OCR Interpretation


The Indianapolis times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1922-1965, November 30, 1932, Home Edition, Second Section, Image 17

Image and text provided by Indiana State Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015313/1932-11-30/ed-1/seq-17/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for PAGE 17

'NOV. 30, 193 Z
WefaMlßDEßgg
BEGIN HERE TODAY
AMOS PEABODY, fldcriy couiln of
LINDA AVERILL, falls to his dVath
from the second floor balcony of the
Averill*' Long Island home. Linda
reaches him Just before he dies, In time
.to hear him gasp. He pushed me I"
Liii'la, realizing her cousin had tried
to tell he. he wa- murdered rushes up-
Mairs to the baioony. Some -.urn steps
behind her tries to strangle her and she
falls in a faint.
Her husband TOM, secs her fall and
rushes to her. There are four guests in
the house and they ail appear.
The guests are: MR 3TATLANDER.
#>•"* associate of Tom s; CAPTAIN
. VOB. handsome Belgian: MARVIN
* ult or of Linda s. and
LIAN SHAUGHNESSEY, Irish writer.
Each of them has quarreled with
cousin Amos
DR. PARSONS takes charge. It Is as
sumed cousin Amos’ death was acciden
tal and that Linda fainted from shock,
when she finally is able to tell Tom
what happened, she persuades him that
they must keep the four guests with
them, until they discover who is the
murderer.
They are unexpectedly aided In this
plan when DR. BOYLE official medical
examiner, sends word that every one In
the house must remain until he has
questioned them. Bovle Is on a fishing
trip and can not return for several
hours.
Suspicion points to Pratt, because he
was the first to reach Linda after she
fainted, and also to Shnughnessay. whom
Tom met as he ran toward the house.
NOW GO ON WITH THF. STORY
-CHAPTER EIGHTEEN (Continued)
“Linda, have you thought of
this? Cousin Amos spoke to you.
The man was overheard and might
have heard. In that case, he’d see
through the whole yarn. We'd give
ourselves away completely."
She pondered this.
‘‘l don't think there was a chance
Os that. Cousin Amos barely
whispered. It was all I could do
to hear, with my ear right down to
his mouth.
“I did gasp his name—that gave
away that I was there, but any one
two feet away wouldn’t have known
,Jv* spoke. No, I think that’s all
right. I can bluff that through.
Now, how does this sound for my
story?
“I had come down from this
room, hurrying after you, and the
body hit the terrace just as I came
out. I dashed forward and called
him, but he was dead ”
“In that case, you should have
stayed there till help came."
“I couldn't be sure he was dead.
He might have been unconscious.
And at that time in the morning
help doesn’t just come—you have
to go get it. I rushed in to—to
telephone ’’
“The telephone’s downstairs In
the hall. You would have stopped
there.”
“Yes. Well, my first aid sup
plies are up here. I dashed up for
—for spirits of ammonia and band
ages and anything I could lay my
hands on."
“Then how did you get into his
room?"
mum
SHE thought that over. "Force of
habit. We used to have it be
fore we moved In here and I was
so rattled that I went there with
out thinking." *
t “That’s not very strong, Binks.”
"Hysterical women do things lots
queerer than that. Well, to go back,
I dashed in—saw the balcony rail
torn away and dropped in a dead
faint!”
“No mention of the thing around
your neck?”
“No. But that's dangerous, too—
I couldn't help feeling that.”
"There’s another weak spot. Why
not say you felt as if you were
choking—”
“Yes— and I’ll describe it as if I
imagined something went around
my neck—” *
Their eyes met.
"We’re taking an awful chance,
Blinks.”
"Why, Tom? You said yourself
a man like that was—was
quite all right after he had the—
the explosion.
“And if none of them has the
sense of being suspected or watched,
the one that did it won’t become
irritated all over again.”
i HORIZONTAL Answer to Previous Puzzle 13 Platform.
1 Theater guide. r - ■ , . , . , , , , , 14 That may be
6 Drops of eye E,D| I Y.LLQ.LA ordered,
fluid. I ;0E A NiGjE L 16 Animals allied
11 To depart. N|E EBfR ANTIjANTBfc O to the mon
-12 Pertaining to SMm[E|A|NTIBwT|D £ IRHE gooses,
the doctrines TiRIBAINi I MpeOVG I ICL 17 Wigwam.
of Arius. E I iLE MiUiß] 20 Chinese meae
-13 Administra* I |RI I sMmO U R nUrEiBIA ~ret
ions of modi- N|E V EIRME NOE. RMrTels 23 Blisters,
cine in doses. EMrIe fllS P 2 4, Weird.
