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Savannah morning news. [volume] (Savannah) 1868-1887, November 01, 1881, Image 2

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NO. 3 WHITAKER STREET,
(MORXISG SEWS BUILDING).
j. H. EriLl, Proprtefr.
W. r. THOMPSON, Editor.
NOVEMBER 1, 1381.
With Kiddleberger still out in the cold
and Statham only sure of a few weeks
at the crib, Mr. Mahone as a dispenser of
patronage is not conspicuously success
ful.
It is recalled of Mr. Secretary Folger
that he once made a demand for an ex
cess of commissions while Assistant
United States Treasurer at New York.
This the Supreme Court felt compelled
to disallow for the very good reason that
the law forbade such profuse compensa
tion.
Loriilard's Iroquois has netted his
owner £17,000 by his victories on the
British turf, and Keene's Foxhall £4,796
by his triumphs in France and England.
Loriilard’s Mistake won £7OB at New
market, and Keene’s Golden Gate £340
on the same course. The aggregate win
nings cf the four amount to about $115,-
000. __ =========
Tyner's plea, compared with these of the
rest of the worthies smirched with the star
route filth, has the merit of uniqueness.
He makes the claim that he did his duty
and leaves his superiors the task of es
tablishing their honesty by proving his
assertions to be false. This is consider
ably better than threatening to make it
hot all around.
It seems that the mission of certain of
the Virginia Readjuster leaders to New
York for financial aid did not secure all
that was necessary, and Mr. Jewell, as
Chairman of the National Republican
Committee, has been applied to for funds
to pay the poll tax for the negroes and
for such other uses as ere common at
election times.
Messrs. Moody and tiankey are hard
at work at their second campaign in
Great Britain. They have begun at New
castle. The London Xeies says their
opening meetings, afternoon and even
ing, were greatly crowded. Overflow
meetings were held, and the largest
chapel in town is not large enough for
the crowds that gather to hear them.
Philadelphia I Word : “If it shall turn
out that Judge Folger is a purchased
Cabineteer, the price of whose induction
into the Treasury is a reversionary seat
on the bench of the Supreme Court, the
transaction sinks to a dicker. It is
neither dignified nor decent. We put
no faith in the current rumors about the
subject. The gossips at Washington are
nothing if not malicious. ”
Mr. Blaine’s State paper on the Pana
ma canal is affording foreign journals a
basis for satirical hints, among which
this from the Pall Mall Gazette is not at
all obscure. It “cannot see why, upon
entering upon any similar negotiation,
the United States should not make it an
indispensable condition that no treaty
should render their military and naval
position worse than at present.”
The Democrats scored two points in
the Lynchburg post office fight —that the
solicitude of the Radical party for
maimed Boys in Blue is woefully hollow,
and that Mr. Mahone can’t deliver the
goods he bargained for. The Republi
cans affect indifference, but unless
Chairman Jewell's poll tax fund for the
Virginia hoodlums foots up roundly
their cheerfulness won’t be striking.
Nobody dreamed that the won
derful reservoir that has for twenty
years supplied petroleum to the world,
and which underlays so much of the
territory of Pennsylvania and West Vir
ginia, would ever become exhausted,
but from the failure of so many of the
once most prolific oil wells, it is plain
that there may be an end to this petro
leum supply. The oil operators are be
ginning to fear such a contingency.
The Memorial Diplomatique, of Paris,
states that Earl Granville, British For
eign Secretary, will propose that the
European powers send an identical note
to Washington courteously rejecting the
conclusions of Secretary Blaine’s circu
lar note with regard to the Panama
canal. No dependence can be placed,
however, on this report unless it is cor
roborated from some authoritative
source, and so far it lacks such confirma
tion.
In the debate in the Cortes at Madrid,
on Saturday, Senor Sagasta said that
while the government would do all in its
power to assimilate the 4\est Indies to
the other provinces of the Spanish mon
archy, not even a liberal government
could grant to Cuba or Porto Rico a
regimen like that of Canada under Great
Britain. He cited in proof of the gov
ernment’s deference to public opinion in
the colonies its departures in the matter
of home and colonial tariffs.
We fail to appreciate the forbearance
of the authorities, Slate and National,
in Richmond, Virginia, over the recent
disgraceful and outrageous conduct of
the Ninth Massachusetts Regiment when
in that city. True, having been invited
to the city they were guests and should
have been courteously received. But.
when they had violated every principle of
hospitality and common decency to such
an extent that the Governor of Virginia
was forced to order them summarily to
leave the city, they forfeited all claims
to further consideration, and should
have been treated only as wh&t they
were —ruffianly blackguards.
It is the private opinion very publicly
expressed of every man in the State of
Georgia, as far as we have been able to
learn, that the appointment of a colored
Radical as United Slates Deputy Marshal
for this section of the State by General
Longstreet was done for a purpose. Mr.
Arthur has declared his belief that the
General had not yet given sufficient
proof of bis repentance for having been
a Confederate to qualify him for a Cabi
net position. Now the General evi
dently wants to show the President that
if, in his opinion, he has not already
proven bis loyalty, he is perfectly ready
and willing to do anything more which
the President may desire.
“Cerro Gordo’’ Williams got in several
bulls eyes on the Radicals in the Senate
on Saturday when he said : “I never
dreamed, Mr. President, that 1 should
live to see the day when an ex Confed
erate Brigadier would lead the Republi
can hosts to defeat or hear an old slave
owner call the roll of his faithful ser
vants, not ‘at the base of Bunker Hill,’
but in the chamber of the Senate of the
United States.”
Mahone is reported to have smiled
broadly at this outburst of the bluff old
veteran, but the fact that was made clear
to him, that the men whom he betrayed
can block his game, was calculated to
sadden him considerably.
Crime In Savannah.
