect the necessary buildings
this summer. A few years ago the site
where Birmingham now stands was a
cotton field; now the place boasts a
population of 6,000, and has in success
ful operation iron furnaces, acres of
coking ovens, and extensive rolling mills,
whilst it. is rapidly becoming one of the
most important railroad centres in the
South.
An English steamship company has
recently been organized for the purpose
of running a fast line between New
York and Liverpool, the time not to ex
ceed seven days between those cities.
Five steamers are to be built, each with
accommodations for 400 cabin passen
gers. A high rate of speed will have to
be maintained, not always safe on the
North Atlantic, where there is danger
of collision with icebergs. Still people
do not mind those little risks in these
days when the world is in a hurry, and
there is no doubt that the new line will
be a success.
Vermont is the only State that has not
a single Chinaman. North Carolina and
Delaware have each one and Alabama
has four. The largest number in any
Southern State is 483, and Louisiana is
the State. Sugar growing has brought
them there. The other States and Ter
ritories in which they are most numerous
are: Pennsylvania, 170; Illinois, 214;
Utah, 518; Arizona, 632; New York,
942; Montana, 1,764; Idaho, 3,378; Ne
vada, 5,423; Oregon, 9,515, and Cali"
fornia, 75,122.
The New York Sun prints a “Roll of
Dishonor,” being the records of 178
army officers, who have been tried, con
victed and dismissed since 1867 for vari
ous offenses—67 for stealing, 70 for un
gentlemanly conduct, 30 for drunken
ness and the balance for various other
offenses. Of the 178 only 8 were gradu
ates from West Point, the other 171 be
ing appointed from civil life. One only
of the West Point graduates proved a
thief. .
Reports of grain at the seaboard show
a marked decrease during the past four
.months as compared with the corres
ponding period of last year. Official
figures are not at hand for a late com
parison of arrivals at Baltimore and New
York, but the decline has been impor
tant The severe winter is largely re
sponsible for the adverse showing at all
ports.
A large bed of kaolin of the best quali
ty has been discovered on the Richmond
and Danville Railroad, near Bon Air,
Virginia. Already the fire brick manu
facturers in Philadelphia have ordered
three vessel loads of two hundred tons
each of the newly-discovered kaolin.
Bills to exempt ships engaged in for
eign trade from State taxation are pend
ing in the Legislatures of New York and
Massachusetts, having passed one branch
in each State. Doubtless in both States
the exemption will be legalized. This is
p practical step toward free ships.
The Monroe Doctrine Again.
The telegraph, a day or two ago, gave
information that the Senate Committee
on Foreign Relations had taken up the
Monroe doctrine resolution of Senator
Morgan, of Alabama, which asserts that
the consent ot the United States Govern
ment is a condition precedent to the con
struction of any interoceanic ship canal
across the isthmus connecting North and
South America. The said committee
decided to refer the resolution to Senator
Burnside, as a sub committee, with in
structions to examine and report it back
to the full committee at an early day.
With all due regard to the opinions
of the Senator from Alabama, and all
others in favor of the United States in
voking the Monroe doctrine as a means
of preventing M. de Lesseps from con
structing his interoceanic canal, it seems
to us that such proceedings are not only
useless, but calculated to bring the gov
ernment into ridicule.
We have never yet been able to see
what possible application the Monroe
doctrine can have to this proposed inter
national work. That doctrine only de
clares in effect that no foreign monarchi
cal government should establish, or main
tain, any form of government on this
continent inimical to our own, and if
any attempt of that character were made,
it should be regarded as an act unfriend
ly to the United States. In other words,
that our republican government should
not be threatened by the establish
ment on this continent of any form of
government inimical to our system.
What possible connection cau this
have with M. de Lesseps’ plans? He does
not desire to establish any hostile system
of government on the isthmus, or do
anything which threatens the welfare or
integrity of the United States. He mere
ly wishes to construct a canal in the in
terests of the commerce of the world,
and be has invited citizens of the United
States, as he has citizens of all other
countries, to take stock in the work,
and give him their money so that he may
have the capital needed for its successful
completion. He, no doubt, would be very
glad if the United States Government, or
citizens of the country, would guarantee
him every dollar he desires, but since
the one cannot, and the'other will not,do
this, he calls for help wherever he can
get it. In all this there is nothing which
we can see to threaten the government,
nor is there anything political whatever
about the proposed scheme. It is noth
ing more nor less than constructing
a great work within the territory of the
United States of Colombia, for the bene
fit of international commerce, with for
eign capital. The United States of
America might as well object to any of
the Mexican, Central or South American
States borrowing money in Europe for
the construction of railways within their
territory, and the Mexican Govern
ment might, with equal propriety, ob
ject to the construction of the roads now
lieing built in Mexico with capital fur
nished by citizens of this country.
Under these circumstances, it is not
reasonable to expect that foreign na
tioDs will accept the theory that the
Monroe doctrine can intervene to enable
the United States Government to carry
out the dog-in the manger-policy of not
building this very important work
itself, and not allowing any one else to
build it. Indeed, it is not even to be ex
pected that the United States of Colom
bia, which wants the canal, will quietly
submit to what it may properly regard
as an undue interference with its rights
aud wishes. Suppose, then, that De
Lesseps,backed up by the European pow
ers, determines to continue the work,
what can the United States do? We can
not afford to go to war for our theories,
and if we did, we could not expect, with
our inefficient navy, to successfully cope
at sea with any one foreign nation, to
say nothing of an alliance against us
should one be formed. All we could do
would be merely to shout, frantically,
“Monroe Doctrine,” and protest, while
old De Lesseps ■would quietly go ahead,
regardless of either the shouts or the
protests, and carry his designs into exe
cution. Truly in this, history would re
peat itself, for it would be but carry
ing out, in this day and generation, the
policy of old Wouter von Twiller, of
Knickerbocker fame, who sat back and
smoked his pipe while he fought his ac
tive enemies with proclamations.