13 Capital of V I SjOpD 1 25 donated.
Northern Ire- RIEHviA TIME BONIII E T 26 Growing out
laud. C AOE T E I 3 4 A bacchante.
IS Branches of |S TO : RE.I lEiNITIeBtIaTN 35 Tries for
learning. iiavor.
in 3*
21 Genuine. 41 Striped fabric. 58 Fresher. 38 Sliding piece
22 Fish. 42 P° ison * n VERTICAL in an engine.
23 To beleaguer. putrid blood. j Province In 39 Title -of for*
B 7 Sea eagle. 44 Devoured. the north of mer German
2S Courtesy title. 45 Otherwise. ruler
29 To permit. 47 Goddess of 2 Oceans. 40 Dogmas.
30 Baking dish. dawn. 3 Ugly old 43 Therefore.
31 To perch. 48 Deportment. woman. 46 Elder son of
52 By. 49 Small carved 4 Adam's wife. Isaac and Re
-33 Front of an Japanese orna- STo thwart. bekah (Bibl.).
army. ment. 6 Writing pad. 4S Husband or
34 Door rug. 52 Pedal coupler 7 Before. wife.
36 Twice. 55 Auriculate. BTo be lndis- 50 Coffee pot.
SS To fondle. 56 To make an posed. 51 Cognizance.
$3 Shrub used oration. 9 A float. 53 Wrath,
for tea. 57 Genial. 10 Entangles. 54 Uncooked-
r m r mm rr m T mm^ mm r - " T’TerTTT?™
n 12
ii i i 5 lb J'7
izzzmzzzmwzzzz
•“■ —i 3 S' 1 ] —I s
T\ §S"S3” §§44
!D±^I11II1I!1III
49 50 51 t 52 53 54
-4 sH 55
wßi©\^y
"Ye-es. But. Binks, promise me
this. Don’t stir from the place
alone with one. Don t fall for any
suggestion to go off in the boat,
or through the trees to the club,
or anywhere out of reach—lnstant
reach.
“On the lawn or in the house,
you're In calling distance of a lot
of people, but if you go any far
ther be sure at least two of them
are with you—then you know it
can’t be both!”
“I see. You think there’s still
danger."
“I know it. Want to back out,
Binks? It isn’t too late.”
She shook her head.
“Were in for it, and we can do
it. You're to talk business w’ith
Mr. Statlander after luncheon?
! Then he's your first victim.
“If Mr. De Vos Is going right
: over to the Stoners, either Marvin
or the Irishman will be mine. We'll
have tea on the lawn at 4:30 and
then probably can shift partners,
| talk to them separately again, and
: you and I can meet and compare
j notes while we dress for dinner.
! They all expect to have dinner here,
j don’t they?’’
“Yes. My guess is that Boyle
will arrive between 6 and 7 and
we don’t know how long he’ll delay
! matters.
"Then, if you w r ant, you can sug
gest they carry out the former
plans for the evening.”
“We’ll do that when the time
; oomes. It all depends now on what
j happens this afternoon.
“Let’s go down, Tom. The time
is short enough at best and w r e can’t
begin our work too soon!"
CHAPTER NINETEEN
WITH the shutting of the bed
room door, Linda felt drop
away from her all sense of worry
and tension. She threw herself
Into the part she must play so
thoroughly that thereafter she
would forget it only in the few
stolen moments alone w'ith her
husband.
And it was as well that she w T as
ready for, as she ran lightly down
the last few stops into the central
hall, a figure standing by the table
whirled about, knocking an illus
trated garden magazine to the floor
with a flutter of gayly colored
leaves.
"Linda?”
"Why, Marvin, you look as If
you had seen a ghost!” she ex-
THEY.TELL MtJW'
Down With the Czar
NOW is the time for some young
and crusading would-be states
man to lift the standard of revolt
against the rules of the state house
of reresentatives.
For years those acquainted with
house procedure have been talking
about curbing the czaristic powers
of the Speaker, but like the weather,
nothing has been done about it.
