OCR Interpretation


The Indianapolis times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1922-1965, December 17, 1932, Capital Edition, Image 13

Image and text provided by Indiana State Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015313/1932-12-17/ed-1/seq-13/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for PAGE 13

DEC. 17, 1932
Wafer! MVJRDERI^
Brans' here todat
LINDA AVERILI. believe* her elder
ly cousin, AMOS PEABODY. wM
murdered when he fell from the second
story balcony of the Avertlls' Long
Island home because of a few words he
gasped before hi* death. Linda rushes
upstair*. Bomeone trie* to strangle her
and she faint*.
There are four guests in the house—
all suspects of the crime. They are:
MR. STATLANDER, business associate
of TOM AVERILL; CAPTAIN DE VOS.
handsome Belgian: MARVIN PRATT}
former suitor of Lindas: snd LIAM
Since there is no evidence on which
to base an arrest. Linda snd Tom, her
husbsnd, agree they must keep the four
men tn the house until they have dis
covered who is guilty. They pretend to
believe the death was an accident
Thev are aided in their plan when
DR BOYLE, medical examiner, sends
word that every ohe must remain until
he has questioned them. Bovle Is on a
fishing trip and can not return for
several hours.
Linda finds the towel with which the
attempt was made to strangle her—
Identified by a smear of sunburn oint
ment. She learns that ROSIE, the maid,
ha* promised to launder a shirt for
fihaughnevsey.
Tom believe* the shin may be an im
portant clew snd goes to have a look
at it. Shaughnesscy discovers hi*
quarters have been searched. To set.
matters right. Linda tells him the whole
story snd asks him to help untangle
the mystery of her cousin's death.
Tom, Linda, and Shaughnesse.v have a
long talk, discussing all the clews, when
Tom explains why suspicion points to
Shaughnessey, the Irishman becomes
angry
NOW GO ON WITH THE STORY
CHAPTER THIRTY-FOUR
TOM'S answer came evenly. “I
am not a detective, amateur or
otherwise, and I simply am doing
what you asked me to do—assum
ing your guilt and giving you the
complete picture of yourself as you
appeared to others since you have
'been here.”
Either realizing that there was
no quarrel there, or again com
manding his rising temper, Shaugh
nessey agreed to this with a note
of apology in his voice.
Averill continued.
“Coming to this morning, you
will remember I was in the water
when the accident, as we have
called It—happened. Linda Mrs.
Averill was directly under the
balcony. She ran upstairs.
“Front the raft I saw her come
out on the little balcony and saw
her pitch forward and fall. I got
in as quickly as I could and on my
way up the lawn you came strolling
around the corner of the house.”
“And how, pray, could I be up
*there to pitch off the old man and
still come around the corner of
the house at the same time?”
Tom turned to Linda. “Your
story starts here,” he said.
n k
STRIVING for Tom's clear exposi
tory style, Linda spoke as calmly
as she could.
“I was attacked in that guest
room, Mr. Shaughnessey. My hus
band didn’t speak of that a few
moments ago, when he ran over the
events of the day.”
“I thought it thin just there,” said
the Irishman with satisfaction.
“iVhy should you be so sure of mur
der? Excuse me, Mrs. Averill—go
on!”
“Cousin Amos few words
before he died. They told me some
pne had thrown him over—that's
why I left him and ran upstairs.”
“Plucky,” commented the Irish
man.
"Well—impetuous!" Linda laughed
a little. Then she told of hearing
voices In the room on her way down,
of her hasty passage through the
apparently empty room after her
cousin had fallen, of the sudden
sensation of choking, of the quick
vision of Tom diving, and of the ob
livion which had descended as she
felt the cloth loosened, too late to
save her from losing consciousness.
* “My turn now,” said Tom. “As
I dove—after I saw her fall—i
saw a man standing behind her in
the doorway. Whoever that was,
of course, had hidden in the room,
hearing her coming—had realized
that she knew there was some
thing wrong, and seeing her go
toward the railing, had stepped
out and tried to strangle her as
the only way of keeping his iden
tity secret.
“My presence on the float—the
fact that I showed I saw her by
waving to her—saved her life.”
"And I—l still do not see how
that mysterious, invisible assail
ant could be identified as my in
offensive (if bad-tempered) self.”
“This way—” Linda saw she
must bear the onus of that explana
tion. “I fall. Tom dives. In that
second when no one sees him—as
sume it is you, Mr. Shaughnessey—
HORIZONTAL Answer to Previous Puzzle 11 Dwells.
