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The Indianapolis times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1922-1965, November 30, 1932, Home Edition, Image 8

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PAGE 8
GOVERNMENT
OF SCHOOL NO.
74 IS BY PUPILS
Sixteen Pupils Make Up
Student Council at
Potter School.
A student council that works Is
the claim of Theodore Potter Fresh
Air School 74, at 1601 East Tenth
street.
The school is the latest of In
dianapolis’ grade schools to inau
gurate government by the pupils.
On the council are sixteen pupils,
four representatives from each of
the building's four rooms. The
council was started early in October.
Officers are elected for six-week
terms.
In the second election, held last
week, Lois Dean was named presi
dent. Louise Adams was chosen
vice-president, and Wayne Sager,
secretary.
Assigned to Committees
Members of the council are as
signed to committees having certain
duties.
Covering discipline in the dining
room, where the pupils are given
health meals twice a day, are Vir
ginia White, Burdelle Neff, Hobart
Croucher, Wayne Sagor, Frances
Brown, Jean Garvin and Margaret
Thomas.
Rules of conduct in the basement
are enforced by Wayne Sagor,
Louise Adams, Albert Fox, Dean
Kennedy and Betty Husted.
Assigned to the halls are Lor
raine Markus, Buddy Murphy,
Evelyn Ayres, Violet Bunch and
Dean Kennedy.
Street Car Patrol
Since many pupils come consider
able distances to attend the Fresh
Air school, two pupils, Virginia
White and Molly Litvak, are on the
committee to discipline street car
conduct.
Representatives of the council at
the assembly hall are Garnet Lot
shaw and Burdelle Neff.
Rules of quiet on the sleeping
porch, where the pupils are given
daily rest periods, are enforced by
George Buchanan, Dick Chenoweth,
Louise Durham, Roberta Duncan
and Katherine Phelps.
Charlotte VanZand is a commit
tee of one to adjudge personal ap
pearance.
The council holds meetings every
Tuesday. Violators are discussed.
Members of the council are warned
that only in case of continual vio
lation of the rules is a pupil to be
disciplined officially by the council.
“One time” offenders merely are
warned.
A-PLUS RATING MADE
BY 58 TECH PUPILS
1,243 Attain Places on Scholastic
Honor Roll at School.
Led by fifty-eight pupils who
made A plus in all studies, 1,243
pupils of Tech high school made the
scholastic honor rol> for the second
grading period of the semester.
Thirty-seven seniors and post
graduates were among those making
straight A plus.
Those who made A plus in all sub
jects were:
Joseph Beechem, Milltcent Cummings,
Gilbert Easley, Carol Geisler, Alfred Kraas,
Lois Henderson, Esther Hipes, Alferd
Kuerst, Mary Ann Kullmer, Marjorie Ma
son, David Luedeman, Kathrine Ross, Dale
Smith, Lois Stevens, Betty Stilz, Leßoy
Wires. Clyde Armel. Richard Aust, Albert
Barker, Donald Brown, Irma Cartmel,
Thelma Coleman, Marjorie Denny, Doro
tha Heiden, Phillip E. Jeffries, Eugene
Holland, Eva Mae Lombard, Harold Mc-
Glothin, Margaret Maxwell, Ralph Neel.
Mary Eleapor Pyle. Margaret Sandstrom,
Earl Schull, Paxine St. Helens. Mabel
Stuart. Opal Tibbs, Josephine Williams,
James All, Lewis Base. Betty Bray, Norma
Brandt, Mary Mae Endsley. Carol Hesler,
Norma Holtman, Esther Jefferson. Felix
Masarachia, Lmiise Moorman, Elfriede
Mordsieck, John St. Helens. Geneva Sene
feld. Richard Stafford. Mary Jane Wade.
William Waters, Richard Wilkinson. Ruth
Yunghaus. Jeannette Robinns. Yale Rob
erts. John Townsend.
ROMAN STATE ELECTS
Shortridge Section Names New
Officers for School Year.
