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The Indianapolis times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1922-1965, May 06, 1933, Capital Edition, Image 12

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PAGE 12
‘S' .HP GIRLS’
PAY LESS THAN
RELIEF DOLES
Some Pennsylvania Shops
Work Long Hours by
Resorting to Tricks.
I!•! Siripps-Hotcnnl \ i r Al’luncc
PITTSBURGH. May 6—Pittances
paid to child and women workers
in Pennsylvania sweatshops amount
to less than the inadequate public
relief given the destitute, and some
employers are working their em
ployes beyond the fifty-four-hour
wrek limit without pay for the ille
gal time.
These disclosures were made by
the Pittsburgh Press in its survey
of sweatshop evils, as four leading
organizations here joined in calling
on the legislature, now in session,
to guarantee minimum wages and
reduce hours of work.
Tools to Work,’ Is Cry
The Pittsburgh Central Labor
Un'cn, the League for Social Jus
tice. the Women's Legislative Coun
cil and the women’s branch of the
Security League joined in a state
ment which said that while more
than 2.000.000 Pennsylvanians were 1
out of jobs, "more than 12,000 chil
dren under 16, exclusive of those |
engaged in domestic service, are 1
working in Pennsylvania’s sw’eat- j
shops at less than $2 to S3 a week."
The statement protested against
the 1 gislature’s action in bottling
up remedial bills.
M * of the relief agencies pay
from $3 to $5 a week, and soma
girl workers, pointing this out, say: |
“We are fools to work. We would
be better off to go to the welfare.”
Trickeries whereby sweatshop op
erators work their employes over
time were disclosed by state offi
cials, after seizures of time cards
showed the women worked less than
the allowed fifty-four hours.
Slops Time Clocks
The employer in one case stopped \
his time clocks at 5:13 p. m., but
employes, leaving two. three, or four
hours later, were credited Vith j
working only until 5:13.
What this is doing to the state
of mind of underpaid workers is;
illustrated by what one of them
said to a state agent:
If things don't pick up, there will j
have to be a revolution. Mills are j
working the girls long hours and
nr king them do lots more work
♦bin they used to. I know girls
in on" mill who work sixty hours!
a w ck and don’t dare say a word,
oi they lose their jobs.”
Urges Amendment Action
/>’;/ •'•i i iiiiw-Hoicartl Xciespnpcr .1 llinticc I
WASHINGTON. May 6.—Disclo- j
SUITS of sweat i hop and child labor
conditions throughout Pennsylvania
“should shame the legislature into
ir”r.cdiate passage of the child
l kcr amendment” in the opinion
oi Representative Clyde Kelly (Rep.,
r • >.
' I hope Pennsylvania will no
l r lag behind other progressive
a far-seeing states in ratifying
t. amendment.” Mr. Kelly said.
rn by Pennsylvania and the
tv n . -five additional states which]
p’ ' necessary will help to remedy
the industrial evils growing out of j
th ' depression. This is an emer-!
gency and the old excuses no longer
ar" tenable.”
Although Arkansas ratified the
a, l n Irrent in 1924 only nine more
si rs have approved it since.
#\ART
W e have an extra special
value in good quality service
able seat covers that should
be of interest to every motor
ist. For all coupes only 79
cents; for coaches and sedans,
$1.19. On sale in our en
larged accessory department.
a a a
News item: Gandhi to be re
leased from jail. And we didn't
even know he was arrested.
Such is fame.
a a a
We believe that Millers arc
the best tires money can buy.
We believe that Millers will
give you more mileage, more
trouble-free driving, more
safety and protection than
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tire. There’s no gamble on
the performance of Miller
Geaivd-to-the-Road Tires. The
Miller Guarantee states in
plain language that if your
Miller Geared-to-the-Road
doesn’t outwear any other tire
built bring it back and we’ll
make good. Prices are excep
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arranged to suit your conven
ience.
BUB
For a real honest-to-goodness
lubrication drive your car on
to our new Electric Lift and
watch the boys work. The price
is only 75 cents which includes
spring spray and vacuum clean
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you don't pay us a cent. We
u?e only highest quality lubri
cants.
BUB
... i .Kh CHANGES
TIRE DISTRIBLIG..
