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Savannah morning news. [volume] (Savannah) 1868-1887, October 26, 1886, Image 2

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GEORGIA'S ANNUAL FAIR.
‘OPENING OF THE I XHI BIT ION
UNDER FINE AUSPICES.
The Display Fxo-cted to be Finer than
fa Any Previous Tear Tremendous
Crowds ef Teople Expected to Visit
the Grounds—Xo-Morrow to be the Bis
It ay.
Macon, Ga., Oct. 25,-Tbe State Fair
Opened to-day under splendid auspices.
Although the dust was stifling in ttie city
It caused no inconvenience at tbe park,
where it bad been pretty successfully
laid. On all the roads tbe trains brought
fi> a number of people, mostly exhibitors,
and by 11 o’clock the park contained a
lively tbiong. The number of visitors
was not large. It b( inti generally under
stood that tbe fair would not be fully un
der way until Wednesday,. tbe interim
being tilled by exhibitors getting their
displays in position and shape.
THE GROUNDS.
The grounds are iu perfect order, not
withstanding no ram has fallen in such a
lone time. Tbe management has prudent
ly arranged to have them watered daily,
which Is (lone by a steamer, the river near
by furnishing tbo water. Tbe dust, in
Ibis manner, is perfectly laid and the
comfort ot the visitor heightened. In
general appearance the park never looked
better nor in re .nviting. Capt. Frank S.
Johnson, of tbe Public Property Commit
tee. has been energetic in putting .he sev
eral buildings iu trim, while Park-keeper
Fennell has tbe grounds in as good order
as if they were a flower garden. Under
the lingering influence of an Indian sum
mer tbe grass is still iresh and green, be
sides being neatly trimmed, and the trees
In thick iollage. The flowers and shrub,
bery in luxuriant growth add to and com
plete tbe beauty ot tne picture.
SCENE ON OPENING DAY.
The scene at the pai k to-day, opening
flay, was an animated one. The Presi
dent and Secretary of the fair, tbe vice
presidents and superintendents, besides
their assistants, were all ou band In their
respective offices, with their coats off and
sleeves rolled up, busy as bees, answer
ing numerous letters oi inquiry,assigning
apace, booking entries, tagging them, and
in a dozen otUer way s starting off the ma
chinery of what is destined to be the
largest and most successful tair in the
history of tbe society. About the budd
ings, too, were presented busy scenes.
Tbe click ol the hammer was heard in all
tbe departments, which were tilled with
lardy exb biters getting their displays in
order, i hey are coming in constantly,
and it is not expected that the entries will
lie complete for several days. Outside
tbe buildings work als o goes on,being en
gaged in principally by tne hucksters and
the proprietors of the sideshows, arrang
ing their staDds, booths, galleries, tents,
etc.
RUN OVER THE DEPARTMENTS.
Although the eutnes are oy no means
complete, space is being rapidly tilled,
and me effect already Is decided and
pleasing. Tbe displays are handsomer
and more extensive man ever before, and
it would be a bard matter to decide whicn
department excels.
In Machinery Hall tbe number of cot
ton gins on exhibition is larger tban ever
before. A leature of this exhibit is anew
Toller gin, exhibited by Col. H. D. Capers,
■wnicb is oue of tbe centres of attraction
for machinists and cotton men.
It is now learned that the Mason cotton
harvester cannot be gotten here. This
will prove disappointing news, as it
would have added untold interest to this
particular department.
In other respects, however, the displays
in this ball are far above the average in
every respect, and will afford an hour of
solid Interest to the visitor. The exhibits
are of tne usual order, such as cotton
gins, feeders and condensers, corn mills,
grist mills, saw mills, stationary and
portable engines, and all manner of farm
ing implement, water wheels, etc,
PREMIUM HALL.
In tbis hall tbe most aciive prepara
tions have been made. It is here that five
agriculiural clubs make displays, occu
pying the entire first floor. The Holton
and Bolingbroke displays occupy the two
ends oi the ball, making a complete and
most interesting show in themselves. Mr.
Edgar Boss has in hand tbe Holton dis
play, and Farmer W ad ley the Bolingbroke
exhibit. Each have their special designs.
Into which have been emptied tbe bins
and cribs and barns and fields of Bibb and
Monroe o >unties. Besides these, whica
may be mentioned as tbe principal ones,
there are others ol more or less pretension
and atiraetiveness. taking up every avail
able inch oi space iu the hall.
FLORAL HALL.
This ball is well tilled with mer
cautile displays of various kinds,
all well arranged and very attrac
tive. Tne second floor is covered with a
variety of other displays, including
the department of needlework, which is
exceptionally large and handsome. On
the third floor ol this building is the art de
partment, which is literally jammed with
art material of all kinds, Inc. tiding sev
eral largo and very line collections of
drawings, paintings, panels, placqucs,
etc., from all pans of the Stale. This dis
play is said t<> bo ahead of anything of the
kind ever before made at the lair.
AMONG THE HORSES.
A talk with Steve Hughes, the well
known horseman, shows that the display
of horse flrh is the finest ever made at
the park. He savs the racing will be the
best in Macon in rnanv years. He has
attended a number of fairs here, and has
been on the grounds since August. The
following horses are now on the grounds:
Fred Neal, ol Nashville, has Hauler
Brooks and Ur. Alinont.
A. J. McKinnau, of Pulaski, Tenn., has
Jim Bone.
Ed. fleers, of Nashville, has Ben Starr,
Louise Monday and •-uminerlek.
J. A. Bland, of Nashville, lias Tumbler,
Red Jim. Sam Jones, Plainer aud Oltra
band.
Sam Mclntosh, of Marietta, has Miss
fconley and other horses.