It is with reluctance that we are called
upon to comment upon the unusual
prevalence of crime in our city which it
has, of late, been our unpleasant duty
to chronicle. To say nothing of the re
cent riots in our midst, with which the
public is already familiar, two murders
and one dastardly attempt at murder
have been reported in less that two
weeks, and it seems that Sunday is the
favorite day for the commission of vil
lainons deeds. On Sunday week, the
mutilated body of the murdered fireman
of the steamer Crimdon was found lying
in the streets; before a week had passed,
a negro employe at the Central Railroad
wharves made a desperate attempt on
the life of Mr. John Foster, and yester
day morning there appeared in our local
columns another account of the probable
murder on the day before of the colored
man Janes Pollard, by the negro James
Williams. And what is worse, the vil
lains who have thus reflected so much
discredit upon the city of late have, as a
rule, so far, gone unwhipt of justice, for
of the three murders and one attempt to
murder, committed recently, with the
exception of the case reported yesterday,
ail the criminals are still at large. We
refer to the murderer of the lamented
Sergeant Harvey, to the murderer or
murderers of the sailor Pedro, and to
the murderous assailant of Mr. Foster.
This is a fearful record, and it is
made all the more startling from the
well recognized reputation of Savannah
for law and order and the prompt pun
ishment of offenders. What is the
cause of this sudden epidemic of crime
and impunity to criminals we know not.
We have one of the most efficient police
forces in the United States, and a force
always prompt and ready to do its whole
duty, but, nevertheless, criminals
escape, and justice is cheated.
Perhaps the force is not
sufficiently large to be as efficient as ne
cessities demand, or perhaps when crimi
nals are once out of the State, or beyond
the confines of the corporation, not suf
ficient inducement for their arrest in the
shape of rewards are presented. In either
£vent the remedy should be applied, and
whatever else may be necessary to make
crime fearful to criminals, and force
them to respect the laws should promptly
be adopted.
We know that many will take the
ground that we should not give so much
prominence to this state of affairs, as it
is likely to injure the city, but we hold
otherwise. In the first place, it cannot
injure Savannah, for the present is an
abnormal condition of things, and is no
worse than exists elsewhere, and besides,
the villains invariably, as soon as their
misdeeds are committed, strive, without
delay, to shake the dust of the city
from their feet, and place thems*!vis
beyond the reach of our local authori
ties, thus giving proof of the fact that
they dread the usual promptness of our
city government in ferreting out and
punishing crime. In the next place it
is clearly the duty of a journal, interest
ed heartily in the welfare of the city, to
expose fully, and comment freely upon,
whatever is a matter of public interest
requiring rectification, with the view of
arousing a determination afresh that
such rectification shall be accomplished.
This is why we, at this time, dwell so
strongly upon the matter under consid
eration. We trust that those in authori
ty may at once redouble every exertion
to bring the criminals now at large to
speedy justice, and to stamp out the
spirit of lawlessness of late so startlingly
manifested. Let the police force, if
necessary, be doubled; let liberal rewards
be offered for lawless and desperate char
acters who may have eluded police vigi
lance, and then when captured let stern
punishment swiftly and speedily follow.
If this be done, we shall soon hear no
more of crime in Savannah, and we shall
be relieved of the most unpleasant duty
of chronicling and calling public atten
tion to criminal misdeeds.
The Descendants of the Bounty Mn
tineers.
The story of the mutineers on the ship
Bounty, who settled on Pitcairn Island
in 1790, is one familiar to every school
boy, but interest in the tale has been re
vived in San Francisco by the arrival
there of Daniel McCoy, who is a grand
son of one of the mutineers, and has
lived on Pitcairn Island all his days.
Being seen by a reporter, McCoy stated
that the community which he has just
left is a model one in point of morality,
and that the general condition of the in
habitants is good. No liquor is allowed
on the island, and the religion of the
community is the Episcopal. At present
there are but ninety six persons there,
but on Norfolk Island there is a popula
tion of 700, the product of an emigration
from Pitcairn in 1856. About one half
the land on the island i3 cultivated, and
the crops of grain, vegetables and semi
tropical fruits, together with the poultry
and goats raised by the islanders, supply
them with an abundance of wholesome
food. They have no horses nor cattle.
The inhabitants are simple in their tastes,
correct in their relations, industrious,
frugal and religious. Their chief recrea
tion is singing. They observe Sunday
with great strictness, and never indulge
in gaming, card playing, or dancing.
W. Mattieu Williams, F. R. A. S., in
an article on the inundation of a portion
of the Desert of Sahara, producing by
means of a canal anew inland sea,
speaks of the new climate that would
exist far around, of the luxuriant vege
tat ion that would spring up, of the in
creased and spreading rainfall swelling
the rivers. He thinks that, quite apart
from political consideration, it is desira
ble that France should acquire sufficient
control over the Tunisian region to be
able to carry out this grand project,
which may be practically and profitably
done, provided the revenues created by
the fertilizing of the land surrounding
this new Mediterranean are devoted to
repaying the cost of cutting the canal,
which must have a considerable width
and depth iu order to carry the very
large quantity of water that will be de
manded to compensate the evaporation
from the flooded surface.
Party movements in New York and
Brooklyn may be interesting to the disin
terested observer. But they have part
ed widely from the square stand up con
tests between the old Whigs and Demo
crats, and the Democrats and Republi
cans of past years. The stalwarts and
half-breeds are by no means reconciled
to each other's modes and aspirations.
The “halls” on the Democratic side are
fighting the people; and there are five
candidates of one sort and another for
Mayor in Brooklyn city. The bosses
deal in voles as i£ peanuts, and each
would sell out for a position in which
there were grab-bags hanging about.