Klfrl I Ifcl |g|*W6|c| ritalilsl "■
Nwta r I pljrl no§e
dulcimer. r ,-.. ■£. g E * he^-
15 Matured. fslE L AJ 1 R
J 7 Genus of non- PEALKi '[rfilMl i|| II I 1( To u ™ a
poisonous laIIIgIAMBIE.I6E:iTvIIeIeIdI c” 8 * 1 ’
rrPTFHP#nTI
<lB Above. l£|& Ci -Uylji. B rSQI&I 25 Porticoes.
19 Bewitching. lA|G I OMT R £ NDMT R AjY| 28 Old French
21 Part of pedes. D AMNMI A G|E.jRBBSQL El coin.
t&i base. [EIK E ~INIE P QITIA[L 1 WiAIPI 30 Measure of
22 formation 41 Indian wig- 2 Reluctant. ,con
formation. w ... . 35 More concise.
Oppoatte of Id. yi.! 38 *>.■“•'■ -l-al
*3sL *-■• mID . =£
26 Exists. 4 pi 1 ! 21 6 Economics 37 Heath.
27 Orient. 4S E xnected <•**>■•> 38 Pace.
29 Mother of £ o J gh 7To be ill. 39 Against.
Apollo. g Work room of 40 More lenient.
31 Sr , 51 Sturgeon. a painter Body with
32 To depart. „ JSmTfiho Dwln.rof ,horUy“‘
33 Behold. 55 Animal who th. Whit. „ Abot ”
44 Nenter pro- . J.” ,' House, U5.A. 46 To asita t.
noun. c 7 v . / IP u 'hat does 4S Queen of
36 Sullen. "J™"- the Eighteenth heaven.
3$ A Slavic* hiirnpr * amendment of 49 Head of tho
speaking * the IT S. Con- Fascist!.
person. VERTICAL stitution 52 Golf device
40 Half an cm. 1 Packer. refer? 54 Hastened.
-TTTTn PTTTT"
ic iI*TT""
rs 'T"| In _ "
_ hgJ ~
.;=“!^(i^Fl=“=
-Sp--P|l--P|l
r, ST’ OTJ 4T - 44 TO* 15 IT
r'F^Fr
55 * *—ISS
Hill h sxLLLi
you step over me. across the bal
cony, into the empty nursery on the
other side.
“You ail knew it was empty, be
cause my little boy was at his
grandmother's. The door leading to
the service stairs is directly oppo
site. * .
“You could step across the hall in
a second, go down those stairs,
through the empty kitchen and out
the sendee door, which would bring
you round that end of the house
just as Tom ran up t£e lawn.”
Shaughnesssey laughed shortly.
“And then—the talk with Rosie, the
shirt, the—l suppose you overheard
more than you say—the kissing and
coaxing. Yes. All very neat. Mr.
and Mr*. Averill. I congratulate
you.”
Shaughnessey rose sudddenly, a
vast blur, darker than the dark air
about him. “The only thing is—l
didn't do it. Good-night.”
“Oh, wait!” Linda’s hand was
again upon his sleeve. “Don’t be
angry, Mr. Shaughnesssey] You
asked us to assume— There are
things against the others, you know.
Plenty of things.’”
As before, he seemed to waver.
Then he laughed again, but more
pleasantly.
“I hope the cases against them
are stronger—for your sake as well
as mine,” he said. “Surely, Mrs.
Averill, you can see how thin this
is!”
mum
LINDA rejoiced secretly in Tom's
firmness of tone.
“Not so thin, Mr. Shaughnessey.
Think it over. You would certainly
be held if I reported It to the police.
THEY-TELL ME'JU
Are My Ears Red?
PLAIN talk will be the principal
topic on the program when the
Republican state committee meets
here Tuesday, they tell me.
Chairman Ivan C. Morgan, the
well-known Austin letter writer, is
expected to be the principal sub
ject of this conversation, which will
be. clothed neither in ambiguities
nor subterfuges.
In fact, Chairman Morgan may
receive no small portion of the
blame for the alleged mismanage
ment of the Republican campaign
in Indiana, and inasmuch as he will
be present in the room, his ears may
assume a color very much resem
bling that of the beet.
Among the high crimes and mis
demeanors which are scheduled to
be charged against the chairman
will be that he did not advise with
the regularly elected committee
men, but joined hands and con
ferred with nonrecognized and un
important Republicans.
That he permitted letters ap
pealing to religious prejudice to be
sent out on state committee sta
tionary and over the signature of
the committee.
That he established many non
essential bureaus, and committed a
host of other "errors in judgment.