Capt. Odum, of Columbus, has several
runners, and so has Mr. McCarthy,of Ten
nessee.
Steve A. Hughes has Troy, Ivory, H. A.
Madger, Jr., aud several other young
horses.
Mr. H. M. Blanch, of Sparta, has Lucy
Cobb, one of the prettiest trotters on the
ground.
John Arnold, of Charleston, has Lucy
Bell, Have Maddox, and others.
J. A. Brown, ot Macon, has Sunny
South, a lour year-old iroiter.
A. B. Cook, of Macon, has secured stalls
for a string ol seven horses belonging to
Maj. W. F. Anderson.
Sam Salter, ol Lee county, has a num
ber ot borses, including Granby, Jr.
JacksonjG. Smith, ol BarnesMllo, the
great Norman horseman, has his large
Stock ol Norman steeds.
Besides the above, which are among the
finest, could be mentioned almost as many
more.
THE POULTRY SHOW
is quite large and attractive. In this de
partment may be mentioned a display of
filteen coops ny Capt. Frank A. Henry, a
display of Wyandotte* by Maj. A. C.
Knapp, and a display of ten tine coops by
Ur. George Matthews, ol .savannah.
OKNKHAL NOTES.
The State Fair no dais are on exhibition
In Holotnon’a windows, aud are very
handsome.
Sixteen borsea trotn Hagerstown, Md.,
wcreeutersd bv telegraph yesterday.
The Cities.o L<ek aud bale Company
have an Inutrestlng exhibit.
Exeura ou t.ckets aie nclug oCer< and by
all the railroads ui cue lata lor luc round
trig.
Tne grounds, including the mile track,
have received two heavy wettings, and
will be kept entirely iree from dust during
| the lair. This will be looked alter by
Chief Jones, of the Macon fire depart
ment.
Nineteen street cars have been put on
the line to the park to run during the en
tire fair.
Mr. A. B. Etes, of Blacksbear, has a flue
display ot sea island cotton.
President Hopkins, of Emory College,
exhibits one of the engines made by the
students of that oollege.
Tne accommodations for visitors will
be amp e, as the new Hotel Lanier aud
several new and commodious boarding
houses have recently been thrown open.
CUPID CAUSES CRIME.
Two Schoolboys Dove the Same
Girl and One Kills the Other.
Louisville, Oct. 25.—A special says:
“Alexander Hoard and John Paxton,
schoolboys, and rivals in love, stood in a
store at New Frankfort, Ind., yesterday.
Their sweetheart. Miss Inez Hollis,
passed by going to school. Hoard threw a
kiss to her and Paxton, enraged, knocked
him in tbe bead with a stick, fractur
ing his skill), and 'hen stamped his
face to a jelly. Paxton seemed a mad
man and foamed at tae mouth, and efore
he could be captured rushed to the woods
waving bis bands aud shrieking. Hoaid
will die. Both are sons of prominent
farmers of Scott county. Great excite
ment prevails. Tbe young lady remains
by tbe bedside of her dying ipver.”
A REAR EATS A CHILD.
Horrible Fate of a Little One Who
Got Too Near a Pet.
Cleveland, 0., Oct. 25.—This morning
Rosa, the 2-year-old daughter of Henry
Doernbreck, a saloon keeper, met with a
horrible death, being almost eaten alive
by a bear. Toe little one was playing in
her tamer’s back yard, and got through
tne tenee into tbe yard of a neighbor
named Kerns, who kept a bear chained in
tbe rear of bis lot. The child ventured
too near the bear, which knocked her
down and commenced devouring her.
The body was horribly mutilated before
the ohild could be rescued. The owner of
the bear was arrested on acharge of man
slaughter.
Wrecked Off Cape Churchill.
Winnipeg, Oct. 25.—Capt. Hawles, of
tbe Hudson Bay Company’s ship Owen,
arrived yesterday overland from Hudson
Bay. He reports that on the voyage trom
London to York Factory, while doubling
Cape Churchill, a burricane arose which
drove tbe ship ou the rocks, battering her
sides in. The crew of thirteen, and the
passengers, consisting of a missionary
and bis family and doctor, escaped to the
shore safely, and made their nay to York
Factory by boats. The crew came over
land after enduring great hardships. The
ship and cargo are a total loss While
coining trom York Factory the party met
Col. Gilder, in company with n s party of
voyageurs, en rouie for Hudson Bay.
Georgia Central’s Room,
Birmingham, Ala., Oct. 25.—A con
tract has been iet lor building the first 27
miles oi tbe Georgia Central rai'road’s
extension from Good water, Ala., to
this city. The completion of tbs gap
with tbe Memphis and Birmingham road
now building and known as tne Kansas
City route, which tbe engineers say will
be finished by July 1 next, will give the
Nnrtnwest a direct short line railway
connection with the Noutbeastern Gulf
coast. The Georgia Central company
has bought $60,000 worth ot unimproved
property in tbis city, adjoining the recent
purchase by the Kansas City road, to be
used for depot and machine shop sites.
Burning of a Distillery.
Louisville, Oct. 25.— A special savs
the large Welch distillery near Owens
boro. Ky„ owned by Triplett & Walden,
was burned this ntoruiug. The loss is
$30,000.
exploded by the flames.
WasuixgtoX, Oct. 25.—A fire broke
out about midnight in McCormick s gro
cery store, situated on Pennsylvania ave
nue, between Second and Third streets,
southeast, which spread to adjoining
buildings and destroyed property valued
at $50,000. During the progress oi the fire
a barrel of gasoline exploded, seriously
injuring twelve tiersons, none of whom,
however, were fatally burned.
Expensive Insurance.