It seems to us that it would be far
more dignified for the United States
Government to drep the Monroe doctrine
theory in the isthmus canal scheme, and
do something which may prove practical
anil useful. It would be much better
for the government to encourage this
great international work,which promises
so much benefit to the world at large,
aud take steps both to secure the
neutrality of the canal, and to protect
our interests when it is completed, than
to be continually conjuring up visions of
imaginary dangers, which, if they
existed in reality, the government, in its
present condition, would be powerless to
avert.
The present season promises to be one
of unparalleled activity in railroad
building. AmoDg the most important
projects are the following extensions:
Of the Northern Pacific westward, of
the Union Pacific to the Pacific coast, of
the Denver and Rio Grande to Salt Lake
City and to the Rio Grande, of the Chi
cago, Burlington and Quincy to Denver,
of the Wabasli to Des Moines, of the In
ternational and Great Northern to La
redo, of the Texas and Pacific to El
Paso, and also to New Orleans, of the
Texas and St. Louis to Bird’s Point, of
the Toledo, Delphos and Burlington to
St. Louis, of the Lackawanna to Buffalo,
and of the St. Louis and San Francisco
to Dallas. “These,’’says the St. Louis
Railway Register, “are but a few of
the extensions which will probably
be completed before the expiration of
the year, and in addition there are nu
merous new roads, feeders to existing
lines and branch lines, which will be
built. There can be no serious doubt
but what the greater part if not all of
these new enterprises are made necessa
ry by the rapid growth of the whole
country. The great influx of immigra
tion, the increase in our manufacturing
and other industries have almost doubled
our national wealth, so that it is not sur
prising that there should be a corres
ponding development of railroad inter
ests. We think that all the proposed ex
tensions and new roads will probably be
successful. ”
Our able Atlanta contemporary flat
ters itself that we will fail to show that
the Railroad Commission law has injur
ed Georgia railroads. We flatter our
selves that we have shown it very con
clusively already by irrefragable proofs.
More than that, we have shown, by the
very law itself —which our contemporary
must admit to be primary evidence —
that the ipte dixit of the Commission is
final and irrevocable, and that, under
that law, the Commission can run the
railroads into bankruptcy, and the roads
are powerless to help themselves. There
fore, the injury which the Commission is
capable of doing the roads is simply
limitless.
Frye’s Slanders Refuted.
Mr. Frye, of Maine, in his bilious,
anti-Southern speech in the Benate a few
days ago, among other things, took oc
casion to say something about the lack
of education in the South, and the ob
stacles here thrown in the way
of the dissemination of proper
knowledge among the masses.
This charge he made, of course,
in utter ignorance of that of which he
was speaking, for your modern Radical
stalwart cares nothing for facts, all he
desires being, at any cost, to make
capital for his party. With him
literally the end justifies the
means, and he never, for a moment, al
lows such small matters as knowledge
and truth to stand in the way of the ac
complishment of his designs. True his
ignorance will be exposed and his mis
statements corrected, but that, in his
opinion, is a matter of no consequence.
He only wishes to influence his constit
uents, and as he is well aware that by
far the greater portion of said constitu
ents will see his statements, which he dis
tributes broadcast among them under the
Congressional frank—but will never see
the corrections and exposures which he
carefully suppresses —he goes on, as be
fore, repeating his stale slanders regard
less of honor or rectitude.
For these reasons it will make but
little difference to Mr. Frye that his mis
representation of the Southern people
by the assertions that they oppose popu
lar education, and that they do all they
can to prevent it, is effectively, though
unintentionally, answered by the report
of the proceedings of the Trustees in
charge of the distribution of the Peabody
fund in the South. In their last report
those gentlemen say:
“The good feeling and co-operation of
the very best part of the population ex
ceed all expectation. It would seem as
if the people were looking directly upon
the beaming countenance of our venera
ble friend, and were carried away with
gratitude and admiration. This cordiali
ty does not expend itself in complimen
tary speeches, but shows itself prac
tically and in a most sub
stantial way. Our advice is
most eagerly sought and our suggestions
most readily accepted. In the many in
terviews I have had with men who have
come to propose a different plan and to
suggest a different mode of action there
is scarcely an instance in which they
have not said in the end: ‘Well, your
plan is the best.’ It is hardly an exag
geration to say it meets with universal
approbation. All the teachers are ex
amined; all the houses are provided; all
failures from sickness, incapacity, want
of discipline, want of repairs, or
breaks from any other cause, are speedi
ly remedied. How could we provide
for these things where there is no school
system, no school authorities? We now
have all the machinery of the State, the
city, the village, for school matters at
our service, and they are the persons who
see that the people raise their part of the
money. The Mayor and Council, even
in small places with only two hundred
children, have generally done the work
for me with the people.”
The statements of these gentlemen
show the deep interest the Southern
people take in education, and how
gladly they avail themselves of the
assistance provided by that princely
philanthropist whom they represent.