* a
No steps will b'e, taken at this
time to request his resignation, they
tell me, although anything may
happen if the discussion becomes
sufficiently heated.
Ostensible reason for the meeting
is to discuss organization for the
municipal primaries and campaigns
in more than sixty cities of the
state, but the district chairmen are
expected to avail themselves of the
opportunity to unburden themselves.
Many of the committeemen feel
that with the proper leadership and
organization they have an excellent
opportunity to wrest control of a
score or more cities from the Demo
crats.
If a change in state chairmen is
deemed advisable, the choice will be
made from among members of the
committee.
n n *
Those receiving the most mention
for the honor in event of Morgan’s
“resignation” are Don B. Irwin,
Frankfort. Fifth district chairman;
Edmund J. Freund, Valparaiso, Sec
ond district chairman; Ewing Em-
But I'm pot threatening you.
“Ail this, as I said, is between our
selves, lor the present, at least.
Don’t you think, however, for your
own sake you should give us your
version—your side of all these inci
dents or accidents?
“After tlfet—my wife said you
hinted at something you had to
tell ”
The Irishman was silent a mo-,
ment.
“ Tis not I that should explain
myself," he said angTily. “I will not
be called to account for my actions.”
“I’m sorry you take that attitude,”
answered Tom quietly. “And yet
I I’m not sure I altogether blame you.
“You must know, however,
Shaughnessey, that it makes me less
willing to talk this over with you
than if you definitely cleared your
self of suspicion.”
“Talk it over or not, as you will,”-
answered the other. “ ’Twas not
I who suggested it.”
“Very well, Mr. Shaughnessey.
That is fbr you to decide.”
It was hopeless. Linda saw that,
whatever had gone wrong, their at
tempt to enlist Shaughnesssey had
failed.
She sighed unconsciously, nor
did she realize how disappointed
and appealing her voice sounded
as she broke the flat silence.
“Oh, dear!” she mourned. “I
hoped you wouldn’t act that way;
It’s a worse mess now than it was
before, and I thought you and Tom
and I were going to straighten it
all out.
“Now, you’re cross and Tom’s
cross, and I don’t know what to
do. Oh, dear!”
ison, Vincennes, Seventh district
chairman, and Benjamin Huffman,
Rockport, Eighth district chairman.
Emison, injured in a recent auto
mobile accident, may not care to
accept the post, even if it offered.
From what they tell me, John W.
Scott of Gary, aggressive First dis
trict chairman, who long has been
discontented with the so-called
leadership of Morgan, may head the
verbal attack, which means that the
chairman will be in for a very dis
agreeable time, because Johnny
knows how to flay.
A good time is expected by all ex
cept Morgan.
7TSCDK
A DAT
BY BRUCE CATTON
WJHATEVER rank history may
give Winston Churchill as a
statesman, there is little doubt that
it will rate him very highly indeed
as a writer. No other world leader,
of recent years has had anything
like his literary gifts.
His newest book is “Amid These
Storms.” and it is something of a
disappointment. A series of sketches
about events too trivial to get into
his other books, it represents, so to
speak, a pocketful of small change.
It is interesting enough, but when
you finish it you haven’t read much
of anything.
Nevertheless, you won’t go to deep
over It.
Mr. Churchill tells, for example,
about the one and only “spy scare”
in which he got involved—an occa
sion when he and some naval offi
cers found a searchlight on the
roof of a country house near one
of the base so the grand fleet, but
learned, after some fuss, that iC
was perfectly harmless.
He gives a very good description
of the German army’s spring offen
sive in 1918, and helps you to un
derstand why it failed. He tells
how close the submarine campaign
came to success and shows how it
finally was conquered.
He recites his experience as a
combat soldier, tells how he learned
to pilot an airplane, and explains
the joys of an unskilled amateur
painter.
It’s fairly thin stuff, but it does
put you in contact with a man who
has astounding energy and a great
zest for living.
Published by Scribners, the book
sells for 83.50.
Answers
****** isSiiin
|pp’fL
r.nraKfr|3r
■pMORDS are inlets or bays along
■*- the mountainous coast of
NORWAY. BENJAMIN FRANK
LIN never applied for a patent.
The MUEZZIN is the Mohamm®*
dan crier of the hour of prayer.
TARZAN THE UNTAMED
_
Tarzan of the Apes had witnessed the entire
encounter from the moment the lion had
leaped upon its prey. For sometime before, he
had been watching the girl. When Numa at
tacked her, the ape-man had at first been
. minded to *
THE INDIANAPOLIS TIMES
HER dejection was so unfeigned
that it seemed to penetrate
the militant egotism of the Irish
man. With one of his mercurial
changes of front, he threw back
ijis head with a peal of laughter.