Shortridge high school Roman
State recently elected officers for
the remainder of the school year.
The new officers are:
Consuls, Jack Apocl and Fred Kershner;
praetors, Jane Brown. Bob Deupree, Mary
rette Hiatt. Harriet Holmes, Anne Elliot.
Richard Clay, Edward Hixon and Mary
Jeanette Seller; censors. David Allerdice.
Buddy Brown, John Westfall and Foster
Clippinger; patrician aediles. Gordon Mes
sing. Mirian Waldo. Barbara Haines, Jane
Shideler, Margaret Ann Clippinger and
Lucy Ann Balch, plebian aediles, Betty
Miller. Robert Craft, Jack Meyhew, Mary
Hesseldenz, Albert Fessler and John Clark;
quaestors, John Barnhill, Ted Weakley,
Willis Biatchley and Richard Smith; tri
bunes, Virginia Burford, Eugene Yockey,
Lois Morton. Malcolm McDermott, Vir
ginia Graves, Jean L. Smith, Betty Carter,
Richard Meuller, William Springer and
Virginia Miles.
PUPILS GIVE OPERETTA
Junior High School Glee Club
Presents Event for Parents.
The junior high school glee club
of Nebraska Cropsey school No. 22,
Illinois and Kansas streets, pre
sented an operetta. “Charter Oak.”
before the parents of the school last
week. Members of the cast were:
Abe Less, Robert Ott, Paul Zick. Mar
shall Busby. Clarence Hudson. Damon
Lewis. Morris Bryan. Harold Brill. Donald
Wechsler, Tilman McCoury, Morris Borin
stein, Raymond Stevens. Grace Jones,
Bessie Goldstein. Bellie Goldstein. Eliza
beth Davidson. Janette Patnick, Gertrude
Berman. Constance Glazier. Mary Scheid,
Arthur Maar, June Grady, Ruth Smulyan,
Evelyn Carr, Helen Cohen, Estelle Levin.
Rubv Petero. Helen McCoury. Clara Ne
fouse and Mactin Bottigheimer.
CITY STUDENT HONORED
Broad Ripple High Junior Heads
State Hi-Y Division.
Phillip Waggoner, Broad Ripple
high school junior, was elected
president of the southern division
of the older boys’ conference at the
state Hi-Y convention at Newcastle
last week. He will preside over the
conference at Orleans in 1933.
Glee Club Plans Yule Program
Thirty-five boys have enrolled in
;he boys’ glee club of Henry P. Co
jurn school 66, at 604 East Maple
road. The club, which was inaug
urated about a month ago. is pre
paring to give a program after the
Christmas holidays.
Pilgrim Village Built by Pupils at Flackville School
W' HC %s■.
Prints Student’s Article
—Photo by Dexheimer.
Barbara Dyar
November issue of School Dress
Review, publication of Columbia
university, carries an illustrated
article written by Barbara Dyar,
editor of Staff II of the Arsenal
Cannon, student paper of Tech
high school, and a comment on a
contest being run in the Cannon
by Jane Bosart and Betty Han
cock.
The article by Barbara Dyar ex
plains the use of pictures of
classes at work in the Cannon
magazine editions. The article is
accompanied by pictures of classes
which were in the 1932 January
magazine edition of the paper.
The comment is on a current
event contest which is being con
ducted by the Cannon all this
semester.
DEBATE DATE IS SET
Manual Team to Argue on
Sales Tax Plan.
“Resolved, That a Sales Tax
Should Be Adopted in Indiana,” is
the topic which will be debated by
members of the Boys’ Debating
League of Manual Training high
school this year. First debate will
be held before the student body
Jan. 4 in the school auditorium.
Faculty sponsor of the league is
John H. Moffat of the English de
partment. Members of the affirma
tive team in the debate will be Ray
mond Meyer, chairman, Clarence
Scott and George Wahl. On the
negative team will be William Gold
stein. chairman, Eugene Luzar, and
Paul von Delinger.
