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Savannah morning news. [volume] (Savannah) 1868-1887, August 31, 1881, Image 2

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MORNING XgW3 BUILDING
=====^^=^^VtfcTp*’
H-.i.THOnP^r Mlt0 r.
The Fnnd for Mrs. Garfield.
This fund now amounts to $156,75? 65,
and the promoters of the movement
seem to be confident that it can readily
be increased to $250,000 if the President
should not recover. Certificates for
$125,000 in government bonds, worth
$145,261 25, have already been placed in
the hands of Mrs. Garfield. New York
heads the list with $113,274 60, Philadel
phia comes next with $12,284 25, and
Chicago follows with $11,500. °i> ****■
urday last Messrs. DrexelA t>o.,of 1 hil
adelphia, notified Mr. f yrus VV. Field
that in fhe event of the President’s death
they proposed to receive in that city sub
scriptions to the fund for Mrs. Garfield’s
benefit, heading the list with $5,000, and
inquiring whether Mr. Field approved
the plan, in reply to which he telegraph
ed his approval.
A gentleman connected with the fund
states that trust certificates for the $125,-
000 invested in United States bonds are
held by the United States Trust Com
pany. The income from the bonds is to
be paid to Mrs. Garfield during her life,
and at her death the principal to be di
vided among her children. If Mrs. Gar
field should refuse the income it would
go back and bcc .me part of the fund.
The trust cannot possibly be broken, so
that there is no possibility of its not be
ing finally devoted to its purpose. The
gentleman who makes this statement
also says that he knows that the Presi
dent has been fully informed in regard
to the trust, and that he has been greatly
comforted by it. The total amount of
subscriptions not invested is $32,000.
Grain Exported to Germany.—
Consul Grinnell, of Bremen, reports,
under date of August 6. 1881, to the De
partment of State at Washington that
the importation of Indian corn into Ger
many during the six months ended July
1, 1881, amounted to 1,200,000 bushels,
and that the latter half of the year will
show a much larger importation of this
excellent staple of food, which, when
better known in the country, will in
crease to an indefinite extent. There
have been but few shipments of wheat
and rye this year. The American flour,
which i3 prepared in a better manner and
at a cheaper rate than perhaps that of
any other country, has been interdicted
by a duty of 25 cents per 100 pounds
This tax was established by the Reich
stag at its last session. The duties on
Indian corn, buckwheat and barley art
six cents per 100 pounds, and twelve
cents per hundred weight for wheat, rye
and oats.
TnE Plot s Assassin in liis Cell. —
A Washington special says: “The gate
and rear window of Guiteau’s cell are in
full view of guards in the rotunda. The
only furniture in the cell is the cot,
which serves as bed and seat, and on the
sill of the window he keeps his Bible
and a few religious books, spending,
however, most of his time reading the
former. Since his exploit with the
guard McGill, about a week ago, it has
been ascertained that at that time he was
much excited, it is believed, because he
had by some means become impressed
with the belief that some parties intend
ed to attack the jail for the purpose of
killing him. Since then he has become
more composed in mind, and the guard*
seldom have occasion to speak to him,
for when not reading his Bible he is
writing.”
Exit Sessions. —The Republicans of
the thirty second Senatorial district of
New York have done a creditable thing
in relegating to private life State Senator
Loren B. Sessions. He was a candidate
for renomination. but the convention on
Friday last, after many ballots, conferred
the nomination on Norman M. Allen,
who, like Sessions, is a strong anti*
Conkling man. It will be remembered
that Senator Sessions was charged with
an attempt to bribe Representative Brad
ley during the late Senatoral contest
at Albany, and whilst he denied that
charge on examination he told how he
had acted as a lobbyist and paid large
sums for the passage of certain bills.
Such a man is a discredit to anv legis
lative body, and for the sake of decency
it is to be hoped Sessions has now re
ceived his final political quietus.
The following piece of information is
from the London Tim*, it says: “Some
time ago an Austrian chemist is said to
have devised anew soporific, the action
of which is so rapid and powerful that
a few drops cf it sprinkled on the head
and face will effectually stupefy a man
in a few seconds, and render him utterly
defenseless. He gave it the name of
‘baendiger,’ or tamer, and offered the se
cret to the Austrian Government. But
the Austrian Government has not only
refused to purchase it, but has ordered
the police authorities to formally notify
the inventor to discontinue his experi
ments, and to abstain utterly from using
his invention in any way, or to commu
nicate it to others, under pain of being
criminally dealt with.”
Senator Butler, of South Carolina, has
a proper conception of journalism. In
a recent letter to a local paper he says:
“Journalism has become as much a
separate and distinct profession as medi
cine, or law, or engineering, or agricul
ture, or architecture, or mining,
and every family should have a
newspaper if they expect or care
to keep pace with the current of events
in this fast moving age. Books are not
always accessible, but newspapers are,
and at a price that places it within the
reach of the poor as well as the rich.”
Members Fixed.— There was much
amusement on the New York ’Change
Thursday at the fining of over a hun
dred members, who, on the striking of
the bell at2:lsp. m., had not left the
floor as the rule* require. The mem
bers have become somewhat dilatory of
late, and, to teach them a lesson, the
doors were closed upon over one hun
dred tardy ones, who will be fined fifty
cents each.
The New York Times gives fitting ex
pression to a general sentiment when it
says that “nothing has ever touched the
heart of this nation with such an exalt
ing influence as the tender solicitude of
the strong man stricken down for the
wife to wi "- - the blow would be severer
than to him, and the heroic fortitude
and devotion with which this ‘gentlest
of gentle womankind’ bore the shock
and addressed herself to the duties it
brought.”
Chang Tsao Ju, customs inteodant at
Tien Tsin, has been appointed to super
sede Chin Lan Pm, the present Minister
to the United States. On the third inst.
a Prince** wes born to the Mikado.
A Proposed reace Congress.
A correspondent of the Washington
Evening Star urges the holding of a
World's Peace Congress iu Washington
city in 1884. The writer says: “The
National Arbitration League of Wash
ington, D. C., desire to make an appeal
to the friends of humanity everywhere
for moral support in their great under
taking, which has for its aim the peace
on earth and good will to men so long
prayed for. The movement has been
organized for many months. Its object
is the settlement of all international dis
putes by arbitration, to be brought
about by agitation in every na
tion, but especially by a world’s
conference at Washington in 1884,
when, from all parts of the earth, great
numbers will be in attendance at the con
templatcd Boston World’s Fair. This
seems to be a time when a movement of
this kind could become practicable.
