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The Indianapolis times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1922-1965, September 26, 1929, Home Edition, Second Section, Image 15

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SEPT. 26,1929
‘Mite’ Manager’s Funeral to Be Friday ; Burial at Cincy Saturday\
/Intimate Sketches
' ( ' gvf f' T. A
orld<Sengs StarsA,
CY PERKINS
CY PERKINS 'is well physi
cally, has one of the great
est arms in baseball, but will
hardly play a bit more im-
portant part
in the series
than the
crippled Hart
nett. . . . The
reason : the
Athletics have
the best catch
er in baseball
in Mickey
Cochrane. . . .
Perkins, a
great catcher
in his day, still
a mighty good
one, is getting
his chance too
late. ... Joined
Perkins
the Athletics in 1918 and is
serving his twelfth year under
Mack. . . . When he was an out
standing catcher in the Ameri
can League, the Athletics with a
weak team were annually finish
ing in last place. ... Is one of
the few catchers in baseball to
have worked more than 1,000
major league games. . . . For six
consecutive years caught in 100
or more games. . . . Had four
mighty strenuous years from 1920
to 1923. ... In each one of those
years worked 140 or more games,
his high water mark being 148.
. . . Always had a great arm and
it is still as good as ever. . . . Has
been a great help to Mack in
keeping his pitching staff on
edge. . . . Not a great hitter, his
average over twelve years is a
trifle better than .260.
Page Expects Hard Tussle in Both
Contests of Double-Header Opener
Indiana Mentor to Split Squad Equally for Games With
Wabash and Ohio U. Saturday.
r>.u Timm Sprrinl
BLOOMINGTON. Ind. Sept. 26.
—“They’ll both be tough." said Pat
Page, Indiana university’s football
coach, when interviewed today,
whether Wabash college or Ohio
university would be the stronger
team in the football opening he-e
Saturday. The Indiana coach is
building up two equally strong
teams to meet the two foes in the
double-header.
Indiana players and fans both
know that Wabash will be tough.
Indiana-Wabash games have been
a part of Hoosier football history
for a score of years. But Page and
his Hoosiers v.iil face an unknown
quantity in Ohio university. This
will be the first time that Indiana
ever tackled the Athens (O.) school.
The Bobcais have won themselves
the respect of every team in the
Ohio conference. Last year they
emerged from the season with a
record of six victories and three* de
feats. The games which were
dropped were lost by close margins.
Ohio never scored less than two
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ehq
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And it snappy chorus on the
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' ■— —*
GABBY HARTNETT
CHARLES 'GABBY) HART
nett is both the hard luck
as well as good luck member of
the Chicago Cubs—Lucky be-
cause he is
with a pen
nant winner—
Unlucky be
cause his bad
arm may pre
vent him from
doing any
catching. . . .
Perhaps his
only chance to
break into the
series will be
in the role of
pinch hitter.
. . . Caught his
only regular
game of the
Hartnett
year last Sunday. ... In the
spring he suffered an arm in
jury that many critics feared
would be a knockout to the Cub’s
pennant chances. . . . Arm failed
to respond to treatment, despite
the fact that any number of
famous specialists were consulted.
. . . Got his name “Gabby” be
cause of his constant chatter
back of the bat. ... In 1927 he
caught 127 games for the Cubs
and the following year worked
in 120. . . . There was no chance
for any other catcher to break in
with Harnett in shape to go.
... That is why it was feared his
arm injury would prove a hard
blow to Chicago's pennant
chances. ... A good batter, noted
for his long distance drives, it
Was felt the Cubs would miss his
many hits for the circuit. . . .
touchdowns a game during the sea
son, exepting the Ohio-Ohio Wes
leyan game. Wesleyan, conquerors
of Michigan, vvon the latter con
test, 7-0.
“Every man on the four-team
squad which will take the field Sat
urday will get his chance to play if
it is at all possible,” said Page to
day.