If Frye & Cos. were susceptible to
shame, they would blush and apolo
gize for their slanders; instead of which
they will repeat them at the first* provo
cation. It is truly sui-l, “ I e stalwart
conscience is as ban: as : a stalwart
cheek.”
(gxrumons.
FOR BEAUFORT!
SUNDAY, MAY BTH.
FIRST visit of the season to Beaufort, offer
ing a splendid opportunity to pass in re
view of Fort Jackson. Fort Pulaski, Tybee
Island and Port Royal from the decks of the
fast and commodious Steamer EI.IZX IIAS
COX. Will leave wharf foot of Drayton street
SUNDAY, May Bth, at 10 o’clock a. m , arriving
at Beaufort at 2:20 p. m . and leav
ing Beaufort at 4 P. v , returning to Savan
nah atßp m. Fare (entire gran i excursion) 50c.
Special inducements offered to excursion par
ties to Beaufort and other points. For further
information, apply to LEVE & ALDEN’S
Tourist Office, corner Bull and Bryan streets.
H. A. CALLAN,
my3-st&Telti Agent.
INAUGURAL
EXCURSION TO TYBEE
THE ADULT BIBLE CLASS of the Savannah
Baptist Church will give their Fifth An
nual Excursion WEDNESDAY, May 4, AFTER
NOON, by steamer H. B. PLANT.
The steamer will leave wharf foot of Aber
corn street at 2 o’clock, and returning, reach
Savannah at 9 o’clock. Refreshments served
on the boat at reason bli prices. One-half
proceeds for benefit of the “Relief Society of
the Industrial Home.” Tickets for the round
trip 50c., half tickets 25c. Can be had at stores of
Ludden & Bates and A. M. ft C. W. West, of
members of the Committee, and at the boat.
Street care will be in waiting when excursion
returns. mv3-2t
Jtommtr ©Mite,
SUM! GOODS
Water Coolers.
Ice Cream Freezers.
Refrigerators.
Wire Dish Covers.
Peacock Fly Brushes.
Improved Fly Fans.
And the BRST Kerosene
Stove made,and so guaranteed.
—AT—
CROCKERY HOUSE
—OF—
JAS. S. SILVA,
140 BROUOHTON STREET.
have the BEST Patent Freezer for the
price in the world. Don’t fail to see them be
fore purchasing. ap2B-N&Teltf
Cigars.
The Last of the Assignment
—OF—
SEIDENBEKG’S
Key West Havana Cigars.
OPF.RA REIN A GOLFO $ 50
CABALLEROS GOLFO 7 50
S. SOLOMON,
my Am Atrent, Marshall House Block.
PusiraL
MUSICAL NOTICE.
pROF. C. 8. MALLETTE will begin his Sing
ing Class on WEDNESDAY, 4th inst., at 8
o’clock p. u. my2-4t
SUPERIOR ICE COLD
SODA WATER,
WITH ELEGANT FRUIT SYRUPS. AT
Q. M. Heldt & Co.’s Drug Store.
TRY THE EGG NOG SYRUP.
apl9-tf
Steel Barbed Wire Fencing.
SOLE Agents for WABBURN ft MOEN
MANUFACTURING COMPANY, owners
of patent. For sale by
WEED & CORNWELL.
mh24-tf
Unt good*.
B. F. MENU.
B argains
-FROM THE
AUCTION ROOMS!
ON MONDAY
WE WILL OFFER:
PA PIECES of COLORED LACE BUNTINGS
OU at 10c. per yard, fully as good as any
sold at 15c.
30 pieces of BLACK ALL WOOL BUNTINGS
at 15c., worth 25c.
A job lot of Real French All Wool COLORED
LACE BUNTINGS at 25c., usual price 60c.
A job lot of Colored All Wool PLAIN BUNT
INGS at 10c., worth 25c.
A job lot of BLACK ARABIAN GLACES, Silk
and Wool, at 25c., usual price 60c.
A job lot of FRENCH PIQUES at 25c , worth
from 40c. to 50c.
A job lot of DOME ->TIC PIQUES at 10c , worth
from 15c. to 20c.
A job lot of PRINTED PIQUES at 6J4c., usual
price B}^c.
A job lot of RAW SILK PIANO COVERS at
*6 00, worth $lO 00.
A 10b lot of EMBROIDERED CLOTH PIANO
COVERS at J 4 50, worth $7 00.
A job lot of EMBROIDERED CLOTH PIANO
COVERB at $6 50, worth $lO 00.
A job lot of Fine WHITE SCOTCH LAWNS, 36
inches wide, at 124 c., worth 20c. to 25c.
Job lots of HEMSTITCHED LINEN HAND
KERCHIEFS at lCc. and 12.40,
Job lots of CHILDREN’S FANCY HOSE at
lfc., 20c. and 25c.
A jo'o lot of HAMBURG EMBROIDERIES Trom
lc. to 15c. per yard.
300 pieces of TRIMMING LACES from 2c. to
25c. per yard.
PONCET’S BLACK SILKS, 24 inches wide, at
$2 25, usual price $3 00.
my2-N&Teltf
GREAT REDUCTIONS
-IN
DRESS GOODS!
BLACK and COLORED SILKS, WHITE
GOODS,
Embroideries, Laces,
CORSETS, PARASOLS, Ladies’ and Chil
dren’s UNDERWEAR. ROBES, BUI'S,
CAPS, BIBS, TIES, and a great many other
articles too numerous to mention. A reduction
which which will astonish all of those who will
favor us with a call. Be convinced at
JACOB COHEN S
152 BROUGHTON STREET.
mh3l-tf
JnM, (gif.
am
LEMONS.