The Indiana house of representa
tives is one of the few remaining
which operates under an archaic
rule which makes the Speaker an
actual autocrat.
He may kill any bill he desires by
pigeonholing it and refusing to
hand it down for action, and that
has been done scores of times in
the past.
. During the special session last
summer, as a case in point, a bill
passed the senate to enable the
making of loans from the Recon
struction Finance corporation, the
money to be used in tearing down
claimed, and then thought that
this was perhaps not the most
fortunate opening. But she doubted
if the words actually reached him.
He stooped to pick up the maga
zine and Tom, behind her, started
forward for the same purpose. As
they both fumbled at it, Linda
looked toward the formal drawing
room and saw Statlander, his
back to her, examining the carved
Italian marble mantel which was
| considered one of the treasures of
the house.
“I’m—l'm glad to see you down,
Linda,” said Pratt. "I’m sorry about
—about Mr. Peabody.”
"Thank you, Marvin. I know
you are. Poor Cousin Amos! And
I must thank you, too, for coming
to my rescue. Tom says you were
very quick.”
He flushed dully and avoided her
eyes. "I couldn’t do much. I wish I
really could have helped you.”
"You did. It was silly of me to
faint.” *
“Are you feeling quite all right
now?”
"Oh, yes, thank you.”
They both stopped dead and at
that moment Rosie appeared to an
nounce luncheon. Thankfully—for
she had felt that she must forever
stand there woodenly discussing her
health—Linda motioned Marvin to
wait and went quickly to the door
of the drawing room.
In another moment, she was sure,
she must have yielded to her
ridiculous impulse to scream with
laughter—or simply have turned
and run away.
Yet all her guests seems acting
strangely. To her amazement, she
caught Mr. Statlander in the act
of bending intently down to peer
up the fireplace chimney and heard
him ask, "This draw well, Averill?”
Tom also was gazing in astonish
ment at the doubled-up figure.
"Perfectly, but w r e don’t use it in
this weather,” he answered po
litely, and this time Linda was not
quick enough with her handkerchief
against her mouth to prevent a
startled giggle from escaping.
n m m
r T''HE sound, however, caused the
curious tableau to dissolve, and 1
at her mention of luncheon the
midwesterner assumed a perpendic
ular position and came eagerly for
ward.
“Thank heaven for meals,” she
thought. “It’s the only time these
slums and rebuilding insanitary
and dirty portions of the city.
tt tt tt
The measure was reported upon
favorably by all who studied it, but
because Speaker Walter Myers re
garded it as a step toward Social
ism, the bill died on his desk.
In previous sessions more than
one bill went the route to oblivion
via the Speaker’s pocket. So, as
may be seen, the Speaker is far too
powerful under Rule 44.
Now, peculiarly enough, such con
dition can not occur in the senate,
where the rules provide that after
being reported out by a committee,
the bills are in the possession and
under the exclusive charge of the
senate.
The president of that body has
no right to determine the order in
which bills should be taken up, the
rules specify.
In the senate names of members
are called alphabetically and the
author or sponsor may ask that the
bill be “called down” for action.
m u tt
The house rules, however, pro
vide that the Speaker has exclusive
charge of all bills after they are re
ported out of committee and may
determine the order in which they
shall be acted upon. Although the
rules provide they shall be dis
cussed in the order in which the
committee reports were made, this
is rarely, if ever, followed.
The answer to the situation is
plain.
House Rule 44 should be made to
coincide with Senate Rule 45.
Such procedure is simple. It mere
ly requires approval of the mem
bers of the house.
But where is the man who will
lead the revolt against the auto
cratic power granted the Speaker*
You tell me.
Answers
I WT BOfS THIS ~ ~r~
W k .Wl;
vtoktfs -£^l!
guesses Jpg£..
*g >*<*? Kmwat?
rpHET CHRIST OF THE ANDES
•*• symbolizes eternal peace be
tween ARGENTINA and CHILE.
The flower shown Is the SUN
FLOWER. JOYCE KILMER wrote
the poem “TREES.”
TARZAN THE UNTAMED
J'.
T. Xl _ 1
Jim, the bos'u’s mate, was almost the last man
to desert the burning transport. Many a sea dis
aster had he experienced. Each time he had saved
his mascot, a monkey. Now as the old tar climbed
tram the hold with the creature chattering—
THE INDIANAPOLIS TIMES .
people have acted normally since
they’ve been here.”