New York, Oct. 25.—At the National
Convention of the Brotherhood of Loco
motive Engineers to-day discussion of
ways and means for reducing the assess
ment in the insurance association was
carried on. with the result of discovering
the general tieliet that the benefits were
too large. Now a brother losing a limb,
or arm, his sight or hearing, receives
$3,000, and in case of his death his repre
sentative gets that amount. The assess
ments have aggregated in the past year
SOO per capita, and the men say this is
more than they can stand.
A Bookkeeper in Canada.
Chicago, Oct. 25.— Wm. Holmgreen,
bookkeeper lor Shourds, Story <4 Kasper,
jewelers at Randolph and State streets,
"uas been missing since Tuesday and is
believed to be in Canada. He is abort
SIO,OOO in his accounts, lie had been
with the firm eight years. Mr. Kasper
was seen bv a reporter to-day but refused
to talk about the affair. “Something is
wrong and Holmgreen is gone, and we
don’t know where ho is,” was ail he would
say.
A Hoy Murders a Farmer.
Lebanon, Mo.. Oct. 25.—0tt0 Hillig, n
fanner living t welve miles from here, was
snot and fa'allv wounded yesterday after
noon by Charles Molot, the 12-year-old
son ot a neighbor. Young Molot was
throwing stones at Hillig’s two little
daughters when their father approached
| and frightened him away. He ran to bis
home, procured a shotgun, returned and
J tired a charge into Htllig’s body, fatally
i wounding him.
Ilowe’s tireat liecortl.
Springfield, Mass., Oct. 25.— XV. A.
1 Ilowe to-day made twenty-two miles in
i titty-nine minutes on Hampden Park. He
made twenty-two miles aud 150 yarils In
an hour. He began to beat his own best
bioyole records at lour miles, and now
bolds everything from the quarter of a
mile to twenty-two mile* Inclusive, be
hides the hour lecord.
Montreal’s Labor Delegates.
Montreal, Oct. 25.—The Montreal
delegates to the Knights ot Labor Conven
tion at Richmond, Va., have returned. It
is understood that efforts may be made by
i amending the constitution to satisfy the
j Roman Catholic authorities of this
province.
The Northwest iievei iiiueut.
Winnipeg, Man.. Oct. 25.—The North
west Council lias decided to appoint a
committee ol eleven members to advise a
ech> me lor dividing the territories into
pryvinces and securing responsible gov
ernment at the earliest possible moment.
1,000 Out lor One.
Chester. Pa.. Dot. 25. A strike oe
curteti at the Edystone print works tn.
day on account ol a printer's wages not
being increased at Ids request, huU tin
entire works are stopped, about 1,000
bunds being made idle thereby.
('old ii lot lilt'd >i uni
Louisville. Ky., oct. 25.—After a
frc ndiy wrestling match yt-s erday, mar
! Will smsburg. William Broughton shit
and nsiu >'i< kdhd John W Istenbunt ami
: wounded WistsoiiUnl ’ b.oilier. The
i shoo lug was coid-biovdid.
SAVANNAH -MORNING NEW?: TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26,18861
jCAPT.HOLCOMBSMII.LIONS
j THE FORTUNE I, EFT BY A YAN
KEE IN THI ANTIPODES.
Tbe Cftptntn’H Surer.sfut Work at Trad
ing:— IIP Establishment at tbe Island
nt Yap —Elia Death at tbe Hands of
IslMudera.
From t7i* Few Vort .Iks.
In the quiet old Connecticut town of
Granby, about fitteen miles from Hart
ford, there has lived since colonial days a
fam.ly oi Holeombs. They were farmers,
like almost everybody else there, luto
one branch of tne family there was born
about sixty years ago Clayton P. Hol
comb. He had a brother and a sister.
Clayton when a boy resolved to leave the
homestead and seek his fortune out in
the world. He bad a passion for tbe sea,
though he bad never seen it, and before
be was 20 he went to New Bedlord
and shipped in a whaliug vessel before
the mast. His brother remained on the
homestead, while his sister, when shp
grew up, married a cigar maker in Suf
tield, Coun., named Manuel Gutierrez.
Yesterday Mrs. Mauuel Gutierrez came
to thla city to Beek information in the a'-
tempt she is making to claim from tbe
Spanish government the fortune whica
her brother, Capt. Clayton W. Holcomb,
is reported to have left, mainly at the
Caroline Islands in the south Uacilic. It
bas been reported in Spanish papers to
have been as great as $5,000,000.
It was not long at.er young Clayton
went before tbe mast that he became
Captain of the whaling ship Chandler
Price, which was sold at tbe time ot tbe
war and taken South as a part of the
“stone fleet.” He afterward commanded
other whaling vessels, and cruised a'.l
over the world. He was lucky and shrewd
and made money. He never forgot his
home, and wrote often to his mother and
sister. At long intervals he came home
to Granby. Tbe last time was seventeen
years ago. One day while on this last
visit he went to Hartford, and when he
returned home he told his sister that he
had made bis will.
“I don’t expect to die for some time
vet,” ne said, “but 1 can't tell what may
happen. I wanted to fix it so that if 1
should die my mother should have tbe use
of my property till her death, when, after
giving a little to my halt sifter, you shall
have half and my brother half. There is
enough of it, so that you will not need to
work any more. All l waut you to do is
to take care of it.”