The potato crop, like the other staple
agricultural products, is reported to be
cut greatly short by the drought. The
general estimate now is a crop of 66 per
cent., and making allowance for some
increase of acreage, this would produce
an aggregate yield of 125,000,000 bush
els —the smallest since 1878.
s olutlo#.
Senator Hill may have lost to consider
able extent the use of his tongue, but
it cannot be denied that he made good
use of his hands when he penned, and
offered, during the closing hours of the
Senate on Saturday, his resolution—call
ed forth by the nomination of Statham
to the Lynchburg postmastership—to the
effect that the bestowal of offices under
the Federal Government for the purpose
of influencing or controlling State elec
tions was “unwise, unpatriotic and con
trary to the spirit of our political insti
tutions,” and if continued would result
in danger to the country.
No resolution embodying more sound
practical truth has ever been offered in
either house of Congress, as has been
abundantly demonstrated in the past.
Ever since the Republican party came
into power the practice of using public
offices for private and political ends has
been generally adopted, and especially
was such practice rendered prominently
conspicuous duriDg Grant’s administra
tions, and the world knows the history
of those administrations. Corruption
everywhere rampant; nepotism and fa
voritism disgracing the land; thieving
rings and cliques fostered and encour
aged even in the White House
and in Congress, and permeating
the whole land, while the national
capital became so corrupt that it was a
common saying that when the moon
passed over Washington the man
who inhabits that planet was forced to
hold his nose. These and injustice, ty
ranny and tldgrant violation of constitu
tional rights characterized that period of
American history and made the title of
“American citizen” to be the scorn of
the civilized world. Surely if common
sense and the instinct of justice and self
preservation were not of themselves con
vincing that the abandonment of the old
Jeffersonian standard for Federal ap
pointments —honesty, capacity, integ
rity—and the use of Federal patronage
for personal and political ends alone,
are dangerous to our republican institu
tions, Grant’s administration should
stand out boldly as a substantial proof
of that fact. Yet Mr. Arthur, when he
inaugurates his administration by adopt
ing similar courses, gives evidence both
that he is unmindful of the teachings of
the past, and that Grant is standing too
near the Executive chair for the public
welfare.
Calera to New Orl“aus.
The following from the New York
Banker and Broker explains, no doubt,
the origin of the rumor rece tly current
of a combination between the Cole Seney
and Louisville and Nashville Railroad
systems. The Banker and Broker says:
“President Cole, of the East Tonnes
see, Virginia and Georgia, has executed
his contract with the Louisville and
Nashville system by which the Cole-Se
ney system uses the lines of the Louis
ville and Nashville from Calera, Ala., to
jNew Orleans, i. e„ the South and North,
Mobile and Montgomery and Mobile and
New Orleans roads. Col. Cole’s contract
enables him to use these lines for all
practical purposes as if they were his
own, and thus makes them part of his
system without the cost of building.
The contract seems equally good
for the Louisville and Nashvdle. for they
avoid a rival line and get the New Or
leans business of the Cole system pro
rata. We have already mentioned this
matter as showing the broad policy of
the leading railroad managers of the
Southeast. None knew so we!' :8 they
that their best interests all lie ii restor
ing, building and improving their roads,
and perfecting their systems, and that
even their large resources will he
taxed for years to keep pace with
their territory. Both the L. &N. and
the East Tennessee, Virginia and Geor
gia are overcrowded with business, and
are building cars by the hundred As
these conditions must remain as long as
the South grows, holders of the above
securities need fear no war of Tates or
decrease in business. Colonel Cole says
that this contract has no reference to the
building of the Georgia connections of
his systems, which are being pushed
with such force as insures its completion
at the time stated.”
The county Democracy of New York
held a rousing mass meeting on Friday
night, at which able addresses were de
liveved by Colonel John W. Forney and
Hon. Samuel J. Randall, of Philadel
phia. Mr. Randall reviewed the record
of the Democrats in Congress upon re
trenchment, and dwelt upon the necessi
ty for the passage of the funding bill,
which Hayes vetoed. “I received,” said
Mr. Randall, “the original veto message
from nis private messenger, and the
erasures and changes showed that the
veto had been written at least two days
before he received the bill.” Continuing,
Mr, Randall said:
“Time has proved the accuracy of the
Democratic position at that time, and
we need to pass that bill again. Why,
in the name of God, should not a young,
growing country like America equal in
credit Great Britain—a country which is
on the decline? The quickest way to
enforce a frugal expenditure of public
money and a return to the admini-itra
tive purity of the fathers of the republic
is to repeal all the laws imposing inter
nal taxes. It is a bold step, you may
say, but it is the best. Why should we
collect $360,000,000 when we only need
$225,000,000, and hoard up the balance
in the Treasury? We have no right to
collect one dollar more from the people
than is necessary to run the govern
ment.”
A Pli ystclan’s Advice ol How to Gain
Healtb.
Harrisburg, Pa., March 30, 1881.
Nothing Is more charming and attractive
than a thoroughly healthy, perfectly formed
woman; a bright-eyed, rosy, laughing, joy
ous, happy-faced girl, one who finds keen
pleasure In merely living. An invalid wife
or mother is a constant object of sympathy
In an otherwise contented household. Happy
the home whose women folk eDjoy perfect
health. In my practice I have always re
commended sickly women to use Brown’s
Iron Bitters. In case of Irregularities, dys
pepsia, indigestion, heartburn, nausea, sour
stomach, nervousness and exhaustive de
bility, I find It- exceeds all other remedies as
a true medicinal tonic. It never fails to
gently soothe, refresh and strengthen the
general system, aud especially those parts
made weak by continued distress; and what
satisfies me most is, that the cures, although
in some instances gradual, are always per
manent. —M. D,
4f;orida
THE
IMPERISHABLE
PERFUME.
Murray & Lanman’s
FLORIDA WATER,
Best for TOILET, BATH,
and SICK ROOM.
r 11 -"-aa—■
Ryan’s Art Gallery.