LEMONS.
LEMONS.
LEMONS.
HEADQUARTERS IS USUAL.
ITALIAN FLAG PEANUTS.
ITALIAN FLAG PEANUTS.
ITALIAN FLAG PEANUTS.
Peannt Dealers Everywhere Use No
Other Brand of H. P. Peanuts.
LIME JUICE,
LIME JUICE,
IS AGOOD SUMMER DRINK
DRY VERZENAY.
DRY VERZENAY.
DRY VERZENAY.
DkVENOGE’S DRY VERZENAY CHAM
PAGNE is the purest and best Champagne sold
in this country. I import it direct and guaran
tee it.
FLORIDA ORANGES.
FLORIDA ORANGES.
FLORIDA ORANGES.
RED BANANAS.
COCO AN UTS.
DES-IC AT ED COCOANUT .
FANCY GROCERIES.
J. B. REEDY,
Grocer and Importer, corner Bay and Whita
ker. my2-tf
Harvard University,
Cambridge, Mail,
ALL DEPARTMENTS OPEN WITHOUT EX
AMINATION TO STUDENTS NOT CAN
DIDATES FOR A DEGREE.
ANY person may enter Harvard College
without examination as an unmatricuia
ted student, or the School of Divinity, Law,
Medicine, Dentistry, Bcience or Agriculture as
a special student. AU courses of instruction
which they are competent to pursue are open
to such students, and certificates of proficiency
are given on the studies which they pursue
satisfactorily. The fees vary with the amount
of instruction received, but are in no case less
than S3O or more than $l5O a year.
Graduates of other colleges are admitted to
the professional schools without examination,
as candidates for a degree, and graduates with
high rank may be admitted to the Senior Class
at Harvard College without examination.
Women are admitted only to the summer
courses of instruction in science and to Uni
versity Lectures. The next Academic year be
gins September 29,1881. For lists of the courses
of instruction and for further information ad
dress F. W. TAUBBIG, Secretary.
apll-MAW4w&thenTu,Th&S6w
ice.
KNICKERBOCKER ICE CO.
DEPOT 144 BAY STREET.
ICE furnished for all purposes and in any
quantity from a car load to a daily family
supply.
This is the only company bringing Kennebec
Ice to this market.
Orders by Mail, Telephone or Telegraph
promptly attended to. ap2B-5m
BOOD NEWS.
“Mohawk” Pure Rye Whisky
THE Cream of Old Whiskies, distilled from
Rye and Barley Malt by the old-fashioned
fire copper process, entirely free from fusil oil
or any matter deleterious to health. In the
manufacture of it nothing but the very best
selected grain is used, and every care taken to
preserve the quality, taste and flavor so highly
appreciated by all lovers of a good stimulant.
Recommended by the medical faculty for the
use of Invalids. Warranted to give satisfac
tion. A trial will convince the most skeptical,
and only $3 00. D. B. LESTER,
Sole Agent, 21 Whitaker St., Savannah, Qa.
apl3-W.F,Mftwtf
fcommisstou
JAsTwTsCHLEY & CO ,
172 bay STREET, SAVANNAH QA.,
General Comm’a Merchants,
OFFER:
1 O AAA BUBHELB Choice WHITE CORN.
IdjUUU 860 bales Prime Timothy HAY.
300 bales Prime Western HAY.
8,000 bushels CORN.
4.000 bushels OATS.
40,000 pounds WHEAT BRAN.
12,000 pounds DRY SALT BIDES.
80.000 pounds SMOKED SIDES.
Also, meal. GRITS, FLOUR, CRACKED
CORN and CORN EYES. apBS-tf
I §ry
Exceptional Lines ai Prices
TO WHICH I WOULD CALL SPECIAL ATTENTION THIS WEEK:
LINENS AND HOUSEHOLD GOODS
TABLE DAMASK.
HEAVY TABLE LINEN, lSc.yard.
Extra Heaw TABLE LINEN. 25c„ 31c. and 374 c. yard.
Extra quality BLEACHED DAMASK, 50c yard.
Extra quality BLEACHED SATIN DAMASK at 75c. and $1 00 yard.
Ertra quality BARNSLEY DAMASK, over two yards wide, at $1 75. No better goods sold
for $2 25
JLiUNTJESIST TOWELS.
100 dozen Extra Heavy HUCK TOWELS, all Linen, 31 10 dozen.
100 dozen Extra Heavy HUCK TOWELS, all Linen, size 40 inches long, 22 inches wide, at 15c.
each.
100 dozen Heavy HUCK TOWELS, all Linen, 44 inches long, 24 inches wide, at 20c. each.
75 dozen Heavy DAMASK TOWELS, 45 inches loDg, 24 incheswide, at 20c. each.
Also, a full line GERMAN SATIN DAMASK TOWELS from $4 to $24 per dozen.
SILK EMB- OIDERED CLOTH PIANO COVERS, 3 yards long, $4.
SILK EMBROIDERED TABLE COVERS, $1 50 each.
CROCHET BED SPREADS. 60c. each.
12 4 HONEYCOMB QUILTS, 75c.. worth sl.
12-4 Marseilles quilt s, $1 so, worth $2.
Also a full line of better grades at lowest { rices.