Alter that he was heard of from all
quarters. He traded in furs from Alaska,
and made regular trips from san Fran
cisco. He wrote that he was growing
richer, and owned his own ship. Ten years
ago he started out trom Hong Kong to And
the wreck of the Pacific Mail steamship
Japan. He was the lucky one, and spent
some time in trying to raise her. ile sent
to England for cable lavers, but tbe under
current was too strong aud tbe work
had to be abandoned. Then he turned
his attenlion exclusively to the Caro
line Islands, the large archipelago in the
Pacific about five hundred miles east ot
the Philippines. He had been trading
w T ith the inhabitants ol tbe Central Car
olines for some time before, but his
shrewd head conceived the Idea of im
proving the islands lor mercantile pur
poses. Tbe islands had been claimed bv
Spain since Saavedra discovered them in
1528, but Spain bad done nothing for them.
When he first wenttriore there were no
white men on tne islands. He selected
the Island of Y'ap for his headquarters
and built a trading station there, which
was the first building on the island. Yap
is one ol the largest of the four hundred
or five hundred islands which form
the Central Caroline group. It is ten
miles iu length. From time to time
letters came to the little post office in
Granby for tbe Captain’s aged mother,
telling about his progress. He wrote that
there was an excellent harbor on tbe
southeast side of Y ap, that be was bring
ing goods from Hong Kong to trade lor
the coacoanuts, arums, betel nuts and
beeswax ot the natives. He said in one
letter that he had become owner of a large
fleet of merchant vessels, which plied
about among the islands and went back
a-id forth from Hong Kong and the Phil
ippines. He wrote that he bad built two
wharves and was constructing a third,
and about 1878 he wrote that ho had
bought from the Spanish government the
island ot Y'ap. It was still to be under
Spanish government, but all its revenue
was to accrue to him. The nearest Span
ish Consul was at Manila, in tbe Philip
pines. Then he went on building stores
and dwellings. The inhabitants of Y'ap
became more civilized loan their neigh
bors. Villages were laid out regularly
and streets were paved, and tbe Spanish
papers began to talk of tbe fabulous
wealth ol Capt. Holcomb.
Brother-in-law Manuel Gutierrez, who
had meantime moved his cigar shop to
mis city, saw the papers and kept them.
One winter's day in 1884 Mrs. Gutierrez,
who still staid with her mother in the
old homestead, got a letter Irotn the
Granby post office wnich brought the first
bail news. Capt. Holcomb hail written it
from Manila, where he had gone to ask
protection front the government. Capt.
Holcomb, in improving Yap, bad lined
his pockets, but had also made Yap a
place to be coveted. In 1884 a German
man 01-war sailed in, toreilown the Span
ish flag Irom the Captain’s station and
set up the flag of Germany. The Spanish
papers began to take up the outrage, and
prominently mentioned Capt. Holcomb,
whose name stood at the head of a peti
tion to King Alfonso to look out for his
flag.
All through the first part of 18,so no let
ter came from Capt. Holcomb. At last one
Uav Mr. Gutierrez saw in Los Novedades
t tie bare announcement that in May he had
been assassinated in the island ot l ap. It
vias about the time that the dispute be
tween Germany and Spain regarding Yap
and other islands was referred to tbe
Hope for arbitration. The Hope decided
in lavor ot Spain, though Germany was
allowed to keep coaling elusions and
s une plantations on tne islands. Mrs.
Gutierrez waited in vain for some infor
mation regarding the death of her brother.
In November she wrote to Secretary Bay
ard, and he replied Unit he
had heard nothing of Capt.
Holcomb’s death. Capt. nolenrnb iad
claimed at; American citizenship all his
tile, and at every port he entered. A few
months later she wrote to the American
Consul at Manila, who replied ttiat he
had had unofficial information. She wrote
to Secretary Whitney, to the American
i onsul at Hong Kong, to the Minister at
Madrid,and to all points that could pos-i
--biy give her information. Officially she
could get iiu information. Secretary Whit
ney said that a man-01-war hud reported
Capt. Holcomb’s death at Washing ton. and
lie aovised her to write to ( apt. AleGlen
sey at Yokohama. She did so, and re
ceived this reply:
U b, 8. Oilirtt, Toiodaim, .ItriK, )
Bej t. tl. iss.i. |
Jfc*. -Vrtfmsf o' fitl4rrrt. Uatt/urU county.
Conti.. V. S. A .:
MAIMM V.-ur letter of July 55 has iu-1
been rei i irsd. 'I he only information I run
give i"ii in regard to' the de-.ili of your
brother, l apt. l*. Ilolo.on *. 1- that lie u s
killed some time In Mu>. Is*;, b\ me intinto
iunis ot I- lent il I-ami, wlneo issiinioeit rear
the Aitmlruiiy 1-Innl heurd the story
from two of tae tan men who uoeoinpanii <1
h in, and one ol whom a I■ i tic '.oai ai 'lie
time he met 111. death, It see.ns he went in
the island for the purport* ol Inning . in
shell-from the natives, and white -land h„
upon tile this -Unwin < t item cloth luey sper and
linn, lie tell overboard it and Ivan nrag cl
utli- ri' Every man m the l><> ,1 as sounded,
tin they managed io get Hie best hack to me
b'|i.
I do not remember the name of the two
a> lies, nor dot I bring them aw av I am
also nil ore to led von Hie name of Ih snip or
ol any of b> r oifie. r-. I >|iaii or verj much
i leased If I Gould hold out Hi* rl gluiuii hope
that your mother might again meet her son,
but lam of tbe ouii.ion ti t there can be no
doubt • f Capt. H Vomb having met with his
death in the manner slated.
A-uring you that I deeply s'mpatbire wtih
▼our mother and yourself in v< ursn I liereavc
nient, X aui madam, very respectfully.
Jolts F. Mi GI.KN.EY,
Commander U. S. N.. l ommandiug Ossipee.