Many travelers over the earth agree that
there are in all civilized countries per
sons of influence who have means, know
the English language, and would be glad
of the honor to come as representatives
to a convention of this magnitude. This
assembly, after mature deliberation on
man’s moral and social relations, would
probably conclude to issue an
address to the world, advising,
among other things, the organization
of a family of nations to so educate
the people on a peace footing that
it wouid be practicable by the dawn of
the twentieth century to disband armies
and navies all over the earth. The re
cent desire of some of the countries in
South America for arbitration from the
United States, after lieing desolated by
war, makes this undertaking at this time
a very important one. Many of the
clergy express a desire of preaching on
the good time coming when sword and
cannon can be used for wire and rail.
It is hoped that arbitration leagues will
be commenced in every county in the
United States, as well as in all the other
countries, so that it will be very un
popular for those in power to expend so
many millions for war, when education
is everywhere so much demanded.”
Why the Germans Emigrate to
America.
The tide of emigration from Germany
continues to attract a large share of at
tention. The Handeteblatt, of Hamburg,
after informing its readers that the num
ber of immigrants landed in the United
States in 1878 was 153,207, in 1879
250,565, and in 1880 586,068, goes on to
calculate that each individual brings in
his labor a capital of $1,200, and that the
total value of the labor thus conveyed to
the United States during the last five
years has been about $700,000,000. “No
wonder,” exclaims the Handelsblatt,
“that the United States of America
prospers!” The Frandenblatt, of the
same city, in its correspond
ence from Schleswig, where
the emigration movement has assumed
large proportions, suggests some of the
motives influencing the people who go.
“Fathers with their sons, and a great
many more sons alone, leave the coun
try to escape the burden or a three
years’ military service.” The people ex
press the opinion that “only an idiot is
unable to learn the required drilling and
shooting in two years,” and that “a
strong man, with sound sense, can learn
the whole affair in one year.” But
for this enforced service, it is said,
Germany would retain thousands of
able bodied, strong young men, who now
turn their strength and fortunes to anew
home on the other side of the Atlan
tic. An example of the decrease in
wages is afforded in the manufacture of
a certain kind of velvet which, in the
five years from 1869 to 1874, paid the
weaver for his labor at the rate of from
66 to 77 cents a yard. At present for the
same labor the weaver gets but 33 cents,
and from some manufacturers but 22.
Prince Bismarck’s protective tariff has
much to do if it is declined to cure this
state of things. It might be supposed
that this scantiness of wages is counter
balanced by corresponding cheapness of
food. But this is not the case. A labor
er, for example, who works eleven hours
a day, getting 66 cents per day, pays 19
cents a dozen for eggs, about 22 cents a
pound for butter, $7 50 per barrel for
flour and 13 cents per pound for mutton.
The Stalwarts In Connell— Current
Rumor*.
A New York dispatch says: “Vice
President Arthur had a number of
visitors on Saturday. At half-past nine
o’clock in the morning Police Commis
sioner French called and was followed
by General Grant and Conkling. Sena
tor Jones, of Nevada, also called. They
all had long interviews with Genera!
Arthur, staying for more than two
hours. At noon neither General Grant
or ex-Senator Conkling had left the Vice
President’s house. It is believed that
they were in deep conference. Many
rumors are predicted as to the new Cabi
net in case of Arthur’s coming into the
power. It is conceded that only two
now in office will remain—Windom and
Lincoln. Either Conkling or Fish will
be Secretary of State. Grant can run
anything in or out of the Cabinet he
may desire. The town is filled with ru
mors and reports of coming changes.
At earliest moment will send reliable
news of these to be made.”
Corn in the West.— The Chicago
Times has reports from seven of the corn
growing States of the West, from which
it draws the conclusion that in Illinois
the crop will be three-fifths of that of last
year, which was a remarkably good one;
in lowa the yield in some sections will
be 50 per cent below that of last year,
and m no section is a full crop expected;
in Missouri along drought has letdown
the crop from one fourth to one half,
and in Kansas the crop will fall consid
erably below the average. Kentucky,
Wisconsin, Minnesota and Nebraska
have suffered from drought, and the
corn crop in each of them will be con
siderably reduced.
The New York Tribune says: “A Re
publican newspaper has just been started
in Mississippi. It is the only one in a
State which once gave nearly 40,000
Republican majority. But, of coarse,
there is no intolerance in Mississippi.
Oh, of course not!” On which the
Chicago Times makes the following very
sensible comment : “If the large con
stituency could read it is probable that
the number of Republican journals
would be greater. Illiterate people
haven’t much use for a newspaper, and
the negroes of Mississippi are mostly
illiterate.”
A writer in the New York press claims
that the Vice President can never legally
become President unless elected so by
the people. The duties, but not the title
and rank of President, devolve upon the
Vice President in case of a vacancy in
the Presidential office, and it is asserted
that John Tyler, Millard Fillmore and
Andrew Johnson had no right to the ti
tle of President, although performing
the duties of the office.
OUR ATLANTA LETTER.
Horrible Wetiher-L(Xl*)iUve Goa*
•Ip- Some Calendar Sill*tte—Per
mouhl and General—Stale Koad
Lease-Singular Railroad Accident
—Georgia at Yorlctovru Centennial
—Minor Topic*—Another Wile
Worth Having—Side Notea-Flnal
Paragraph*.
Atlanta, August 29 —The heavy wind storm
which prevailed all through Saturday night,
although not accompanied by rain, kept many
families awake, as no one could tell what mo
menta heavy rain might set in. It was a night
of fear and trembling.
Yesterday noon the wind subsided somewhat,
and a 6teady rain commenced, which at times
was quite heavy. After dark the wind in
creased again and the rain became heavier,
and this state of things continued all night.
This morning we are having much lees wind
and only occasional light showers. Reports
from the country indicate that the fanners
have been damaged rather than benefited by
this rain. In many places cotnon has been
blown out in the fields and ruined.
The farmers do not feel in the is-st of spints
in view of this new departure in the weather.
After a long spell of dry weather, which has
near y ruined their crop prospects, they fear
that a similar spell of wet weather may follow,
in which case the crops that have survived the
drought will probably “go under” in conse
quence of too much rain.
LEGISLATIVE GOSSIP.
