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The Indianapolis times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1922-1965, November 30, 1932, Home Edition, Second Section, Image 18

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PAGE 18
DEATH CLAIMS
4 LON6-TIME
CITY RESIDENTS
Funeral Services Are Fixed
for Three Women and
One Man.
Four persons, each of whom lived
In Indianapolis more than forty
years, died Tuesday. They were
Daniel Hawkins Mahoney, 68, of 930
North Ritter avenue Mrs. Dorothea
Rugenstein, 76, of 602 Terrace ave
nue; Mrs. Dora Shalansky, 69, of
1956 Central avenue, and Mrs. Car
rie Wemmer, 64, of 401 East lowa
street.
Mr. Mahoney, a retired grocer,
had lived in Indianapolis since he
was 8. He was a brother of M. M.
Mahoney, state senator-elect.
He was Lorn in North Vernon.
After coming to this city he was en
gaged in the monument business
many years before entering the gro
cery business. He lived for twenty
five years at 9 North Beville ave
nue.
He was a member of Our Lady of
Lourdes Catholic church, Fraternal
Order of Eagles and Loyal Order of
Moose.
Funeral services will be held at
8:30 Friday in the home and at 9
in Our Lady of Lourdes church. Bu
rial will be in Holy Crass cemetery.
Was Born in Germany
Mrs. Rugenstein was born in Ger
many in 1853, and came to the
United States after her marriage in
1883. She lived on Union street
thirty-six years, and lived the last
thirteen years at the Terrace ave
nue address. She died in the home
of her daughter, Mrs. Charles
Specker, 1526 South Alabama street.
She was tjie widow of Charles M.
Rugenstein.
Funeral services will be held at
the daughter’s home at 2 Thursday
and at 2:30 in St. Paul’s Evangelical
Lutheran church, of which she was
a member. The Rev. H. M. Zorn,
pastor, will officiate. Burial will be
in Concordia cemetery.
Dies After Long Illness
Funeral services for Mrs. Shalan
sky will be held at 2:30 today in
her home. She died in Methodist
hospital following a long illness.
She came to Indianapolis forty
six years ago from Maryampol, Rus
sia. where she was born,
She was the widow of Joseph
Shalansky, who was killed by a rob
ber in 1913 in a downtown hotel.
They were married about a year
after Mrs. Shalansky came to this
country.
She was a member of Beth-El
temple and Central Jewish Congre
gation.
Dies at Daughter’s Home
Mrs. Wemmer died in the home of
her daughter, Mrs. Lillian Harring
ton, 1227 South Meridian, street. She
lived in the home on lowa street
more than forty years. She was
born in Lawrenceburg, but lived in
Indianapolis since she was a young
woman.
She was a member of Pleasant
Run Reformed church.
Funeral services will be held at
2:30 Friday in the Harrington home.
Burial will be in Crown Hill cem
tery.
NO CELLS FOR SALE
Ft. Worth Has to Turn Down Tlea
of New Mexico Town.
Bn United Press
FT. WORTH, Tex., Nov. 30.
Mountain Air, N. M., wanted some
more jail cells, so the town clerk
wrote Chief of Police Henry Lee
here to learn if he had any to spare.
Ft. Worth has plenty of jail cells,
but none to spare, Lee answered.
Some may be on sale, however, next
January, when a police sub-station
is discontinued by installation of
radio on squad cars.
TRAIN WHISTLE BANNED
Resort Owner Gels Writ When
Tooting Annoys Guests.
ft ii United Press
MADISON. Wis., Nov. 30.—L. P.
Krueger, operator of a summer re
sort at Wisconsin Dells, has ob
tained from the state public service
commission an order demanding
that the Chicago. Milwaukee. St.
Paul & Pacific Railroad Company
quit blowing train whistles near his
hotel. Krueger complained that
loud and excessive tooting was ruin
ing his tourist business.
USE SCHOOLS AS HOMES
Abandoned. One-Room Buildings
Converted Into Cottages.
By United Press
HARRISBURG Pa.. Nov. 30. —The
“little red schoolhouse" in Pennsyl
vania is rapidly becoming “John
Smith's cottage.” according to the
state educational bureau.
Sales of many abandoned one
room schools to private owners, who
convert into homes, is
reported by the bureau. One build
ing near here houses two families.
COLOR IN HIS POP CORN
Black, Blue, Red and Pink Are
Some of Hues Offered.
ft]/ United Press
CRESCO, la., Nov. 30.—Warren B.
