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The Indianapolis times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1922-1965, October 25, 1924, Home Edition, Image 7

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SATURDAY, OCT. 25,1924
STAGE PLAYS TO ■
BE SEEN AS MOVIE
ENTERTAINMENT
‘Spring Cleaning’ and Pot
ash and His Pal on
View Here.
Stage plays in movie form will
demand attention on the local screen
next week.
“The Fast Set,” adapted from the
stage play, “Spring Cleaning.” will
be on view at the Apollo, beginning
Snuday.
The Circle will present Potash and
Perlmutter in anew series called
"In Hollywood With Potash and
Perlmutter.” The Ohio will offer
Gloria Swanson in "Her Love Story.”
The Isis for the first half of the
week will present Jack Hoxie in
“Daring Chances.” For the entire
week Smith's will feature Thomas
Meighan in "The Alaskan.”
-I* -I* -1-
I-AVISH PRODUCTION
BOOKED AT APOLLO
Lavish cabaret settings, richly
furnished apartments and great
scenes in which 'William De Mille has
rivaled his distinguished brother.
Cecil, in the presentation of splash
and color mark "The Fast Set,”
coming to the Apollp next week with
Betty Compson, Elliott Dexter,
Adolphe Menjou and ZaSu Pitts
forming a quartette of stellar play
ers.
Adapted from Frederick Lons
dale’s Broadway stage hit. “Spring
Cleaning.” the story relates of af
fairs in a family torn apart by the
different views on life of husband
and wife, and welded together again
as the result of a strange but most
effective idea seized and acted upon
the husband.
The action centers around Richard
Sones, a successfuu author who
writes about romance but does not
live it; Margaret, his pretty wife,
who is intrigued by the laughing,
dancing, irresponsible crowd that
makes up the "fast set” of the me
tropolis; Ernest Steele, philanderer,
a suave bachelor, specialist in love
making and idol of lonesome wives,
and Mona, a girl of the streets, the
amazing instrument used by the des
perate husband to save his wife
from her high-stepping associates.
In support of the quartet of stars
are Dawn O’Day, Grace Carlvsle,
Claire Adams. Rosalind Byrne and
Edgard Norton. "Deep Se: Panic.”
an Imperial comedy, the Fox News
weekly, organ selections by Earl
Gordon and musical entertainment
by Emil Seidel and his orchestra
will complete the program.
-I- -I- -I
TWO PALS TO BE
SEEN ON CIRCLE SCREEN
"In Hollywood With Potash and
Perlmutter,’ adapted from the suc
cessful play. “Business Before Pleas
ure." by Jules Eckert Goodman,
will be the attraction at the Circle
beginning Sunday.
When last seen at the Circle, the
famous fifty-fifty partners were en
gaged in the cloak and suit business,
but m the new picture they have de
serted that field and have decided to
make motion pictures.
Their first attempt at "bigger and
better pictures” is “The Fatal Mur
der,” in which the relatives of Abe
Potash have ail the important roles.
This proving a dismal flop, the part
ners are undecided as to their next
move when Blanchard, a broker, of
fers to lend them SIOO,OOO if they
will star Rita Sismondi, a portrayer
of vampire types, in a picture.
They agree to do this, but their
domestic lives are upset by the ad
vent of the glamorous Rita at the
studio, both Mrs. Potash and Mrs.
Perlmutter being jealous of the in
nocent “vamp.” Mawruss' wife
threatens a divorce when she learns
that Mawruss has set out for a spot
on location to warn Rita against
Blanchard, whom she is planning to
meet. Abe, to save the situation.
motors to them, but is injured in a
motor accident en route and is car
ried to a house which the film di
rector is planning to burn as part of
his production.
Alexander Carr Is seen in his old
role of Mawruss Perlmutter, and
George Sidney has the late Ram
Bernard's part, "Abe Potash.” Mera
Gordon is Mrs. Potash. Belle Bennett
is Mawruss’ wife, and Betty Blythe
is the vampire who starts ail the
trouble. Others in the cast are An
ders Randolph, Peggy Shaw, Charles
Meredith, Lillian Hackett and David
Butler.
\ The program also includes an
crgan solo by Dessa Byrd, a Lloyd
Hamilton comedy "Jonah Jones.”
and the Circlette of News The cver
-ture is “Mendelssohnia ” a group of
the famous composer’s favorite num
bers arranged by Bakaleinikoff.
with a pictorial accompaniment
by James A. Fitzpatrick.