Radio Dial Twisters
—S: 4S P. M.—
WMAQ 1 670*—News.
P. M.—
KYW (1020* —Three Siring*.
WBBM (770*— Collin's or
chestra
NlßC—Kaiter.mever’s Kin
dergarten to WEAF
WON *72o* Kemp's or
chestra
WJR '7so l —lnquiring Re
porter
NBC—Joint Commission on
Emergency in Education
to WJZ
WTMJ 1 620*—Radio Column.
—#;i P. M.—
CBS—The Maaic Voice.
—6:30 P. M.—
KYW (1020*—Don Pedros
orchestra
CBS- Belasco's orchestra
WBBM 1 70 1- —Spelling Bee.
NBC —The Economic World
Todav to WEAK.
WGN (720*—Seven League
Boots: Glee Club.
WLS (870 Barn dance;
Three Contraltos.
—7 P. M.—
CBS—Easv Aces.
NBC Rannv Week's or
cneatra to WEAF
WLS (870*—Barn dance
frolic.
,WSM (650) —Three On a
Mike.
—7:15 P. M.—
CBS-- Boswell Sisters.
1 NBC Zora Lavman and
Debonairs to WEAF.
WGN 1 720 1— 01d favorities.
WSM * 650 < —Bll land Bob;
Vagabonds.
—7:30 P. M
i CBS Charles Carlile.
! WBBM (770*—Polack s or
chestra.
VVFBM (1230) Indianapolis
i lndianapolis Power and Light Company)
SATURDAY
P M
s:3o—Ozzie Nelson orchestra (CBS).
s:4s—Bohemians.
6:ls—Magic Voice (CBS*.
6:3o—Leon Bclasco orenestra (CBS*.
6:4s—Brown County Revelers.
7:00 —Easy Aces (CBSi.
7:15 Boswell Sisters iCBSi.
7:3o—Charles Carlile (CBS*.
7:4s—Saturday Frivolities (CBS*.
B:ls—Public Affairs Institute (CBSI.
8:45 —Gertrude Niescn (CBSi
9:00 —Strolling Players.
9:3o—Ben Pollack orchestra (CBS*.
10.00 —Ted Fiorito orchestra (CBS).
10:30—The Columnist.
10:45—Louie Lowe orchestra.
11:00—Atop the Indiana Roof.
11:30—Tallyho Club orchestra.
12:00 Midnight—Sign off.
SUNDAY
AM.
B:oo —Church of the Air (CBSi.
B:3o—Aeolian string quartet (CBS).
9:oo—Entertainers.
9:3o—Christian Men Builders.
110:30 to noon, silent.)
12:00—Bohemians.
P. M.
12:30 —Records.
I:3o—Symphonic hour (CBS).
2:oo—Cathedral hour (CBSi.
3:oo—Poet's Gold (CBSi.
3:ls—Four Clubmen iCBSi.
3:30 —To be announced.
4:oo—Wheeler Mission program.
4:3o—Roses and Drums iCBSi.
s:oo—Second Presbyterian church.
s:3o—Romany Troupe (CBS*.
s:4s—Studio program.
6:oo—John Henry (Part Onei (CBSi.
615—Kostelantz Presents iCBSi.
6:4s—John Henry (Part Twoi (CBS).
7:CO—Hale Mac Keen.
7:15 —Chicago Varieties (CBS).
7:30 Gauchos iCBS*.
B:oo—Columbia Revue (CBSi.
B:3o—Ann Leaf with Madison Singers
(CBSI.
9:oo—Eddie Duchin orchestra (CBS'.
9:ls—Atop the Indiana Roof, Ted Weem’s
orchestra.
9:30 —Abe Lvman orchestra (CBS*.
10:30—Ben Pollack orchestra iCBSi
10:30—Charlie Straight orchestra (CBS).
11:00—Atop the Indiana Roof, Ted Weem’s
orchestra.
11:30—Tallvho Club orchestra.
12:00—Midnight—Sign off.
WKBF (1400) Indianapolis
(Indianapolis Broadcasting. Inc.)
SATURDAY
4:30 —Tea Time Tunes.
4:4s—News flashes.
s:oo—Musical Menu.
s:3o—Aunt Dessa and Uncle Connie.
s:4s—Dinner Melodies.
6:oo—Knothole Gang.