The creation of the new Northeastern Judi
cial Circuit having demoralized the calendars
of the Western Circuit and the Blue Ridge Cir
cuit,bills are now before the House to rearrange
the calendars of these two circuits.
The Rev. Dr. J. L. M. Curry. In his recent
educational address before the General As
sembly. said • money makes the mare go ”
Since Colonel Cole arrived here with his mil
lions for the development of Georgia a good
many mares have been made to go. which has
suggested the insinuation that there was “a
mare's nest" somewhere in this vicinity.
Whenever any “pet measure” is defeated by
the General Assembly there are interested par
ties alwavs ready to abuse the legislators, call
them Potty Peagreens, or Pauper Legislators,
or Bull Dogs of the Treasury, or suggest that
they will memorandums of Georgia’s
history on their shirt cuffs. During the war
the ablest Generals were at home or in Con
gress. and at the present time our wisest legis
lators are in the lobby rings.
In his great speech before the Joint Railroad
Committee of the General Assembly, Senator
Brown remarked that it was a mis Ake to sup
pose the people did not understand their
rights as to railroads. Why, said he, our
trains never kill scrub stock for a farmer. If
a cow, ox, mule, horse, or hog is run overby
a train and killed, we are always called upon
to pay for blooded stock or first class animals.
It seems almost impossible to get scrub stock
to go near a railroad. The people fully under
stand their rights in this direction.
There was some little discussion on the Sen
ate amendments to the bill prohibiting the em
ployment of minors in barrooms. The Senate
amende 1 so that the parties could so employ
or consent to such employment of minor chil
dren, but the House refused to concur. An
other amendment proposed to prevent their
employment to sell liquor in any place. Col.
Basinger opposed this on the ground that it
would work great injustice to minors em
ployed in drug stores and in family groceries,
where liquor is sold for medicinal, mechani
cal or culinary purposes. It was enough to
prevent their employment in regular bar
rooms. and beyond this the friends of the mea
sure ought not to seek to go. The amend
ment was opposed by several other members
and not concurred in by the House.
SOME CALENDAR STATISTICS.
The House calendar shows that Chatham’s
Representatives have to date introduced the
following number of bills: Basinger 21, Bacon
7 and Nichols 4, all of which are bills of some
importance.
The following members have introduced only
one or two bills each: Burch, of Laurens;
Christie, of Terrell: Brewer, of Elbert: Hagen,
of Paulding: Gray, of Catoosa; Hill, of Wilkes;
Lonon, of Dougherty; McLueas, of Fayette;
Ralnev, of Schley; Sapp, of Thomas; Thomp
son. of Chariton; Walker, of Berner.; Willing
ham. of Oglethorpe.
Incredible as it may appear, yet there are a
number of members who have not introduced
a single bill. They are: Branch, of Irwin;
Bennett, of Jackson; Deal, of Cherokee: Dan
iel. of Madison; Fuller, of Wilcox: Harp, of
Chattahoochee (at home sick); Heard, of Mil
ler; Hall, of Echols (disabled for duty); Hen
ry, of Fannin; Little, of Franklin: McClel
land, of Colquitt; Robins, of Talbot; Sellers,
of apDliug; Scruggs, of Glasscock; Stapleton,
of Jefferson: Walker, of Crawford. The lat
ter gentleman has been in the General Assem
bly of Georgia about forty years, “off and on,”
as Representative or Senator, and yet he has
neither opened his mouth to speak nor intro
duced a bill this session. He is always in his
saat, and votes right to the point.
PERSONAL AND GENERAL.
The name of Mr. Bennett, of Jackson, was
given me in place of that of Mr. Silman, of the
game county, who made the fine speech in
favor of the educational tax biJL The mistake
was not mine.
Another error, however, was mine, - et I can
in no way account for its origin. 110 . F. G.
Foster, of Morgan, and not Judge 'l-vigga, of
Richmond, is the author of the bill a lowing a
widow to waive her dower and a j car’s sup
port for herself and children.
My predictions as to the fate of the bills ap
propriating money to the Yorktown Centen
nial. the Cotton Exposition and Col. Jones’
history have proved correct, and in a few davs
the prediction in regard to anew capital will
also be verified, as there is no prospect for the
passage of the bill.
Speaker Bacon is always at his post, Dd
never loses an opportunity to push ahe&d the
business of the House. He constantly over
looks the Clerk’s desk, and watches amend
ments with an eagle eye, thus preventing mis
takes or confusion. This morning he gave the
House a deserved “lecture” on the loss of time
resulting from their inattention to voting.
Leaves of absence greatly retard the
progress of business on Saturdays and Mon
days, it being difficult to get a constitutional
vote when half a dozen members happen to
“step out to see a man." There are fifty men
in the House who ought never to be re-elected
to seats in this body, as they seldom attend to
the duties devolving upon them.
THE STATE ROAD LEASE.
The special committee to investigate the
ownership of the State Road lease, of which
Representative Mattox, of Chattooga, is
chairman, has about completed its labors, and
will soon report the re.sult.
As was expected at the start, by the “know
ing ones,” nothing important will come out of
the committee, it is a subject that becomes
more mysterious the longer you investigate it.
Great surprise is expressed at the ignorance
of prominent men who were supposed to know
all about the lease.
The chief point reached, so far as I can
learn, simply shows that Senator Brown,
although now owning only a half share, really
controls the Western and Atlantic Railroad as
with a rod of iron. He has been on the inside
during all the changes and transfers, and un
less his power is acknowledged, can suddenly
open a little tin box full of legal points.
What promised, in the minds of some, to
produce startling developments in regard to
the sale of shares and the present ownership
of the lease, will hardly produce a ripple in
railroad or legislative circles when the com
mittee's report is presented to the public. If
there has been crookedness, or a failure to
comply strictly with the terms of the lease, it
can only be made certain to the public by a
voluntary confession of some lessee.
A SINOITLAR railroad accident.
There was a very peculiar feature about the
accident last week on the North Georgia and
Marietta Railroad, some seven miles from Ma
rietta. The special sub-committee on the
penitentiary were on the train, having been up
to inspect the convicts working on that road.
Hon. J. B. Park, member of the House from
Green county, had been riding on the engine,
but got off just before the accident occurred,
and thus saved his life, as the engineer was
mortally injured. The committee were in the
rear cars and escaped any very serious shaking
up at the time the engine went off the track,
but were less fortunate at a later period.