Play to Be Given at School
Pupils from each of the twelve
departments of Crispus Attucks high
school will take part in “The Magic
Door,” a play to be presented Dec.
2 before the Parent-Teachers’ As
sociation. The drama will depict
the work of each of the school’s
courses of study.
What Street Is This?
PICTURE No. 29
THIS BLANK MAY BE USED FOR ANSWERS
Name the Street Contest Editor. No. 29
The Indianapolis Times.
214-220 W. Maryland St
Indianapolis, Indiana.
I consider the best name is
My name is
Address
Hold all answers until close of series.
Town State
§pr v .
Betty Hancock
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Jane Bosart
OWEN SCHOOL PUPILS
WILL PRESENT PLAY
Auditorium Scene for Drama of
“Shanty Town.”
Pupils of Robert Dale Owen
School 12, McCarty and West
streets, and school patrons, will pre
sent a play, "Mrs. Tubbs in Shanty
Town,” at 7:30 Friday in the school
auditorium.
Pupils who will have roles In the
presentation are Junior Bunting,
Ellen Murline, Pauline Hunchell,
Hazel Kemper and Billy Bunting.
Others who will take part are:
Clarence Hadley, George Ennis, Wil
liam Montgomery, Mrs. Wade Bunt
ing, Mrs. Ellen Hickey, Mrs. Clory
Kemper and Miss Dorothy Huffman.
Junior Class Stages Project
Tue junior class of Washington
high school held its annual Thanks
giving basket project last week.
Members of the committee in charge
were Jane Fletemeyer, chairman;
John Dunn, Reva Wright, Edgar
Pearson, Eunice Grimes and George
Totten.
THE INDIANAPOLIS TIMES
Left to Right—Mary Katherine Pyle, 1719 Rochester avenue; James
Barnhill, R. R. 17, Box 239-B, and Robert Swain, 3008 Cold Spring road.
The Pilgrims have landed at Flackville school on Lafayette road.
Pupils of the school have completed a Pilgrim village of four houses,
complete with trees and plenty of Pilgrims.
Shown in the photo are Mary Katherine Pyles, who is putting the
finishing touches on a Pilgrim; James Barnhill, who is doing “this and
that” to one of the houses, and Robert Swain, who insists upon the
correct angle of the chimney top.
The pupils used the village as the background for their Thanks
giving program last week. In addition, the project has been used as
a basis for their studies of history, geography, reading and sewing.
The girls made the costumes for the dolls. Boys in the school built
the houses from corn stalks and tree bark. The trees were from tree
branches —quick work for a boy with a knife.
Focus Activities of City
Schools on Yuletide
Plays and Music Will Help
Pupils in Celebration of
Season.
While mother and father are won
dering where prosperity is, pupils
in the Indianapolis schools are pre
paring for Christmas, knowing that
it is “just around the corner.”
With Thanksgiving in the back
ground, the pupils are winding up
their studies of pilgrims, of Ply
mouth Rock, and of Massassoit.
Now, their more immediate wor
ries are carols, the Christmas spirit,
and Santa Claus.
In all schools, the Christmas sea
son will b? worked into the pupils’
lessons. Music classes, glee clubs
and choruses will learn the better
known of the Christmas carols.
Pupils to Write Plays
In many buildings, the music or
ganizations will present musical
programs during the week preceding
the holidays.
Literary-minded puplis also will
take advantage of the coming of the
Yule season. Plays to be presented
by grade school actors will, in many
schools, be written by pupils in their
English classes.
These dramas will be the result of
much reading of Christmas stories
—for background. Most of the plays
will not be the product of one au
thor, but will come from many pens.
Play Santa to Needy
Next will come the staging of the
plays. Scenery and costumes are a
problem this year, for the pupils
must keep in mind the edict of
Superintendent Paul C. Stetson. He
announced at the opening of the
present school term that school dra
matic productions must not incur
expense to the children's parents.
Many of the schools will play
Santa Claus to the needy. They will
take up collections of old clothes,
and of food, which will be distribut
ed through the schools’ social serv
ice department and through welfare
organizations.