6:15 —Harry Bason.
6:3o—Recordings.
6:50 —The Sportslight.
7:oo—Devore Sisters.
7:ls—Leather Stocking Tales.
7:3o—Connie’s orchestra.
B:oo—The Voice of Courage.
B:ls—Revue.
B:3o—The Old Pathfinder.
8:45—T0 be announced.
9:oo—Memories.
9:ls—Sunshine Singer.
9:3o—De Sautelle's orchestra.
9:4s—Art Berry’s orchestra.
10:00—Morrey Brennan’s orchestra.
10:30—WKBF barn dance.
11:30—Art Berry's orchestra.
11:45—De Sautelle’s orchestra.
12:00—Sign off.
SUNDAY
A. M.
9:30—T0 be announced.
9:4s—Masters Music room.
10:00—Watchtower program.
10:15—Sacred concert.
10:30—To be announced.
11:30—Harry Bason.
12:00 —To be announced.
P. M.
12:15—Dessa Byrd's organ recital.
1:00—To be announced.
1:15—To be announced.
I:3o—Connie’s matinee.
2:oo—Conte ensemble.
2:45—T0 be announced.
3:oo—Matinee musical.
3:3o—Cadle Tabernacle.
4:4s—Male quartet.
s:oo—Starost Sisters.
5:15—T0 be announced.
s:3o—Negro melody hour.
5:45 —Marshall players.
Kenneth Roberts
uses the
World Almanac
Nation’s leaders in every ■ nli hC jjjjffi
of activity statesmen, edu- mig
cators, lawyers, journalists, edi- ( , MIK
tors and government officials. r heavy paper AKSm
commend the World Almanac. W cover
America’s greatest Reference
Kenneth Roberts, Washington
Nation’s leaders in every field
of activity statesmen, edu
cators, lawyers, journalists, edi
tors and government officials,
commend the World Almanac.
America’s greatest Reference
Book.
Kenneth Roberts, Washington
journalist and well-known writer
for the Saturday Evening Post,
says, “In many years of news-
Eaper work I never saw any
ook of reference so constantly
consulted by editors and report
ers as was the World Almanac.
More recently, when the writing
of novels and magazine articles
has made it necessary for me to
carry a reference librarv to
Europe each winter, the World
Almanac is invariably a part of
it—an indispensable part."
Testimonials of this high
character cotne constantly from
many parts of the country
because the World Almanac is
a veritable store’-'ouce of infor
mation a thousand books
i lie Indianapolis Times
A Scrippi-Howard Newspaper
SATURDAY
—7:30 P. M.—
WGN (720—Kemp's orches
tra.
NBC-K-7 Spv story to
—7:45 P. M.—
-■-BS—Saturday frivolities.
WBBM '77o*—Charlie hamp
■■WGN (7201—Lewis White Ac
orchestra.
* WLS (870 1 —Old Time Partv
a -HP. M.—
r KYW (1020i—Globbe Trot
ter; Bngode’s orchestra.
NBC—Rolfe Saturday night
dancing party to WEAF
NBC—Gilbert and Sullivan
Gems to WJZ
—8:15 P. M
8 CBS—Public Affairs Insti
tute.
WGN (720 *—McCoy’s or
chestra.
—8:30 P. M.
• NBC—Cuckoos to WJZ.
—8:45 P. M.—
CBB—-Gertrude Niesen.
■ WGN (720* —Concert orches
, tra.
—9 P. M
'KYW no2o(—Sports: Buc
, caneers.
- CBS—Haymes’ orchestra.
, WGN < 720* —Kemp's orches
tra: Dream Ship.
NBC—Contralto: Waldorf’s
orchestra to WEAF
NBC Buccaneers to WJZ.
I WMAQ (670i—Dance pro
gram.
—9:15 P. M.—
' WJR 1750 1 —Radio Reporter.
NBC—John Fogartv. tenor,
to WJZ.
WLS (870)—Barn dance.
NBC—Cohen Murder Mys
tery. , i
6:oo—Masters Music room.
6:ls—Larks trio.
6 30—Connie's orchestra.
7:oo—Sunshine Singer.
7.30—T0 be announced.
B:oo—Cadle Tabernacle.
9:ls—Hoosier Melody Boys.