It seems that the rear car of the train did not
leave the track, and the car in front was only
partially off. and apparently in a solid posi
tion. This being the case, the scalded engineer
and wounded passengers were taken into the
rear car. where Dr. Wm. M. Willingham, mem
ber from Oglethorpe county, and Dr E. A.
Perkins, member from Burke county, attended
to their injuries.
Imagine their astonishment when, an hour
after the accident, the rear car went tumbling
down the embankment. Of eourge the poor
engineer was badly injured again (he died that
night), while Dr. Willingham and others were
considerably bruised about their heads, Rhoul
den and faces. The earth suddenly gave way
under the car partially off the track, and ft
dragged the rear car down the embankment.
GEORGIA AT THE YORKTOWN CENTENNIAL.
The appointment of Colonel J. H. Es.il!, of
the Mornino News, to represent Georgia jour
nalism at the Vorktown Centennial, however
it may be viewed, is considered a most appro
priate and wise selection, as the following rea
sons will readily suggest:
He is President of the Georgia Press Associ v
tion and of the Southern Press Association,
and proprietor of the leading commercial daily
journal of the State. No one, therefore, could
more fitly represent the journalism of thin Em
pire State of the South at this grand centen
nial gathering.
Again, he is the most soldierly looking mem
ber of the Governor's staff, and resides in the
only city in Georgia whose military corps have
yet expressed a purpose to attend and partici
pate In the Centennial, without waiting for the
State to appropriate money to pay their ex
penses in part or in full during the trip.
The appointment of Col. Esti'l is looked upon
as a justly deserved tribute to Savannah’s
liberal and prompt action in regard to a pro
per representation at Yorktown. and I hesitate
not to say that the venerable Chatham Artil
lery, with its ancient guns, will in no way be
second in point of interest to any command
from other sections of the country. And the
gallant Irish Jasper Greens will worthily
represent the State they have so often honored
in the past.
MINOR TOPICS.
The proposed new railroad from Troy, In
Pike county, Ala , to Elya, in Coffee county,
will present a rival road from Montgomery,
taking in that direction the cotton which h-s
been coming from Troy to Savannah. Colonel
Wadley seem* never to be “caught napping” at
any of his outposts, but is always ready to
move forward promptly to meet any new rival
that pops up to encroach upon his territory.
Few people believed that the late raid on ths
gambling houses in Atlanta would amount to
anything more than a temporary scare. And
such it has proved to be. The frightened
gamblers have returned, and new and elegant
establishments are being reopened on the most
public streets in the city. As I have before
written, the leading gunblers are too rich, and
too influential in politics, and their operators
too numerous to be suppressed. They hold the
balance of power in city and county elections
The Senate Temperance Committee have de
clined to have anything more to do with tne
general temperance bill in that body, and it
was recommitted to the Judiciary Committee.
It is now too late to seriously consider any gen
eral temperance bill, as nearly all the counties
desiring temperance legislation have secured
the passage or introduction of local bills to
suppress the liquor traffic in their midst.
Much has been done in this way to promote
temperance throughout the Btate, and its
friends need not be discouraged.
As I am not a subscriber to the Magazine of
American History, and saw the May number
merely by chance, the criticism of Librarian
Harden is rather out of place. As he saw the
August number fourteen days before my para
graph was published. It is very strange that he
should have kept the matter private until
after I had called public attention to it in the
interest of the society. If lam to be blamed,
I am glad to share the censure with so excel
lent a gentleman, and trust that while he is
pulling the “mote” out of my eye I shall also
be allowed to pull the “beam’’ out of his.
I notice the mention of Fort Mon lac in con
nection with the Florid* Ship Canal, which
reminds me that the gallant soldier for whom
that fort was named. Major David Monlac, was
the only Indian that ever graduated at the
West Point Military Academy, as Lieutenant
Flipper is the only negro. This Monlac was a
Creek Irdian, born in Alabama, who gradu
ated, in 1822, next to the foot of his class. He
was appointed Second Lieutenant in the Bixth
Infantry, but resigned without'seeing service.
In ISS6 he entered the Florida war as Com
mander of a mounted anmpany of Creek In
dians. and soon after became Major of the
regiment. It was while gallantly leading this
command against the Seminole* in the battle
of Wahoo Swamp, November 21, 1836, a week
after his promotion, that he fell with his face
to the foe.
ANOTHER WIFE WORTH HAVING.
Under the head of “A Wife Worth Having,”
a correspondent of the Aiken :8. C.) Journal
and Review , speaking of a visit to the Hon.
Geo. D. Tillman, says: “In this connection we
cannot help remarking that Mrs Tillman is
one of the most energetic and wonderful wo
men in the State. Notwithstanding the cares
of a numerous family, she mounts her horse
daily and personally superintends every detail
of her husband’s extensive planting interest,
and is considered one of the most successful
managers of a farm in Edgefield county. Ow
ing to the Congressional duties and other busi
ness relations of Colonel Tillman, he has turned
the plantation over to her, and she ha* proven
equal to the emergency. Such a woman is an
honor to our State, and a crown of glory to the
man whose household she adorns.”
All honor to this noble South Carolina mat
ron, but we have here in Georgia a wife in
every respect her equal in the domestic vir
tues so worthily recorded. I refer to the esti
mable wife of Col. Thomas J. Bmith, of Wash
ington, the popular and well known Master of
the S’ate Grange, and one of Georgia's most
public spirited agriculturists. For years past
his public duties have called him away from
home a great deal of the time, and during these
absences Mrs Smith has had charge of his ex
tensive farming operations. In fact her labors
of this kind have been so frequent and so suc
cessful that she is widely known as ‘-The
Widow Smith.” No one is more heartily wel
comed to Btate and county fairs, while her
displays are alwavs the centre of attraction,
for in the domestic duties of the home, as well
as in the management of the farm, she lias few
equals and no superiors. Her imposing figure,
smiling face, and cheerful conversation, have
become familiar and welcome at all agricul
tural gatherings. Georgia needs many more
such nobie women.
SIDE NOTES.
Hon. E. A. Buck. Clerk of the United
States District and Circuit Courts, officially an
nounces that they will not convene next Mon
day, as was expected, but on the following
Monday, which is September 16th. Parties in
terested will do well to remember this change.