I would beg leave to introduce to my patrons
and the first-class people of this city,
SENOR JOSE VILA,
OF MADRID,
WHO Is now located with me, and Is a
finished Artist in OIL PAINTING. Por
trait. Historical and Genre Abo PASTEL and
CRAYON from life, or copies of the dead. Any
work finished by this artist will be guaranteed
by me. The public are invited to call and see
specimens of his artistic skill.
’ D. J. RYAN.
pug
wlm
FOB *
RHEUMATISM,
Neuralgia, Sciatica, Lumbago,
Backache, Soreness of the Chest,
Gout, Quinsy, Sore Throat, Swell
ings and Sprains, Burns and
Scalds, General Bodily
Pains,
Tooth, Ear and Headache, Frosted
Feet and Ears, and all other
Pains and Aches.
No Preparation on earth equals St. Jacobs Oil
as a safe, sure, simple and eheap External
Remedy. A trial entails but the comparatively
trifling' outlay of 50 Cents, and every one suffer
ing with pain can have cheap and positive proof
of its claims.
Directions in Eleven Languages.
BOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS AND DEALERS
IN MEDICINE.
A. VOGZLER <fc CO.,
Baltimore, Md., 17. S. A.
sron
gRWN’s
IRON
BITTERS
BROWN’S IRON BITTERS are
a certain cure for all diseases
requiring a complete tonic; espe
cially Indigestion, Dyspepsia, Inter
mittent Fevers, Want of Appetite,
Loss of Strength, Lack of Energy,
etc. Enriches the blood, strength
ens the muscles, and gives new
life to the nerves. Acts like a
charm on the digestive organs,
removing all dyspeptic symptoms,
snch as tasting the food, Belching,
Heat in the Stomach, Heartburn,
etc. The only Iron Preparation
that will not blacken the teeth or
give headache. Sold by all Drug
gists at SI.OO a bottle.
BROWN CHEMICAL CO.
Baltimore, Md.
See that all Iron Bitters are made by Baoww Chbmicaa
Cos. and hare crossed red lines aud trade mark on wrapper.
BEWARE OF IMITATIONS.
For Mile by Lippman Bros, and Solomons & Cos.
Caxattvr.
rnsaciußKn by ** rnymcia.ns.
Prepared fronuL'fj i J tropical
fruit* V tu<i plants.
A lsdicioui and
freshing Fruit
f,2enge, Which
Serves the Purpose
of Pills aud Dis
agreeable Purgative
Medicines.
TROPIC FRSTT IdXITIVr is the ros%
preparation in the would for Constipation, bili
ousness, Headache, Piles, and all kindred Com
plaints. It act* pentlv, effectively, and is deli
cious to take. Cleansing the system thoroughly,
it impjwts vktor K mind aud hotly, and dispels
Melancholy. Hypochondria, fto. One trial con
vinces. Parked In brosuetl tin koxei only,
PRICE 25 and 00 CTS. SOLD BY fit DRUGGISTS.
LIPPMAN BROTHERS and OSCEOLA BUT
LER, Wholesale Agents.
ifo let Srts.
75 DIFFERENT STYLES
—OF—
TIN TOILET SETS.
Undoubtedly the BEST and CHEAPEST as
sortment in the city, at
CROCKERY HOUSE
-OF
JAS. S. SILVA,
140 BROUGHTON STREET.
Go there and see them, be astonished at the
remarkable LOW PRICES, then “cap the cli
max” by buying one.
tflothtng.
CLOTHING
Made to order by tbe oldest
Tailoring Establishment in
America JACOB REED’S
SONS, Philadelphia. Call and
see our heautiiul samples.
Davis Bros.fcCo.
BULL AND YORK STREETS.
REAOICK’S
Intelligence and Collection Agencr.
N. E. Corner Bull and Bryan streets,
FURNISHES servants and employes of al
kinds. Rents houses, lands, etc. Does
collecting and furnishes Information of all sort.
Address all communications to
FRANK M. BEADICK,
Proprietor.
UNIVERSALLY ACKNOWLEDGED
The Largest Tented Exhibition
IN THE WORLD.
THE GREAT FOREPAUGH SHOW I
rt#^ ILY TRopj c
.* 81l ..... —.
Now on its 17th Annual and first Extended
Grand Southern Tour, will exhibit af
ternoon and evening
TWO DAYS IN SAVANNAH,
MONDAY and TUESDAY, November 7 and 8.
EVERYTHING NEW FOR THIS SEASON.
Exhibits in addition to its myriad of marvelous
monopolized features, in the Great
CIRCUS IN TWO RINGS!
AND COLOSSAL
Menagerie & Trained Wlid Beast Show
85 SPECIAL FEATURES WHICH NO OTHER
SHOW CAN DUPLICATE:
I. 80 PERFORMING ELEPHANTS.
8. SBOO,OOO GORGEOUS ORIENTAL PA
GEANT, a living embodiment of Moore’s mas
terly poem, LALLA ROOKH’S DEPARTURE
FROM DELHI is represented in the streets
and is FREE FOR ALL No such beautiful
scene ever witnessed outside of the Orient.
3. TRAI' ED GIRIFFK, BROKEN TO DRIVE
IN HARNESS
4. TWENTY TWO TRAINED STALLIONS
AND PRETTY PONIES, performed by LEO
VON WESTE
5. GREAT TWO-RING CIRCUS and Double
Troupe.
6 Selbini & Villion Troupe of BYCICLE
RIDERS. First appearance in America.
Turn Somersau ts and form Pyramids upon
Bycicles going at a 80 mile speed.
7. The Great Clowns, BURKE, SEELEY,
ROBINSON and LAISCILL.
8. 3 HERBERT BROTHERS, the best Acro
bats living.