STAR TACKLER RETURNS
AMES, la.. Sept. 26.—10wa State’s
line was strengthened with the re
turn for practice of Lloyd Bohan
nan, veteran tackle, who appeared
for the first time in a hard varsity
scrimmage Wednesday. Hitch, anew
comer, exhibited his talents at a
wing position.
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V itaphone Movietone
Act* News
Little Veteran Yank Boss
Fought Until Last, Phy
sician Says.
LEAVES GAP IN GOTHAM
Failure of Team Hastens
Death of Huggins.
BY GEORGE KIRKSEY,
Lniled Press Staff Correspondent
NEW YORK, Sept. 26.—There
was a yawning gap in the ranks of
the New York Yankees today. Little
Miller Huggins, driving force behind
six American League pennant win
ners and three world championship
teams in the last twelve years, lay
dead.
He died at 3:16 p. m. Wednesday
after battling courageously for'six
days against an insidious infection
which started from a boil on his
cheek. He was 50. He had been
weakened by influenza and was a
physical wreck when he was carried
to St. Vincent’s hospital last Friday.
Repeated blood transfusions failed
to do more than prolong his waning
life.
In an official statement by Dr.
Edward H. King, Yankee physician,
the cause of his death was described
as “pyaemia, the process of pus
forming organism in the blood, and
with infection of the face and oe
dema, the filling of the lungs with
water, as contributory causes.”
Many, including Dr. King, believed
“the midget manager” sacrificed his
life in a futile effort to win another
pennant with the Yankees—to win
four flags in succession and estab
lish an American League record.
“He had been a sick man for
weeks,” Dr. King said, “but would
not leave the team until he was
positive that it had no possible
chance of winning the fourth
straight pennant.
“His lowered vitality resulted In
the rapid spread of the infection
which we were unable to curb. He
should have used his energy to save
himself instead of worrying about
his ba'l club.”
Even with death lingering at his
door, Huggins refused to give up
the battle for his life. He hung on
grimly to the very last breath. Once
when he regained consciousness he
muttered between thin, pale lips:
“Tell the boys I’ll be out of here in
a week.”
Funeral services will be conducted
Michelin Tires
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THE INDIANAPOLIS TIMES
Comments on Huggins
Babe Ruth—He was my Mend. He was
a great guy and X got a kick out of
doing things that wouid help him. I am
sorry he couldn’t win the last pennant
he tried for.
Lou Gehrig—l guess I miss him more
than any one.
Connie Mack—l have lost a very dear
friend. I am only one of thousands who
will regret his passing.
Wilbert Robinson—He was one of the
greatest managers in baseball, a keen
Judge of ball players and a fine handier
of men.
John A Heydler, president of the Na
tional League—All baseball men feel Hug
gins’ loss keenly.
E. S. Barnard, president of the American
league—The American league has lost a
great manager.
John J. McGraw—He has left an empty
spot in baseball that can never be filled
again.
Owen Bush—He knew the game inside
and out and was a real manager in his
quiet way. Basebal surely will miss little
Miller.
Friday at 2 p. m. in the Little
Church Around the Corner by tne
Rev. Dr. J. E. Price, pastor of the
Washington Heights Methodist
Episcopal ciiurch, assisted by the
Rev. W. H. Weigle Jr.
The body will be taken to his
birthplace, Cincinnati, where burial
will take place Saturday. Services
in Cincinnati will be at 2 p. m. Sat
urday at the First Presbyterian
church.
All members of the New York
Yankees will attend the services
here. In respect for the memory of
the little Yankee leader all Amer
ican League games for Friday have
been called off by President E. S.
Barnard.
first, six tik::s
By United Pres*
NEW YORK, Sept. 26.—Miller
Huggins’ record as manager of the
New York Yankees’ follows:
Year Pet. Finished
1918 488 4
1919 576 3
1930 617 3
1921 641 1
1922 641 1
1923 645 1
1924 585 2
1925 448 7
1926 591 1
1927 714 1
1928 656 1
(X) 1929 581 2
(xi Standing through Wednesday’s games.
\ !/\
psjglj
Huggins Was Clever Fielder, Bunter
and Place Hitter During Career
Miller Broke In With Cincy Reds in 1904: Figured Promi
nently in Life of Babe Ruth.