“I do not believe," said Mrs.'Gutierrez
to a reporter of the Sun. “that Capt. Hol
comb met his aeatu in tbai way. The
Spanish officials have manifested a singu
lar reticence about it. Tbe Spanish Con
sul here only the other day professed ab
solute ignorance of it. The Spanish pa
pers have suddenly cased io talk about
his deaita and h s enormous wealth. I
think there has been some underhanded
business about it, and f nave told the
Stale Departmental Washington so, but I
get n<> satisfaction. 1 want to get at the
truth.”
Capt. Holcomh’s will, which he made
seventeen years ago, when be was last
home, is still with tbe lawyer at Hartford,
ft will be opened soon and proven, and
steps wdl probably lie taken to force a
restitution of tli-> ’millions which Capt.
Holcomb controlled in the mercantile
busiuess of tbe Southern Pacific.
FATHER GIUSTINIANI.
A Priest YVho was Believed to Pos
sess Miraculous Power.
Baltimore, Oct. 28.—The ceremonies
attending the funeral of Father Giustini
ani, the late rector of the Catholic church
of the Immaculate Conception, drew out
to-day an unusually large number of peo
ple. for the dead father was looked upon
by all bis congregation as a man of more
extraordinary qualities tban tbe average
priest. He was regarded as a worker of
miracles, and tbe respect aud affection in
which he was held was fully shown in the
great grief displayed by tbe people of his
church to-day. Cardinal Gibbons was
tbe officiating prelate, and he was at
tended by all tbe most prominent clergy
of the city. Tne church was crowded
both at tbe early masses and the hign
mass of requiem.
F’atcer Giustiniani came here about
twenty years ago. He was of noble birth,
the eon of the Marquis of Giustiniani,
and a young man of excellent promise.
His family was military, and his lather
achieved great prominence in Venice dur
ing the war of tbe republic. Father
Giustiniani left bis lauiily and bis bright
prospects to study tor tne priestuood. He
catue to this country in 1835. He was 75
vvnen he died. His reputation for tbe
possession of supernatural powers began
over a dozen years ago, w hen a child,
whose condition had been pronounced
hopeless bv the physicians, aiter a
visit trom Fatner Giastiniani immediate
ly recovered. Other cases of tbe same
nature followed, until bis fame as a
worker of miracles was spread through
out his pastorate. It is said that while
lie was praying before tbe image of the
Virgin Mary one day the image became
alive and extended her clasped hands to
ward him. This is implicitly believed by
many members of the congregation. Only
several weeks a„o he visited ttte ohild oi a
prominent citizen aiter it bad been given
up by the doctors, and it recovered.
A COLONIZ vTION St HEME.
A City Below the Frost Line on the
Mexicau Pacific Coast.
From the yeu> York Tribune.
Boston, Oct. 23.—Kev. William F. Ea
ton, ol Kuightville, Ale., was years ago a
Baptist clergyman, but he atterward
drifted into politics, and in Greenback
times was a candidate for Governor, poll
ing 103 voles. Now he is the sole New
Euglaud director of the Credit Foncier, a
scheme in which many Portland aud
Cape Elizabeth peoxvle are interested, and
soon he is going to lead a band of his ad
herents to the Mexican State of Sinaioa,
on the Gull of Calitornia, waere they will
make an attempt to found a colony which
snail be co-operative and practically
independent. Mr. Eaton was tound
tbe otuer day engaged in a job of
carpentering. But this was only a tem
porary occupation. He talked freely of
bis intentions aud of the prosoect oi"tbe
enterprise, tbe inspiration of wnich seems
to nave been a b ok entitled “Integral
Co-operation,” published eeveral years
ago bv Albert K. Owenn, of Chester, Pa.
The Colonists is a corporation organized
under the laws oi Colorado, with its Dead
quarters in New York city. Tile amount
ol its capital is to be $1,600,000,000 in
shares o! $lO eacn; Its teachings are sim
ilar to those of Henry George and its di
rectors are to be the governors of the
commonwealth. Mr. Eaton states that
tbe corporation has in Sinaloa 80,000 acres
of land held in fee simple; that 200,000
more are available, and that a contract
has been signtd by the Mexican Secretary
of Public Works, and by representatives
of the colony.
The persons who are prepared to be
come colonized are estimated by Mr.
Eaton to number over 4,000, nearly all
from the Middle Stales. The sixty men,
women aud children who are to leave
Portland and its vicinity, under Mr.
Eaton’s leadership, are to go to the Bay
oi Popolambo to tound “Pacific City,”
and they hope to be at work there before
Dec. 1. The land is said to be below the
frost line and adapted to tbe cultivation
ot all tropical lruits, but Pacific City Is
destined, so ttie colonists maintain, to be
not an agricultural but a manufacturing
centre, supplying the Mexican markets
to the South aud East. Mr. Eaton shows
his faith in the project by preparing to
cut loose entirely from his New England
borne. He will take with him his wife,
whose enthusiasm for the enterprise is
only equaled by bis own and his daugh
ter just verging upon womanhood.
Stewart Settles Up.
Mobile. Oct. 25.—Superintendent Mer
iwether authorizes tbe statement that all
ol Manager T. C. Stewart’s indebtedness
to the Western Union Telegraph Company
in Mobile has been settled.
Large or small buyers ot Wood, buy
your Wood Horn C. H. Sheftall, Tele
phone 2Tfl.
Stoero. ________
Special Inducement!
PARTIES buying stoves from u* will receive
the benclil of having them put up by regular
tin and sheet Iron workers. No HAND?
MKN trusted with lliis, the most Important
feature of ihe stove business. Call aud select
your Heaters at one*. Our store is open on
Saturday evenings until 8:H0.
LOVELL & LATIIMORE,
Hardwaro and Stoves*
SAVANNAH. - .... UA
©rorrrtro
New Canned Vegetables
Ahnaragnt*. Snßar Com.