GIRLS LEAD HONORS
Outnumber Boys *n Grading
at Washington.
Girls outnumber boys by almost
two to one on the high honor roll
and hono rroll of Washington high
school. The two lists, published at
the close of the second grade pe
riod, included 103 girls and fifty
nine boys.
Pupils on the high honor roll are:
Cecelia Kupferchmidt. Hazel Grundon
Marv Wicker, Mary League. Josephine
Crider, Lyla May Fullen. Elmer Koch
Harvey Slaughter, Charlotte Hauser. John
S’earn. Marguerite Halbing, Alice Walker.
Benjamin O. Russell, Lottie Gross,
Geraldine Kelly. Helen Bingman, Frances
Cates, Norma Farnsworth. Thelma Martin,
Vera Thompson, Mary Mellinger, Doris
Stark. Helen Walker, Robert Fuller,
Arthur Hicks, Mildred Fletemeyer, Haven
Swindoll. Eugene Whitis, Lucile Broich,
Arvis Wright, Dorothy Gage, Arthur Goode.
Edith Gingerv. Vivian Flannigan. Evelyn
Lewis, Betty Bamford, Jane Leonard. Doris
White. Mildred Morrow’. Dorothy Edwards,
Herman Fischer. Helenay. Paul Bainaka.
Robert Flake. Lucille Rieck, Gilbert
Sprecker. Alvin Spangler, Julia Snaren
blek, Georgia Belle Weatherford, Sophie
Somrak, Hazel Chapman, Margaret Case
and Frances O'Neil.
SHORTRIDGE JUNIORS
SELECT PRESIDENT
Don Morrison Is Victor After Cam
paign of Two Weeks.
Don Morrison was elected presi
dent of the Shortridge high school
junuior class last week. The elec-
ti o n campaign
held sway among
members of the
third-year class
for two tveeks
prior to the bal
loting.
Other pupils
who were named
to offices in the
class were: Mary
nette Hiatt vice
president ; Aline
Bailey, secretary;
Robert Mueller,
treasurer, and
William Koehne,
chairman of the
junior vaudeville.
mb , ; .
jpp
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The election was held during a
meeting of the class in a confer
ence period.
The department of agriculture
explains why popcorn pops. Heat
ing the corn converts moisture in
the kernels into steam and pressure
causes an explosion in the kernel.
7TSGDK
AM
BY BRUCE CATTQN
nnHE Civil war produced few
stranger figures than Mary
Lincoln, Abraham Lincoln’s wife.
She was perhaps the most un
popular “first lady” the land ever
had. She popularly was supposed
to be vain, extravagant, a shrewd
ish social climber; sne had three
half-brothers in the Confederate
army, and at one time she even
was accused of being a Confederate
spy.
That she had a violent temper
and frequently unloaded it on Lin
coln in public was common, knowl
edge. ' ~
The first really sympathetic and
careful study of this unhappy wom
an is provided, now, by Carl Sand
burg, in “Mary Lincoln: Wife and
Widow;” and in this book Mr. Sand
burg sets forth bluntly the fact that
Mrs. Lincoln suffered from a pro
gressive disease of the brain which
finally robbed her of her reason.
Mr. Sandburg cites a doctor’s
post-mortem examination to sup
port this statement. He reminds
us that Mrs. Lincoln, ten years after
the war, was confined for a year in
an asylum, that she suffered delu
sions of persecution, and that she
bewailed her poverty in spite of the
fact that President. Lincoln left her
an estate of approximately SIOO,OOO.
But his study is a sympathetic
one. By revealing the woman’s
handicap, he makes possible a kind
er and juster appreciation of her
than before has been given.
Published by Harcourt, Brace &
Cos., the book costs $3. Its im
portant collection of documents was
cited by Paul M. Angle.
CLASS GIVES LUNCHEON
Thanksgiving Party is Held by 8A
Class at School No. 72.
Members of the 8A class at School
72, Troy and Carson avenues, gave
a Thanksgiving luncheon last week.