9:3o—Morrey Brennan's orchestra.
}0:00 —De Sautelle's orchestra.
10:30—Art Berry’s orchestra.
11:00—Sign off.
WLW (700) Cincinnati
P M SATURDAY
4:uo—Meyer Davis and the Waldorf-
Astoria orchestra iNBC).
4:3o—Bacnelor of Song. Joe Emerson.
4:4s—Three Keys iNBCi.
s:oo—Salon orchestra.
5:30—80b Newhall.
5 Jo —University of Cincinnati talk.
6.oo—Buster Locke’s orchestra.
6:3o—Charlie Agnew’s orchestra.
7:00—Boss Johnston.
7:ls—Tony Cabooch.
7:3o—Crosley Follies.
B:oo—The Saturday night dancing party.
B. A. Rolfe (NBCi.
9:oo—Charlie Agnew's orchestra.
9:ls—Over the Rhine,
9:30 —Dave Bernie’s orchestra.
10:00—Rhythm Club.
10:30—Maxim Lowe and his Hotel Shore
ham orchestra tNBCi.
IROO—Charlie Agnew’s orchestra.
1 * ; 30—Dave Bernie’s orchestra.
12:00 Midnight—Buster Locke's orchestra.
A. M.
12:30—Charlie Agnew’s orchestra.
1:00—Club Crosley.
2:oo—Sign off.
Fishing the
Air
A complete description of America’s
premier turf classic, the Kentucky Derby,
will be heard over the Columbia Broad
casting System Saturday from 4:46 to
5:30 p. m., from Churchill Downs. Ken
tucky. with Ted Husing and Thomas Bryan
George sharing the microphone.
Representative Michael J. Hart of
Michigan will discuss “Inconsistencies
in Appropriations and Legislation." when
he appears as guest of the American
Taxpayers League program Saturday at
5 p. m., over WENR and an NBC net
work.
James G. McDonald, chairman of the
Foreign Policy Association, who has just
returned from a tour of Eurooean capitals,
will report his findings in his weekly
broadcasts on "The World Today" begin
ning Saturday at 5:45 p. m., over WENR
and an NBC network.
HIGH SPOTS OF SATURDAY
NIGHT’S PROGRAM
4:30 NBC (WJZ*—Laws That Safe
guard Society.
4:45 CBS & NBC—Kentucky Derby.
5:00 Columbia—Washington Political
Situation.
5:45 NBC (WJZ)—Vincent Lopez or
chestra.
6:00 NBC (WEAF* —Kaltenmever's
kindergarten.
6:30 NBC (WEAF)—The Economic
World Todav.
7:00 Columbia—Easy Aces.
7:45 Columbia—Saturday Frivolities.
8:00 NBC (WEAF)—B. A. Rolfe's or
chestra.
NBC (WJZ)—Gilbert & Sulli
van Gems.
8:15 Columbia—Public Affairs Insti
tute.
Those harmonizing Boswell sisters still
are on the road and their program over
WFBM and the Columbia network Sat
urday Irom 7:15 to 7:30 p. m., will come
from Minneapolis.
a million facts condensed lnt
one handy-size quick reference
book .an indispensable aid at
home, at school or at your of*
fice. Its value cannot be meas
ured in dollars and cents, yet
the cost is so low any one can
afford it. On sale now at news
stands and bookstores. Only 60
per copy for heavy paper cover.
SI.OO per copy for cloth binding*
Or it may be ordered by mail
direct. Send 10c additional lor
wrapping and postage. Address
the World Almanac. 125 Barclay
Street. New York City. Pub*
lished by the New York World-
Telegram.
—9:39 P. M
KYW (10201—Canton or
chestra
> CBS—Pollack s orchestra.
WGN 720 > —Cummin's or
chestra; Agnews orches
tra
NBC—Stern's orchestra to
WEAF.
NBC—Phantom Gvpsv to
WJZ
WJR 750 1 The Mummers.
WMAQ 1 670 1 —Organist.
—lO P. M.—
CBS—Fiorito’s orchestra.
NBC—Ralph Kirbery; John
son's orchestra to WEAF.
NBC—Don Pedro's orches
tra to WJZ.
—19:10 P. M.—
WGN (720 1 —Cummin's or
chestra.
