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The Indianapolis times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1922-1965, September 30, 1929, Home Edition, Image 11

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SEPT. 30, 192f_
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r.TI NEA SEPVIC£ >NC -I AUTHOR OF * RICH GIRL- POOR Cl RL * ETC.
THIS HAS HAPPENED
HELEN PAGE feels hopelessly In love
with her handsome guardian. LEONARD
BRENT. A chance meeting with a dying
beggar, CHARLES NELLIN. who tells a
strahfte story, causes Brent to change
his plans for Helen's future. Shortly
afterward he tells Helen that in accord
ance with a promise given her parents,
he is now to reveal her identity and
she Is the only grandchild of a million
aire. CYRIL K. CUNNINGHAM. Brent
takes her to Cunningham and offers as
proof a locket containing a picture
which he had taken from the dying Nel
ltn. Pending investigation. Helen re
mains with her grandfather, who gives
her anew car. She drives everywhere
until she accidentally hits EVA feNNIS,
who has to be taken to the hospital.
Helen meets Eva’s brother ROBERT, who
1. lls In love with her.
junningham announces that Helen Is
his dead daughter's child and his heiress.
Brent Anris a lost locket which exactly
matches the one he had taken from
Nellin. To avoid discovery, he asks
Helen not to wear her locket in public.
A few days Inter Eva and Helen over
turn a canoe on the lake and Robert
rescues them. While changing clothes.
Eva tells Helen that she had lost an old
fashioned locket the night of her party.
Fearing Robert's attentions to Helen
ar.d annoyed bv the demands on him for
monev by CARMEL SEGFO. Brent tries
to think of a 'ale plan to secure Helen
and her Inheritance.
NOW GO ON WITH THE STORY
CHAPTER XXIV
TT was several days before Brent
went up to Bramblewood follow
ing the Sunday afternoon of Bob's
.rescue of Helen on the lake. His
wlans had been slow' in maturing,
inasmuch as Helen's actions had an
Important bearing upon them.
On Monday he had telephoned
to ask her to come down to New
York and lunch with him. but she
said her grandfather's condition re- !
quired her to be with him.
The next day Brent telephoned !
a second time, only to receive the
same message. He felt it unwise to
be too insistent and on Wednesday j
he decided to drive up to Yonkers j
and see for himself whether if
really was the seriousness of her
grandfather's illness that kept
Helen at Bramblewood or whether
Bob Ennis had anything to do with
it.
On that day Mr. Cunningham was
better and Brent was convinced that
he had not been so ill as Helen pre
tended. "She did not want to see
jne,” he conceded.
But his conclusion was a trifle
puzzling to him. because in man
ner she had not changed greatly
toward him She did not speak of
Bob. and Brent had no desire to
bring up his name.
Had he been able to question her
fully he would have learned that
concern for her grandfather had
driven all other thoughts from her
mind—all thoughts except the one
that she might need someone to
lean upon when death fiflally
become so dear to her.
Instinctively she turned to Brent
when she thought of being left en
tirely alone in the world. But it
was not the turning of one blindly
In love and Brent sensed the differ
ence, although he did not correctly
analyze it.
a a a
TOU musn't exhaust yourself
so.” he said to her while she
was pouring tea for him.. “I never
saw your hands shake like that be
fore. Don’t you go out at all?”
“I haven’t been out since Sun
day.”
“Don’t you think you could leave
your grandfather tomorrow and
come down to New York? W T e will
go to a matinee and I’ll have you
back here early."
“I’d like to.” Helen admitted. “He
is much better today; perhaps he
will be able to sit up tomorrow.
Time passes much faster for him
when he is at the window.”
“What does the doctor say about
him?”
“He says he is getting stronger.
I mean stronger than he has been
since Sunday, but that he never will
be w'ell again.”
“He might live for years.”
not for years, but tile doctor
said he might linger for months—
even a year. But any sudden shock
Krill kill him.”
Her words, serious as they were
to Helen, were of greater signifi
cance to Brent Even a few months
he told himself, might be sufficient
time for Helen to realize that being
in love and being in love with love
are two different things.
At that moment, in Leonard
Brent's mind, the seal was finally
eet upon Mr. Cunningham's fate.
•Will you telephone me In the
looming?” he asked Helen, “to let
,me know If you will lunch with
me?”