Guests were Mrs. Ida Langerwisch,
head of the domestic science depart
ment in the public schools, and
Miss Ada B. Crozier, director of
physical education.
The luncheon was part of the
gardening project, which has been
carried on by the pupils.
MOTION PICTURES
f LaSt \ A Picture as great and unusual as Its east! 15 All Star Players’
I 1 “ IF 1 HAD A M *LLION”
I I IlilcS I Gary Cooper Charles Buggies Jack Oakie
I ■*■ ■ ■ * Wynne Gibson George Bast Frances Dee
V I OOaV ) Gene Raymond. W. C. Fields, Mary Boland, Alison Skip- ]
\ ' / worth, Charles Laughton, Rosroe Karin, Lucien Littlefield,
Vaassanr Richard Bennett. >
Tomorrow!
I mortal desires . . ~until
Hill "~ V ml JP 9 fate tripped her up and
made her sacrifice her
jPyCOMfTAHCE
./BENNETT
'M JOEL McCREA—PAUL LUKAS

I “ROCKABYE” .
IjH Hit No. 1 of the Bb
Pre-Christmas Jubilee Celebration 131
—Extra Added Attractions — ||f
|iOE PENNER in “HERE PRiNCE” ,
'rnrr A Grantland Rice Sportlight with SOB
'rvci * O JACK DEMPSEY—A Lit I E BOOTH gif
’DEL-MAR JIMMY FOXX-ZLSWORTH VINES*
Paramount News Flashes H
Miss Hiatt
Pupils ‘Own ’ Groceiy
| • jf' "<■
Left to Right—Mary Jean
Briggs, 2823 Sutherland avenue;
Betty Lou Hasselbring, 3029 Ruckle
street, and Grant Appel, 3031
Ruckle street.
Pupils in the third grade at
School 76, College avenue and Thir
tieth street, have found an easy
way to study their geography, art,
and arithmetic lessons.
They have founded a grocery
SEVEN RIPPLE
CLUBSJLECT
Romance Language Group
Is Organized.
Seven newly formed clubs, the
Romance Language group, of Brcid
Ripple high school elected officers
recently at their first meetings.
Those who will hold offices for the
rest of the school year are:
Spanish I—Margaret Albert, president;
Lloyd H. Wilkins, vice-president, and Rich
ard Cravens, secretary.
Spanish ll—Gladys Scott, president;
David Olvey. vice-president, and. Edith
Prather, secretary.
Spanish lll—Jack Bisinger, president,
and Max McCord, vice-president.
French I—Wretha King, president; Ver
non Britten, vice-president, and Margaret
Van Meter, secretary.
French ll—Jack Klein. president;
Harold Copeland, vice-president, and Alice
Remy. secretary.
French lll—Jack Rich, president; Mar
garet Duvall, vice-president, and Ruth
marie Hamill, secretary.
French TV—Elinor Earle, president:
Frances Robishaw, vice-president, and
Helen Blue, secretary.
‘STENO’ CROP STILL
GOOD AT TECH HIGH
29 Girls Win Awards in Typing
Proficiency Tests at School.
Indianapolis business men need
not worry about a shortage in the
crop of feminine stenographers.
In the recent proficiency tests in
typing at Tech high school, twenty
nine girls won awards, while only
two boys passed the trials.
Arthur Moore and Joseph Zim
merman were the boys. The girls
were:
Lillian Casey, Mary McColloch, Mary
Lucas, Eleanor Edwards, Cora Doctor,
Esther Roth. Bernice Leach, Mary Fultz,
Irene Carden, Mary J. Burke, Virginia
Maier, Thelma Powell, Thelfna Green
wood, .Kathrvn Jones, Margaret Thomas,
Rita June Fisher. Tove Thielst Isabel
Sommer. Martha Traut, Ethel Bradley,
Elsie Rose Kennedy. Ruth Morrison,
Florence Corboz, Thelma Thompson, Jose
phine Turley. Irma Holtman, Mary F.