—10:30 P. M.—
KYW (1020i—Merry Garden
orchestra.
CBS—Brown Hotel program.
NBC—Kassel’s orchestra to
WEAF.
NBC—Lowe's orchestra to
WJZ.
—ll P. M.—
KMOX (1090i—Dance pro
gram.
KYW (1020i—Canton or
chestra.
WBBM (770 1 —Around the
Town.
WENR iB7O) —College Inn or
chestra.
—11:30 P. M.—
KYW (1020)—Sosnik’s or
chestra.
WENR (870)—Don Pedro's
orchestra.
■ WHAM illsoi Skultety’s
i orchestra.
THE INDIANAPOLIS TIMES
Dietz on Science —
MYSTERY VEILS
MOST OF SPACE
FOR SCIENTISTS
Despite Recent Advances,
Universe Still Is
Closed Book.
BY DAVID DIETZ
ScriDDs-Hot*ard Science Editor
New discoveries in science disclose
mysteries as well as facts. Scientists
today know more about the universe
than ever before. Yet at no time
in the history of civilization were
scientists so conscious of the small
ness of their knowledge.
That is the impression I get after
two weeks in the east attending the
annual meetings of the American
Philosophical Society, National
Academy of Sciences. American
Geophysical Union, American Seis
mological Society and the American
Physical Society.
Dr. V. M. Siipher, director of the
Lowell Observatory of Flagstaff,
Ariz., told how eighteen years of
study of the night sky had culmin
ated in establishing the fact that
there was a faint illumination in
the open night sky that did not
come from the stars or any known
source of light.
This illumination, he explaned,
consisted of definite wave-lengths
or bands of light scattered from the
infra-red, through the colors of the
rainbow, to the ultra-violet. The
various wave-lengths fluctuated in
intensity independently of each
other.
Describes Cosmic Ray
Dr. Robert A. Milikan, famous
physicist of California Institute of
Technology, told the scientists that
he was convinced that the energy
of cosmic rays in our own galaxy
was about equal to the total energy
of all the starts in it. He said he
was convinced that the energy of
cosmic rays was about the same
throughout the universe.
Since the universe consists of
much more empty space than stars,
this would mean ihat by far the
greater part of the energy of the
universe consisted of cosmic rays.
Dr. Arthur H. Compton, bril
liant young physicist of the Uni
versity of Chicago, described experi
ments which convince him that at
least 10 per cent of the cosmic rays
are particles with positive electric
charges.
Moving Toward Galaxy
He said that they might consist
of the newly discovered positive elec
trons or “positrons,” or that they
might prove to be the nuclei of hy
drogen or helium atoms.
Dr. Dayton C. Miller of Cleveland,
former president of the American
Physical Society, told how he was
convinced from his ether-drift ex
periments that our galaxy was mov
ing through space with a velocity
of 120 miles per second in the di
rection of a constellation in the
southern hemisphere, not far from
the south celestial pole. The con
stellation is known as Dorado, or
the “sword fish.”
Earth Is Bombarded
Perhaps the situation can be
summed up in words of Dr. W. J.
Humphreys, physicist of the United
States weather bureau, and chair
man of the American Geophysical
Union.
“Our earth* is in the midst of
gravity fields, electrical fields and
magnetic fields,” he said.
“It is bombarded by electrons and
alpha particles shot out of the sun
and perhaps the stars. Cosmic rays
and perhaps many other unknown
forces rain down upon it.”
The big job ahead of science is
to solve the mystery of the role
these many forces play in the uni
verse and upon the earth. That is
why scientists are certain that their
present-day knowledge represents
only a fraction of what is yet to be
learned.
Pupils Are Guests of Indiana U.
/{.// ( nilrii Press
BLOOMINGTON. Ind., May 6.
Neadly 1.000 high school students
were guests of Indiana university
students and faculty todaq. The
pupils came here for the third an
nual state high school and Hi-Y day
program. President William Lowe
Bryan welcomed the guests.
A Detroit hospital has acquired a
million-volt X-ray tube for treating
patients.
ULEfe.
4th Anniversary Wy
EASY TERMS jf J
Atwater Kent 7-tube Table a
Model. Sale price pI U
Freshman 7-tube Lowboy C 1 C
Sale Price 1 )
Brunswick 9-tube Lowboy. COJ
Sale Price
Crosley Long and Short COQ
Wave Lowboy. Sale Price...
