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The Indianapolis times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1922-1965, October 25, 1924, Home Edition, Image 5

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SATURDAY, OCT. 25, 1924
GRAND OPERA AND RACHMANINOFF HERE ON SAME DAY
Nikolai Sokoloff Will Conduct Cleveland Symphony Or
chestra at Caleb Mills Hall Wednesday—Shrin
ers to Present Marine Band Thursday.
By WALTER D. HICKMAN.
Musical activities in Indianapolis will reach a critical point
on Sunday. Nov. 16. when Ona B. Talbot will present Rachmani
noff at a piano recital at the Murat in the afternoon.
Asa Murat Theater attraction, the San Carlo Opera Com
pany will be at this theater on the evening cf the same day.
Here are two completely worth-while musical attractions
on the boards for the same day, one in the afternoon and one
at night.
Such bookings will tax the ability
of the real patrons of music, but 1
am absolutely “sold” on both attrac
tions even before. they get here be
cause I know what to expect of
both.
It may not be wise booking to
crowd two such big offerings upon
Indianapolis during the same day.
Rachmaninoff needs no additional
words of praise and the ability of
the San Carlo organization is too
well known here to repeat words
of praise.
Indianapolis does not get much
opera The visits of Rachmaninoff
are not frequent enough. Other
cities have such a rush of musical
bookings and it is squarely up to
Ithe musical organization of Indi
anapolis to support these two worth
while attractions.
The reason that I am taking this
liberty of calling attention to these
two bookings is that both are ex
pensive attractions. Opera is the
most expensive pastime upon the
stage.
Mr. Trowbridge has been advised
that the San Carlo Opera Company
wiU be able to present at the Murat,
one of the following operas: “Trova
tore.” by Verdi: "Faust.” with Elda
Veltori; “Rigoletto.” by Verdi with
Tina Paggi. new coloratura soprano,
or “Madam Butterfly,'.’ by Puccini
with Miura. Japanese prima donna.
Personally. I do not believe that
it would be wise to repeat “Madam
Butterfly” because the San Carlo
company presented it here last sea
son. My choice would rest between
‘‘Faust” and “Rigoletto.” My first
choice is “Faust.”
I would welcome letters from read
ers of this department concerning
their choice of the four operas.
Write me. please! me get a line
on what Indianapolis wants to see in
the line of opera.
Mrs. Talbot tells me. that next
week will be the last week for sea
son tickets for her three Sunday aft
ernoon concerts which includes
Rachmaninoff, Farrar and Kreisler.
-I- -I- -!-
GREAT CONDUCTOR
HERE WEDNESDAY
The Cleveland Symphony Orches
tra, Nikolai Sokoloff, conductor,
appearing at Caleb Mills Hall on
iWednesday evening, Oct. 29, under
>he auspices of the Federation of
‘Public School Teachers, will play for
its opening number the Brahms'
Symphony in C minor, the com
poser’s first venture into this field
of composition.
The same number headed the pro
gram of the Cleveland Orchestra at
its opening concert in Cleveland on
Oct. 16.
An Intermission follows the play
ing of the symphony. Then comes
Sibelius’ tone-poem “Flnlancia.” the
marvelous portrayal of the impres
sions of an exile on his return home
after a long absence. Foliowing this
is Debussy's “The Afternoon of a
Faun.’
The program closes with the prel
ude to Wagner s “Mastersingers,” the
scintillating polemic of an artist and
his critics. It is Wagner's protest
against the rules and regulations im
posed upon composition in his own
day.
The concert will begin at 8:15
o'clock.
-I- -I
MARIXE BAND TO
GIVE TWO CONCERTS
The very phrase, "the band of
the presidents.” should he sufficient
AMUSEMENTS
THE WORLD’S GREATEST
AND UNCLE SAM'S PRIDE
MARINE
BAND
IN TWO GRKAT I'OPiI.AR AND
PATRIOTIC CONCERTS AT
CADLE
TABERNACLE
5 p. m.—MAT. A NITE—B p. m.
7HURS., OCT. 30
Auspices Murat Shriners, open
to all the public. Benefit Shrine
pilgrimage fund.
20,000 SEATS FOR
MUSIC LOVERS
It would b<* a rfHwtion on the
magical life of IndianapolK to
this great Hand with only half-tilled
house*. Two Kreaf program* of
highest musical achievement in
rlanhii’al and popular Mlertions offer
a real treat.
Nothing Gained by De
lay—Buy Tickets Now
SEATS ARK NOW ON SALE at
Merchant* Heat & Light Cos., Clarke
6 Cade C lay pool I>rug store. Fuller -
Ryde Music Cos.,
PRICES ARE LOWEST—2Sc for all
school pupil* at matinee; 50c for
adnlt*. NITE—SOc, 75c, SI. plus tax.