Bn United Pregg
NEW YORK, Sept.. 26.—For a
quarter of a century Miller Huggins
was a major league player and man
ager. He broke in with the Cincin
nati Reds In 1904 and in his day
was recognized as a clever second
baseman and a remarkable place
hitter and bunter.
In 1910 he was sold to the St.
Louis Cardinals and in 1913 was
made manager of the team. Hug
gins engineered the deal which
brought Rogers Hornsby from the
Dension (Texas) club to the Cardi
nals for SSOO. After managing the
Cardinals for five seasons. Huggins
came to New York in 1918 to take
over the Yankees.
$130,000 for Babe
In reorganizing a club that had
finished in the first division only
five times before he took charge,
Huggins bought Babe Ruth from the
Boston Red Sox in 1919 for $130,000.
In 1921 the Yankess won their
first American League pennant. Un
der his guidance they won the pen
nant in six out of the last nine
years, including three world cham
pionships and dominated the base
ball world.
There were many trying days for
the little, stooped-shoulder manager
—he never weighed more than 140
and was scarcely 5 feet, 1 inch in
height.
Babe Ruth, Bob Meusel and other
stars on his team gave him plenty
to think about at one time or an
other. In the end, it was “the
Runt,” as he was, sometimes called,
who played the winning hand.
In his quiet, careful way Huggins
figured prominently in the career of
Ruth. Under a manager less calm,
calculating and tolerant, Ruth’s star
Powell sign c°.
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EXCURSIONS
CHICAGO Cincinnati '2-
A Aft Shelbyville .75
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Sunday, Sept. 29
Leave Indianapolis 11:35 p. m.
September 28. or 12:40 a. m. Sep
tember 29. Returning leave Chi- Special train ■will leave Indian
cago 10:10 p. m. or 11:40 p. m. apolig 7:00 a. m. Returning, leave
September 29. Tickets good in Cincinnati 7 :15., Eastern Time,
coaches only. Half fare for chil- same date. Tickets good in coaches
dren. only. Half fare for children.
Tickets and full particulars at City Ticket office, 112 Monument Circle.
Rhone Riley 3322 and Union Station, phone Riley 3355
BIG FOUR ROUTE
Special One Day See the monster
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TUESDAY 0 =
October 1
Fast special Interstate train direct to down
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Lv. Indianapolis 5:15 A. M.
Regular train returns at 11 p. m., but return
tickets will be good on any train leaving Louis
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Buy Your Tickets Early
INTERSTATE
PUBLIC SERVICE CO.
might have gone out back in 1925.
At that time Ruth frequently
wandered far from the straight and
narrow. One of his exploits brought
about a clasl} with Huggins. Babe
was fined $5,000 and suspended for
“misconduct off the field.”
Backed by Owner
An internal insurrection started
among the Yankees against Hug
gins. Ruth protested, pouted and
threatened. Huggins kept his coun
sel.
Colonel Jacob Rupper, owner of
the Yankees, backed Huggins to the
last ditch. Peace was restored.
Ruth came back with his head hung
low. Ever since, the Yanks knew
who was boss.
Huggins drew S3O 000 a season as
manager of the Yankees and saved
his money. He gave his players
most of the credit for winning pen
nants.
“You got to .have the players to
win,” he used to say. “Common
sense, patience and leadership are
useful only if you have the players.”
Baseball will miss him. He was
one of the three ablest leaders of
all time.
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Pros Reach
Semi-Finals
Richards Meets Kinsey and
Kozeluh Battles Wood.
Bu United Prt gg
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PAGE 15
| /tonal tennis championships reached
| the round today with Vin
i cent, Richards defending champion;
Howard Kinsey of California,
Charles M. Wood of Ardsley, N. Y.,
and Karel Kozeluh of Czecho-Slo
vakia as participants.
Today’s pairings pitted Richards
; against Kinsey and Kozeluh against
i Wood.
Paired in the doubles, Richards
and Kozeluh entered the semi-finals
against Wood and Paul Heston.

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