Radio Bargain Shop
225 East Washington St.
Prepare for Your Place
Strong course* in Stenography
Bookkeeping. Accounting and Sec
retarial Training. Bulletin sent on
request. Fred W. Case. Prin.
Central Business College
Architects & Builders Bldg.. Ind’pls.
The things you must pay out
money for in doing your own
washing cost almost exactly the
same as Progress Laundry will
charge for the same service.
Riley 7373
CJuff 1 OUTLET
•"shoe stores
RELIABLE JHOEUT LOWEST PRICES
The Strong Old
Bank of Indiana
The
Indiana National Bank
of Indianapolis
Special Dinner Service
Is Given at Sherman Inn
Hostess Can Take Bridge
Guests to Popular Spot
to Dance and Feast.
No longer will it be necersary for
the potential hostess to worry as to
what to serve for dinner at her
monthly bridge party, now that the
Sherman Inn onnounces its new
service of catering to all types of
entertainment.
Under management of E. S.
Truemper, group meals for ban
quets. bridge parties, or any otner
form of entertainment where tables
up to forty are recjUired, or the
serving of a hundred people, has
been arranged as an added feature.
The Sherman Inn long has been
recognized by thousands of patrons
as one of the most delightful estab
lishments in the city. Beautiful
decorations, as well as attractive
superb surroundings, offer to all a
pleasing welcome. Cleanliness also
plays a prominent part.
Prices for group dinners are rea
sonable. according to Truemper.
One of the other features of the
Sherman Inn is the serving of beer.
All popular brands are constantly
on ice and ready to be served, at
popular prices.
Dancing is featured at the inn
every Tuesday, Thursday and Sat
urday evening, with Danny Dutton's
orchestra.
The inn is located at Sherman
drive and New York street.
BUY COAL NOW,
DEALER ADVISES
Price Lower and Quality Is
Better, Declares City
Company Official.
“Getting your coal in early is just
like putting money in the bank,” de
clares Richard Tubbs, owner of the
Monument Coal Company, 701 East
Washington street. “The prices pre
vailing at this season are lower than
they will be again this year, and
that means that the money you may
invest in coal now really is earning
interest. *
“In my experience in the coal
business, I should say that the qual
ity of the coal shipped now, while
the rush is not on at the mines, is
likely to be a little better than it is
when there is a demand that keeps
everybody hustling.
“Coal shippers like to get the coal
out as early as they can. If there
is a part of the vein that is a ’ittle
better than the rest, you can depend
upon the fact that it will be worked
during the slower season.
“We have a much wider range of
choice in the spring than we have
in the fall, when everybody is clam
oring for coal.
“More people will put in Monu
ment coal this year than ever be
fore. It is really an ideal furnace
fuel.”
PRAISES LOWLY WORM
FOR SERVICE TO MAN
Make Possible Absorbtion of Water
By Soil, Says Scientist.
B,y Science Service
WASHINGTON, May 6. The
humble earthworm has a far more
important role in the world than to
be impaled on a hook for the snar
ing of fish. At the meeting of the
American Geophysical Union here,
R. E. Horton, noted engineer, paused
in the midst of a scientific discus
sion of how rainwater gets into the
soil to pay his respects to “that
most excellent good fellow, the
earthworm.”
Earthworms make endless tunnels
through the upper soil, and as every
golfer knows, they come to the sur
face once in a while. These tunnels,
as well as other animal burrows, Mr.
Horton explained, are of the greatest
importance when rain begins to fall,
because they permit the air to
escape from the soil as the water
soaks in, thereby making it possible
for the ground to take up much
water that otherwise would run off
the surface in destructive waste,
LIQUID HELIUM MADE
IN NEW LABORATORY
Process for Eliminating Wire Re
sistance to Electricity Is Discovered.
B. Science Service
PASADENA, Cal., May 6 Liquid
helium and superconducting lead
were produced at the new cryogenic
laboratory of the California Insti
tute of Technology here just six
months after the beginning of con
struction and a year after the proj
ect was started.
Professor A. Goetz found that a
thirty-foot coil of fine lead wire
suddenly lost all trace of electrical
resistance because of its immersion
in liquid helium. It remained in
this superconducing state for twenty
minutes while he and Dr. Alfred B.