If yon like much* you will
he a better citizen by hear
ing the world** greatest
Band, which is as ancient
and honorable a* the Cnited
State* government, of which
it I* a part.
DamamUaw This is the White
Kemember Mouse Band—the
Band of the Presidents since George
Washington. X \
Date Changed
“Simon Called Peter,” the
only play which created a sen
sation on the road without the
usual New York indorsement,
will have a showing at the
Murat for a week commencing
Nov. 17. instead of next week,
as announced.
The play, which is a dram
atization of Robert Keable's
novel by Jules Eckert Goodman
and Edward Knoblock, is a
story that deals with the sub
jects uppermost in the minds
of every one at all periods of
their existence and illustrates
in a bold and startling way th
conditions, mental and phys
ical, that love and religion pro
duce.
to interest American citizens in the
appearance of the United States Ma
rine Band in Cadle Tabernacle for
two concerts, next Thursday after
noon and night, according to the
declaration of Ed Gausepohl, chair
man of the entertainment committee
of the Murat Shriners, under whose
auspices this organization will ap
pear here.
School children are especially ap
pealed to and a special low price
has been made for them at the mati
nee, it is announced, but it is pointed
out that the entire scale of prices
for these concerts is much lower
than the band has been playing for
in other cities on this tour.
“This is because we have a seating
capacity of about 10.000 for each
concert.” Gausepohl said. “It would
be a shame for the aauditorlum to
be only partially filled whin the at
traction has such high musical
merit and such a popular and patri
otic appeal,” he added.
. -I- I- I
SOPRANO TO GIVE
RECITAL AT TEMPLE
Frances Johnson, soprano, with
Adah Strong at the piano and as
sisted by the Weber String Trio
will give a recital at the Masonic
Temple on Friday, Nov. 7.
Program follows:
Comment, dia&ient-ils . . Liszt
Cello-q.ie o prefer* Fomlrain
Staendchen Straus#
La Pnmavera d'Or Glaxounow
Mrs. Johnson.
"Songs Mr Mother Taught Ms”
DrorshaK
Com* ChiM Beside Me” Bleiehinann
"rtaetrm P.nrr.ari<-e" . .. . R.msky-Knrsokow
“Mammy s Song" Clutsam
Mrs Johnson.
"Meditation" (Suite Poetique)
- Boisdeffr*
Rondino" Beethoven-Kreislcr
"Pale Moon" (Ind:an Love Song)....
Logan-KreiiJcr
Trio
Bird of the Wilderness" Horsmann
"A Memory Uanz
"Babies Syes ' Mclntosh
Dedicated to Mrs. Johnson.
"Tiptoe" Carev.
Mrs. Johnson.
“Ava Marie’ Schubert
Mrs. Johnson and Trio
FIRST RECITAL DUE
AT THE METROPOLITAN
The first recital of the season to
be given bv students of the Metro
politan School of Music will take
place next Saturday afternoon, Nov.
1. in the Odeon. the school's recital
hall, at 3 o’clock. The program is
open to the public without charge.
A one-act play will conclude the
program, which will be composed of
piano, voice, violin, cello and cornet
numbers, readings and a musical
monolog. The following students
# LYRIC#
VAUDEVILLE'S SUPREME SENSATION
HARRY SLATKO’S REVUE
“MAKIN’ ’EM DIFFERENT"
With Eva Sully, Al Plough and His Oddity Boys
JAMES*EDITH JAMES NORTON * BROWER
Personality Blended with Music Bug House Fables
GEORGE YEOMAN AND LIZZIE
IN THEIR RIOTOUS COMEDY HIT
“The Editor of the Assassinated Press”
Hattie Althoff* Sister MACKWILLIAMS
The Tragedienne of Songs Original Types of Dancing
THREE WHIRLWINDS
INTRICATE FEATS OF ROLLER SKATING
Mack Sennett All Star Comedy “Riders of the Purple Cows”
Kinograms—Second Episode of “The Go Getters”
/he <jync and Evening
MANAGERS CLAIM THESE WILL PLEASE PATRONS
: will take part: Virginia Judd, Rob
j ert Russell, Marion Fehrenbach,
: Mary Elizabeth Steuher. Aubrey
| Thomas, Virginia Wjlking, Elizabeth
Couch, Lueretia Griffin. Jeannette
Solotken, Marie Zorn, June Eleanor
Watson. Ruby Busclier. Betty Ruth
Martindale, Harriett Harding, Vir
i ginia Habig. Betty McFadden, Edith
I Garrison, Lucille Reeves, Martha
| Louise Fuik, Ernestine Bradfleld,
j Mildred Harrell, Tommy Poggiani,
I Virginia Stout, Lucille McKay, Hilda
i Kreft, Harriet Hofer, Georglar "a
‘ Rockwell, Charlotte Brown, The'
Peterson, Lavoran Robbins, Hej
Emert, Elizabeth Whetzel. Bet /
j Lenhart. Virginia Pitman and Ed*
. ward Green.