Perry, 73, after twenty years of
experimenting has crossed golden
bantam corn and pop corn, and is
now selling the product for seed at
$43 a pound.
For the discriminating housewife.
Perry also offers pop corn in black,
blue. red. pink, yellow, lavender and
purple shades.
NOW TRY
THRIFTY SERVICE
(Damp Wash Flat Work Ironed)
MON.. TUES. 7 C THU RS., FRI. A V2C
WED § Lb. SAT Q Lb ,
(Minimum Bundle, Sle)
PAUL H. KRAUSS DRY CLEANING
ri. 4591 sv. r. rlc r* ■? h , ,g ur r ,h, u * nT #,hw ri. 4591
Reliable Laundry In Indianapolis. *'*•
When Good Fellows Get Together —
(r *^ij^MF^" pi* :W. Kj^i
~. i inH|
NB B 2 v "
A RADIO, piano, plenty of fic
*- tion and magazines, with
games and the windows dressed
in curtains with potted plants on
tables were found by about forty
neighbors when they spent their
first spare hours Monday in the
Oak Hill Leisure Hour Club.
On Friday night the Oak Hill
unit will hold a program. Every
one is invited to attend. Parents
are particularly urged to come.
The program is as follows:
Community singing with Mrs.
Compton, donor of <the hall, and
Mrs. Rose Snyder at the piano;
Sam Stephen, song leader and
soloist; talk by Dwight S. Ritter,
director of the Leisure Hour
movement; Robert Coates and
Frances Williams, reading and
skit; Curtis Hess, whistler; Floyd
S. Hubbard, magician; Miss Nelda
Shephard, pianist; Sammy Sulli
van, reading; Cfck Hill Siring
band; Harry Ragsdale, acrobatic
clown; Mrs. Snyder, piano selec
tions.
NEWLYWED SET
FREE DY JUDGE
Wedding Night Traffic Sins
Forgiven in Court.
Love’s labor was not lost entirely
for Thomas Porter, 20, of 824 North
Alabama street, who today was
saved from going to prison for law
violations occurring on his wed
ding night.
Porter faced trial today before
Municipal Judge William H. Sheaf
fer on charge of drunkenness, driv
ing while drunk and failure to stop
after an accident.
The charges are part of the story
of Porter’s return from Greenfield
the night of Nov. 17 with his bride
of a few hours, the former Miss
Mary Ann Berger, 18, also of In
dianapolis.
Reaching the city limit, the auto
in which Porter, his bride and two
friends were riding, was alleged to
have been sineswiped by three other
cars.
In court today, the officers testi
fied that Porter was unable to give
a definite account of the evening’s
activities.
The wedding party broke up when
Porter was taken to the county jail.
There he was held for four hours
before providing bail.
Sheaffer placed Porter on proba
tion for one year; revoked his driv
er’ license for a year, and suspend
ed a thirty-day jail sentence on
conviction of driving while drunk.
The two other charges were dis
missed.
Good Bad Men
They Were in Old Days,
but Not Today, Decides
'Diamond Dick.’
Bn United Press
Norfolk. Neb., Nov. 30.
The old-time western “bad
man,” a straight-shooting outlaw,
who carved a long string of
notches on the handle of his six
shooter, had more honor than the
machine-gun gangster of this
present-day, according to Dr.
Richard Jerome Tanner.
Dr. Tanner, mild-mannered
country physician, whose deadly
marksmanship with rifle and re
volver made him the hero of the
famous "Diamond Dick” novels, a
series of western thrillers, cele
brated his sixty-third birthday
Tuesday.
Although, in fiction, “Diamond
Dick” killed scores of white men
and made many Indians “bite the
dust,” Dr. Tanner admits a peace
ful life.
“I never killed a single man.
white or Indian,’’ he declared.
“I never even hunted buffalo. But
I was a pretty good shot.
“My favorite stunt used to be
to have some man stand about
thirty paces away, and then shoot
a penny out from between his
thumb and forefinger.”
CUT-PRICE
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r SI
Upper Left Photo—“ Sweet Adeline” is initiating the first daytime
Leisure Hour club at 2001 Winter avenue, the Oak Hill club. The club
opened Monday.
Upper Right—“ Hearts” are getting a play at the club’s card tables.
Lower Photo —Mrs. H. H. Compton, 75, of 2001 winter avenue', who
loaned the club the use of Compton's hall for day meetings and a Fri
day night program, she is shown standing at the doorway of the club
with Ralph R. Matillo, chairman of the club’s activities.