Focke, research fellow, congratu
lated each other that the apparatus
functioned perfectly as . designed
and needs no modification.
The new low-temperature labora
tory is considered a triumph of
thermo-dynamic reasoning and skil
ful construction. The method used
is a sereis of adiabatic expansions,
and this method permits the use
of small quantities of helium.
Held for Slugging Detective
Carl Ruddick. 29. of 507 1 ;; Massa
chusetts avenue, today was charged
with assault and battery and at
tempted robbery in the slugging of
C. M. Spragg. B. & O. Railroad
detective, who was beaten and
robbed of his pistol by two men in
the railroad yards at East street
April 22.
The longest nerve in the body is
the sciatic nerve.
PI | N |U IiXIIAAII
■ g\ 9 ■ U# m I Mm if |||l|
1 soak K 1 V■■ Hll Klf IJg ■
i iff iwi 1h I aßi \r JttOiiLl
—— ■■ ■ •
*j)iruiawL& (in LEW O „i^ IES
No C over Charge Before 9 F. M. Formerly With
HOTEL ANTLERS
SLASH IN FARES
BOOSTS TRAVEL
BY INTERURBAN
Tickets Sales Increase at
Rapid Rate, Railway
Official Says.
Immediate response of the Hoosier
traveling public to the drastic fare
slashes of the Indiana Railroad
System Thursday is seen in rapidly
increasing ticket sales and ticket- i
window inquiries. W. L. Snodgrass, j
general superintendent of traffic,!
said today.
The reductions announced for j
Thursday brought the one-way fare :
down to 2 cents a mile, the round- j
trip fare to l'z cents a mile, and
effected similar sharp decreases in
the prices of commutation and mlie- j
age tickets. Interurban fares have
not been so low since 1918, it was
pointed out.
New time tables were issued Sun
day to show additional commuter
trains on the Anderson, Tipton and
Louisville divisions, placed in serv
ice to take care of the anticipated
increase in commutation business,
Snodgrass said.
Sell Tickets on Trains
In the new fare tariff, provision
has been made for conductors to
handle sales of one-way and round
trip tickets on trains, thus avoid
ing the necessity for passengers to
purchase tickets at a station before !
boarding the train. Also, tickets for !
pasasge between Indianapolis and
Franklin and intermediate points
have been made interchangeable.
Reaction of the public to our bar
gain rate offer has been more than
satisfactory,” Snodgrass said. “This
is natural, for we believe comfort
able, fast, safe travel at 1.35 cent a
mile, as in the case of our ten-ride
commutation books, virtually quali
fies as 1933's great bargain offer.
“Next to this bargain, the round
trip rate has made the strongest
impression. It now is possible to
make the round trip for exactly
what the one way trip cost before
the reduction.
“Advantage of the 500-penny cou
pon book on the new fare basis is
that it is good for bearer and party.
Also, It carries 250 miles of travel
for 1 1 2 cents a mile. Thus it affords
the purchaser a round trip price for
one way travel if he chooses it that
way.
Travel Is Economical
“We have heard favorable reports
particularly from people who have
been driving their own cars. It does
not take a statistician to figure out
the economy of traction travel now
over that of the private automobile.
Gasoline costs the average motor
ist almost 1:35 cents a mile now.
Oil brings the cost well above that.
In addition, there are depreciation
cost, tire repair, license cost and all
the other items that propertly
should be charged against every
mile the motorist drives.
“Electric line travel always has
been cheaper than automobile
travel, figuring costs as a busines
man figure sthefn. But now it is
actually cheaper than the out-of
pocket gas and oil cost.
“Even the man who already has
an automobile better can afford to
ride the electric lines.”
‘ROBOT’ CLOCK WILL
GIVE TIME SIGNALS
Remarkable New Device to Be In
stalled in Naval Radio Station.
B,y Science Service
WASHINGTON, May 6.—Future
time signals from the United States
navy’s great radio station at Ar- j
lington, will be more frequent, more i
accurate, and yet require no addi- j
tions to the naval observatory per- I
sonnel, because of a remarkable new j
type of crystal-controlled “robot”
clock which has been invented by
two members of the naval research
laboratory. The clock was described
at a meeting of the American Geo- I
graphical Union here, by Paul Sol- I
lenberger, astronomer of the naval
observatory.