-I* 'l* I
CONTKSr CIOSIXG
DATE ANNOUNCED
| The contest for the scholarship
offered by Gertrude Conte, instruct
or at the Irvington .School of Music,
consisting of free vocal lessons from
Nov. Ito June % l to the singer whose
voice promises greater possibilities,
will close Friday, Oct. 31.
I The contest is open to all and the
I voices are tested by single appoint
ments.
‘Meet the Wife’
PATRICIA CALVERT
In the oast of “Meet the Wife,”
in which Mary Boland is featured,
will be Miss Patricia Calvert. This
comedy opens at English’s on Nov.
13 for three days.
AMUSEMENTS
THE INDIANAPOLIS TIMES
No. I—Adolphel—Adolphe Menjou, looking
very wise, will be seen In "The
Fast Set" at the Appollo next
week.
No. 2—Antonio Moreno as he
appears in “The Border region,"
opening Sunday for the first half
Rounding
Round
Theaters
With
WALTER D. HICKMAN
mT is gratifying to learn that
the legitimate theater will
co-operato with the IJttle
Theatre movement. week when
the Litre Theatre at the Masonic
Temple produced “The Torchbear
ers," it was necessary' to obtain some
gold furniture. An extensive search
was made but none was found in
private homes. Finally, the commit
tee remembered that gold furniture,
a splendid collection, is often used
at Keith’s. A trip to Keith's back
stage resulted In Howard Quinn be
ing interviewed. Os course he would
be glad to loan his furniture. And
by that splendid get-together sys
tem which is always found at
Keith’s, the Little Theatre produc
tion had its gold furniture.
-I' -I- -!-
My mail the past two weeks has
been very heavy. A letter bearing
the name of Mary' Mahan, -133
Bosart Ave , directed attention upon
my remarks concerning “The Red
Lily,” recently at the Apollo.
The letter to me from Mary
Mahan is in part as follows:
“Take, for example, your write
up on ‘The Red Lily’ In Monday
evening's Times, The first thing
you said was that everybody land
ed in the sewer. That is absolutely
untrue. Only one of the players en
ters the sewer and the scenes there
last only a very few moments. You
criticised the choice of lily as its
name, but the repetition of that
name on stage and screen is not
one bit more tiresome than your
flippant jokes on good pictures.
Then, too, you make the insulting
statement that Novarro is the boy
whom certain producers ‘'Vant to
make more famous than Valentino.
Can you truthfully deny that No
va'TO has Valentino hacked off the
map so far as popularity, acting,
ability and good looks are concerned?
You also said that this picture would
of the week at the Palace.
No. 3 —Gloria Swanson In a
domestic pose In “Her Love Story”
at the Ohio.
No. 4—Betty Blythe as the
movie vampire in “In Hollywood
with Potash and Perlmutter” at
not add to Noovorro's fame. It will,
for his work in this picture almost
measures up to that in ‘Scara
mouche,’ and ‘Scaramoucho’ is the
perfect picture, the best and most
wonderful that has ever been made.
"What have you against the cast?
Wallace Beery does some fine work,
although not quite so good as in
some of his previous productions.
But what of Enid Bennett? I ad
mit that I have never liked her work
very well before, but In this pic
ture I certainly have to hand her
a bouquet.
“Then your remark about the end
ing being a burlesque travesty on
the happy finale, in that statement
you go one step too far. You said,
If Niblo h.ts pictured the real Paris
of the Latin quarter’ and ’I am glad
this Paris exists only on the screen.’
How do you know that this isn’t
realism, how do yo'u know this isn’t
the real Paris" Have you been there.
rgJAI |QII ’ C THURS., FRI., SAT. MAT.
LIIULIdH 0 Nov. 13-14-15 SAT.
A SMASHING COMEDY HIT!
STEWART & FRENCH SAY You Simply Must
Meet the Wife
By LYNN STARLING
W:TH MARY BOLAND
Seats, Nov. 10 „“,“ s NOW
C OMtMtcHCJHg o uruxcty :s=j
=§j DIRECT FROM THE BIG REVUES j|§
'ZZZ: NOIiVAL GLADYS iIEE
§j BAPTIE & LAMB {§
with their
==: ICE BALLET jS
1 MILT COLLINS M
r—i THE SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE :=E
sEEI INDIANAPOLIS’ OWN ENTERTAINERS !=
si KD R. EL IZZZ
M EAST & DUMKE M
SZZ: IN THEIR LA TOST EDITION
==j “LOTSA PERSONALITY” ;EE
Ij ARTHUR DEVOY&CO. il
£•5; PRESENTS IZZ
~ “BROKEN PROMISES” :==
• BERNICE R\Y IS
ffj KIMBALL & GOMAN ||
mmJl “Setting the Styles In Songs and Steps” ISIS
SSI WALLACE ALLEN AT THE PIANO -
|§: y 44K*£P/ioto feature :||
w' lA 4 HE - LENt CH^^ICK - :sss
18
ss L^ j~
l^iiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiil
the Circle.