9. MARIE ASHBY, the London Equestrienne.
10. SAMUEL WATSON, England’s Champion
Rider
11. JENNIE EWERS, Heroine of the Flaming
Zone.
18. The intrepid Z ILA, who rides a Veloci
pede over a % inch wire 100 feet from the
ground, aud wheels her baby over the same
high wire; the most d.u-ing woman that ever
lived.
13. LOYAL, the Human Cannon ’Ball, who is
shot from a Cannon.
14. The largest collection of Animals ever
exhibited.
15. ROSINA-DUBSKY, the Hungarian Eques
trienne.
lfi. CHARLFS EWERS, Champion Hurd’e
Rider.
17. The Great Double Troupe of Leapers and
Tumblers.
18. Trained Tigers, Lions, Hyenas, Apes and
other Animals
19. Six-ton Black Unicorn, of Holy Writ
20. Special Circus for Boys and Girls in a
Separate Ring.
21. All the Wild Beasts Fed in the Presence
of the Audience.
22 “The Beautiful Woman,” LOUISE MON
TAGUE, who received TEN THOUSAND DOL
LARS from Mr. FOREPAUGH, which sum sha
was awarded as the CHOSEN LOVELIEST
LADY IN THE L AND This charming lady
will appear in the GREAT FREE STREET PA
GEANT as the poet’s heroine, LALLA ROOKH.
23. More Human Curiosities, Giants and
Dwarfs; more Horses, Cars, Cages, People,
Performers, Animals, Arenas, Canvas, Sensa
tions, Seats Cost More, Spends More, Receives
More, and gives more satisfaction than any
show in the world.
24. Sexton’s United Monster Bands, unsur
passed in the Union.
25. The Largest and Smallest Flephants.
Remember the Name. FOREPAUGH, pro
nounced 4-PAW. Exhibitions Afternoon aud
Evening, at usual hours.
Admission 75 cents for adults and 50 cents
for children Excursion Trains on all Rail
roads at reduced rates.
GttAND STREET PAGEANT,
AT 10 A. M„ NOVEMBER 7.
Branch Ticket Office open November 7 and 8
at Connor’s Book Store, where only a slight ad
vance will be required.
ADAM FOREPAUGH, Sole Proprietor.
©rocmfS ana i'roristons.
“PEACHES.
PUT UP IN 3 POUND CANS WITH RICH
HEAVY SYRUP, NEARLY EyUAL
TO PRESERVES.
—AT—
A. M. & C. W. WEST’S.
Always on Hand,
A FULL SUPPLY OF
Fine roasted coffee.
FINE RAW COFFEE
FINE GREEN and BLACK TEAS.
CANTON GINGER PRESERVES.
CANNED GOODS.
NEW’ RAISINS.
NEW CITRON.
NEW CURRANTS.
NEW NUTS.
—AT—
F. L. GEORGE & CO’S,
JUST RECEIVED,
A FRESH SUPPLY OF
Table chocolate.
SWEET CHOCOLATE.
BREAKFAST BROMA.
MAILLARD and TABLE BRCMA.
HOMEOPATHIC COCOA.
BERMUDA ARROWROOT.
DURKEE’S SALAD DRESSING.
EDaM CHEESE
APPLE BUTTER in 5 pound pails.
PEARL SAMP.
For sale by
TILTON & STANTON,
31 WHITAKER STREET.
PRETZELS, PRETZELS.
ZWIEBACK.
BLOATERS, DUTCH HERRINGS.
MALAGA GRAPES.
IMPORTED SAUSAGE.
TRUFFLE LIVER SAUSAGE.
MUNSTER, LIMBURGEIt, SWISS and EDAM
CHEESE.
All fresh and of the best quality, for sale
AT—
NICHOLAS LANG & BKO.’S,
BEEFTONGUES.
Choice Beef Tongues
50 CENTS EACH.
For sale by
JAS. McGRATH & CO.
J. W. SCHLEY, WM. SCHLEY,
Savannah, Ga. New York.
JAS. W. SCHLEY & C 0
WHOLKBALE DEALERS 11$
flay, Grain aud Provision.?,
172 BAY STREET, SAVANNAH, GA.
XX} E call the attention of our country friends
TV to our large and assorted stocks of
CORN, HAY, OATS. BRAN, BACON, FLOUR.
FEEDS and RUSi’PROOF OATS. All orders
will receive immediate attention. Inquiries
promptly answered.
Maplewood Institute
1740 R young ladies and gentlemen, 18 miles
’ west of Philadelphia, located on the
Philadelphia and Baltimore Central Railroad.
Courses of Btudy English, Scientific and Classi
cal. Students prepared for U. 8. Naval and
Military Academies, and the best American
colleges. A thorough chemical department.
Reading taught by a first-class Elocutionist.
Penmanship by a Professor, master of the
beauties of the art. A home-like department
for little boys. Fourteen Instructors.
JOSEPH BHORTLIDGE (Yale College), A.
M., Principal, Concord vllle, Del. Cos., Pa.

m imii mm
OF WINTER GOODS WE HEREWITH ANNOUNCE. OUR NEW STOCK CONSISTS OF
AO tie Novelties of tie Season!
We offer upwards of 10,000 pieces of desirable DRESB GOODS from the lowest to the finest
grades, in Black and all the new colorings.
ora SATINS AND SILKS
Comprise a full line of Blacks as well as all colors for Trimming and Dresses in Plain and In
Gros Grain. Our figures are unexceptional!? low.
Steel, Jet, Beaded and Silk Fringes.
We offer S5 different styles from 25c. to $2 50 per yard. These goods were selected with great
care and will be found to be extremely handsome and cheap.
PASSHMENTBBIES, SILI CORDS AID TASSES.