-I- -I- I
-I>IG STARR FEATURED
IX HER 1-iOVE STORY
Gloria Swanson, 'ian Keith and
Baroness de Hedemann are the
featured players in "Her Love
Stcry,” the Mary Roberts Rinehart
storv which will be the featured
photoplay the corning week at the
Ohio Theater. The picture by Miss
Rinehart was adapted to the screen
by Frank Tuttle. Miss Rinehart
will be remembered as the author of
such popular successes "Twemy-
Three and a Half Hours Leave” and
"Tlue Bat.”
Supporting Miss Swanson are Gen-
Plan Now to Attend
‘‘THE FOLIC OF THE WITCHES
AND GOBLINS”
Big Masquerade Ball Friday, Oct. 31,
RIVERSIDE DANCE PALACE
INDIANA’S GREATEST FLOOR
Four Cash Prices for Best Costumes
Bring Your Whole Party to Riverside
Music by Connie’s Orchestra. 9 p. m. to 3 a. m.
Look—Every Saturday Night is Souvenir .Njght for Ladies.
Band Soloist
ROBERT E. CLARK
When the United States Marine
Band plays next Thursday after
noon and night at the Cadle Taber
nacle under the direction of the
Shriners, Robert E. Clark will be
a trombone soloist.
era! Lodjinsky, George Fawcett,
Echlin Gayer, Mario Majeroni, Sid
ney Herbert, Donald Hall, Jane Au
burn and Bert Wales.
"Her Love Story” is a tale of the
Balkan kingdom of Vlastavia, where
the Princess Marie, played by Gloria
Swanson, Is deeply in love with
Rudl. a handsome captain of the
king’s guards. Their match is hope
less, since Marie's father, the arch
duke, has planned to have his
daughter marry the reprobate king
of Mergovina, a neighboring coun
try.
Hoping to avert fate, Rudi and the
Princess are married secretly hv a
gypsy, and when the duke tells his
daughter of his proposed marriage
she tells of her marriage to the Cap
tain. Rudi is sent to a distant place,
while the duke, ignoring the gypsy’s
marriage, marries his daughter to
the king. A child is then born.
"A Diving Fool” Is the Sunshine
comedy, which, with a Pathe news
weekly, will complete the picture
program. Music will be provided by
the Charlie Davis orchestra, which
will be heard In an attractive pro
gram of popular melodies. Lester
Huff, organist, will play his original
novelty composition. "Halloween
Night in the Clock Shop.”
-I- -I- -!•
HOME TO BE SEEN
IN WESTERN COMEDY
The Isis will have Jack Hoxie for
the first half of next week in "Dar
ing Chances." In fact, all that Hoxie
and the Universal Ranch Riders do
throughout the lightning action of
the picture is to dare chances: bull
dogging, lassoing, broncho-break
ing in the rodeo, one of the high
lights of the picture, followed l>y a
steeplchase race with Hoxie on his
white horse Scout. Punctu ited by a
hold-up and kidnaping, the dory
turns in an instant from sporting
events to a grim pursuit of bandits
through dangerous Sierra trails.
Claude Payton, Doreen Turner. Jack
Pratt and Alta Allen are in the cast
A Orar.tland Rice Sportlight enti
tied "Danger Lure” and "Bungaloo
Boobs,” a Pathe comedy will be addi
tional program features.
Thursday the rnid-weeek change
will bring William Fairbanks in
“Her Man,” a romance of Big Busi
ness with Fairbanks in the role of
the son of a wealthy capitalist who
turns cowboy and succeeeds in foil
ing the designs of an unscrupulous
pair who seek to defraud a rich
easterner in the purchase of land*
containing great waterfalls which
he desires to utilize for power pro
ducing purposes. The cast includes
Margaret Landis, J. P. McGuire,
Mark Fenton and Frank Whitson.
The fun feature will be "Snappy
Eyes,’” a Century comedy.
-I- -I- I'
“THE ALASKAN” IS
NEXT MOVIE AT SMITH’S
James Oliver Curwood. famous
writer of the great outdoors, is the
author of "The Alaskan.” the fea
tured photoplay at Mister Smith's
theater the coming week. Thomas
Meighan has the title role. His sup
port includes, Estelle Taylor. John
Sainpolis, Frank Campeau, Anna
May Wong. Alphonz Ethier, Maurice
Cannon and Charles Ogle.