Helen promised, and shortly aft
erward Brent took his departure.
He did not go up to take leave of
Mr. Cunningham.
He spent a restless night—not be
cause he was troubled by his con
science, but because the daring of
his plan was perfectly apparent to
him If anything went wrong he
would be unable to explain the act
that he now depended upon to clear
his path.
“But the odds are with me.” he
encouraged himself. “I’ve got to
gamble.”
Helen called him at 10 o'clock to
say she would meet him for lunch,
but that she could not stay to at
tend a matinee. Her grandfather’s
condition was slightly worse.”
“But I told him last night that I
might go down today,” she explained
to Brent, “and he insists that I go.”
“Tell him I'm much obliged,”
Brent said pleasantly. “I’ve missed
you, dear.”
When he saw' her she showed evi
dence of being under a severe strain.
“We will lunch in some quiet
place,” he told her, “and then I’ll
drive you home. It will be good for
you to be out of doors.”
Helen welcomed the suggestion of
driving back to Bramblewood. “But
we mustn’t be too long at lunch,”
he pointed out, "or I won’t have
time to drive up. I promised to be
back to tea.”
a a a
HER information gave Brent a
new' thought. He began to act
cn it at lunch by ordering dishes
that would require special prepara
tion. Helen protected the delay, but
Brent assured her he would make
up the time on the road.
“You need to relax and stop wor
rying,” he cautioned her. A mo
ment later he signaled the head
waiter and w'hispered to him w’hile
Helen sat with her eyes closed, try
ing to overcome her weariness.
Presently a beautiful orchid
corsage was brought to her. She
put out her hand across the table
in thanking Brent and for a mo
ment he wondered if he had not
been unduly alarmed about Bob
Ennis.
But on the drive to Yonkers she
was silent and pensive. Brent hard
ened his heart to carry out his
plans, knowing that defeat for him
might w'ell be behind her mood.
He too fell silent and they were
only a short distance from Bram
blewood when that which he had
planned occurred. Suddenly, and
without apparent reason, the car
lurched to one side of the road.
Brent had allowed the front
w'heels to strike a rut and had not
attempted to control it. This gave
him opportunity to drive the car off
the road under pretense of getting
it righted.
It happened so quickly that Helen
had no time to realize what Brent
had done. She though that he had
been careless, but she did hot ques
tion its being an accident.
They came to a stop in a weed
grown depression so deep that Brent
was unable to get the car back on
the road under its own power.
“I ll have to go for help,” he said
to Helen when finally he appeared
to accept the inevitable. “Fortu
nately. we are near Bramblewood.
They ought to be able to pull us out
with the service car.”
Helen started to climb to the
ground. "I’ll walk with you,” she
said.
"If you don't -mind,” Brent ob
jected quickly, "I'd rather you
stayed here. I’ve some things in the
car that I shouldn’t like to leave
unguarded. Besides, you are prob
ably pretty badly shaken up. Better
wait here, dear.”
Helen sank back in the seat. She
was a bit unnerved and very tired.
The walk held no particular ap
peal for her.
“I won’t be long,” Brent prom
ised. and started off.
tt a a
WHEN he reached Bramblewood
he asked for Marks, and told
Ashe not to say in Mr. Cunning
ham's presence who it was that
wanted to see his attendant.
“Miss Nellin and I have met with
a slight accident.” he explained,
"and I wish to inquire if Mr. Cun
—By Williamt
ningham's condition will permit us
to tell him of it.”
"He is not very good, sir.” Ashe
volunteered.
"Too bad,” Brent said feelingly.
“Try not to disturb him when you
send Marks down.”
When Marks came a few minutes
later Brent told him that his car
was ditched and asked him to send
someone to get it to Bramblewood.
"I’ll go up and reassure Mr. Cun
ningham,” he said, moving toward
the door.
"Please be careful. Mr. Brent,”
Marks replied uneasily. "He has
been fretting about Miss Nellin’s
absence. If he thought anything
had happened to her ...”
“I understand,” Brent said. "I
won’t excite him.”
But when he reached the sick
man’s room he was, even without
words, a startling visitor. He had
left his hat downstairs and his gray
ing hair was now wildly disordered.