Three such clocks have been built. !
They embody anew principle in
crystal control, in that the piece
of quartz whose vibrations govern
the movement is longer than in for
mer clocks and therefore vibrates !
at a rate so low as to require no |
electrical reduction, as in the case
In crystal-controlled clocks now in
common use. Tests of the new
clocks indicate that they will run
indefinitely with an accurracy with
in a thousandth of a second a day.
NOTICE—
Manufacturers and Jobbers
SPACE FOR RENT
Complete Housing FacilitiM for
Large or Small Plants
Private switches, served by Belt R.
R. and traction lines connecting
with all railroads.
Watchman Service Free
Indianapolis Industrial Center
19th St. and Martindale Are.
CHerry 1945
RI. 9381
ICE-O-Therm ♦
Meat Display Counter. .
Expressly designed for ICE.
Moderate in first cost.
Economical to Operate.
Beautiful in design.
Air circulation throughout case is very thorough,
blanketing the entre display with conditioned air of
low temperature.
See Our Display of Commercial Equipment
POLAR ICE and FUEL CO.
TA. 0689. 2000 NORTHWESTERN AVE.
BEN HUR UFE ASSOCIATION
A Fraternal Beneficial Society providing for its members
Legal Reserve Life Insurance
An Indiana Institution Established 39 Years Ago.
Assets Over $10,000,000.00
Paid to Members and Beneficiaries
Over $32,000,000
LOCAL BUSINESS OFFICE—BO9 K. of P BUILDING
Arrius Court No. 5 meets every Wednesday evening at
322 EAST NEW YORK STREET
Home Office, Crawfordsville, Indiana
W T pi STEAMSHIP TICKETS
■ ■ I J LETTERS OF CREDIT
FOREIGN EXCHANGE
Richard A. Kurtz, Foreign Dept. TRAVELERS CHECKS
gUNION TRUST*
120 East Market St. RI ley 5341
BRAKES
CARBURETORS
WHEEL & AXLE
ALIGNMENT
OFFICIAL
BENDIX SERVICE
INDIANA
CARBURETOR AND
BRAKE SERVICE
Bring in this ad for FREE
Carburetor Adjustment
325 N. Delaware St. LL 187 C
24-Hr. AUTO REPAIRING
AND
TOW-IN SERVICE
DON HERR CO.
Riley 2484 Ky. Are. ft Maryland
Be Sure to Get Your — Special Lemon
I ce Cream It’s Delicious
Jessup & Antrim Ice Cream Cos., Inc.
There’s a Courteous Velvet Dealer Near You!
n
You Save Money
to buy it...
every time you
RJde
"and Buses
w 'th “Fisk” Tires
§j§jSSm\j You Take No Risk
B Investigate “FISK” Quality
\ou buy the best when you buy
Fisk Tires or Tubes. Their in
mMW k creased tread rubber assures you
of longer wear and better service,
Every FISK Tire is unconditionally guar
anteed against faulty workmanship or
TlmeTW Re-Hro
GET A E/SKT Open Sunday Morning
C H. FRANCK TIRE SERVICE
Fisk Tire Distributor
543 E. WASHINGTON RI. 7878
—MAY 6, 1933
-►NEW*-
ALL-ELECTRIC
AUTO.IAOIO
N ° w S4Q no
Only .
(Complete)
Easily and Quickly Installed
ih Any Make Car
Call Lincoln 6466
for Free Demonstration
Kruse Radio, Inc.
33 West Ohio St.
FOR ECONOMY
PLUSQUALITY
of Finest
SafljKxiii -( Bathroom
Ostermeyer Paper Cos.
Riley 6902 148 Virginia Ave.
Three-year course of study
leading to the degree
Bachelor of Law
INDIANA
■LAW SCHOOL
University of Indianapolis
For information address the
Sec’y. RI ley 3433.
INDIANA LAW SCHOOL
The 8 E. Market St Bldg.
Indianapolis, Ind.
SPEEDWAY GOLF
CORPORATION
(Course Open About
April 1)
SEASON TICKET
RATES REDUCED
For Further Information
Call Lincoln 5217

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