The Springfield Republican is very much
mistaken in supposing the proposed visit of
the First Connecticut Regiment to Charleston
and Savannah “would be the first of any
Northern regiment iuto the Southern States
since the rebellion ” The Seventy-first Regi
ment of New York visited New Orleans last
winter and were cordially welcomed. Courte
sies have frequently passed between Northern
and Southern soldiers since the war.
The friends in Thomasville and Atlanta of
Lieut. Henry O Flipper, of the Tenth Cavalry,
can find no excuse for his conduct in connec
tion with the handling of commissary funds.
Every chance was given him to promote his
own interests in a legitimate manner, and it
was expected that lie would appreciate such
opportunity. The Army and Navy Journal
speaks kindly of his downfall, and says:
“Lieut. Flipper’s success at West Point and
entry into the army was a triumph for the col
ored race, and as he was the single represen
tative * • * he may be said to have had the
character and prestige of hia race in his keep
ing." Having proved unworthy, he has put
insurmountable obstacles to the future ap
pointment of colored officers.
FINAL PARAGRAPHS.
Quite a sensation was created at the Becond
Baptist Church yesterday morning. Mrs. Ida
Wade, a prominent member of the choir, was
singing a solo, when she suddenly fainted and
fell, thus suddenly interrupting the services.
Henry Leonard, Esq., brother-in-law of Hon.
John H. James, one of the most popular and
experienced bank officials in Atlanta.has been
appointed manager of the Bradstreet Commer
cial Agency in this city. No better selection
could have been made.
I see that Mr. C. 8. WilsOD, of Brookville,
Fla , publishes a young man called “Seals,”
and claiming to be a son of Colonel Seals of
Eufaula. As young Seals has absconded after
his arrest for horse stealing, I fear that Mr.
Wdson is himself deceived, and that the
“Seals” he refers to is the son of Colonel
Seals who recently absconded,
The friends of the Savannah, Florida and
Western Railway will be glad to know that
Messrs. Haines. Taylor, Hardee, Owens, and
others, representing this road, have been suc
cessful in their efforts to secure living rates
for freight over their line. The Senators aid
Representatives, as well as prominent citizens,
from along the road, endorsed the appeal for
an advance in rates before the Railroad Com
mission. Chatham.
The Brought in the West.
A dispatch from Noble, Illinois, says:
“Still the unmerciful drought that has
prevailed in this region of country for
the last nine weeks, with one or two
dust dampening exceptions, holds on,
and the result is, blasted corn fields,
withered vegetation, dried up pastures
and a general scarcity of the water sup
ply, the like of which does not come in
range of the knowledge of the sixty-year
old settler of the country. Thousands
of acres of corn will not produce a sin
gle ’nubbin,’ and tens of thousands of
acres more will not yield a peck to the
acre, while a bushel "to the acre, on the
average for all of Southern Illinois,
would be a large estimate. What the
people will do for grain to keep their
stock on and to fatten their meat is a
question that puzzles the most astute,
and well it may, for it is a matter of such
seriousness that it is folly to make light
of if.”
St. Carolus
No Preparation on earth equals St. Jacobs Oil as
a safe, SURE, SIMPLE and CHEAP External Remedy.
A trial entails btK the coinparatirely trifling outlay of
50 Cents, and every one suffering with pain cau have
cheap and positive proof of its claims.
DIKUTIOKS IK F.I.F.VLN LANCiUALES.
SOLD IT ALL DRUOQISTS AND DEALERS IN MEDICINE.
A. VOGELER & CO.
ltaJthimre, Md., V. A. A.
Magnolia salm.
SOMETHING
EVERY LADY
OUGHT TO KNOW.
There exists a means of se*
•nriug a soft and brilliant
Complexion, no matter how
E>or It may naturally be.
agan\; Magnolia Balm is a
delicate and harmless article,
which instantly removes
Freckles, Tan, Redness,
Roughness, Eruptions, Vulgar
Flushings, etc., etc. So deli
cate and natural are its effects
that its use is not suspected bj
anybody.
No lady has the right to pre
sent a disfigured face in society
when the Magnolia Balm is sold
by ail druggists for 76 cents.
Httlliturg and VarfrtM (Soods.
riiMfiTi,
185 Brougliton Street.
STILL GREATER BARGAINS WILL BE OFFERED THIS WEEK.
1,000 REMNANTS OF
EMBROIDERIES! EMBROIDERIES!
Thrown out at stock taking. They are all choice and desirable patterns, and no old or damaged
goods. The prices will astonish the people. They will be spread on our CENTRE
BARGAIN TABLEB TO-DAY. You must not fail to notice them
as you enter. The balance of the
CORSETS AND LADIES’ UNDERWEAR!
Offered last week has been reduced still lower, to clear out. Our HOSIERY and UNDERWEAR
largely seduced. The original and best UNLAUNDRIED SHIRT in the city tor 85c..
worth st. Extra inducements in Children’s SLIPS and ROBES.
Parasols, Parasols.
In Bilk, Fancy Brocade and Satin, at half price. SHOES for Ladies, Gents, Misses, Children
and Infants, at our popular low prices.
ESTABLISHED IW{).
Plats M’s Net Variety Store,
4
138 Brougliton Street,
THE LARGEST AND CHEAPEST PLACE IN THE CITY FOR
MILLINERY AND VARIETY GOODS!
MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.-
irou Btmrs.
BROWN’S
OOT that at Irem hitter* are made by BROW* OHKSCCAL o*. an*
have cross#* re* bat* on wrapper.
IRON atruetonic
sure p
APPETISER Q | | |
IRON BITTERS are highly recommended for all diseases requiring
a certain and efficient tonic; especially Indigestion, Dyspepsia, Intermittent
Fevers, Want of Appetite, Loss of Strength, Lack of Energy,etc. Enriches the blood,
strengthens the muscles,and gives new life to iho nerves. They act like a charm
on th digestive organs, removing ail dyspeptic symptoms, such as Tasting the Food,
Ildching.Heat in the Suimeich,ll nribur;,. The only Iron Preparation
that will not blacken the teeth or give headache. Sold by
all druggists. Write for the AP>O T : .ok 1 32 pp. of useful and amusing read
ing)— sent free, BROWN CHEMICAL CO., Baltimore, Md.
For sale by LTFPMAN BROTHERS, Wholesale Druggists.
Those Cigars at He Boss Grocer, 21 Barnard Street
ARE FELLING LIKE HOT | Cf) HH H I CAKES. AN ADDITION
AL LOT JUST COME IN, _||| 81111 l I AND WILL BE SOLD
AT AN EXTREMELY | VV)JUU I LOW PRICE.