With a jerk he had loosened his
tie. His coat w'as pulled off one
shoulder and one cuff of his shirt
w'as hanging below his tugged-up
coatsleeve.
Altogether he w’as as disheveled
as he could make himself. He burst
Into Mr. Cunnigham’s room with
the abruptness of a man who had
lost all his self control.
The invalid, watching the doer
for Helen’s coming, sat up with a
start.
Brent came on. staggering slightly,
and clutching at his throat with one
hand, while the other groped for
support on the air.
Quite close to the bed he stopped
and. appeared to see the man upon
it, for the first time since he had
entered the room.
Mr. Cunningham’s face was as
white as his pillow and his eyes
were horribly distended. "What is
it?” he attempted to say, but there
w'as nothing more than a croak to
Issue from his blue lips.
"Oh, my God!” Brent cried, as
though the words had been wrung
from him in agony. "Helen! Helen!
She has been killed.”
(To Be Continued)
School Bus Law Ignored
pj/ Timet Special
MTJNCIE. Ind.. Sept. 30.—Declar
ing motorists are repeatedly violat
ing a state law requiring them to
stop while a school bus is receiving
or unloading pupils. Lee O. Baird,
county school superintendent, turned
over to Prosecutor Joe H. Davis a
long list of license numbers of cars
whose drivers violated t'e law.
Davis will file charges as .Ton as
names can be checked with the
numbers.
Eight Alleged Gamblers Held
p.’i Timet Special
COLUMBUS, rnd., Sept. 30.—One
dime and a pair of dice were all
local police confiscated in a raid on
a craps game w’hich resulted in the
arrest of eight factory employes.
The game was in progress on a
sidewalk.
THE RETURN OF TARZAN
A great ocean liner was nearing France.
Aboard her was Tarzan of the Apes,
returning home to his African jungle.
Thinking, rather sorrowfully, over the
past few weeks, he wondered if he ha<|
acted wisely. For he had renounced his
birthright and the woman he loved. To
a man to whom he owed nothing.
THE INDIANAPOLIS TIMES
BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES
BOV l 1 SURE VUU-tO A DOMKSY \ \* VM* aUT
fSCT ViHtW \ BARGMNfcO T’6£T ! HftVSfc TEAT -£.
TH’ IT COQA’O TWO. CAS?* 1 v THIS KSTCHtN ’
___
OH 1 MISS, COOLO VOOSfc HEY?/ C Y SA-AAY IyOO’RB XiS’ FITT
fey WfcULQ H A VOOR MMM?I HPNtN’T % TH’ OMt 1 VOMMUA TALK V •/'
™ U A YOR OMER gO TO 1 TEUI ME -WHAT'S ’,].f/
Bs ■ TH’SECRET? .7f/J
FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS
SVVHOW T4OS6 NJiSCE. I SOT SOME "| Tx UkC AMIMAUS Ct. , Y)
OAMOy PICTUCES You OP GCtTZXV 71;AM AMNTWIMS ES.GT- = J A Vj-‘.O / !
SWCfAED US FCECIivES SEASS I'U. YOU U.MOWI VjWaT I'D ! ANi.VAU \
'SPscrAu.y tue omes J lp uue 7b ee vkwem / uomtcr ij :
OP -me AMIMAX-S! rfvOOCQME OJER , x eCO VW OP, OSCAR? \)j SPOCE’ < \
's J>k ;
WASHINGTON II
f / setter JOIN me,
l GOlNtr TO CANADA ON A J OBOY ! \
MOOSE HU KtE . W*Ffa YO&IT'LI l TELL )
J" TyBETCHA 1 Jrb™ countess .J
SALESMAN SAM
[ A t ©/ )&OSH-SOME BOON WHtJTs
jßk /fSSSt STANCE.,I’LC
I* UKg omi', voice
MOM’N POP
ts NO THAWS.VwtU. if YOU hEy.wmaTs) IK JUST
/ YMAY NEED A \ EVER DO,HERE'S IaTFR g. THE B>G / LOOKIN' T‘SEE
SING 1 _\TTLE HELP \MV CARP-JUST A STRANGER ipr a tF THERE'S ANYONE
ONE OF \ OUT OF A HOLE \ CALL ON > DOGS POPS V 9 /HI DIN UNDER HERE. I
HIS \ MYSELF SOME ) ME / FOOTSTEPS VV WANT TO MAKE
INVENTIONS, \ TIME A ' AND FtNAU-Y SURE THAT YOU AND
Tarzan's thoughts drifted from the
past to the future. He tried to look for
ward wih pleasurable sensations to the
scenes of his birth and boyhood. But
who now would there be to welcome
him in the fierce, cruel jungle where
he had spent twenty of his twenty-two
years? Only Tan tor, the elephant,
could he call friend.