Flanagan and Jeanette Smithers.
store, right in the classroom. They
learn geography by tracing the
journeys of the carious foods from
their native lands to the store. Art
comes in when they built the store,
complete with decorations inside
and out.
Their arithmetic lesson Is occu
pied with learning to make change
with the cardboard nickles, dimes,
and quarters in the cash register.
HAZEL FISHER NAMED
CONCERT CLUB LEADER
Ten New Members Are Admitted to
Tech Organization.
Hazel Fisher was re-elected presi
dent of the Girls’ Concert Club of
Tech high school recently. Dor
othy Sanders was named secretary
treasurer; Lillian Ball, librarian,
and Margaret Crist, wardrobe mis
tress.
Ten new members have been
admitted to the organization this
semester. They are:
Ruth Cradick. Millicent Cummings. Rhea
Stevens. Ruth Thompson, uienoora Valen
tine. Lillian Buchanan. Dorothy Dennis,
La Verne Anderson. Gladys Stevens ana
Ruth E. Brown.
Mrs. Blanche Quirk is director
of the club. Accompanist is Miss
Charlotte Moore of the faculty.
SINGING CLUBS ELECT
School 49 Groups Choose Leaders
for Term.
Eugene Leak has been elected
president of the boys’ glee club of
William Penn school 49, at 1902
West Morris street, for the present
term. Other officers are Donald
Wright, vice-president; Robert San
ford, secretary; and William Beas
ley, chairman of the music com
mittee.
Officers of the girls’ glee club at
the school are Helen Deatrick,
president; Ruth Blackwell, vice
president; Mary Alice Waltz, sec
retary; and Maxine Burtton, chair
man of the music committee.
MOTION PICTURES
A I W
9 “RIO RITA” I
JOE E. BROWN
Said a Mop.th- / I
AMUSEMENTS
IT^iWnk
The Star of Radio
find Musical Comedy
fl GRACE HAYES I
M IS PERSON
5 OTHER BIG ACTS
LY-v-i-l A’i mi*
lON THE SCREEN
“The SPORT PARADE” I
Marion Marsh—Joe! Metre*
PCEH
\ MORREY /
1 BRENNAN /
“THE GIANT OF
m JAZZ’’ AM) HIS AST
ORCHESTRA
35c Befoie 8:30 Mb
.NOV. 30,4932
96 PUPILS ARE
ON HIGH HONOR
STODENTLISTS
Awards at Shortridge and
at Manual Training Are
Announced.
Ninety-six pupils in two high
schools were named to the high
honor roll for the second grading
period, ending this week. In addi
tion. 242 pupils made the honor roll.
, Those who were admitted to the
high honor list at Shortridge high
school are:
Hilton Brown Atherton. Lucy Ann Balch.
James Briggs. Harry Page Bucher, Gordon
Cohn. Elsie Connan, Grace Ferguson. Jean
Lou Foley. Barbara French. Mary Cather
ine Funkhouser. Sophia Gerson, Grace
Hibbard. Mar’ Alice Hicks. Fletcher
Humphrey. Julian Kiser. Robert Lipton.
Betty Lutz, Sa ’a mtzabeth Marks. Robert
McVie. Jane McWorkman. Mary Louise
Merrell. Gordon Messing. Elizabeth Mvers,
Marjorie Newman, William Rasmussen.
Dorothy Reasoner. Arthur Sachs. Marjorie
Schock. Marv Jeanette Seller, Helen Ross
Smith, Charles Snider, Margaret Stump.'
Marv Ellen Vovles, Carol Wagner, Arleen
Wilson and Alice Marie Wooting.
60 Pupils Are Honored
Sixty pupils, thirty boys and thir
ty girls, were named to the “Top
Ten” honor roll of Manual Training
high school. Receiving honorable
mention were 235.
Heading the high honor list were
five pupils with averages of 97.5 per
cent. They are Marguerite Johnson,
Miriam Goldstein, Joe Calderon,
Edmond Phillips and Samuel Gor
don.