“ 'Tis 10 years of age you are,
Mrs. Averill, and not a day older!
Sure, who could be angry with a
mere child like yourself!
“If you'll forgive me, after I've
apologized for resenting that your
husband gave me what I asked for,
I’ll be glad enough to side with you
instead of against you—and that
goes until the police are called in,
if called they must be, and another
man marches off with them to the
lock-up. Is it a bargain?”
“Oh, that’s grand!” Linda’s eyes
fairly shone in the dark. “Sit down,
do! Tom. pour some more of that
punch. Now, Mr. Shaughnessey.
what comes next?”
OUR BOARDING HOUSE
Ilf UND NOW, ALTUN, YOU LUMMKOPF- PEOPlft
jtf HERE: \SS A NEW PIECE, "DER VMJSE /tf> WALKED AROUND F
Ul UP DER PRE-TUtS/ ACH -1, BET £f / ON THEIR HANDS, \
IT TAKES ZWEI YEAR FOR YoU Tc ) l THEN EVERYTHING S
LEARN——UND IT IS SO &IYIPLE -* ) ) WOULD HAVE TO i
\ even a could learn to built J
] K 'BLAY IT; YAH LISTEN —SCALE S UPSiDfc "DOWN Jr J
} UF'G SHARP—EIN-ZWEI-ZUM— j
AfiQ* tIN-ZWEI -2UM- S '
TA * TEE - ‘ Dt£ " DEE * j • |l2
FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS
' f OSCAR SAYS HAP* RV \ WELL, Voi> kwoW J ff TAU£E THIS j £ ( t Tl ( I TWIS IS MY UWCLES ) ELMER DROVE EM 'WTO T&wN TV
LANDEP AT SIMS LAKE I UIUAT A BIS TEASE V SHORT CUT— FT’U. \£ MiUPCP D ) TMEfiES MB. AS PLANE, M8.51M... (IN OUB FUWEC.-W£ SAVE ME /$
IN A SEAPLANE!! VW kWE )5.... ALWAYS CC / SAVE TIME-Boy.’ - vU E SO / , I‘J WUEJ2E DID JTW* OOUAR SiU/WAT '
DIDN'T WE SISN UIS NAME A PLAYING SOME V A ~ ES l Vuiu. tBE GLAD / V 4 J WELL ASK \ &a WESO’Z /f UE PEELED OFF A POLL BIS j :
TOTWAT TELESRAM? WN 1 PPACTICAU AMD SEP UNCLE j __Lt!/*-' *1 i - /(ENOu<SU T> STUPP A,— '
WASHINGTON TUBBS II
UHHERtuntN! LOOK! 1 , a j
IV AN assassin. TY v MISTAKE', here ISS PER pRiMCE, NOMII J
SALESMAN SAM
\
ttJHeae/s \ v /ou’u_ 6o ©#><;< "'x uJoto! 100 cauch is C( S*i cO Z' ( ~. _ ; T\
O'*’ A* JfML FER SUrtPlM’) IS HE. , SUFFiCieHTLV GNOU&UI \ 1 *2ST !tSa*\f 0t J
BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES
r f t B "" "S ✓ 1 - ■ mi. i ■ i.
HOWb TV,' OY OATt I SV.YY~ VfcAR p iVJfc TH\ViVt\Vi l MOSTfcND 0?= TV,'
DOO6H ?>OX COM\K>' F \V<b VlYVto' 0? Oy' <DATy. W&TYVi OT COVSY.-
rw w \oosnc
-—let the lion have his way with her. What
was she but * hated Red spy? Had he not seen
her in enemy headquarters conferring with the
high command? And later, masquerading as a
British officer? It was the latter thought
“Next, I think,' said the big man
judicially, “you tell me what it is
you have against the others. Is that;
fair, Averill?”
“I suppose so.” Tom tried to
speak cordially. Linda felt that in
his heart he still was far from
pleased that this had been forced
upon him.
Tve spoken of the various quar
rels the other three men had. It's
six of one and half a dozen of
the other leading up to this morn
ing.
“But one clew came out of the at
tack on Linda that is tangible and
important. We have the towel with
which she was choked.”
Shaughnessey listened in silence
to their account of its finding.
“I’ve been thinking,” said Linda
slowly. “Cousin Amos was alone
here in the house last night. You
know that little lavatory in the-'
room he had has only • hand
basin.