The story of "The Alaskan” has
to do with the intrigues and adven
tures of a young Alaskan who fights
a syndicate seeking to wrest his
land from him. The Alaskan meets
a young girl on board a steamer,
falls in love with her, but learns of
her perfidy and discovers that she
had been drowned.
"What an Eye” is a Buddy Mes
senger comedy which will be shown
together with a Pathe News week
ly. Music will be provided by the
Grand Cremona.
Fitzmaurice Is Able to Work Again
George Fitzmaurice, who is as
sociated with Samuel Goklwyn in
pi eduction of First National pictures,
has recovered from his recent ill
ress and this week will commence
filming of his next picture, “A
Thief in Paradise,” adopted for the
creen by Frances Marion from
Leonard Merrick’s novel, "The
Worldlings.” Ronald Colman will
'lead an all-st: r cast. The director
has added Jack Voehell as assistant
nd An tone Grot as art director to
’iis production staff.
AMUSEMENTS
ROBERTS PARK
CHURCH TO HOLD
ROUE-GOING
Choral Society Will Have
Charge of Night
Service,
Ar ”| SERIES of Home Coming
Services at Roberts Park
u—J Methodist Church will be ter
minated on Sunday with special
services.
This week is being observed as
Founders Week and got under way
Thursday night when the old people
were guests of honor at a prayer
meeting.
The celebration will be continued
with a special program on Sunday
morning by the pastor and by the
Choral Society at night.
The Choir of the Past, The Choir
of the Present and the Choir of the
Future will be presented by Dr. W.
L. Heiskell, Judge Clarence E.
Weir and Dr. Dunlavey respectively.
Dr. Heiskell was the first director
of an organized choir to sing in the
church, reaching as far back as
1886.
The Roberts Park Choral Society,
as now organized, was so started by
the late Emil Wulschner, Charles B.
Sinex and Mrs. Jennie Judah, then
organist of the church, in Septem
ber of 1897. Os this committee on
organization, Mr. Sinex is the only
survivor.
Os the original membership, there
are only four who continue in ac
tive service. Mr. Sinex, Miss Emma
Smith. Mrs. W. J. Chidester and
Miss Belle Kettron.
Under a number of directors since
the death of Mr. Wulschner in 1900,
the society has prospered and holds
a prominent place in the musical
life of the city. Many of the promi
nent singers have received their
start in the choir loft at tills old
church, and doubtless look back
with pleasure to their associations
there.
A cordial invitation is given to
any and all old members to come
out and attend the evening service.
The program follows.
Oia-at,—"Home Sweet Home” Mrs. Burtch
Hymn No. 207—‘The Church's One
foundation."
Prayer . . . Dr. Dunlavey
yu.vtet—"Still. Stjii With Thee' . . .Foote
Miss Wright. Miss Zahl. Mr. Call arid
Mr I.aur.
Address—“ The Choir of the Past”...
Dr. W Heiskell
Anthem-—Every One That Thirsteth"
Martin
Address—" The Choir of the Present"
Judz • C. E We.tr
Anthem—“ Holy Ghost the Infinite”..
Shelly
Offertory
M- George Eehert
Address—" The Choir of the Future"
Dr. Dunlavey
Anthem—"H alleluia! Handel
Ben dietion.
* • *
CHURCH TO OPEN
DRAMATIC SEASON
The forty-seventh season of ama
teur dramatics at th- Sacred Heart
in
■ "Her Love Stem
\\T E ran out of superlatives praising “Manhandled.” Now Gloria Swan- ||(l
[( ▼ V son tops them with “Her Love Story.” And where, oh, where can we i||
I, find words to describe it? aI (I
l\| Gown upon gown, thrill upon thrill, dazzling beauty and heart-piercing gjjl
1, drama—“ller Love Story” IS her greatest picture! tiffl l
I' Sunshine Comedy, “The Diving Fool ”
l 1 LESTER HUFF’S ORGAN SOLO I 111
|| “HALLOWEEN NIGHT IN A CLOCK SHOP” lli
/j CHARLIE DAVIS ORCHESTRA 111
THE INDIANAPOLIS TIMES
Church will be opened next Sunday,
when the St. Cecilia Players will
give the play, “The Last Words,”
by Charles Lauck, a member of the
organization. The following are
members of the cast: Ella Lawrie,
Charles Schludecker, Inez Nordloh,
C. Francis Rathz, Julia Boehm, Al
bert Hoereth, Joseph Foltzenlogel,
Edward Schludecker, Flpra Her
mann, Joe Seibold, William M.