NOTTINGHAM CURTAIN LACE, all prices from 124 c. to $1 per yard.
300 DOZEN
Ladies’ Regular Made Silk Clocked BAT.BRIGGAN HOSE at 25c. a pair, value for 35c. pair.
100 dozen Gents’ French Finish HALF HOSE at $3 a dozen, worth at least $4.
A full line Misses' and Children’s HOSE at the lowest possible prices.
KTBW MATTING!
Just received 30:) pieces CANTON MATTING, in Plain, White, Red Check and Fancy Color
ings, price ranging from 134 c. to 60c. yard.
SPECIAL NOTICE.
Again I would call the attention of parents to my stock of BOYS’ and YOUTHS' SUITS,
sizes from 4to 15 years, and prices from slls to §lO. No such opportunity has been hereto
fore offered to the people of Savannah to buy these goods at fair prices.
In MOURNING GOODS from the lowest to the finest grades, as well as in SILKB and SATINS
of every description. I unhesitatingly say that purchasers will find a larger and more select
stock at lower prices than they have thus far seen in this city. All I ask is an examination of
the goods. Samples sent on application.
DANIELHOGAN.
ap2s-M,Tu,W&Thtf
A REVOLUTION IN PRICES!
NOT HAVING SUFFICIENT ROOM ON OUR GROUND FLOOR FOR OUR INCREASING
TRADE, WE OFFER THE FOLLOWING BARGAINS, W T HICH ARE DISPLAYED
ON OUR. SECOND FLOOR !
We are determined to offer such inducements to the public that they will find it worth their
while not to mind the one flight of stairs. Young ladies will be in charge of that department.
NOTE WHAT WE OFFER ON OUR SECOND FLOOR AND THE PRICES:
ONE CENT
Will buy each of the following articles: A paper Between Needles, a Thimble, two dozen of the
best quality silvered or black Hooks and Eyes, a 2-yard long Corset Lace, a cake of Fancy Soap,
a paper of Hair Pins, a cambric-lined Shirt Front, a Spool of Cotton and many other articles.
TWO CENTS
Will buy half dozen 14-yard long Linen Shoe Laces,a cake of real nice Soap, Linen Torchon Edg
ings. Imitation Torchon Lace, Real Everlasting Trimmings, Valenciennes and other Lace Edgings
and Insertions, a rubber tipped polished Lead Pencil, a roll of medium width twilled Tape, a card
containing one dozen Napkin Pins, fancy bordered Handkerchiefs, an Ivory Fine Tooth Comb, a
Japanese Fan, etc.
THREE CENTS
Will buy a package of 25 good Envelopes, 12 sheets of good Commercial Note Paper, a variety
of excellent Laces and Embroideries, a Linen Shirt Front, lined, a half pound Cake Castile Soap, a
card (12 dozen) Shirt Buttons, a paper Pins, a pair Rubber Bracelets, a gents’ bordered Cambric
Handkerchief, a black polished Fan, a Fan Holder, Doylies, etc,
FOUR CENTS.
1,000 yards Calico at 4c., a real nice Gents’ Cambric Handkerchief, a Pocket Book, a Leather
Wallet, Embroideries, Laces. Ladies’ Linen Collars, a 3-yard long Linen Corset Lace, a Turkey
Red Handkerchief, a yard of Garter Elastic, Ribbons, a paper of 25 steel pointed English Hair
Pins, a bunch of Alpaca Braid and a multitude of other articles.
FIVE CENTS
Will buy a 10c. cake of Sweet Soap, a pair of 10c. Fancy or Bleached Children’s Hose, a pair of
Men’s Fancy Half Hose, worth 15c.; Bleached and Unbleached Ladies’ Hose, a Round, Fine or
Dressing Comb, any quantity of Laces and Embroideries, 24 sheets of good Note Paper, Ladies'
Embroidered Collars, an all linen Handkerchief, 6 dozen Dress Buttons, Ribbons, a Cloth Fan,
Tidies, Earrings, etc.
SIX CENTS
Will buy an all Linen, 34-inch long Towel, an all Silk Windsor Ladies’ Tie, a beautiful Round
Comb, a heavy Dressing C>mb, a good Pocket Book, usually sold at 25c.; a yard of best quality
Garter Web, a paper English Pins, Ribbons, 20 styles of Dress Buttons, worth 20c. to 25c. per
dozen, a bottle good Cologne, and many other articles.
SEVEN CENTS
Will buy some very beautiful Laces and Embroideries, a fluted Lawn Apron, a pair of Misses’
Fancy Hose, size 74, 8 and 84; Ribbous, a Gents’ large size Turkey Red Handkerchief, a box
Lily White, and other articles.
EIGHT CENTS
Will buy an embroidered Gents’ Shirt Front, a pair of nice Bracelets, a linen Hemstitched
Handkerchief, Embroideries, Laces, Combs, Hair Brush, and so forth, worth two, three and
four times their price.
NINE CENTS
Will buy a Ladies’ fine Linen Handkerchief, a Linen Torchon Collar, Lace Bibs, Earrings, Brace
lets, Breastpins, Silk Handkerchiefs, each and every article a bargain.
TEN CENTS
Will buy an excellent pair of plain or embroidered Cuffs, worth 25c. and 35c.: fine embroidered
Mull Ties, never sold before for less than 25c.; a 42-inch all Linen Towel, worth 20c.: a large size,
all Linen Napkin, a pair of Ladies’ Thread Gloves, a Too'h Brush worth 25c., a bottle of German
Cologne worth 25c , Misses’ Silk Embroidered Solid Color Hose, Embroideries, Laces, Ribbons,
etc., every article a special bargain.