We invite all in search of such goods to examine our complete assortment before making a se
lection, for we positively offer a very beautiful assortment at specially low prices.
WATERPROOFS AND CLOAKINGS.
CLOAKS for LADIES’ and CHILDREN.
ULSTERS AND SHAWLS.
DOLMANS and WALKING JACKETS.
In thest goods we claim to have the largest and best line at positively bargain prices,
BUMETS, COMFORTABLES, BED SPREADS,
From 5Cc. to sls. In this class, as in all others, we defy competition.
DO NOT FAIL TO 00 TO lEISBEIN’S.
OUR BAZAR!==-===OUR BAZAR!
OUR BAZAR!
OUR BAZAR!==—i=z=—OUß BAZAR!
Is crowded with bargains of every description. A visit to his attractive place on our second
floor will amply repay. We especially call attention to our
Liadies’ Underwear,
Which will be found superior and cheaper to any in the city.
DAVID WEISBEIN & CO.
B. 'h\ MCKENNA.,
13*7 Brougliton Street.
A TIMEUY SUGGESTION.
COLD WEATHER
Is coming upon us. It will come when least expected, and perhaps when least desired. It will
strike with a suddenness and severity that will be hurtful to those of us who have not at hand
BLANKETS, CLO AKS.FLAN IELS
AND WOOLEN GOODS generally, which are to be found at the store of B. F. Me TENS A.
Get these necessary articles at once. To be without them when the first cold snap comes
is exposing one's self to severe cold, pneumonia, rheumatism, and kindred ills. Lose no time,
procure the means of defense at once, and be prepared to bid defiance to Jack Frost by calling
at the store of B. F. McKENNA for BLANKETS, Plain, Twilled and MEDICATED FLANNELS,
Real WELCH FLANNELS, BASKET and OPERA FLANNELS. SUITING FLANNELS snd
WATERPROOFS, in all shades. Ladies’, Gents’ and Children’s MERINO UNDERVESTS, Ladies’
and Gents’ MEDICATED UNDERVESTS.
CLOAKS, DOLMANS AND JACKETS
In newest and most fashionable designs, and other desirable winter goods at low prices.
B. IT. MoKENNA
GrUTMAIV BROS.
OFFERS THE BEST SELECTED STOCK OF
Fringes, Broideries, Passementeries,
ORNAMENTS, LOOPS. BUTTONS, HOSIERY, KID GLOVES, LACFS, NOVELTIES, BELTS.
BAGS, UNDERWEAR, CORSETS, HANDKERCHIEFS,
GENTS’ FURNISHING GOODS,
CLOAKS, DOLMANS, ULSTERB. BLANKETS. COMFORTS, SHAWLS, STEEL FRINGES and
BUTTONS,
Black Velvets and Plushes.
Receiving NOVELTIES daily. Balance of our stock of DRY GOODS below cost.
GrTJrS?JMLJ±.JXr SDFLOSL,
141 Brougliton Street.
&c.
ALLKN fc
DEALERS IN
Furniture, Carpets, Floor Oil Cloths, Mattings,
WALL PAPER, WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, etc. We invite your attention to our large
and well selected stock of FURNITURE, CARPETS and OIL CLOTHS. We have on hand
at ail times, in our Six Story Btore, Nice WALNUT BEDROOM SETS, POPLAR and PAINTED
BEDROOM SETS, PARLOR SETS in Hair Cloth, Rep and Raw Silk, from S4O to S3OO, COMMON
BUREAUS, FINE BUREAUS. A choice selection of MAPLE CHAIRS and ROCKERS WAL
NUT CHAIRB and ROCKERS of every description. COMMON BEDSTEADS. WALNUT BED
STEADS, DINING ROOM FURNITURE of all grades, such as TABLES, SAFES and SIDE
BOARDS. OFFICE DESKS and CHAIRS.
OUR CARPET DEPARTMENT
18 UNUSUALLY FULL. BRUSSELS CARPETS. INGRAIN CARPETS in large quantities, NA
PIER, COCOA and CHINA MATTINGS, RUGS. OIL CLOTHS, CRUMB CLOTHS, MATS, etc..
WALL PAPER, WINDOWjBjJADES. LACE CURTAINS, LAMBREQUINS, CORDS and TASSELS
and CORNICES, REPS, CRETONNES and RAW SILKS, in all grades, for upholstering purposes.
AliXxZlX cb XiIXDSAT,
169 and 171 Brougliton Street, - ..... savanna!), Ga.
HURRAH FOR THE
SOUTHERN FURMTURE HOUSE!
The Great Success of the Southern Furniture House.
THE CHEAPEST HOI SE IN TOWN. Exchanges NEW FURNITURE for OLD. Call and give
us a trial.
S. HERMAN, Proprietor,
170 BROUGHTON NTRKET.
©rgaus.
jjMjV I Every Iniyer should
M That guarantees good
LmJLJLmJLJh Every day irork and
VW>*. lv ' u ‘Y i ' Jf 1 u s£ Years of service.
9endJ<tr lUmtratai Catalogue. ESTEY OR6AN CO., Atlanta, 6a.
~—l .l: 1 - .....
******** ***
wHinimnt ***** **************
JOHN FLAXNERT. JOHN L. JOHNSON.
JOHN FLANNERY & (’O.
Cotton Factors,
- —AND—
Commission Merchants,
KELLY’B BLOCK, BAY STREET,
Savannali, Ga.
Bagging and iron ties for sat f at
current market rates T
PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO AIL
BUSINESS ENTRUSTED TO Ua
LIBERAL CASH ADVANCEB MADE ON
CONSIGNMENTS OF COTTON
WM. W. GORDON. HKNRY BRIGHAM
W. W. GORDON & CO.
(Successors to Tison 4 Gordon),
Cotton Factors
—AND—
Commission Merchants,
NO. 112 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA.