Lauck, Joseph Leppert, Robert
Schmalz and Leo Herbertz. Musical
numbers for the occasion will be
rendered by the Sacred Heart or
chestra.
• * *
REV. L. C. FACKLER of St.
Matthew Evangelical Lutheran
Church will preach Sunday morning
on “The Secret of Success as Re
vealed in the Life of Elias.” Fol
lowing this service, a quarterly con
gregational meeting will be held. At
night a reformation festival will he
held, with the pastor preaching on
“Continue the Building of- the
Church of the Reformation.” On
Wednesday night the teachers will
meet at the parsonage.
• *
DR. EDWIN CUNNINGHAM of
the Central Universalist Church will
preach Sunday morning on The
Mystic—llls Friends and His Foes.”
• • •
AT GRACE M. E. CHURCH, Dr.
M. B. Hyde will preach Sunday on
the following themes, "Training the
Young in Religion" and “Prepara
tion for the Kingdom.”
* • •
A LARGER SERVICE CAM
PAIGN is under way at tho First
Baptist Church at Cumberland, Ind.
Sunday morning Dr. S. G. Hunting
ton will preach on "Loyalty” and at
night a Jubilee service will he held.
At 3 p. m. Sunday Dr. Huntington
will preach on ".Tesus ’Only.”
• •
REV. H. B. M’CLANAITAN of the
Emmanuel Baptist Church an
nounces his Sunday eubpects as
"Spiritual Sacrifices” and "The
Sevenfold Purpose of the Second
Coming of Christ.”
• •
REV. PAUL W. EDDINGFIELD
of the Broad Ripple Christian
Church will preach Sunday morning
on “Punishment for I<aw Breakers,"
and at night on “lessons From Old
Testament Problems.” lie will give
a child talk Sunday morning on
“Romeo and Juliet.”
• • •
DR. FRANK S. C. WICKS an
nounces the following order of serv
ice at All Souls Unitarian Church
Sunday morning:
"Hvmn t- Saint Cecelia” Gounod
"Chant Negre” Krutuer
Hymn 330
Four Service
Anthem —“Words of Alteration ”
Tte--v-nslve Reading—2oth Selection.
Script ur.
Hymn .‘>32
Notires ind Offerings
"Dawn Among the Trr.-s" Wintz
Hymn 300.
B# nedletion.
Voatluile—‘Fantasia’’ Bertlioh!
• • •
AT SECO'ND EVANGELICAL
CHURCH. Rev. J. H. Rilling will
preach Sunday morning on “The
Christian Race.” At night, “Obed
ience to Law.”
• • •
“ACTS OF PAUL” will be the
afternoon theme of B. 1,. Allen at
the Montrose Church of Christ. The
MOTION PICTURES
WEEKLY SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON
Jesus Stills the Sea of Galilee During a Storm
TEXT—Mark 5:35-41.
And the Bame day. when the even
was come, he saith unto them. Let
us pass over unto the other side.
And when they had sent away the
multitude, they took him even as he
was in the ship. And there were
also with him other little ships.
And there arose a gre t storm of
wind, and the waves beat into the
ship so that it was now full. ye
And he was in the hinder part of
the ship, asleep on a pillow; and
they awake him, and say unto him.
Master, rarest thou not that we per
ish?
And he arose, and rebuked the
wind, and said unto the sea. Peace,
he still. And the wind ceased, and
there was a great Calm. ,
And he said unto them, Why are
ye so fearful? How is it that ye have
no faith ?
And they feared exceedingly, and
said one to another, What manner
of mail is this, that even the wind
and the sea obey him?
The International Uniform Sunday
School Lesson for Oct. 2d: The Still
ing of the Storm.—Mark 4:35-41,
By WM. E. GILROY, D. D.
Editor-in-Chief of the Congrega
tionalism
The people had so thronged about
Jesus as He was teaching by the
Sea of Galilee that He had had
some of His fishermen friends puil
out in a boat a few feet from the
land, and He had concluded his ser
mon from the boat while the people
stood on shore listening. The sea.
or lake (for it was a body of water
not more than thirteen miles long
and eight miles broad), must have
been very calm.