The epicure and invalid should not miss to send for a sample bottle of my
DIRECT IMPORTED WINES
Guaranteed to be genuine, pure and of finest flavor. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC DELICACIES
always arriving, and a general grand assortment of
FANCY GROCERIES * LIQUORS
Constantly on hand. I must not fail to remind you that the 4-year old HIRSCHMAN’S BO
NANZA WHIcKEY, at $2 25 per gallon, is,according to quality, worth twice the money.
A. HIRSCHMAN,
THE BOSS GROCER, 21 BARNARD ST..SA VANN AH, GA.
Mom of Cheap Groceries al tie Bed Grocery.
PURE WHITE SUGAR. CHEAP HAMS. -
MACKEREL in Tomatoes. MACKEREL in Mustard.
SEA TROUT. NEW MESS MACKEREL.
IMPORTED SWISS CHEESE. SAP SAGO CHEESE.
LUNCH TONGUE at 25 cents. CANNED CORN BEEF.
FULTON MARKET BEEF. ORANGE MARMALADE.
CIGARS and TOBACCO. FINE WHISKY and WINK
NEW BARLEY. FRESH OAT MEAL.
HUSSiLK. db 00.,
22 AND 22 1-2 BARNARD STREET.
ODDS AKTI) ENDS !
We have just completed our inventoiy and find that we have on hand quite a
numlter of ■
BROKEN SUITS!
By “Broken Suits” we mean that we have Coats, but not the Pants or vests to
match, or Pants and no Coats to match, and so on. To those who do not care for
full suits, but can use either a Pants, Coat or Vest, can secure first class goods at
half their value, for we have determined to close out these odds at any price. In
fact, they are not worth to us more than half of their cost in this broken condition.
As these goods comprise some very desirable goods, and as we are willing to sac
rifice them we anticipate a big rush, hence we would advise you to call as soon as
possible. Do not postpone your visit to
L. HANFF & BRO., CLOTHIERS,
154 BROUGHTON BTHUET, Opposite Welabeln’n.
dairies, &*urlrg,
A. K DEiBOUILLONi;
JEWELER AND DEALER IN
Waltham and Elgin Watches,
FINE GOLD JEWELRY, DIAMONDS,
AGENT FOR THE PIONEER WATCH.
STERLING BILVERWARE, TRIPLE-PLATED WARE.
FRENCH AND AMERICAN CLOCKS. GOLD-HEADED CANES
STAR SPECTACLES, OPERAv MANUFACTURER OF FLORIDA
GLASSES. JEWELRY.
31 BULL STIiEET, OPPOSITE SCREVEN HOUSE.
iron Works.
NOVELTY IRON WORkE
JOHN lIOURKE, PROPRIETOR,
NO. * BAY AND RIVER STREETS, - SAVANNAH, GA. W
Iron and Brass Foundry and Machine Shop. | f
All kinds of IRON and BRASS CASTINGS, repair* on machinery, etc.. it&.'fclg ' . „ , S js
at lowest rates. F 1 imf
SUGAR MILLS AND PANS A SPECIALTY.IIjI
My Mill* all have heavy WROUGHT IRON BHAFTS, and are war
ranted for one year. ■ ■
Sand for my Price List before purchasing elsewhere.
SAWS fCurtis&Co.
S3 811 to 819 North Second Street, St. Louis, Mo.
Manufacturers of every dew ription of Circular, HI ill, sail C'rn**-Cut Savva: Wholesale Dealer* i*
Rubber and Leather Helling, Filet*, Mandrel*. Cant Books, Saw Cum mere, ITpacts, and
all Saw and Planing Hill Supplies; Sole Mannfacfcnrere of Lockwoeri’s i’ntenl Slotted
Circular Saw. EVERY SAW WARRANTED. IW'Carafni H'entiiu to repair work. A *entg fo
TAIMITE EMERY WHEELS HACffINEUT.
Our New Illustrated Catalogue mailed tree on application.
TUB
Great German
REMEDY
FOB
imm,
NEURALGIA,
SCIATICA,
LUMBAGO,
BACKACHE,
GOUT,
SORENESS
OF THE
CHEST,
SORE THROAT,
QUINSY,
SWELLINGS
AND
SPRAINS,
FROSTED FEET
AND
EARS.
uunivs
AND
SCALDS,
GENERAL
BODILY MIIIS,
TOOTH, EAR
AND
HEADACHE,
AND
All other Pains
AND
ACHES.
Ktetcfm, jewelry, & t.
1b Largest JswglitHoqsb
SOUTH OF NEW YORK 18
HAMILTON’S,
Where can be found the MOBT VARIED
STOCK in this line on sale in any city
North, South, East or West.
i •
A MOST MAGNIFICENT AND UNSURPASSED
ASSORTMENT
Jewelry, Watches,
DIAMONDS,
SILVERWARE,
BRONZES, CLOCKS,
FreiiMJapeselrelties
OPERA GLASSES, ETC.
Strangers in the city should visit this well
mown and extensive Jewelry Establishment,
008. OF BULL AND BROUGHTON BTB.
S.P. HAMILTON,
Waltham Watches
IN
GOLD AND SILVER CASES.
AN ELEGANT ASSORTMENT OF
DIAMONDS, JEWELRY
-AND
SILVERWARE,
At the lowest possible prices, at
M. STERNBERG’S,
24 BARNARD STREET.
Mmmev <s>oods.
BEWARE OF IMITATIONS.
Water Coolers.
WATERING POTS.
FILTERS.
Patent Ice Cream Freezers
THE BEST MADE. AT
HARDWARE AND STOVE HOUSE
—o—
COMACK HOPKINS,
187 BROUGHTON STREET.
IN SEASON!
IMPROVED FEY FANS.
Ice Cream Freezers, Patent
and Plain.
Porcelain Lined and Other
Styles ot Water Coolers.
Wire Dish Covers.
Patent Fly and Roach Traps.
Refrigerators.
And the very best Kerosene
Stoves.
—AT—
CROCKERY HOUSE
-OF
JAS. S. SILVA,
140 BROUGHTON BTREET.
mTI. HARNETT, _ BEN. GEORGE,
Formerly of the Late of the
Marshall House. Bcreven House.
BARNETT HOUSE,
(Formerly PLANTERB’ HOTEL).