Ia ly .lane Pens.
Okra and Tomatoes.
Fresh Lkra. I.in.a B ans.
Succotash. String i.e .fia.
GEORGE & GOODMAN'S,
Conmr stale mid WhiUker street*.
'I *• COUNT) orrii HB I. I
1 Blanks require cty county nfih ora for rlie
■►* *f lUo court*, r for Uico • #.. mp plied to
nU*My lu Mule \| M, *%h.Us PitlMjNu
IIODmK. a Wilt tali or * (met* savannah.
ptamaofß.
MELT..—DASHER.—Married, at the i%i
denee of W. B. Mell, 195 Liberty street,on the
morning of Oct. 20, at 7:30 o’clock, Robt. S.
■Well and Miss Jennie V. Dashes, by Kev.
T. T. Christian, of Trinity M. K Church, as
sisted by Rev, J. E. L. Holmes, of the Baptist
Cburcii. Will be at home after the 29th inst.
No cards.
Sunrrai
PERKINS,—The friends and acquaintance
of Mrs. Rose Perkins, of Mrs, Ed ward Hop
kins and Mr, Robert Perkins, are invited to
attend tbe funerul of Mr. Wu, Hknrv Per
kins, ironi his late residence, corner .lories
and East Broad streets. THIS AFTERNOON
at 3 o’clock.
Dlerttnrta.
Chippewa Tribe No. 4, I. 0. of R. 31.
\ regular meeting of this Tribe will be held
THIS EVENING at 8 o’clock.
Visiting and transient brethren fraternally
invited.
A. N. MANITCY. Sachem.
C F. M. Bernhardt, Chief of Rec ords.
Notice.
City of Savannah, i
Office Clerk of Council. >
OctoDer 23, 1888. Y
Owners of property in the City Extension
east of Bull street are respectfully invited to
meet the Committee of the City Council at
the City Exchange at 4 o’clock on TUESDAY'
AFTERNOON, the 28th inst , to consider the
question of opening the streets.
By order of the Committee.
FRANK E REBARF.R.
Clerk of Council.
Special iTottcco.
Hr. 11. H. Hitchcock,
Graduate Medical Department of the Uni
versity of the City o( New Y'ork,
Has opened an office at 180 Liberty street, for
the nractice of Medicine and Surgery. Dr.
Hitchcock was'for three years Resident Phy
sician and Surgeon of the Panama Railroad
Company at Aspinwall (Colon), (T. s. C.
rduce bis return to the United States he has
taken a special oourse of instruction in Dis
eases of Women at the New York Polyclinic,
and at tbe Women’s Hospital of New York
city.
Notice.
Savannah, Oct. 25,1R86,
Our attention has been called to a certain
circular letter, purporting to be in the inter
est of naval stores operators, in which our
names are mentioned among others, as favor
ing a “co-operative” scheme. We de6ire to
say that we know nothing of it, and have had
no communication with anyone on the sub
ject. Respectfully,
B. DREW & CO,
Special Notice.
All persons are hereby cautioned against
harboring or trusting any of the crew of the
Norwegian bark “Zampa,” Olsen, Master, as
no debts of their contracting will be paid by
Captain, or
A. R. SALAS & CO., Consignees.
J. <i. Nelson & Cos.
Are now ready for business with an unsur
passed STOCK OF GROCERIES at very low
prices. Call and be convinced.
UNDER GUARDS’ ARMORY,
Corner ’Whitaker and President streets.
Dr. 8. Latimer Phillips,
Formerly House Surgeon to the Presbyterian
Eye, Ear and Throat Cnarity Hospital, Balti
more, Md„ will engage in the special prac
tice of Eye, Ear and Throat Diseases, at 151
South Broad street.
Office hours: 8 A. M. to 2 p. m.
Dr. J. P. S. Iloiistoun
Has returned to the city ami remixed his
practice (limited to diseases of Eye, Ear and
Throat , at his office No. 98 Harris street.
Ur. T. J. Charlton, Jr.,
Offers his profes-ional services to the citizens
of Savannah. Office 67 Whitaker street.
Kesidence 145 Perry street.
State and County Taxes, 1886.
Office Collector State ani> County ,
Taxes. Chatham County, oeoiioia, >
SAVANNAH, Oct. i5, 1886.1
The digest is now open for the collection of
the above Taxes, on all property, real and
personal, the specific tax on professions; also,
the POLL TAX, for EDUCATION A L PUR
POSES. on ail MALE RESIDENTS of the
city and county, between the ages of twenty
one and sixty years.
Office at the Court House. Hours from 9 a.
m. to 2 p. m jas. J. Mcgowan,
Tax Collector O. C.
Dividend No. 4.
Office Mutual gas Light Company,)
Savannah, Ga.. Oct. 19, 1886. i
A dividend of ONE AND ONE-HALF ner
centum has this day been declared frioin
earnings of last quarter. payable at this office
on and after NOVEMBER 15 next, to stock
holders of record this day,
LEiVIS C. LILLIE.
Secretary.
Savaunali and Tybee Railway Com
pany.
Office of Treasurer, 111 Ray st.j
Savannah, Oct. 7. 1886. ,
Bv resolution of the Board of Directors
adopted this dav. a second installment of
TWENTY Five: PERCENT, of the Prefer
red Capital Stock is ual'ed for, parable at this
office on or before the EIGHTH (Bth) DAY OP
NOVEMBER, 188..
JOHN W. BURROUGHS,
Treasurer.
Ulmer’s Liver I orree or.