When Jesus had finished His
| teaching He suggested that they
should cross to the other side of the
sea. Apparently He wished to get
away from the people, for lie was
so greatly in need of rest that He
fell asleep in the stern of the boat.
Note also that Mark says He lay
asleep “on a pillow.” Someone of
the disciples had been thoughtful
for his Master’s comfort.
And then there came what often
happened on this little sea—a sud
den and violent storm. The boat
began to fill with water and was in
peril of being swamped. These
storms came with such suddenness
and violence upon so small a lake
because of its peculiar situation.
| The little body of water was set in
a depression among hills so high
j that on the east side they rose to
| a height of 2,000 feet. The surface
of the Sea of Galilee itself was 680
i feet below the Mediterranean. This
: low water level among high hills led
i then as now to differences of tem
perature that produced such storms
as that described in our lesson.
Most of the disciples were prob
ably used to the sea, but they were
congregation will meet at 4362 N.
Baltimore Ave. At the morning hour
| Mr. Allen will speak at the Bright
! wood Church of Christ on "Pen Pic
j tures of Christ.” At night he will
J preach at the Dublin (Ind.) Church
j of Christ.
• • •
BIG SERVICE PLANNED
FOR si ND.XY AT TABERNAC LE
Joint reformation service, under
j the auspices of the Evangelical Lu
jt he ran Churches of the Missouri
1 Synod of Indianapolis, will he held
at 10:30 a. m. Sunday at the Cadle
i Tabernacle
none the less terror-stricken, and all
the more because their divine guest
still slept, unconcerned about their
peril and His. In their terror they
awakened Him. and there was re
proach in their words: CAREST
THOU NOT THAT WE PERISH?
Is not that very much like the ex
periences of life? Sudden ills and
troubles assail us, and our best
friends seem oblivious to our need.
We are apt to be petulant and dis
trustful, even toward those from
whom help is about to come.
Jesus rebuked the winds and the
waves. “Peace, be still," He com
manded. “And the wind ceased and
there was a great calm.”
The miracles of healing suggest
Christ's greater power to heal the
souls of men. So, here, this miracu
lous stilling of the storm on Galilee
is symbolic of the power of Jesus
to still the storms of life. Our lives
are full of passion and restlessness
and danger because we do not bring
them under the sway of His p**ace.
We are accustomed to think of the
power of Jesus as manifest in quiet
lives, never assailed by sweeping
emotions, and never marked by great
Paui Lindemann, editor of The
American Lutheran” of St. Fault
Minn . will be the chief speaker.
The program follows:
Org in Prelude Mr G H Kaatrup
Scripture Reading and Prayer .
The Apoaties' Creed.
“Trhmjplianl Mountain of the World”
W. Rhys Herbert
Matt* Choir.
Mr. Paul Elbert, Director.
Sermon Pastor Paul Lindemann. St.
Paul Minn.
‘‘The Forty-Sixth P*a'm".... Dudley Buck
M ai>a Choir.
Priyer and Benediction.
The Poxologry.
Missouri Synod churches of In
dianapolis and vicinity include:
St. Paul’s, New Jersey and Me*
K ft A Betty Compson
til W.m Elliott Dexter
W O* WL V Adolphe Menjou
1 v" Zasu Pitts
p J t VV w A comedy drama cf ultra-smart
society, adapted from Frederick
( ill ,S ' / liOnsdale’s Broadway stage hit,
I > ‘‘Spring Cleaning.”
’Syßk > Imperial Comedy
%SjM ‘‘DEEP SEA PANIC”
| ■ Harlow R. Byerly Singing
New ballad Sensation,
ill “Give Me One Rose to Remember.*
I\M ‘ ' EMIL SEIDEL ]
/ J -I, \ y 'J) j and His Orchestra j I
m EARL GORDON J/J,
Organ Selections^^^^
I adventure? and dangers. But that
' notion is all wrong. The power of
! Jesus to calm the storms of life has
| been displayed,throughout the ages
: ir. the most tempestuous of men.
Here among the disciples were
those passionate men, those stormy
petrels, James and John; here was
impetuous and Impulsive Peter: but
we think also of innumerable tem
pestuous souls over whom Jesus has
triumphed with His peace.