MARKET SQUARE, - - SAVANNAH, GA.
HARNETT & GEORGE,
PROPRIETORS.
RATES, 82 OO PER DAY.
THIS favorite family Hotel, under its new
management, Is recommended for the
excellence of its CUISINE. HOMELIKE COM
FORTS. PROMPT ATTENTION and MODE
RATE RATES.
omwisistott Wtrr’mt*.
D. H. BALDWIN. JOSEPH HULL.
GEO. J. BALDWIN.
BALDWIN & COMPANY,
DEALERS IN
Fertilizers, Bagging, Ties
—AND—
Commission Merchants,
18 WILLIAM STREET, N. Y.
116 Bay Street, Savannah, Ga,
AGENTS FOR THE
IMPROVED LIGHT DRAFT
Gullet “Magnolia” Gin.
—ALSO-
Tlie Hull “Sea Island” Cotton Gin,
A PERMANENT and successful improve
ment upon all other Sea Island Gins, mak
ing as good if not better lint, and at the same
time doing twice the work.
JAS. IV. SCHLEY & CO.,
172 BAY STREET, SAVANNAH GA.,
General Comni’n Merchants,
OFFER:
13 OHA BUSHELS Choice WHITE CORN.
lOjUVU 250 bales Prime Timothy HAY.
300 bales Prime Western HAY.
8,000 bushels CORN.
4.000 bushels OATS.
40,000 pounds WHEAT BRAN.
1*2,000 pounds DRY SALT SIDES.
30,000 pounds SMOKED SIDES.
Also, MEAL, GRITS. FLOUR, CRACKED
nonv and CORN EVES.
&UUa*u? (goods.
ini
The greatest variety in the city from 25c. up
in Gingham, 1-awn Cambric and Nainsook,
with Insertion, Cord and Puff.
CROCHETED SACKS
At 50 and 75 cents.
HATS.
HATS.
HATS.
HATS.
NONE CHEAPER IN THE CITY.
DEXTER'S KNITTING COTTON
In all colors.
STAMPING TO ORDER.
HATS.
HATS.
HATS.
MRS. IC. POWER,
188 BROUGHTON 8T , SAVANNAH, GA.
<on? 6oods.
REMNANTS
Laces & Trimmings
'T'ORCHON. CLUNY, MECHLIN, VALEN
-1 CIESNES. BLOND, NOTTINGHAM, BRE
TON and LANGUEDOC LACES, in over 150
different designs.
Also, an endless variety of CROCHET, IRISH,
EVERLASTING. REVERSIBLE and CYPRUS
TRIMMINGS in remnants, at TEN CENTS each.
The bunches contain from 2 to 12 yards, war
ranted perfect and of the very best goods
made, each piece containing the full number
of yards marked on the wrapper, the price be
ing much less than regular goods by the yard,
as will readily be seen when the goods are ex
amined. The remnants are
A CURIOUS SIGHT,
And may be seen at
JACOB COHEN’S,
Who is Sole Agent for Savannah.
We have the entire production of these goods
(all of which are imported).
a&iitttjs, ©U$,
OLIVER S PAINT AND OIL STORE
Sasli, Doors and Blinds.
Li X M E3,
PLASTER, CEMENT.
5 WHITAKER STREET. SAVANNAH. GA
JOHN G. JBUTLEJB,
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
White Lead, Oils, Colors, Glass, Etc
HOUSE AND SIGN PAINTING.
SOLE Agent for the GEORGIA LIME, CAL
CINED PLASTER, CEMENTS, HAIR, LAND
PLASTER, etc. Sole Agent for F. O. PIERCE
& CO.’S PURE PREPARED PAINTS. One
hundred dollars guarantee that this Paint con
tains neither water or benzine, and is the only
guaranteed Paint in the market.
No. 22 Drayton Ktnwi Savannah. Ga
Cotton factors.
T. W. EBTES. A. C. McALPIN.
ESTES & McALPIN,
Cotton 'Factors
-AND—
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
108 BAY STREET,
SAVANNAH, - - - GEORGIA,
F. M. FARLEY,
Cotton Factor,
94 BAY STREET,
P. O. Box 238. SAVANNAH, GA.
Stationcrii.
DAVIS BROS. & CO.,
STATIONERS! PROMS,
—DEALERS IX—
STBAIV AND MANILLA
WRAPPING PAPERS,
Paper Bags, Twines, Etc.
CORNER BULL AND YORK STREETS,
SAVANNAH GA
Caterpillar, Caterpillar!
THE TEXAS COTTON WORM
DESTROYER,
A sure remedy for the Caterpillar on Cotto
or Rioe. EasilF applied and per
fectly safe to use.
I>. B. HULL,
SAVANNAH,:
Agent for Georgia.
Steel Barbed Wire Fencing
S°M4TOFAOTJWNa W COM™SYf £“5
of patent. For sale by
WEED & CORNWELL.
a ., yoUDfr .aTSr
A,, . yea ™ ol f situation as cotton check*?
weigher , or clerk in any csD&citv -j *
stands txxjkkeeping, and not °work
Address F. Q, C , care of Morning News. *° k *
ANTED, fiice Harvest Hands. I offZTw
an acre to cut and stack my Z „
seagebank Rice Plantation, Mackav Point *®
ply to me or at plantation. *
JAMES J. WARINft
MpiN ROOFERB WANTED.—
I tin roofers, to whom the best wages wm v
paid. Apply immediately to wa * esw 'Ute
... n CORMACK HOPKINS,
WANTED, a situation with
cer or cotton merchant; small
expected at first: good references given f
wanted. Address L. R„ News office. k u *
W- VNTED * OD * or two Pleasant unfurnished
’ rooms. Address with full partieulAii
as to terms, location, etc., ARMCO, care rd
News office. e 01
\\ r ANTED, an, energetic young man fr,r
”, general collecting; small amounts Oali
at Masonic building, W G, SHEPPARD *
WANTED, a situation as clerk. Willing tn
w-ork, and writes a very fair busine,.
hand. Address F., this office.
WANTED, a situation by a first class douwZ
entry bookkeeper; not afraid of work
best of references given. A, 8.. News office
WANTED, every one to cal! and try
Mackerel, Cod Fish and Lobsters at
congress hall restaurant
WANTED, immediately, floor of~TcomT
Central preferred. Apply, with terms
C. A., News office. ’
ATI A Santiago de Cuba, Fresh Mackerel Fresh
' Cod Fish, Lobsters, Bos'on Rib's and
Lamb, at KAUFMASN’S CONGRESS HALL.