This vegetable preparation is inynluoble for
the restoration of tone and strength to the
system. For Dyspepsia. Constipation and
other ills,caused by a disordered liver, it can
not be excelled. Highest prizes awarded, and
indorsed by eminent medical men. Ask for
Ulmer's Liver Corrector and take no other.
II 00 a bottle. Freight paid to any address.
B. F. ULMER, M. D.,
Pharmacist, Savannah, Ga.
SAVANNAH, GA , Oct. 16, 1886.
Edward J .Kieffer, Esq,'.
Dear Sir—l had chills and fever for eleven
months, and took quinine until I was nearly
deaf from theeffectof it, without euringthem.
Three-fourths of a bottle of Peruvian Cure
broke them up, and now, two months after
taking tt, I am perfectly well and hav* not
felt any symptoms of their return.
8. A. FACKLER.
Printer on Mystic Bro'herhood.
Kauiiro.
Don’t Be Humbugged
INTO paying two price* for vour Furnaces,
Ranges and Sieves. Don’t believe It whin
told that the art of setting them is coniine.i
t . anv one linn. We arc even's tor the Boyn
ton Kuril nee Company, of New York, who are
the inventors of all Furnaces, Ranges and
Healers that have ever lieen pat on the
market in Dial name. Wc guarantee good
work and reasonable prices.
CORNWELL & CHIPNIAN,
ODD FELLOWS BUILDING.
I.mnDni*
Savannah Steam Laundry
NOW COMPLETE IN ALL ITS DETAILS.
tlmminent bands dirn t from Troy guaran
tee first el as.* work. See my new list, spcclsl.
I) and spied for l onng men. Towels supplied
to otliors ‘lauv at ,• moderate charge.
M. DHAUKU,
nil LONOKE** hTKEKT.
savannah theatre.
Tm Hints OiIrfSgKLIKSS
MILTON ANDDOLUE
MOIJI.IJS!
And hi* famous Company of Corned ans.
TUESDAY, Oct. 16, the Unique and Powerful
Melodramatic ( omedv, written bv
MTLTON NOBLES, called
THE PHOENIX !
TWELFTH CONSECUTIVE YEAR.
Graves, the Bohemian, j .. rlTriv kort vs
Kludkok, the Phoenix. ) MILTON NOBLES
Sadie, the Flower Girl .DOLLIE NOBLES
WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27. Milton Nobles’
Powerful Play, called
LO V E A. TV 1> 1. AW !
Accepted by the public and conceded by tbe
critics to be among the ablest plays from the
pen of an American dramatist.
Seats on sale at Davis Bros’. MONDAY,
Oct. 25. Next attraction. “Michael SlrogoL’*
Oct. 29 and 80.
Cxntrotono.
Excursion Rates.
CENTRAL RAILROAD
OF
GEORGIA
STATE FAIR
Macon, Ga.
Opening MONDAY, Oct.
25thJ886.
OISK FARE
FOR THE
ROUIV! D TRI P
FROM ai.l stations.
Tickets will he on sale SUNDAY', October
24 th, and continue until SATURDAY', Novem
ber6th. Go id to return until NovemberSth,
inclusive.
For Tickets, Sleeping Car Bertls, etc., ap
ply at office 2o Bull street, nr at Depot.
GEO. A. WHITEHEAD.
General Passenger Agent.
J. C. SHAW, Ticket Agent.
Emil Trip Tickets
VIA THE
Savaaflali, Plcrifia & Western By
TO THE
Georgia Stats Fair,
MACON, GA.,
Oct. 24 to Nov. 6.
Round Trip Rates:
SAVANNAH $5 75
JESUt* 40
BLACKSHEAR 5 30
WAYCROSS. 6 60
VALDO-iTA 6 ‘ZS
QUITMAN 57.
THOMABVILLE 4 95
BA IN BRIDGE. 6 05
CAMILLA 4 00
Tickets on sale Oct. 24 to Nov. 6 inclusive,
not good to return after Nov. 8. 1886.
WM. P. HARDEE,
Genera! Passenger Agent.
_ Jjatj anD (ijratn.
X. ii. iiClIXi,
WAREHOUSEMAN
AND
Commission Merchant,
DEALER IN
Flour, Hay, Com, Oats, Bran, Etc.
V\ T HOLESA I.E DEPOT for Grain and Pro
> t visions. ( hcice lot Seed Rye, Rust Proof
Seed Outs. Ffeah MEAL and GRIST in wnlte
sacks always on hand. Special |>rict large lots.
Warehouse, No. 4 \VaJley street, on line C.
R. R. Office, 83 Bay.
Rust Proof Seed Oats.
Call and see my stork before buying.
-ALSO-
Keystone Mixes Feel Hay. Grain,Bran,
ETC., BY
S.
K2 RAY STREET.
fantirro.
LADDERS
4- Ladder, - $1 00
5- Ladder, - 1 25
0-Foot Ladder, * 1 50
7- Ladder, • 1 75
8- Ladder, - 2 00
L R COLLINS & CO.
jpropooulo lUantrft.
To Builder*—Bv>Dnali Hotel.
SEALED propoaal* will lie received until
in on November 15, for the whole, or for ail
ii work of any one trude.for imllditigaliirge
lirlck Ho ini, PianH and *i ecifloati-oi* ma . fie
neon by applying 1010L..1. H. ENTILL, Hr.
dent, 8 Whitaker street, Savannah, Gi. Pay.
liient* will lie ill ca<h. lllda from re-pouaibia
and volatile mechanic* only invited. Thu
right ib reserved to reject an v or all hid*.
•I. A. WOOD. Architect,
"HChamber*street. New York.
Statute mtO Wti*.
JOHN C. BUTLER.