‘Com King’ Title Is at
Stake in Farm Judging
Little Gold-Painted Dais
Holds Covetous Eyes of
Mid-Westerners.
BY RAY BLACK
United Press Staff Correspondent
INTERNATIONAL AMPHITHE
ATER, STOCK YARDS, CHICAGO,
Nov. 30.—A little gold-painted wood
dais, just big enough to hold ten
ears of corn ranged side by side,
held the covetous eyes of a ring of
silent farmers at the International
Hay and Grain Show today.
The man who raises the ten ears
of corn that the judges place on
the gilded dais will be “corn king”
of North America,
In the corn belt, that title is su
preme on the farm. It means more
to the farmer in Indiana, Illinois,
lowa and the states that fringe
them to be named “corn king” than
to receive almost any other title
imaginable.
In the last thirteen years, some
Indiana farmer has won the “corn
king’s” title every year but three.
Last year the winner was Edward
N. Lux, Waldron, Ind. A brother,
Peter J. Lux, Shelbyville, Ind., has
had the grand championship corn
exhibit three times. „
The healthiest boy and girl in the
United States want to be a doctor
and nurse, respectively, both like
outdoor sports and indoor dances,
and both sleep with their windows
open, but only the girl likes spin
ach.
The new health champions, se
lected at the National 4-H Club
contest held in connection with the
Don't Coddle a
COLD!
Kill it at the First Pop
of Its Head!
The moment a cold shows, knock
it off! Don’t let it linger—and don’t
attempt to palliate it! Many rem
edies merely pamper a cold, to the
victim's regret. The only way to
deal with a cold is to kill it—as
quickly as you can!
If treated promptly—when the
sneezing or headache begins—a cold
can usually be knocked in 12 hours.
But you must get at the root of the
trouble, a germ infection within the
system. This calls, first of all, for
a COLD remedy, not a cure-all. A
preparation that's good for all kinds
of ills and ailments can’t be equally
effective for a cold. Many popular
remedies only make relief more dif
ficult because they are constipating
and also make the system acid.
A Cold is An Internal
Infection
Take a cold remedy and an IN
TERNAL one. A cold is an internal
infection and, as such, requires in
ternal treatment. Don't be fooled
by merely local or external applica
tions. They can’t reach the seat
of the trouble and they can’t stop
the spreading of the infection with
in the system. Your doctor will
tell you that.
Your doctor will also tell you
that there is nothing better you
can take for a cold than Grove’s
Laxative Bromo Quinine. Most
physicians will frankly admit they
couldn’t write a better prescription
for a cold if they wanted to. For
THE INDIANAPOLIS TIMES
International Livestock Exposition,
are Ross Allen of Salem, W. Va.,
and Dorothy Eiler of Hill City,
Minn.
The term “boy champion” is
somewhat of a misnomer for Allen.
He is 20 years old. a senior in col
lege, and weighs 184’£ pounds. Miss
Eiler is 16 and weighs 126. Both
are almost perfect physically. Al
len scored 99.4 points out of a pos
sible 100. Miss Eiler scored 98.6.
Texas Special, a lumbering Here
ford steer from the land of the
Texas long horns, was adjudged
grand champion of the live stock
exposition, winning for lean, drawl
ing William J. (Bill Joe) Largent
of a 2,000-acre ranch in west Texas
the triumph supreme among stock
men.
The winner, weighing 1,241
pounds, broke many precedents. It
was one of the few Herefords who
have won the grand championship
at the stock show, and one of the
few from the cattle country of the
old west.
GET UNEXPECTED FEAST
Unemployed Help Selves as 67 Sheep
Die in Train Wreck.
Bn United Press
KISKI JUNCTION, Pa., Nov. 30.
—A train wreck solved the food
problem for unemployed in this dis
trict, at least temporarily. Six cars
of a livestock train were derailed,
killing sixty-seven sheep. There
was no interference as needy per
sons helped themselves to the mut
ton, it was reported.
An infusion of wild cherry bark
was an old Indian remedy for pain
in the chest.
Grove's Laxative Bromo Quinine
does the several things necessary
to rout a cold, in the way that is
necessary.
First, it gently, but thoroughly,
opens the bow r els—the first require
ment in overcoming a cold. Second,
it kills the cold germs in the sys
tem, drives out the poisonous in
fection and reduces the fever.
Third, it relieves the headache and
that grippy feeling. Fourth, it tones
the entire system and fortifigs
against further attack.
That is the treatment you want
for a cold and, for your- own safety,
be satisfied with nothing less!