\\7 ANTED, a situation to do writing of anv
News klDd AddressC * H T - care Morning
wANTED, Pianos and Organs to tune and
TANARUS repair. Rates reasonable. Second-hami
iastruments. T. B. TURNER, 134 State street
between Bull and Whitaker sts.
ifor sßrnt.
Ipoß RENT, an unfurnished floor of two
rooms: bath room on same floor. Also
two furnished rooms. Apply 7, y Charlton
street.
r PO RENT, three elegant rooms, Ist floor,
L over Butler’s drug store, on Congress and
Bull streets. Apply to DR. ROYAL.
T'O RENT, second floor of residence 158 Tay
* l° r street; four rooms, bath. etc.
RENT, that, desirable large frame
x house, situated southwest corner Congress
and Abercorn streets; possession given Octo
ber Ist. Apply to n. J. FEAR, Executor, Ml
Bay street. ’
RENT, three nicely furnished rooms on
X secord floor, with bath room adjoining
near St. John’s Church. Address X X
this office. '
TO RENT. Store and Dwelling 154 Bryan
street. Apply to S. MITCHELL, Lyons’
Block.
£aU.
SALE, Boston Roast Meat and Lamb,
CONGRESS HALL RESTAURANT.
Reppard streets, near Drayton. For terms
apply to R, B, REPP ARP, No, 70 Bay street.
p*OR SALE, 1 20-PLANER and MATCHER,
Richardson Merriman <S- Cos. make. Planes
20 wide 5 thick, and matches 16x1)4 thick, a
splendid machine at a great bargain. Cost
new 81,600, and is practically as good as new-.
Full description, price and anv further par
ticulars giTen upon application. Address
Lock Box 1,010,
Fitchburg, Mass.
J7>OR SALE.-500,000 CYPRESS SHINGLES,
CYPREBS LUMBER, ASH FLOORING and
WAINSCOTTING, OAK and HICKORY
LUMBER. -
D. C. BACON & CO.
T> O ATS FOR SALE.—Ship. Rail and Row
Boats, at H. SCHRODER'S,
Market Dock.
BOARDS, suitable for fencing.
For sale cheap by
BACON & BROOKS.
Yj'Oß SALE, steamboat boiler and engine,
1 10J4 inch bore and 32 inch stroke, stamped;
all in good order. Also, one engine MxlS, all
complete. JOHN F. ROBERTSON, Agent,
Savannah, Ga.
£ost. -
JOST OR MISLAID, August 2£th, on tug
J Forest City, a black satchel; contains
among other articles two gold medalions, fami
ly miniatures. Return to 145 Perry street
fPisaUanrotts.
AT CONGRESS HALL RESTAURANT, just
received via Santiago de Cuba, Fresh
Mackerel and Cod Fish. Lobsters.
BOSTON RIBS and LAMB, via Santiago de
Cuba, just received at
CONGRESS HALL RESTAURANT.
mt jßailraads.
rrrrn
SUMMER SCHEDULE
OUTWARD. | INWARD.
lkavb lkavb leave isle arbivs
SAVANNAH. MONTO’RY. OP HOPE. SAVANNAH,
10:35 a. u. 7:35 a. x. 8:10 a. h. B:3S a. m.
*3:25 p. m. 12:15 p. m 12:50 p. m. 1:20 p. m.
7:25 p. m. 5:35 p. h 6:10 p. x. 6:38 p. si.
•Sundays this is the last outward train, and
last train arrives in city 6:50 instead of 6:38.
Monday mornings an early train for Mont
gomery only at 6:25 a. m.
Saturday nights last train leaves city 7:40
nstead or 7:25.
And don’t forget. EVERY CAR on WHITA
KER LINE runs through to CONCORDIA
PARK every afternoon from 3:30 until 8:06
o’clock.
EDW. J. THOMAS.
Superintendent.
Tyliee Ferry & Tramway.
THE NEW IRON SALOON STEAMER
H. B. PLANT
WILL run the following schedule, com
mencing SATURDAY, August 13th, from
wharf foot of Abercorn street:
Sundays—From Ty bee, 7:00 a. x., 12 n„ 7 p. u.
Sundays—From city, 10 a. m. and 2:30 p. x.
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Satur
days—From Ty bee, 7:00 a. a.; from city, 6 p.
x. Another steamer may be substituted on
the Monday trips.
Tuesdays and Thursdays—From Tybee, 7:00
a. m., 12 x. and 6 p. x.; from city, 10 a. m , 4
p. x. and 8 p. .
Family excursions Tuesdays and Thursdays.
The cars will always meet steamer as wharf.
Tramway tickets must be bought at this
office. All freight prepaid on wharf.
N. B.—No freight received after 15 minutes
to time of steamer’s departure, or taken on
theS p. m. trips Tuesdays and Thursdays.
JNO. F. ROBERTSON. Agent
sfus Jrpot.
REMOVAL.
ESTILL’S MS Dim
(ESTABLISHED IS6SD
THE undersigned would respectfully inform
his friends and the public* generally that
he has removed from his former stand, Iso.
Bull street, to
NO. 47 BULL STREET,
(Savannah Guards Building)
CORNER OF YORK STREET LANE,
Where he hopes to receive a continuance of
that patronage which ht has received for the
past sixteen years. . .
My stock will consist of all the artic.es usual
ly kept in a first class
WBWS DEPOT
Such as NEWSPAPERS, PERIODICALS,
BOOKS, STATIONERY, etc., etc.
Special attention paid to the delivery of the
Savannah MORNING NEWS, SUNDAY TELE
GRAM and all other papers from the estate
lishment.
WILLIAM ESTIEE. Jr.
AH !
KEROSENE OIL, GALLON, 13c.,
TWO GALLONS FOR A QUARTER.
FLORIDA WATER, bottle 68c.
BUFFALO LITHIA WATER, bottle <*■*
BROWN’S POLISH for Ladies shoes Vortle,loc.
BKNBOWPBELWIRFLOW oJAP , tor. W
BLUE MOTTLED bar 3fc,
tCCL TOILET POWDER, pound 40c.
All kinds of DRUGS and MEDICINES at
reasonable prices,
Jotmoon cto Cos.,
Corner Broughton and Habersham stt.

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