R JES M E M BER!
All we ask is an examination of these goods, and if we find that Ladies will not mind the
trouble of a flight of stairs, we promise them to make it an institution, and we will add daily
some of the MOST MARVELOUS BARGAINS to this department. In fact, we intend to make it
.A. NOAH’S ARK!
As usual, our store is brimful of live bargains. We have new attractions daily. We will men
tion a few
5,000 pieces CALICO, in short length, running from 10 to 20 yards each, at 54c. per yard. We
warrant these Calicoes to be of the very best make. In fact, the same as sold at 84c.
We will not cut them. We sell them only by the piece.
100 all Linen Ladies’ ULSTERS, slightly soiled by machine oil, at 75c. each. These goods are
worth from §2 to $3 50.
500 all Linen Ladies’ ULSTERS, perfect in every way, from $1 up.. These goods must be seen to
be appreciated. They are the nicest goods ever brought to this market.
500 yards BLACK SILK, at 39c. This Silk is worth 75c., and nothing less.
2,(100 yards WORSTED DRESS GOODS, former price 2'c. reduced to 164 c.
1,000 yards BLACK ALL WOOL BUNTINGS, down to 164 c.
50 dozen HEMSTITCHED MOURNING HANDKERCHIEFS, splendid bargains.
250 dozen TURKEY RED DOYLIES, at 42c.. 50c. and 60c. per dozen.
500 dozen DAMABK TOWELS, the best and cheapest ever offered.
BARGAINS IN EVERY BINE AT
DAVID WEISBEIN’S.
ap2s-N&Teltf
JHamoni jtyertarUiL
lanioiHl iSpectacles aiKl Eye Glasses.
THEY are PERFECTLY COLORLESS, do not polarize light, have no PRISMATIC COLORS or
scattered rays, common to pebbies and other lenses in use. ___
The CORE or CENTRE of the lenses come DIRECTLY in front of the eye and never TIRE
the eye, but prevents the heated rays from entering; thereby producing a CLEAR and DIS
TINCT VISION as in the natural healthy sight. , ,
They are mounted in all styles, GOLD, SILVER, STEEL, RUBBER and SHELL FRAMES of
the BEST QUALITY. , w
If you try them you will use no other. For sale only by
Samuel L\ Hamilton,
SOLE AGENT FOR SAVANNAH,
mhl g. t f CORNER BULL AND BROUGHTON BTREETB.
(glgttanfl,
THANTK.S.
It is conceded by everybody who has seen my new stock of SPRING
and SUMMER CLOTHING this season that my effort to produce the best
garments for the least money is as near perfection as it can be got at, and
my thanks are due to my many customers and friends for their apprecia
tion of my endeavors, by their extensive patronage extended me so far
this season. All those who have not visited my store yet are invited to do
so, and I promise to show them the nobbiest, neatest and best made Cloth
ing in the city at prices to induce eveD those to buy who are not in need of
them. Men’s, Boys’ and Children's CLOTHING, HATS, SHIRTS, UN
DERWEAR, NECKWEAR, etc., in large variety. Call early, and if you
don’t buy it will not be my fault.
SIIWON MITCHELL,
ap23 tf 24 Whitaker Street (Lyons’ Block).
Jtociftg.
THE 1 a IS T
Anniversary of the Union Society
WILL BE CELEBRATED AT. BETHESDA
THURSDAY, MAY STH, 1881.
I f=| Ml w g V 111 IST 1 jfe
1 US'till
THE ANKUAL ADDRESS WILL BE DELIVERED BY
REV. ROBERT J\ KERR,
PASTOR OF THE INDEPENDENT PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.
The members of the Bociety are respectfully requested to attend and bring their families and
friends, and citizens generally are cordially invited to be present.
The address will be delivered at 2 o’clock p. M.
Members will please come prepared to pay dues.
Fare for round trip 50 cents; children 25 cents. To be procured from the Committee on Sale
of Tickets, at Hamilton’s jewelry store Solomons’ drug store, Butler’s drug store, Fernandez’
cigar store, Bren’s ticket agency, Wm. Estill’s news depot, and at the s., S. & 8. R. R. ticket
office.
ap25.26£my2,3,4*5
S. f S. cfc IS. 3FL. R.
SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE, May 4 lEBI.
THE following SPECIAL SCHEDULE, to supersede all others, will be run on the sth
INST.:
LEAVE ARRIVE LEAVE ARRIVE ARRIVE
SAVANNAH. ISLE OF HOPE. ISLE OF HOPE. BETHESDA. MONTGOMERY.
9:25 A M. 10:00 A. M. 10:10 A.~M
10:25 A. M. 10:55 A. M. 11:00 A. M. 11:30 A. M. 11:30 A. M.
1:30 P.M. 2:05 P.M. 2:15 P.M.
3:00 P. M. 3:30 P. M. 3:35 P. M. 3:55 P. M. 4:05 P. M.
6:00 P. M. 6:45 P. M.
7:50 P. M, !
LEAVE LEAVE ARRIVE LEAVE ARRIVE
MONTGOMERY. BETHESDA. ISLE OF HOPE. ISLE OF HOPE. SAVANNAH.
7:35 A. M. 8:05 A. M. 8:10 A. M. 8:88 A. M.