The meal was not altogether the
ordeal she had dreaded, for all
seemed determined to make it as
easy for her as possible, and the
conversation, if rather stilted, was
pleasant and safely general.
At the end it was she who in
troduced the subject which, for all
their efforts, had been uppermost in
her mind—and she had no doubt,
in theirs.
"I want to thanfc you all,” she
said, "for being ao pleasant about
that silly bit of petty officialism—
Dr. Boyle’s order that you must all
stay here until he comes.”
Tom took his cue from her.
"Yes,” he said, “and we want you
all to enjoy the time that is left as
much as possible. So long as you
are back here by, say 6, there is no
reason you shouldn’t do whatever
you like this afternoon.”
OUR BOARDING HOUSE ’
■ : ROYE A. TRAY OF HIHHF WELL ; THER£'fc A VUHNY )§||
INTO OJBEfc, AXD /MPI THING - PEOPLE
STUFF DIDNT FIZZ, INVEfcT*THErR, MONEY \N j '
STARTED TO AAELT, PROPOSITIONS THAT TURN {
ECTfD THE J S OUT TO “BE. FIZZLE.E)
ded plausible when l } here you wanted e
ARD IT-'ABUT WHY ) VOURS TO BE A FIZZLE /M \
XPERItAENT PPL&T, M LOOKS LIKE TH' jM/
. SPENT ALU THAT \ \ STOP-SIGNAL IS M
FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS
THAT I AVN.I. W 1 MANY? wwx J SUUCKS.' To f M/6U-...1F I WAVE 7& )}\f) f POP... JUST COME J \rfHAT.-.? 1 ( t CTN W TUERE YoU ABE R
VfoORMIWD BACK still TPEY’BE STOEWM \ TUOSE’LL TAKE DO it, I’LL MAKE f AM’ LOOK H )UE CQYPLAWED f= / POP IT'S JUST V
ISOFFOF [AfWK W /ALL APTECMOOW= V QUICK V/ORK yffc FRECKLES HAS <ID ME ABOUT C A CASE OF USIM' It
FOOTBALL, kFOOTBALL= PLACE—.MOW r/ THAT’S A Bl<S 1 0 F ,T U J\ IT TUE LEAVES )U IS BACK /MKHi IZI UE AD /
WASHINGTON TUBBS II
| / AOV. X THE REST is NOME TO A (iPkUT \tl\lVi NILLV, THE BOV PRINCE OF PANP6- s
woTTA Uoop FOR US.EH,iAPPi£? SOON HEARS OF VT AMP FUES INTO
©ASH PEM'ES THAT HE \S PRINCE VJILVN NIIW,
TRMEUMG INCOGNITO, PUT NOBOW BEUEVES / f HWillSl
HIM. SO HE AMP EASV SOOM LEARN TO KEEP SHU I I o\l MM
ANP ACCEPT WHATEVER FAMQRS ARE. OFFEREE. \ U_‘Vf 'wWTHPBr
SALESMAN SAM
A A Th’ ? “'N C ft"N fcooTs TH' cqpTCTe.Fi. oNs. opTH' ZTH’ glHs ~>T\u_ ROHNim' AH' changes fte. \r \
rvNto-m IoOftMMA G-IUSOUSE TAIL. ,\ § ( M£Od . TH' OH£. '/ft BE6M USIM'? A ttADF. ft LOMG- END RUM CjuOMT REAR. FROtt Hitt HER SOttE. TlftS. 1
g, RDS OP, C K 1M WeR CELLS: / I UftLL! */ t UUTU (T; TUST COHEN SOT£-
~ y : 1 ... .■■
BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES
*""" "" "" 1 ' H /THf. awfF'flto
-OOSY CN&X.&2KM ggJ&' W&M
DOWW TO TVt CTFYICt KR© ~B**H*fe
‘TTYVTVfcM to 6*\OCTY NT BS 6N, 1 v***" u ~ '***~ WtM
p**+"*st~**>* ■ F t . ?z£**tZ4~-.isz. m
Onmbl, ]Ut tr, Um Rm Burrow,,.
Patribated by United Feature Syndicate, Inc. / * /ft' g-45
up on the lower deck he stumbled over Pat's
limp farm. Finding she lived, he lifted her in his
strong arms and managed to make the portside rail,
already touching water. Here, luckily, a raft still
wai ted and
The Belgian spoke first.