Bagging direct from factories and
ARROW TIES JUST LANDED FROM S
8. “IRENE MORRIS,” FURNISHED CUSTOM
ERS AT LOWEST MARKET PRICES.
ADVANCES MADE ON CONSIGNMENTS
OF COTTON.
T. W. ESTES. A. C. McALPIK.
ESTES & McALPIK,
Cotton Factors
-AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
108 BAY STREET,
SAVANNAH, ... GEORGIA.
F. M. FARLEY,
Cotton Factor,
94 BAY STREET,
P.O. Box 233. SAVANNAH, GA,
©ammisston iiifrrfeams.
and. h. Baldwin! Joseph hull
GEO. J. BALDWIN.
BALDWIN & COMPANY,
DKALKRS IN
Fertilizers, Bagging, Ties
—AND—
Commission Merchants,
18 WILLIAM STREET, N. Y.
116 Bay Street, Savannah, Ga,
AGENTS FOR THE
IMPROVED LIGHT DRAFT
Gullet “Magnolia” Gin.
—ALSO—
The Hull “Sea Island” Cotton Uln,
A PERMANENT and successful improve
ment upon all other Sea Island Gins, mak
ing as good if not better lint, and at the same
time doing twice the work.
“JULIUS HUNT,
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
AND DEALER IN
RICH.
Business solicited. Orders executed with
promptness. Advances made on consignments.
106 BAY STREET. SAVANNAH.
Stotts, ftarduatt, <£tc.
Miff HOPKINS,
167 BROUGHTON STREET, SAVANNAH,
DEALER IN—
Stoves, Hardware,
CUTLERY.
CONTRACTOR FOR
Tin M|g M. Work.
Sole Agent for the unrivalled
FARMER GIRL
—AND
SOUTUERN HOME
Cooking Stoves,
CONTAINING all modern improvements.
Their popularity is attested by the large
increased sale in Georgia and Florida. Send
for illustrations and price list.
& T crrcstftshirf £aucc.
THE GREAT SAUCE
OF THE WORLD.
LEA & PERRIN S’
Imparts the most delicious taste and zest to
EXTRACT
of a I,KTTKIt from wC. J
aMEDICALGEN- Iff SOUPS,
T4LEMAN at Had- gl
ms, to his brother HI GRAVIES,
at WORCESTER, 3$
“TeUlfeA & PER- F,SI1 ’
RIXS that their EESSSJI
sauce Is highly es- ! f- J ZyUg MOT Ac COLD
teemed In India,
and is In my opln- Hiu.ASjjjjS MEATS,
lon. the most I'ala-Igwvjyi
table, as well asHiSSSI.. , ,
the most T he’" g lß < *'*' Tli '** Ac *
some sauce that j
ay
Signature is on every bottle of GENUINE
WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE
Sold and used throughout the world.
JOHN DUNCAN'S SONS,
AGENTS FOR THE UNITED STATES.
NEW YORK.
gubliratioujS.
MARY J. HOLMES.
JUST published: MADELINE. A splendid
new novel by Mrs Mary J Holme*, who.-e
novels sell so enormously, and are read and re
read with such interest. Beautifully bound,
price $1 50.
***Also handsome new editions of Mis.
Holmes’ other works—Tempest and Sunshine —
Lena Rivers—Edith Lyle—Edna Browning—
Marian Grey—West Lawn—Forest House —
etc., etc.
ALSO, SOU) BY ALL BOOKSELLERS:
MAY AGNES FLEMING.
A CHANGED HEART. Another intensely
interesting new novel by May Agnes Fleming,
author of those capital novels—Guy Earls
court’s Wife—A Wonderful Woman-Mad Mar
riage-Silent and True—Lost for a Woman—
etc. Beautifully bound, price $1 50.
G. W. CARLETON & CO.,
Punlisbers, N. Y. City.
CIDER.
We are receiving our first lot of the new crop
SWEET CIDER,
IN THE MARKET.
H. MYERS & BROS.,
Agents Duffy Cider Company.
AssT JU
B V REP^ A RD am and
flrst-class shop <Jn flnV° tal to ch “
Whitehall street, Atlanta Ga bY RfcJ
WANTED, consumers „ f *'
PINE andT^GHTWOtf!, t >
dere sent me |. y Cut <-r in ,P[\
w T f- v,or
will be pro m p t | v fillet a ''
"YY ANTED, purchasers f, r
SPLIT SEAT CHAIR?.
fL. babbit j> a i„, .
SLss&.
between Bull an j V.TiitaVer.W '"
■for grnL^
P°® F?. ENT - a Hall. suitahi^fFTT ss :
1 drtll room. Apply ...
IT OR PENT, a nieelv
i 57 York street. 1
fyo RENT, from Noveml. r .
-A- sirable e&rriaev rsnneite ik.
ner of Bay and West Broad s?r R ? uth Si
Jfor SaiT""
p'OP SALE, a Plantation j n
0,1 < entral I{ ~lr . a,
nsh, containing you i aciv , f ; s
clea ed, fenced and in goo J
fine dwelling houve, gf n a . 1 ‘* n ' itl ?
every kind; an orchkrd wit, ‘ J r '
Novemner For further . fr ir.j
E. F. NEUFVILLE No -?r '**
Savannah. ' ' *- '‘‘“Yerciai^
F
business For particular, '■ / U!> of
25t West Baltimore street. l!a!ti’i,?, r , >1 „ ? 4
JpORSALE, lot on the northwest
Lincoln and New Houston streets,
easy. Apply to
l’ C. BA COS in
|7 0K SALE OR RENT, a RICK PtTR.
