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The Indianapolis times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1922-1965, October 17, 1929, Home Edition, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015313/1929-10-17/ed-1/seq-2/

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ENGLISH MOTOR
SHOW OFFERS
WIDE VARIETY
New Auto Models Indicate
Trend to Compete
With U. S.
BY HARRY L. PERCY
United PrfM Staff CorTenponitent
LONDON’. Oct. 17.—New wonders
In the way of automobile con
struction were revealed at the
Olympia hall, here today, when the
English Motor Show opened to con
tinue for ten days.
Striking improvements in car
comfort have been made, partic
ularly in body-work, finish and
general furnishings. The motif of
the show is “comfort.” and this has
even been applied to the arrange
ments of the show itself.
The public is able to view the new
models much better and with great
er comfort than in former years be
cause of the recent ruling that not
more than two properly accredited
salesman are allowed on each stand.
Have Many JJpoths
In the automobile section there
are about ninety stands, more than
sixty in the carriage -work section,
and 336 for accessories and com
ponents. The Society of Motor
Manufacturers and Traders. Ltd
organizers of the show, anticipates
a record attendance.
Six and eight cylinder automo
biles are most numerous in the
show, and they are priced and de
signed with the object of meeting
American competition. It is stated
that the general standard of Brit
ish production has never been
higher, although great secrecy has
been maintained in the building
and trying-out of some of these
models.
Secrecy Was Maintained
The new Morris medium-powered
six was, for instance, assembled at
Le Mans. Prance, and tested in
Luxembourg and other places on the
continent. It is a 14 9 horsepower
car, with a road tax of $75.
Another six, a sixteen horsepower
Singer, to be sold under $1.500 —
cheap for a British six-cylinder car
—was tested very severely. To pre
vent the attentions of the curious,
the car was camouflaged as a green
grocer's van. It was able to take a
hill of one in six with a full load at
thirty-six miles per hour.
3~-'-
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\ You’ll Think f\ f : J&.
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FRIDAY and //S->4,
fk, N SATURDAY! F /8&
1 Off-face styles! Long side I Ch , I
- j; 1 pokes! Brimless and rolled I
\ K 1 brims! Short front cloches! :/ j 1
\ fl\ 1 Skull caps! Fisherman backs! / 1
~ 1 Some with veils! Black. / % _
F \ Cardinal. Maroon. Green. I
FEATURING A BASEMENT SALE OF
HATS QQC
JUST ARRIVED!!
Ik/ Smartest Colors!! HI
i> A Newest Metallic Trims!!
[ftfci Mg' }Oever for
-k - i Miss or Matron
Love Me, Love My Dog
Teething Is Important Stage
in the Life of Your Puppy
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fk^'jrk
** ! i ' rT t • TrT Triiniti it Tftfitii
Sometimes called the “Plum Pudding Dog,” he is conceded to have been
brought from Dalmatia. His love for horses and carriages made him
known to many as the “coach dog.” He is distinctive for his spotted
coat and resembles a pointer in general appearance. He has a keen
scent and splendid sporting proclivities.
BY MRS. HELEN B. JILLSON
Teething not only plays an im
portant part in the life of the hu
man baby, but it is of vital impor
: tance in the life of the young dog-
The pup’s first teeth appear after
about three weeks, little sharp rows
j which he proceeds to try out very
j soon, first on his mother and then
; on the ears of his brothers and sis
| ters or, if alone, on any piece of fur
niture or his blanket- I need not
go into detail on this subject, as
every one knows by experience or
hearsay, the propensity of the lively,
mischievous pup.
At the age of 5 or 6 months, Mr.
Pup begins dropping his baby teeth.
Sometimes they loosen and slip down
his throat with a good morsel of
food. Unless closely observed, the
baby teeth go and new ones come
in before one is aware or the tran
sition.
However, the first ones often are
stubborn and difficult to uproot and
cause a bit of trouble. If the stub
■ born tooth refuses to drop out nat
i urally and the dog is in discomfort
a good dog surgeon can remove the
offending member and happiness is
restored all around.
After the second teeth are es
tablished there is little trouble from
then on until the dog gets to be
The Dalmatian
what is termed in dogdom an “aged
dog”—three or four years on. Dis
coloration may appear at the roots
of the teeth, which, if left unat
tended, may cause trouble.
This can be removed with pumice
on cotton and an orange stick. If
the trouble is of long standing and
simple home remedies fail, a veteri
nary surgeon can clear it.
I do not know that one of every
four have it, but I do know that
pyorrhea and inflamed gums often
are complaints in the dog world and
my advice is to be forehanded. A
large bone given frequently to bite
upon aids the health of the gums
and the teeth tremendously.
The Gulf of Mexico at its great
est width from Galveston to
Campeachy—is 68 miles wide. It is
1,120 miles long at its greatest length
—from Vera Cruz to Florida.
Be Safe!.
©Obtain a full cover
axe policy on your
, automobile before
\ starting on your next
I t ufl coverage at low
State Auto
Insurance Ass’n.
tll-Jb Occidental Bldg LI. *571
THE INDIANAPOLIS TIMES
REBELLION IS
PREDICTED FOR
TEXTILEMILLS
Sherwood Anderson Avers
Owners Must Give
Workers Rights.
Bn Rcrivva-Hoteord Newnpaner Alliattct
WASHINGTON, Oct. 17.—“ Unless
the owners of southern textile mills
show more vision in handling their
present industrial troubles, an
economic explosion among their
workers will some day do irrespara
ble harm to the industry.”