Jesus eaid to tho disciples, "Why
are ye so fearful? how is it that ye
have no faith?” Is not fear some
times the gateway to faith? Is it not
a good thing to be afraid, when our
star drives us to refuge and help?
Perhaps thin is one of the lessons
■ 'hat strong men find it hard to learn.
It is a good, thing when man finds
an extremity that drives him to God.
Let us note also that though God
mc-jf seem Indifferent to our distress,
even as Jesus slept through the dis
ciples’ peril, He is really very near
and ready to help when we call upon
Him. Often He can not help us until
cur readiness to let Him is expressed
in our cry. But how quickly He
comes with His “Peace, he still."
Tarty Sts. Pastor, H. M. Zorn, 717
S. New Jersey St.
Trinity, East at. 1 Ohicr Sts. Pas
tor, J. D. Matthius. and M. Reinke,
assistant pastor, 957 Middle Dr..
Woodruff Place.
St. Peter's, Brookside and Jeffer
son Aves. Pastor, F. W. Schurman,
2115 Brookside Ave.
Eramaus, Laurel and Orange Sts.
; Pastor, W. C. Meinzen, 1224 Laurel
St.
Redeemer, Park .and Fairfield
Aves Pastor, W. H. Eifert, 3523
Central Ave.
Grace, 2416 w. Walnut St. Pas-
MOTION PICTURES
tor, H. Scheperle, 3024 W. Michigan
St.
St. John’s, Five Points. Pastor,
L. Wambsganss, R. P, Box 75.
Zion, New Palestine. IT|itor, Fr.
J. Markworth, R. 2, New Palestine,
Ind.
* • •
FINAL SERVICE TO
BE HELD SUNDAY
The Fairview Presbyterian Church
holds its final Sunday worship in
the old building at Nineteenth and
Alabama Sts. tomorrow at 11, when
Dr. Edward Haines Kistler will
speak on “Removing the Ancient
Landmarks.” It will also be the oc
casion for the Holy Communion.
Mrs. Frank T. Edenharter has
arranged the following numbers for
this hour of worship: Prelude,
“Prayer,” F. Flaxington Harker;
anthem, “He Shall Come Down.”
Dudley Buck; offertory, “Bread of
the World”; Mendelssohn’s “Conso
lation,” arranged by C. W. Zeck
wer; postlude, “Andante,” Homer
Bartlett. The final worship in the
old building will be held Thursday at
8, when the minister will speak on
“Ye Shall Go Out With Joy." The
formal opening of the new chapel
on Forty-Sixth St„ at Kenwood
and Capitol Aves., will be held next
Sunday, Nov. 2, at 11 a. m. and
7:45 p. m.
• • •
REV. CLYDE GIBBENS of the
Garden Baptist Church announces
his subjects as "Broadcasting” and
"Sickness, a Judgment of Sin.”
* *
AT ST. PAUL M. E. CHURCH
| Sunday, Dr. Frank L. Hovis will
; preach in the morning on “The
Eleventh Commandment" and at
night on “John Mark.” Vinson H.
Manifold will address the men at
9:30 a. m.
* • *
“THE LORD’S TABLE” will be
the morning theme of the Rev. Earl
Coble, pastor of the Bethlehem Lu
theran Church. At night, “Tempta
tion."
• • •
AT HILLSIDE CHRISTIAN
CHURCH Sunday morning the pas
tor, Homer Dale, will preach on
"Shepherding and Sheep.” His tttpic
for the evening sermon will be "I
Was Sick and in Prison.” At chil
dren’s church services the subject
will be “After the Resurrection.”
• •
REV. GUY V. HARTMAN of Hall
i Place M. E. Church will speak Sun
\ day on the following subjects: “The
j Blessedness of Forgetting” and "The
I Purpose of the Sabbath.”
Muncie “Y” Leading
Muncie Y. M. C. A. leads in a
membership contest between eight
Indiana cities. State headquarters
announced today. Muncie has a
point score of 69.50. Other cities In
the contest are Marion. Lafayette,
Oreensburg, Evansville, Michigan
City and Gary.
Bombs Scare Families
Police were called to Eastern Ave.
and Michigan St. on reports from
| families there that someone was
i shooting. Officers say they found
a political meeting there and four
| bombs had been exploded to get a
j crowd.
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