I of 450 acres of fresh
neur, in the parish of Iberia | v : n. „ Uk *l
large and well known estate ff “7'
The soil is exceedingly fertile, an j 3
supplied every condition to make
desirable location tor profits - " u *\
the State. Water for irrigation t, ul “f
portant factor in this crop, is to'^tj o '
and easily at any season dtsirw< M ?
single operation required but
with machinery, and with hut a tS
labor, and at less than half the mS*
pense ess3ntial to the r.ver pfi®?
tailed information apj.lv to K wvS
Esq., of Messrs, Maxwell a lVaJe \,?
delet street. New Orleans, ~r
ed at Grand Marias post. Dice. La U
I.^Olt SAI E, tlie Steam Pron t .|ier~ilnJ
T DRAKE; length 98 4 feet denft J
breadth U.l; feet, tonnage ® j
18,4. New bottom Octotj,-- ts-i, aJJ
a , n . d retllrn J tube - Boiler buat<2
! 8 ’, : Compound engines, consumejO
in —4 hours. L)raft fi.fi fot t litadeJ ThsiJ
especially ceiled for carrying erainLi
Capacity for carrying B.PO busies n i
she has a steam hoister and .j rtick
The above bteamer is in every wav mis
for the coasting trade, and especially
ing rice or phospate in bulk. *
For particulars ajmly to (iFuui
RIECKE, .34 Broad street, Charbston l:
STEAM VESSELS FOR
and passenger proje-iler. J!5
two years old. Iron passenger propdi,
feet long (new). Iron tug, surface
densing (new). Several cheap second
tugs, all flzes. SAMUEL HOI.MEt
KINDLINGS, OAsTpiXe!
HQHTWOOD. For sale ty
BACON & BitOCI
BALE, 1 So-FLANEK cd MATui
Richardson Merriman o Cos. maks Rj
26 wide 5 thick, and matches P'.xr, thiet
splendid machine at a great bargain. (
new $1,600. and is practical!-, as „ooi ej t
Fuli description, price and any fumieri
ticulars given upon appiicatim. Ac
Lx‘2 Fox l,6it
i itchbury. Ms
mtmmmmmmwmmmmmmmmHmmußmmm. .rw—g—^
i-'otimi.
FpiiE Drawing of the Little HabaM
X take place FhIDAY, November 4,:
Whole tickets sl, Halves 5Cc.
CHANGE OF SsCUEDILE
Superixtendent’s Office 8., s. AS.HI
Savannah, < 'cteber 29158 L
ON and after NOVEMBER Ist the foils
Schedule will be observed:
MONDAYS, TUESDAY'S. THUBSDAIiI
FRIDAYS.
OUTWARD, I IN'VVAIii).
LEAVE I ARRIVE I LEAVE I lit'
SAVANNAH | SAVANNAH | ISLE HOPE. | MONTO
6:25 p. m | 8:38 a. M | 8:10 A. m. | 1:31
Monaay morning eariy tram fur Jl.llll
ery only at 6:25 A. M.
WEDNESDAYS, SATURDAYS XxFl
DAYS.
LEAVE ARRIVE \ LEAVE ISLE LSI
SAVANNAH. SAVANNA S. j OF KOPE. j MCSISI
10:25 a. h. 8:38 a. k 8:10 a. r 7:3 t
*3:00 p. m. 1:20 p. u 12:50 p. *. 12:15 1.
6:25 p. M. I 5:38 p. m I 5:10 p, xj 4 Sit
•Sundays this is the last outward trstt
Saturday nights last train 6:5!), instea’c!'
EDW J. TKuMiH.
3'ipcrinteKia
COAST LINS' KAILROiI
SUBURBAN SCHEDULE.
ON and after MONDAY, October 10tW
the following sphednle wii! be obstw
“OUTWARU, | INWIKD.
LEAVE LEAVE
SAVANNAH. THCN'JERBOLT. SOXAVifI
6:45 A. M. 7:45 a. M. 7
10:35 am. 12:50 p.m :W.
3:35 P. M. 5:30 p.m. 5:40 Rl
6:35 p. M. | 7:05 p. u. T:lsf J
Saturday night last car leaves city a: ■ '■
SUNBAY SCHEDULE. .
In the morning leave Savannah at ct .
and 12:00 o’clock. In the evening ewT
hour from 2:35 until 5:00 o clock. -A*
leaves Thunderbolt a! 7:00 o’c'ock v *
FRANK LAFXJb
* Snperl o! 7^
mat- _
M. L. HARNETT,
Formerly of the
Marshall Sous*. Screven
HARNETT i®
(Formerly PLANTERS’ EGTZU
MARKET SQUARE. - - EAYAKMW
HARNETT & G EOBO
PROPKIEIOBS.
BATES $2 00 PER I)i!
THI3 favorite family Hotel, undet j* 1
management, is reeoinmen - g
excellence of its CUISINE, jjqJ
FORTS. PROMPT ATTENTION sod
RATE RATES
SUtt
TLiY THE PUB®
Mohawk Witt
ONLY SOLD BY
I>. B. LESTDB
21 WHITAKER STREET.
0 part ucrsh i p JI cn i
NOTICE
A
instant, between DAV IDWEL - E p#M
nah, Georgia, General Partne ,
J. BREMER, of the cl '>, (f three
Special Partner for a term lbe *
from the lh October. : >• V
name of DAY ID \\ USM-A A Dry <3
the transaction ot a M< ?rt 1 u <,M 1 .
Business in Savannah, Georg". .. . ~„rW
Partner has contributed to
the sum of Thirty’ Thousar and DoU
Certificate b fl*ed
Court, Chatham
EDWARD^Jj^g
TOMBS AND WJ®
TTOTELS, Churches and P. j re fer
11 For specimens cf wor In*^
Mills, Arnold *“d CaseT haii’ mi l
venture and the Groo'er j, liß4 fur 3
monument) in Laure Grove.
Estimates guaranteed- wOOD Architect*
210 Broadway* Ne

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