\\ T ITT IK LKAli'.i OLOItS. OU.s, GLASS,
V ARM ML KTi .; READY MIXED
PA I N'l>; It A I I.KO A I). MKAVIKR \N|)
MILL HI PPLIK.H.SA-HEH.nOfiR!- BUMP,
and RIfILOKHS lIiHDWAHK. Sole Am-nt
fm-GVOKGI A LI MK.< A I.f lN KD PLANTER,
CEMENTS, HAIR, and LAND PI.AaTKU.
0 Whitaker filrct-l. vrya -4j Lu..
gntita, gtc.
RUST PROOF OATS
SEED RYE,
CABBAGES, POTATOES
ONIONS, APPLES, ’
LKiYIOIN^
CORN. HAY. OATS. BRAN. ETC p-r,’
GRITS, MEAL, PEAS, ETC., tT®.
PEANUTS,
T. P. BOND &CO
155 BAY STREET, 'J
Fruits, Apples, Pears, Grams
BY EVERY STEAMER*
Almond8 ' Pr nnes, Cui-rast,
Potatoes, Onions, Canned Gooffs
Sugar-cured Meats, Hams, 'shorna—
Strips, etc. ’ ’“ontoeri,
Coffee, Sugar, Rice, Tea, Butter, Sab Fm,
Lard, Syrup, Molasses, brooms and Pali. '
Wines and Liquors, all grades. *■
Virginia Handpicked and Georgia Pe n „,
Poultry and Eggs, wholesale and retail '
Kalamazoo Celery frh every week *
For sale at the lowest rates.
A. H. CHAW* PS ON
POTATOES
CHOICE EARLY ROSE POTATOES
B. E. Peas, Onions, Beets, Apple,,
Cabbage, Crapes, Pears.
Healparters For Florida Ora®,
Hay, Crain, Etc.,
Seed Rye, Seed Oats, Feed Meal, Bran, Etc
169 BAY STREET,
W.P.Simkins&Co.
EDWARD LOVELL Til,
155 Broughton and 138-140 State streets,
PEALEKS IN
General Hardware,
AMMUNITION
AND
SPORTING GOODS.
MUkzle and Breech Loading, Single and
Double Barrel Shot Guns. Colt's
Lightning and Winchester
Repeating Rifles.
pro Her.
X L. IiAIiTRIDGE,
SECURBTY BROKER,
BUY'S and Bellson commission all classes n
Stocks and Bonds.
Negotiate* loans on marketable securities.
New York quotations furnished by private
ticker every flfte n minutes.
WM. T. WILLIAMS & CO.,
BROKERS.
ORDERS EXECUTED on the New Y'ork,
Chicago and Liverpool Exchanges.
19 COMMERCIAL BUILDING,
SAVANNAH, - - - GEORGIA.
gotEla.
MARSHALL HOUSE,
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA. '
GEO. D. HODGES, - - Proprietor,
Formerly of Ihe Metropolitan Hotel,
New York, and the Grand Union,
of Saratoga Springs.
Reduced prices lor atimmer and special
rates to boarders. The Beet Tables, Coolest
Rooms.and Most Central Location.
PULABKI HOUSE,
SAVANNAH. GEORGIA.
\FEW CHOICE ROOMS for families with
permanent boord. Also, table boarder!
desired at ri duced rates. Highest standard
maintained. Unexcelled culsme and attend
ance.
JAMES M. CASE, Proprietor.
CoarOioQ.
THE MORRISON HOUSE,
One ol the Largest Boarding Houses
in the South,
HAVING been newly fitted up, afford!
pleasant rooms, good board, with pur*
Artesian Water, at prices to suit those wish
ing regular, transient or table accommoda
tions. Northeast corner Broughton and
Drayton streets, opposite Marshall House.
(Eotitrartor.
P. J. FALLON.
Buildsr and Contractor,
22 Ilruyton Street, Savannah.
IASTI MATES promptly furnished for build-
JTls lour of any clam
SSiatrr.
Double Soda Water-
CIREAM SHAKES, Milk Sherbeis. Only
/ Fruit Juices and Kocfc Candy Syrup
used. Call and see the “Electric Crea’.J
Shaker. ”
BUTLER’S PHARMACY,
Bull and Congress.
ilnDertaitetL
D> DIX OIS ; .
UNDERTAKER,
DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF
COFFINS AND CASKETS,
43 Bull at. Residence 59 Liberty t.
- GA.
D.I lIItO
KISSIMMEE CITY BANK,
Kissimmee City, Orauge County. Fla
CAPITAL #so.ol'°
cpRANSACT a regular banking busines*.
I Give particular attention to Florida c
lections. Correspondence solicited.
change on New York, Ne.v Orleans. 8a
nab and Jacksonville, ila Resident Ag
for Coutts A Cos. ami Melville. Evans A i••
I ondon. Englaud. New Yo-k corresponded-
TbeSoahoard NaHonal Bank. _
Ditr Ft uof.
OHARI sES HAT/
—PROPRIETOR—
Southern Dyeing & Scouring
i: BTAHI, I8 H M NT.
D2 Broughton afreet,opposite Marshall no
Savannah. Ga.
Fine work. Price* rennonable.
Itrtrrimman-
Sai.nniaii firterllin Inllrmurjr.
gkUfJCE aN i* staid.l - '*•£ - 4>
l f NER soil in BROAD ANO f -tTTv
RVNDOLPU STREETS. "*■ fTTj.
GEORGE E. MATTHEWS. Veto
riiiar y surgeon. treats all Di*ea-e of .
f allle and Dog,. Med cities anpplied fnr ‘-
die*es. c at, s proto ptly attended io,any'>
city op n untv. . ... ...
Preacrl .uona by mull. On liand av an
v Tm* Ellina Nd ill*

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