The “Top Ten" list includes pupils
with grade averages above 90 per
cent.
Named to ‘Top Ten’
Those who were named to the
“Top Ten” are:
Samue Gordon. Joe Calderon. Edmond
Phillips. Frederick Wahl. Morris Cohen.
Richard Burkhart, Charles Goebel. Robert
Mathews. George Lee. Eugene Lazar. An
thony Danna. Herschel Kopp. Angelo An
gelopolos. Robert Hall. Harry Einstandlg.
Robert Specker, Joseph Fogle, Edward
Beckman. Jake Camhi. Thomas McCubblns.
Alex Lazar, Donald Briggs. Eugene Greene,
Charles Henn. John Woerijer, Richard Hill,
Frank Schneider. Abe Yosna. Jason Bedell.
Ralph Brown. Marguerite Johnson, Miriam
Goldstein. Freda Brill, Geraldine Gitltatt,
Marie Kuntz, Erma Postel. Wilma Laus
man, Esther Stotler. DeLoris Rahm. Bea
trice Waiss. Francis Snoddy. Roseann Fo
garty. Yettle Lleberman, Jeannette Gen
try. Wilma Williams. Mayneta Baumgart.
Marjorie Howard. Ellen Ceplin. Georgianna
Amt. Gertrude Oertel. Goldie Pardo, Fran
ces Stumps. Ruth Russell. Helen Blakely.
Margaret Bade. Mildred Briggs, Clarice
Reimer. Mildred Grossman, Wilma Yeager
and Hope Brown.
ART WORK EXHIBITED
Products of Tech Pupils Put on
Display in Main Building.
Work of representative pupils in
the art department at Tech high
school is on display in an exhibit in
the main building of the school.
Cartoons, drawings of birds, street
scenes and work done in architec
tural art make up the display.
Pupils whose work appears are:
Margaret Sandstrom. Jean Welty, Marion
Wortman. Eugene Holland. Jean Stevens.
Virginia Marsh, William Bromstrup,
as Bank. Arthur Williamson, Ervin Miller,
Robert Randall, Kathryn Townsend. Nolen
McCrae, Charles Bowers, Dorit Graybill,
Martha Stewart and Richard Aust.
MOTION PICTURES
FREE PARK—PLAZA MOTOR INN ||
APOLLO*
Hurry! Hurry! Last 2 Hays!
urn ROGERS
Indianapolis’ Own
DICK POWELL
with MARIAN NIXON in
TOO BUSY
TO WORK
Starts FRIDAY
1 1
Is:* xt. ‘ 4
1* v, ... ..m ... . •
SHE’S BACK
GREATER THAN EVER!
A New
CLARA
BOW
More Allurinr . ,
Vivid and Fascinating
Be All Hlltf
|9AVACI|
From Tiffany Thayer’s Novel
Pil AC El
x-clusive I 25c
Never to be Shown In I “**
Any Other Theatre I Till 1 P.M.
DOUGLAS |
FAIRBANKS
In a Modern Comedy-Drama
Mr. Robinson Crusoe
Friday
JACK HOLT
with LILLIAN MILES la
“Man Against Woman”
NEIGHBORHOOD
THEATERS
NORTH SIDE
■MBpjM'fV Talbot at JJnd Bi.
Family Nile
iRSBBiBBSSSBBEHSKfWaIter Huston
‘KONGO’* 1
E Noble at Maafc
Family Nlta
Joe E. Brown
“TENDERFOOT ’
m and SMb St.
M.l *1 ' I{Cfl [€ John Gilbert
mtUUIMM Leila Hyama
“PHANTOM OF PARIS”
ISM Boose yelt Ava.
If*H yiV/tM >1 Von F.IU
Peter Shannon
“HOTEL CONTINENTAL”
WEST SIDE
BBBBHBiW. Watb. A Belmoat
y r>**H Family Xlte
UiiMMMB
• STRANGE LOVE OF MOLL* LOCVADT*

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