Grove's Laxative Bromo Quinine
may be tiken with utter safety by
young and old. It contains no nar
cotics and produces no bad after
effects. It does not upset the
stomach, nauseate or make the head
ring or swam. In virtually every
c . ntry in the world it is the ac
cepted cold remedy.
The “Stitch in Tjme”
In dainty tablet form. Grove’s
Laxative Bromo Quinine is conven
ient Snd pleasant to take, as
as effective. It comes in handy,
pocket size boxes, cellophane-
WTapped, and is sold by every drug
store in America. When you feel a
cold coming on, take Grove's Lax
ative Bromo Quinine at once. There
is no better remedy for a cold and
no reliable dealer will try to tell
you there is.—Advertisement.
EXTEND SCHOOL
HOLIDAY PERIOD
TO TWOWEEKS
Board Takes First Step in
Shortening of Term to
Meet Budget.
Three cheers for the school board
resounded from various public
schools today as the city's 58,000
pupils applauded the board’s action
Tuesday night in lengthening the
Christmas vacation period four
days.
The board decided to start the
vacation period at the close of
school Friday, Dec. 16, instead of
the following Wednesday, and to
delay resumption of classes until
Tuesday, Jan. 3, instead of Jan. 2.
Officially, the vacation dates had
been Dec. 19 to Jan. 2, inclusive.
Teachers were less joyful as the
decision will lop off four days pay
from their checks. The action was
the first the board has taken to
ward shortening the school term
to meet its pared budget.
The board continued its shakeup
of the buildings and grounds de
partment with dismissal of eleven
janitors, matrons and firemen, and
appointment of two $95-a-month
janitors and seventeen temporary
janitors at $75 a month. The lat
ter will serve only six months.
A. H. Sielken, department super
intendent, explained that some of
those dismissed were charged with
insubordination, others with fail
ure to perform their duties, and
some were dismissed because of
their age.
Those dismissed were:
C. A. Keeler. Minnie Foster. L. H.
Wricht. G. S. McKennv. C. D. Humphrey.
W. C. Shipp. N. P. James. C. F. Etter.
Hoy Harbaueh, H. W. Kidd and F. T.
Davis.
Temporary appointees were:
R. W. Harding. J. B. Lewellen Harry
Harris. J. S. Edwards, D. C. Burns, F. j.
Dailey. Dorsey Willingham, E. C. Barker.
R. H. Bennett. William Thurnell. Charles
R. Wilson. Louis K. Ulrich. Basil Means,
F. D. Stuart. R. E. Horton. R. Adams, G.
W. Allison. Two others named were G. S.
Fultz and H. A. Sprague.
Superintendent Paul C. Stetson
announced appointment of Beulah
Pauley, resignation of Marie Stumps
Williams, leaves of absence granted
to Lela B. Randell and Nellie
Hicks, and transfer of Margaret
Holdaway from the research de
partment to clerk at Broad Ripple
high school.
BEATS DAD INCOURT
Son Wins SSOO Damage Suit in Auto
Injury Case.
LOWELL, Mass., Nov. 30.—William
Blake, 11, sued his father for SSOO
damages and won his case. The
boy had been injured by an auto
mobile driven by the elder Blake.
ASK Dr. FORSHEE’S Ail Work Done in I I
ABOUT 10-PAY PLAN Dr ‘ ™^ HEE ’ S
Dr. FORSHEE’S LABORATORY
NATURAL BEAUTY JjATE^
si 7.50 \£T“ ■
ilsx
VvrvYtlr Si 9.50™' flan Who Knows How I
I I■■ I 111 Fitting and
ymm m / Upper or I Broken Plates
Sxs y/ I Rebuilt or Repaired
T ttAWg ( Lover | Whi i e Y ou Wait
T ■ CROWNS—BRIDGEWORK
FOUNTAIN P£NS
FACTORY*
T- , TRAINED WORKMEN
THE H.LIEBER CO
*l4 WEST WASHINGTON JT
WT* outlet
t/SHOE STORES
KFLiaSIE SHOES AT Lt/yvES" EE CES
Rail Leader
' HHBB '
Hr
Harry G. Taylor, above, has
been named commissioner of
western railroads, “to secure co
operative action between lines in
rates and train schedules.” Tay
lor also will be chairman of the
Western Association of Railway
Executives, with headquarters in
Chicago. He is a former news
paper editor of Almena. Kan., and
Central City, Neb., who became
manager of public relations for
the American Railway Association.