That is the opinion expressed to
day by Sherwood Anderson, the
novelist. It is based upon his knowl
edge of the mountain folk and their
descendants, who make up the
largest part of the textile employes
in the Carolians. southern Virginia.
Tennessee and Georgia. Owner of
two newspapers at Marion. Va., An
derson has lived and worked among
them for several years.
Workers Have Spirit
*‘Th*ey have spirit and they have
independence,” said Anderson. They
are rapidly becoming a part of mod
ern civilization, responsive to the
economic urge which eventually
stirs the most latent forces.
“They are learning what comfort
is and what it can be—something
of which they before have been ig
norant. Eventually, they wall seek
wages and conditions to meet these
new demands.”
Anderson believes that the work
ers will not long tolerate conditions
now prevalent in the mills and mill
villages. Some day, he thinks, the
employes will be fully unionized, and,
once organized, they will wage a
bitte fight for what they think is
coming to them.
Advises Early Action
“It would be far wiser,” he said,
“if the owners inaugurated a pre
AN ANCIENT PREJUDICE
HAS BEEN REMOVED
Never again need scientific research grope in darkened cellars behind doors bolted against torture. AMERICAN INTELLI -
GENCE has swept before it the ignorant barrier which stupidly impeded men of genius and science marches proudly on.
when we removed harmful corrosive A GRIDS (pungent irri
TTEARS ago, when cigarettes were made without the aid of (I I S §JF IP IjMl I
modern originated that ancient prejudice against
LUCKY STRIKE’S extra secret process—removes harmful cor
rosive ACRIDS (pungent irritants) from LUCKIES which in the
old-fashioned manufacture of cigarettes cause throat irritation and“ It's Toasted”—the phrase that describes the
coughing. Thus “TOASTING” has destroyed that ancient preju- 6x113 “toasting” process applied in the manu
dice against cigarette smoking by men and by women. facture of Strike Cigarettes * The finest
tobaccos —the Cream of the Crop —are scien
tifically subjected to penetrating heat at mini
s 4~ gf®l| mum, 260° —maximum, 300°, Fahrenheit. The
%% 8 8 1 8 if** M 8 ' exact, expert regulation of such high tempera-
JL tures removes impurities. More than a slogan,
“It’s Toasted” is recognized by millions as the
No Throat Irritation-No Cough. most modern step in cigarette manufacture.
TUNE IN—The Lucky Strike Dance Orchestra, every Saturday night, over a coast-to-coaet network of the N. B. C.
01929, The American Tobacco Cos., Min.
liminary experiment in organization
now rather than have it forced upon
them, as it will be some time. That
would permit both employers and
employes to work together for im
provement of conditions.
“Otherwise, there will be a more
disastrous upheaval than I care to
contemplate. The present troubles
will seem peaceful by comparison.”
Shorthand is now a compulsory
study for the 600 men of the Shef
field (England) police.
"^Npw
he’s always
hungry
... says Indiana mother!
“T AURENCE is absolutely the
L picture of health now,” says
Mrs. James E. Johnson, 533 East
20th St., Indianapolis. “A |few
weeks ago we had to force him to
eat; now he’s always hungry.
“I knew what to do when he be
came bilious, half-sick and list
less, because we’ve always known
about California Fig Syrup. My
boy’s coated tongue and bad breath
cleared up with the first few spoon
CALIFORNIA
FIG SYRUP
THE RICH, FRUITY LAXATIVE
AND TONIC FOR CHILDREN
No More “Iron Maidens”!
CANDIDATES TO MEET
National Party Members Schedule
Session for Friday. *
Meeting of city candidates and
members c* the National Party will
be held at 7:30 p. m. Friday at
headquarters. 206 Holliday building.'
Council candidates, Bert Decker,
C. D. Reddick and Mabel Laßue,
will hold three meetings next week
and another general meeting will be
held at party headquarters Tuesday
night.
. . K
mr
fuls; and in just a few days his
stomach and bowels were acting per
fectly. He’s gaining right along now.”
California Fig Syrup has the full
endorsement of the medical world.
A pure vegetable product, loved by
children. A gentle, but thorough
cleanser of a youngster’s system and
agentleenergizer for sluggish bowels.
A stimulator for lagging appetites
and digestions; a help in building
sturdy limbs and robust bodies.
The name California is
important. No imitator
can put that on his prod
uct.
taporedromml
KOTEX is designed so carefully
there’s never a suggestion of its
use! Corners are rounded and tapered
for perfect fit. There is noawkw T ard
bulk ... no way in which Kotex
can ever embarrass.
Why Kotex is light, dainty
Kotex can be made without bulk or
weight because of its unusual filler
. Cellucotton absorbent wadding.
Cellucotton absorbs 3 times more than
an equal weight of cotton. You get
protection, therefore, without a trace
of old-time bulkiness.
Kotex deodorizes, too. And dis
poses instantly, just like tissue.
Kotex fillet is used in 85% of our
leading hospitals in preference to
any other absorbent! . . . definite
proof of safety and superiority.
.OCT. 17. 1929
KOTEX IS SOFT . . .
1 —Not a deceptive softness, that
soon packs into chafing hard
ness. But a delicate, lasting
softness.
2 —Safe, secure .. . keeps your
mind at ease.
3 Kotex filler is fat lighter and
cooler than cotton,yet absorbs
5 times as much.
4 In hospitals .. . Kotex is
the identical material used
by surgeons in 85% of the
country’s leading hospital*.
Kotex—4sc for 12-at any drug, dry good*
or department store.
Kotex Super-Size—6sc for 12.
KOT6X
The New Sanitary Pad which deodorize*

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