10:25 A. M. 10:35 A, M. 11:10 A. M.
12:15 P. 'M. 12:25 P. M. 12:45 P. M. • 12:50 P. M. 1:20 P. M.
4:40 P. M. 5:00 P. M. 5:38 P. M.
5:50 P. M. 6:10 P. M. 6:50 P. M
6:50 P. M. 7:00 P. M. 7:20 P, M. 7:25 P, M. 7:55 P. M.
Passengers from Savannah to Isle of Hopet ke trains leaving city 10:25 A. M„ 8:00 or 7:50 P.M.
Passengers from Bethesda to Isle of Hope take trains leaving Bethesda 12:25 or 7:00 P. M.
my4-2t EDW. J. THOMaS, Hup’t,
ietmrg, &t.
CITIZENS AID STRAtt!
ARE RESPECTFULLY INVITED TO INSPECT ONE OF THE HANDSOMEST BTOCKS OF
JEWELRY, DIAMONDS & WATCHES :
Ever brought under the roof of one establishment in the Southern States. Owing to the ex
pected large demand during our Masonic Fair, I have make extra exertions to be
able to please all legitimate demands We are proud to say that we
nave established the well earned reputation of being
—STEICTLY RELIABLE IEEE
And it is our earnest endeavor not to forfeit it. Everything we sell, from the humblest piece
of Jewelry to the finest Diamond, we guarantee to be exactly as we represent it,
and as we have always worked upon the principle of
SMAIiIi PROFITS,
Each and every one who will patronize us will receive undoubted and full value. In truth, we
treat the inexperienced purchaser as honorably as we would sell to the best of
judges. Those wishing good and reliable goods, and are willing to pay
VALUE AND NOT FANCY PRICES!
Are respectfully invited to call at the Jewelry House of
M. STERNBERG,
ap26-tf NO. 24 BARNARD STREET.
A. L. DESBOUILLONS,
JEWELER AND DEALER IN
Waltham and Elgin Watches,
FINE GOLD JEWELRY, DIAMONDS,
AGENT FOR THE PIONEER WATCH.
STERLING SILVERWARE. Vg/ TRIPLE-PLATED WARE.
FRENCH AND AMERICAN CLOCKS. GOLD-HEADED CANES.
STAR SPECTACLES, OPERA MANUFACTURER OF FLORIDA
GLASSES. JEWELRY.
21 BULL STREET, OPPOSITE SCREVEN HOUSE.
nov3-W,F*Mtf
gaby damans.
SUCCESS! STILL ANOTHER SUCCESS!
Plats M’s Nm Variety Store,
138 Brougliton Street,
THE REMARKABLE LOW PRICES, EXTENSIVE VARIETY, COMBINED WITH THE SUPE
RIOR QUALITY OF CUR STOCK OF
Itm CIMMS!
Has caused a rapid sale of the same. We have sold more Baby Carriages since April 25th than
all other dealers in Savannah combined.
OUR RECORDS WILL PROVE THIS!
And we respectfully invite the public to examine our stock before purchasing.
Picnic Hats, Picnic Hats, Picnic Hats.
my3-tf The largest assortment at the LOWEST PRICES.
ITfotiS ad Cordials.
W. M. DAVIDSON,
158 BRYAN STREET,
Has just received in store, in addition to his large and well selected stock of FOREIGN BRAN
DIES, SHERRIES and PORTS, the following, which he will sell at bottom prices:
CHAMPAGNES.
50 baskets PIPER-HEIDSICK, Pints and Quarts.
25 cases MUMM’S “EXTRA DRY,” Pints.
25 cases MUMM’S DRY VERZENAY, Quarts.
25 cases THEO. ROEDERERB & CO., Pints and Quarts.
5 cases BOUCHE FILS & CO.’S EXTRA DRY.
CIiARETS.
25 cases ST. ESTEPHE, Pints and Quarts.
50 cases ST. JULIEN, Pints and Quarts.
25 cases MARGAUX, Pints and Quarts.
25 cases LA ROSE, Pints and Quarts.
25 cases CHAT BOELLIAC, Pints and Quarts.
25 cases PONTET CANET, Pints and Quarts.
OORDIAIiS.
5 cases MARASCHINO.
5 cases CHARTREUSE, Yellow and Green.
5 cases CURACOA, Jugs and Bottles.
10 cases ABSYNTHE, 5 cases BENEDICTINE,
10 cases KERSCHEN WASSER.
15 cases VERMOUTH, 5 cases CARMELITE.
LIME JUICE in Pints and Magnums, just the thing for Picnics. BLACKBER
RY CORDIAL, very fine, by the case or gallon. ap29-3t
Sfattrfl.
Ipllll&piliws
Lit *rty street. Jll * at N 0 ]*g
WANTEDTTsT^i^'br.r — —
WANTED. 7, -
j 52 ’without encambra .--' * 0
street, second door w^ t
*7,001i $
-■ V.-fflyjt
WAV'.EI, to noiV:7^; r ;7 —1
J,,! . P alr Crutches for hi'ch 1,1“.