No. s—Hoot Gibson in a scene
from "Daring Chances” at the
Ibis* for the first half of the week.
No. 6—Thomas Melghan In a
scene from ‘The Alaskan” at Mis
ter Smith’s all next week.
■lo you know personally? Don’t
criticise unless you do.”
I have always told my readers for
'hem to have their own opinion re
garding every picture they see be
cause I have and express "only my
own opinion.
•i- -I' 'l'
A parent told me that his son is
both impressionistic and honest. His
son attends a city school kindergar
ten and a few days ago the child in
the classroom told of his pleasant
experiences in the playroom at the
Capitol Theater. This is the first
time I know of that the charm of
a playroom In a theater has reached
the schoolroom. And the father ad
mits that his son has a great time
in the playroom at the Capitol. As
far ;is I know this is the only play
room with an expert attendant in
charge, in any burlesque theater in
this country. Why shouldn’t par
ents leave their children at play
AMUSEMENTS
while they attend a Columbia wheel
show'? No reason in the world.
I -I-
Agaln I have started something.
Some of the letters received this
week venture the opinion that both
Fred Allen and Jimmy Savo are
both “great comedians” in “Vogues
and Frolics.” In my review I spoke
at length on the merits of Savo. I
said that Savo does not need the
assistance of Allen to be a wonder
ful clown. I did not intend that
this should reflect upon Mr. Allen’s
ability as a comedy artist.
“Earth's Oddities” will be the title
of the next Lyman H. Howe Hodge-
Podge to be release-1 by Educational
Film Exchanges, Inw
AA’DlTni tTMFATRE
L PHONE CIRCLE 3939 [
BURLESQUE ■
STARTING TOMORROW MATINEE—ALL WEEK
The New Girly Revue
TAKE A LOOK
With CY PLUNKETT
Evyleen Ramsay George Schreck
HANDSOME BRIDGE LAMP GtVEN AWAY
EVERY MATINEE, TO SOME LADY
To Mothers—Let the kiddies romjS while you enjoy our
shows. Modern equipped playroom for children in the bal
cony. Nurse in charge. Tell your neighbors.
■SADIES AT THE MATINEES 254
SfkwEEK OCT 2fc 7aJ
J|fhEADLINERS^^
1 _ JAMES J. MORTON I
** The Favorite Comedian f |
2 PAT & JULEE LEVOLO jjW
O— KURTZ & CULLEY |
Salt and Pepper Boys
A MR. RICHARD KEAN j
“Ts Characters From Famous Plays jA
g_ OLCOTT & POLLY ANN
g— CRAWFORD & BRODERICK
ROSEMARY & MARJORY rffm
Q_ PEACOCK ORCHESTRA g
Iloosier Harmony Hounds kl
Qj JOE ROME & LOU GAUT ‘ ‘j% J
When Extremes Meet %
1A KENEY, MASON & SCHOLL
& Impossible on Skates ; ||
REAL BARONESS
BOOKED TO SING
AT ELF. KEITH'S
Vera Lavrova Hailed as An
other Patti by the
Critics.
In the guise of an exquisite young
girl, charming to look at, more than
charming to meet, simple in tastes,
and refined in manner, a genuine
baroness and a singing sensation
has made her debut upon the B. F.
Keith circuit. She will appear at
the local Keith Theater Nov. 2 for
the week.
Vera Lavrova, young Russian
beauty, whose extraordinary colora
tura soprano voice has won her the
title in America of another “Patti,”
is, in private life, the Baronss Royce-
Garrett, wife of Baron Captain Mich
ael Royce-Garrett, lineal descendant
of an English companion of Peter
the Great, who settled in Russia.
At the age of 25, this daughter of
Russian aristocracy has been
through brutal experiences which
might easily have killed her. She
and her young husband, who had
lost a leg fighting with the white
army against the Bolshevikis, spent
months wending a tortuous way
through southern Russia to the
shores of the Black Sea, where they
were aided by the English to reach
America. Suffering and privations
almost beyond human endurance
were their lot for week after week.
One catches a glimpse of her suf
ferings only in her singing. There
is a soul to her voice which other
great singers lack, depth and emo
tional power to her interpretations
of Russian masterpieces in particu
lar, which tell more eloquently than
words the suffering she has experi
enced.
AMUSEMENTS
5

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