“Then, if it is quite agreeable to
Madame" (he made a little bow to
Linda) “I shall keep an appointment
which I have for the early afterr
noon. I had understood—before
the accident, which we all so much
regret—that you had planned for
the later afternoon, and so had ex
pected us to be here by then."
"Yes,” said Linda. “The boat’s
ready—we’d planned— As it is,
Mr. DeVos, of course I shall re
main h*re all afternoon and well
have tea on the lawn about half
past 4. If all of you care to come
back for that, It would please me
very much, but if not—”
"Mr. Averill and I have busi
ness to attend to,” the mid-west
erner broke in on the little pause.
“We should have gotten down to
it before.”
“We’ll go over your figures this
afternoon,” said Tom quickly.
“Bring them downstairs whenever
you like. I’m quite ready any
time. Shaughnessey, how about
you?”
"My plaus are what you wish,”
replied the Irishman. He had been
more silent than any during the
mea! and Linda started a little
when he spoke. "Unless it incon
veniences anyone, I’d like nothing
better than to pass the afternoon
quietly at my writing.”
What was there about every
thing this man said that suggested
inevitably some double meaning,
something hinted at but cleverly
concealed? Surely a simple state
ment that he wanted the time to
himself to work should not have
her disbelief!
Linda found the very blandness of
his manner unconvincing, in its ap
—By Ahern
sji%
RpL U, Jf
willing hands relieved him of his precious
burden. When Pat regained consciousness she lay
bundled upon the slippery raft, far from the sunken
transport, her companions a motley group of men
—and Jocko, the monkey.
parent effort to stress the absence
of any other mean’ng.
m m m
SHE recalled her thoughts to
realize that Tom evidently had
asked Marvin his plans, but she
had not caught the answer. She'd
soon find out, fiowever.
She rose and as the others fol
lowed suit, she managed to leave
the dining room with him in spite
of his somewhat awkward attempt
to sheer away. But she did not
have to use strategy to discover his
objective. Unexpectedly he spoke
first.
“Linda, you're sure you don't
mind having other people drive
your car?”
“Not any one as careful as you,”
she hazarded and saw that it was
the right answer.
“I’ll only run De Voss over and
come right back.”
OUT OUR WAY
/ OVuOOH MV ARm!\ p__— __
/ GOOD GOSH, WATCH /-r ie. \
WHER’VOU’PE. GOiN! I /"V/ HnJnA \
CAMTVooitLU LalL\yl I 1
VWHERE. TH GOOSE. I rJBMtx '{• * \ Tn Tfil /
wwx wart.
(f\W WASH SOON FiNPS HIMSELF ( ~ \
i •&& ifs2j/\NT> IS TAKEN! TO A GRIM, FORB\PPIHC
g^ STL£ tN THe MIDDLE OF A LAKE.
( i V I
TV\FT£> TVS. LN6T T. CNd So<bs> VEVE RENJfcQ. VR>ONA \ SfcWHB.
SEND \ \s> Y\R>K\_ \NT \ OOR>T V\t YCQ6YT NmTE. 6Y.idOQ.NTK
mu ■ rra ’-1 lui
Shaughnessey started for the
garage, Marvin with him. Linda
was alone with Tom, and by un
spoken agreement they strolled out
the casement window, across the
flags on which earlier that day had
lain the twisted body of Cousin
Amos, and over the grass to a little
cluster of garden furniture.
"I feel as If I were In a Shake
speare play," Linda said. “First
Murderer, Second Murderer, Third
and so on.”
“As long as you can take It as
a game. D'nks!" he iocied at her
anxiously.
“Oh. I know It’s serious business.
But somehow the idea of my being
in any such mess—me, Linda
Averill, born Binks Varden, erst
while social secretary to people
who never lowered themselves to
have anything happen to them
well, it simply seems impossible!”
(To Be Continued.)
—By Edgar Rice Burroughs
At dawn, only the endless sea surrounded the
shipwrecked. Later, an India-bound liner, called
by the transport’s wireless, rescued the lifeboat
bearing Pat’s despairing father, but the undiscov
ered raft drifted all day under the broiling sun.
)
PAGE 17
—By Williams
—By Blosser
—By Crane
—By Small
—By Martin

xml | txt