—By Martin
C UuR-CY SAM\'<3riT A VLAMtcVI )aU_ RIGHT, GULz' JUST >
The others would hunt him or flee
from him, as had been their way in the
past. Not even the apes of his owm tribe
would extend the hand of fellowship.
Civilization had become distasteful to
him. He longed for the old jungle life.
Yet he looked with little relish upon
the future he had mapped out lor him
self.
OUR BOARDING HOUSE
\ MIS-f£R —-ASICIAiS ME UlI<A-r AIAPoLEOU K*3 orF "PRICE Ckl
f VdOLILDA dU/E/U FOR TMi5 CAR A-f “IVT ACCOUii-f OF-fh(E 'tlßeS 1 X
I ‘BATVL.E OF HJA-TERLOO —-To BE if "BEIASO WoRAi A Bt-r —.
i vioiJES-r HlrTel Voa T I'D SAV \it IT? H BlT*'"Trfe laMER TDBES
l COURSE I DoiDT MEAU “To ICAlociC If) ARE lAi EVCELLE^i'T'
( rs, buy Houu mamv miles does si/e
\ es-r OUY OF A gallon, MoT COUAiYi/UGy' KoRJ MV FRiEUP. f
\
VIiYM Yt4’ VtJlAjp UJ BACIC J V -TWRILL OF v-^
/~~~ —————————— r - j~ ' ,► . >
THAT'S IT EXACTLY !f \ /
UAYE A Bl<3 OOTPIT AM' J / ‘ 4Jkic>M IWI r' .
60 IMTO ALL PARTS OP V""" ~ “V f y ' '
THE VMOQLO LOO 141M6 J 601M6 \ TOO "
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[ ®vc,Y Y)
j>v ?t ''~_ m [ /
f ' i/junnPPP-l f( |p NOU T '-" NVC YOU'RE goiNcj to leave \
;/ A / INDCcn M& MOM 6 IN THIS PiNVCW UTTie TOWM,
j/ 60M' MOOSE HUMTIWA 1 W - T "| j \ WHILE VOU'RE OUT HAVING A (rOOD J
I AW last ADVENTURE j XJ™*- WP - 6 MISTAKEN! f
BEFORE TU’ WEPPIN'./ t PO NOU HEAR. THAT
<&)FTCR LEARNING THAT THE stranger') NOW AS YOOP \ wtLL.I HAVE AN INVENTION
HE HAD JAWED WAS NONE OTHER ATTORNEY YOU YIHAT WILL MAKE FLYING AS
THAN cIOD TWELLFR POP IS CAN TALK \ SAFE AS MOTORING AND
DO EVERYTHING frankly with HE ) 1 WANTED TO MAKE
vArXVX Tu r . HANDSOMELY JUST WHAT / SURE t WASN'T BONG
possible to get Jud out of the laws fOP JWS \ watched when \ showed
clutches-so he seeks legal advice freedom, of ALL these \IT TO POP. YOU set
OF LAWYER - - HAWK STRANGE ACTIONS \ t THOUGHT HE
" f /VDSE-T-mFr INTERVIEWS IN POP'S OFFICE? /miGHT BACK ME
f GET HIM OUT J Jt* | A RUN ) JUDIN JAIL ;11 ri! ’HE
PD Yer. BACK, So \ VHReD TR’ sToR.e
H-eRe’S TH' BACK HOME. To SHIP
C 1 1 BV n C rrv,'T IWC,
—By Edgrar Rice Burroughs
As he mused upon this. Tarmr: saw,
reflected in a mirrow, t our men at
cards. Suddenly he was all attention,
permitting no detail of the picture to
escape him. Bharp words arose.
Springing up, one of the players leaned
across the table, striking another full
in the face. Then the others closed in
between them.
PAGE 11
—By Ah pm
—By Blossei
—By Crane
—By Small
—By Taylor

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