TWIN BANDITS
FLEEWITH $lB
Grocery Robbers, Described
as 'ldentical.’
Two bandits believed twin broth
ers obtained $lB today in a robbery
of a Standard grocery at 2346 North
Illinois street.
Orville Gwynn, 28, of 4707 East
Washington street, store manager,
and Harry Keller, 63, proprietor of
a restaurant at 2338 North Illinois
street, were in the store when the
bandits entered. However, Keller
was in a room at the rear and the
robbers was unaware of any wit
ness other than Gwynn.
During the robbery, Gwynn kept
$5 in one-dollar bills clutched in a
hand. Keller, who remained in hid
ing, had S4O.
After obtaining the money, the
robbers bound Gwynn with wire.
It is not known whether the rob
bers had an automobile.
According to Gwynn, the robbers
were identical in size and appear
ance, each about 23 years old and
weighing about 135 pounds.
4 VONNEGUT STORES TO
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VONNEGUT’S
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Hoosier Optical Cos.
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PUDLIC BUILDING!
BY BOND ISSUES
TO BE URGED
Roosevelt Favors" Method
Over Present Policy of
Quick Payment.
By Scripps-Hotcard Xewspnper Alliance j
WARM SPRINGS, Ga., Nov. 30.
President - Elect Franklin D.
Roosevelt has evolved a system of
balancing the budget by paying for
past public projects, such as dams,
irrigation, battleships, public build
ings and other federal undertakings,
with bond issues rather than outl
of current government, income.
Although he had planned to with
hold announcement of the plan
until his inaugural address, it was
learned today that he has discussed
it with numerous visitors, in order
to get their reaction.
Already, several chairmen of;
prominent congressional committees j
have expressed their approval of j
this method of financing.
It is an old scheme as rpplied to
municipal projects, but new as to
the federal financial scheme.
The philosophy behind it is that,
in these hard times, the present i
generation should not be saddled
with the complete costs of improve
ments which will last for many gen
erations.
Although the detailed charge to
be withdrawn from current budgets
by this method is now known, it is
understood it w'ill run into several
hundred millions of dollars.
If this estimate is borne out, the
incoming administration may find ,
itself able to balance the budget j
through revenue from beer, econo
mies and deferment of long-time
costs.
This system of deferring costs
could be applied to public buildings
and even to vast road networks un
dertaken in an effort to decrease
unemployment.
The total cost, including interest,
would be larger under the Roosevelt
program, but it would fit in better
with the present financial condition
of the treasury.
This method can be made retro
active—and that is the essence of
the program as it involves next
year’s budget. Funds for Hoover
dam, and similar projects have been
authorized but not appropriated.
Hurry! Hurry! IJ j! I
7 TUBE Ipi I
Superheterodyne
5 69- Radio I|
sale ruin: $2 0.75 ® ""compw.
Special Anniversary Sale offering of new floor sample
radios brought from our branch stores. More than
One-Half Off, while present stock lasts.
R. C. A. VICTOR
Reg. $69.50 RADIOS
Table Model, Consde Model,
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$ 1933 Christmas Club
jj| Now Being Organized
if Do Not Fail To Join
jjjf A Class To Suit Kvery Purse
23 North Pennsylvania
1 Jlf OKS S£Hi? |||
51 M THURSDAY NIGHT jU^y
-NOV. 30, 1932..
SHALLOW LAKES BEST
Fish Flourish Better There Be
cause of Prolific Plant Life.
By T nitrd Press
GLACIER PARK. Mont.. Nov. 30.
—Shallow lakes are the most prom
ising for fishermen, according to a
biological study of lakes and
streams in Glacier National park
made by Dr. A. S. Hazzard.
Plant life flourishes better in t
such lakes, attracting insects, and
fresh water shrimp, on which many
trout live, also grow more abund
antly In shallow water, increasing
the number of fish, said Dr. Haz
zard.
NIGHT SCHOOL
Business men give preference to
those who are preparing for bet
ter positions. Spend part of your
evenings, profitably by attending
night school. Courses offered
here in Accounting. Typewriting.
Stenography Secretarial, and
other business subjects. Low cost.
Bulletin. LI. 8337.
Central Business College
Architects A Builders Bldg.. Penn
sylvania Si Vermont Sts., Indp'l's.
G. S. KELLER
Successor to _
OPTICAL
v DErX.
32 N. Penn. St.
illj' ' l l FH' ITTi f 1 i
SANTA’S
UfM QUESTION I
BOX! 1

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