“I believe he may have gone
across Jhe hall to take a tub bath
and used a towel from the rack
there. He was a very tidy soul
and I think would bring the towel
back to leave the place clean for
any one else.
“In that case, he easily might
have hung it where Rosie often
leaves clean towels—over the back
of that little rush-bottomed chair
by the door.
'Tve thought all along that who
ever was there simply stepped be
hind the wardrobe there—what
other place would there be to hide
in a hurry?—?nd then when I
passed, stepped out again. He
could have caught up a towel from
the back of the chair.
“In fact, that's the only pface he
could have got it from, for he didn't
have time to go into the lavatory.
—By Ahern
that prompted him to interfere. Doubtless
the British would be glad to question her. Tar
zan not only recognized her but also the lion.
Like all jungle creatures, the ape-man had that
miraculous sense ofracent
% *
besides the danger of being heard.
“And if it was either Mr. De Vos
or Marvin, why should either one
have brought a towel with him.
expecting me to come and get
strangled?”
“Excellently reasoned,” cried the
Irishman, now in thoroughly good
humor. “You should be a lawyer—
or at least a writer, of fiction. Mrs.
Averill! That sounds to me like
a perfect reconstruction! What
would you sav, Averill?”
“Just that, answered Tom warm
ly. “How that towel got there has
bothered me more than I've ad
mitted to you. Binks.
“After all. as you say, no one
would bring a towel to strangle
someone who isn't expected to turn
up at all. Now the question is—
who took it away?”
(To Be Continued)
OUT OUR WAY
If j* * D Tl /OH - MARviE.Y' DiDMT V O'- UKE. A
? “° l • j I // 1 WEAR VOO SAM T v.©Y OF US— HE.
, t // YOU HAO TO C*L\_ v/nte-VT BE. Ao\-E. Ts>
p o v<- k 111 NOOR WIFE. To MAv(E. A MILLION*
„ * I \ii hour Back, voo dollars, \f heo
k hi \ coouom' reach rr. p\j-r A <=, much
t „ f \ I WASH SvAE. COULD MEkiTau EFFORT INTO
— 1 t | V SEE NOO COIN)' MAvllu' *T AS HE Purs
~^
' P . a i-j- y, sts stmiq. *c sea -vr it-f\
f TVINS* HIMMELI V WIEN*. DOTS V" AN \f DOWN MIT t>SR iMPOSTEP'. /KEY, WAIT!
rv tnV / OER PR,NCE \ Twßowl ,w O£R BLDOmin / take -im to mv
. ISS SEEING/ IK) PEP K L 00V)GE0N. A O O OMS 'AT
UWFOGM. r[ • Wg. V R Ss A-A
-TVIIMS!yN- C /X. COUSIN O' MINE,
’ i
f N THE eKCITEMEFIT, WASH fOOGETS To USPv !
StJT , ATPABENTLY, NO ONE NOTICES. VT.
ye>FS.. ejowt of th Ftvu*b was. v \t p * FtitF.,
TY\t\<a VOWT THROUGH <bCHOOV. hNPPV -60 - LOCH-V , TOVOVCF.FOFD
ti'AQF AUVOAVb P>9oyF-*N'\T VaXXIVOnIt VXV4F HFW *. T VlOuUDhiV
BF m$L T'TVFM <b\vJL WF: V\N3 A 6AFF ANi' f>AN>F
1° ’ \OFA P>ON>KiF.T-
' TV\* b\OF OF HFS OFF. I
CAN> VAAVLF. OF o‘s
ASK FREE SPEECH'ZONE
Civil Liberties Union Hopes to Get
Area Set Aside in Capital.
By Scrippt.Hoirard Setrupaper AlUnnm
WASHINGTON. Dec. 17. Plans
to set aside a “free speech zone”
in the nations capital, similar to
Hyde Park in London, have been
started by the American CivU Lib
erties Union.
At a meeting of the Washington
committee of the union, a sub
committee was named to confer
with District of Columbia commis
sioners to secure some place where
massed and marching men might
encamp while lobbying congress for
relief and other matters. At pres
ent there is no set policy for han
dling such demonstrators.
Several congressmen are interest
ed in the move, among them Sen
ators Costigan and McKellar and
Representative La Guardia.
—By Edgar Rice Burroughs
by which he could recognize individual
animate. He knew this lion had reason to re
member him. Those unintelligent sounds Olga
had heard caused Numa to draw back, unde
cided whether to charge or flea* M Taraan
came toward him.
PAGE 13
—By Williams
—By Blosser
—By Crane
—By Small
—By Martin

xml | txt