Hull street. A w'y r * J
YI/'ANTe.D, a first-,Mass c r
posite the Screven F n^", u <£
V^soff Southern Scenery." qUarter Joj
- Wll.v,*
WANTED, Pianos and 0rgan77777
repair. Rates reasonable
instruments. T. B TurnerioV*
between Bull and Whitaker 7s" 1
tszsss. ' m ““ b fta'ss
• mvt.tr
&
x,. Jre “ " it ' nc ' L ,
■ rnyicf
F OR SALF - LOT “7771777^1^7
and New Hou ton streets.
my 2 tf ~ „ _
- - i’ £. bacon
UX)R SALE. EXHIBITION HAU
-T Bazar and Fair. This bui 7n- tS " '
about 75.000 feet rough lu°“w -
planed flooring, and 1.55 emu-" r -et
felt. Written proposals fol i|,e r .nr-v ' fin J
the whoie or any part wi 1
to refu e anv or ail bids res -rv,-1 1-; ' ht
to be handed to li ?r °Poli
ap26-tf SAMUEL P. HAMILTON
_apa>-tr Chairman Commits
QYPRESs SHINGLES and B* aBDc
For sale by
mh3B-tf J< A CON * Hi: Oogs
mhai-N&Teltf 141 Brou.-hj-,.
E°? E > a few choice ti-o-..u>h • 777
Applyto f bre6lt S ° UU ' doWn bL' K LAMBi
my2-M.W*F3t JOSEp H H. BIKER
F°L SA^ E ’- CIIEAP ’ °tary 7771777
U Sfcx.-fc; in perfect order. w;th new m
tenal complete. W„ Box 245 P o ma
apl9-W*Stf ’ ’
tB TYNAN,COrner Br^f^S
■pVDR SALE, the following stereotype >77
A ratus: 1 Steam Drying Pres*, <i>7, \‘
Platen 18x24; 1 Iron Beating Tab, y V '
Iron Casting Mould (Hoe's No. fi), to ca--
Ifaß-igs^zsf.gr
JpOR REST, Furnished Room : ,
ap22-F,MAW6t Sourh Broad g*reet.
S|SABLE BOARD $6 per week at the
rayi St HARNETT BOUSE
Xost.
LOST, at Thunderbolt Ten Pm Alley, on Fri
day, 29th inst., a Gold Locket, geometrical
l,ne on one side and rai-ed sea shell on the
other. A suitable reward will be paid for ita
return to this office. m j2 3t
lailroaas.
SCHEDULE.
8., S &B.R.R. Cos , i
BnKRI.VTENnENT'S OFFICE t
ON and after FRIDAY’, April 29ch, the fol
lowing Spring Schedule will be observed:
OUTWARD.
LKAV>. ARRIVE ISLE | LEAVE ISLE I AJtRm~
SAVANNAH. OF HOPE. OF HOPE. MONTO EHI,
10:25 A. u. 10:f sa. m 11:00 a. v 11:30 t. *.
*3:25 p. m. 3:55 P. m 4:(0 p. h 4:30 p. a.
7:25 p. m. | 7:55 p, m b:00 p. m j 8::30 p. m.
INWARD.
LEAVE ! ARRIVE ISLE | LEAVE ISLE ARRIVE
MONTa’RV OF HOPE. OF HOPE. SAVA.VS.4B.
7:35 a. m 8:05 a. m. 8:10 a. m. ; S:3S aa.
12:15 p. M 12:45 p. m. | 12:50 P. k. 1:20 p. m.
5:35 p, < \ 6-05 p, m. I 6:10 p. m.| 6:38 P. M.
•Suiidays this is the last departing train.
Monday morning an early train will leave
city f r Montgomery onlp at 6:25 a. m.
Saturday nights last train leaves Savannah
at 7:40 instead of 7:25.
EDW. J. THOMAS.
ap29-tf Superintendent.
COAST LINE RAILROAD OFFICE, i
Savannah, October 30,1880. I
ON and after MONDAY, November Ist, 1880,
the following suburban schedule will be
observed:
LEAVE LEAVE LEAVE
SAVANNAH. THUNDERBOLT. BONA VESTURE.
7:00 a. h. 8:00 a. h. 8:10 a.m.
10:35 a. m. 12:60 p. m. 1:00 p. m.
3:35 p. m. 4:50 p. m. 5:00 p. K.
6:35 p, m. | 7:05 p, m, 7:15 p. m.
SUNDAY SCHEDULE.
Cars leave Bolton street at 7:00, 10:00 and
12:00 o’clock in the morning, and m the even
ing every half hour from 2:35 ur.til 6:00 P. k
Last car leaves Thunderbolt at 7:05 p. m.
FRANK LAMAB,
octSO-tf Superintendent
Stores.
Cootim Stoves.
Cooling Slues.
Cooking Slows.
COOKING STOVES.
COOKING STOVES.
COOKING STOVES
LARGE STOCK, LOW PRICES.
CORMACK HOPKINS,
ap’9-tf 167 BROUGHTON PTRE^
gtjKcc f rltrdulr,
fylee Ferry & fSB
THE NEW IRON SALOON STEAMER
H. B. PLANT
foot of Abercorn street: .
Sunday s-From Tybee, 7a. m., U*■ • „
Sundays—From eity, 10 a. m and l *.;"J Fr oin
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays
Tybee, 7 a. m. : from city, 6 p. m Fro m
Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays * „
Tybee, 7 A. m. and 4 p.m.; fromcitj.l
Tuesdays, Thursdays a
will meet every
bridge and wharf having been repairs
put in perfectly safe condition. at this
y Tramway tickets must be bough
office. Allfreight prepaid on wha'f. . ut9 s
B-No freight received after 15
to time of Bteamer’a^artu^B^Tsc^^
ap39-tfATellt

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