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The Indianapolis times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1922-1965, May 06, 1933, Capital Edition, Image 5

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MAY 6, 1933_
‘FOLLOW thru; musical comedy, relights the lyric
Joe E. Brown, William Boyd, Lionel Barrymore and
Ramon Novarro Head the Casts of the Feature Movies
Now on View at Local Photoplay Theaters.
RAMON NAVARRO is the star of "The Barbarian," now playing an
exclusive Indianapolis engagement at Loew s Palace.
Navarro is supported by Myrna Loy, C. Aubrey Smith, Reginald
Denny, Hedda Hopper, Louise Closser Hale and others.
Navarro, who is considered the most finished master of foreign tongues
on the Golden Coast, and whose voice has charmed the feminine hearts
the world over, sings anew number in both Arabian and English.
The romance of his new production is built almost entirely around
his voice. It is with this, his most dangerous weapon, that he woos and
wins the hearts of all he comes in contact with.
As Arabian desert guide, swag
gering, unprincipled and wholly
unreliable, he meets and charms
all those whose fair faces please his
whimsical fancy.
It is when he is hired by Myrna
Loy and G. Aubrey Smith to take
them to Miss Loy’s fiancee, Regi
nall Denny, a joung English engi
neer, that retl love at last comes
to him.
He starts out in his usual man
ner to win the heart of his loved
one, only to be made fun of. Em
bittered, but not discouraged, he
kidnaps her, taking her to his peo
ple far out on the desert, where he
prepares to mairy her.
She escapes, however, and finds
her fiancee, whom she plans to mar
ry immediately. While she is pre
paring for her wedding, Novarro’s
fatal song of love comes floating up
through her window to her. The
call is too much—she steals away
—back to the desert and Navarro.
Sam Wood, noted director, han
dled the microphone for the Metro-
Gold wyn-Mayer studios.
Thelma Todd and Zasu Pitts are
back again in their latest, ‘Maids
ala Mode." Walt Disney’s famous
brain child, Mickey-Mou.se, gets his
chance to run through all his clever
antics in a siiort cartoon, entitled
‘ The Mad Doctor.”
Happenings of the week as pictur
ed by the most recent edition of
the Hearst Metrotone News rounds
out the program.
a a a
BROWN IS A
BALL PLAYER THIS TIME
Joe E. Brown returns to the
screen this week at the Indiana the
ater in “Elmer the Great,” the play
which he made famous on the
Broadway stage.
“Elmer the Great” is hearty,
wholesome humor from the time the
audience is introduced to Elmer
Kane, world's champion batter,
asleep in his Gentryville (Ind.)
home until he has won both the girl
and the world series championship
for his team.
Patricia Ellis has the role of Nel
lie, the girl for whom Joe is ready to
give up baseball if necessary to win
her love. Frank McHugh is High
Hips Healy, Joe’s pal on the team,
and is responsible for many of the
laughs. Claire Dodd, Preston S.
Foster and Russell Hopton are also
in the cast.
For the baseball fans there is the
thrill of seeing the genuine big
league players on the diamond dur
ing the world series melee. Many
laughs are furnished in the last
game, w-hich is played in a <ea m
mud, with Joe sliding home in all
of it for the winning run.
Mervyn Leßoy, who directed the
picture for First National, keeps it
moving every minute and has
missed nothing in the way of op
portunity to make “Elmer the
Great” the pennant-winner that it
is. The screen story has lost none
of the spontaneous hilarity of the
stage hit by Ring Lardner and
George M. Cohan.
Ed Resener is directing the Indi
ana concert orchestra in another
musical offering. Selected short
subjects and a Paramount new r s reel
complete the program.
nan
"OLIVER TWIST”
IS NOW AT CIRCLE
Charles Dickens’ classic. ‘‘Oliver
Twist,” presented for the first time
as an all-talking picture, opened
yesterday at the Circle theater.
Monogram has given this story a
unique production. The story is cut
down to bare essentials; in the set
tings there has been no attempt
made at lavish display.
Every one knows how Oliver, the
homeless orphan, trudged to Lon
don, unknowingly sought shelter
with a desperate gang of thieves,
eventually to be rescued by a kindly
English gentleman who turns out to
be his own grandfather. Told in this
wise the story seems trite, but char
acterized in the inimitable Dickens’
’ ay it becomes one of the most ab
sorbing romances ever written.
Brutal Bill Sikes is true to life in
the hands of William Boyd; the vil
lainous Fagin alternately frowns
and sneers in the person of Irving
Pichcl. while Doris Lloyd imperson
ates the ill-fated Nancy Sikes.
Alec Francis is seen as Brownlow.
tv >e old gentleman who befriends
Oi.' er and takes him into his home.
Others in the cast are George K.
Arthur Barbara Kent and Tempo
Piggot. Direction is by William
Cowen under supervision of Herbert
Brenon.
808
LIONEL BARRYMORE
HEADS ArOLLO CAST
•‘Sweepings.” best seller novel
penned by Lester Cohen, noted
DANCE A | Harold
SAT.* VK V CORKS
SVNUAY | Corker.
HARBOR
• HAPPY DAYS ARE HERE AGAIN”
Drive out W. Wash. St. to Ben Davis.
Follow Municipal Airport Sign South.
REDUCED PRICES HERE!
CHILDREN 15C-ADULTS 35c
GENTRY “Xk SHOWS
ALL WEEK,,-?-,
MATS: 3:4S—'TWICE DAILY—B P M
(EXCEPT SAT. MATINEE AT J-SO)
.three DIFFERENT LOCATIONS
MON DAT—TI ESDAY &■ WEDNESDAY
AT TH I rD T n’H. GHTH * ILLINOIS Sts.
r*T H irv?u Y ^ ND TRIIIAY AT
• ST A UNWOOD AVE.
SATURDAY E -Washington St. A
vinivnum sherfdan Ave.. Irv'gton
RIVERSIDE
INDIANA’S GREATEST AMUSEMENT PARK
Opens SUNDAY for the Season
AND WILL REMAIN OPEN EVERY NIGHT DURING THE SUMMER
Bring the whole family out tomorrow to marvel at the new features
and thrill at the old favorites. You'll quickly discover whv Central In
diana folk, summer after summer, choose Riverside for fun and whole
some recreation. And you'll get the Riverside habit sure as you're born.
RIVERSIDE-*Just for Fun’
American novelist, has reached the
screen under the RKO-Radio ban
ner, and is appearing currently as
the featured film at the Apollo.
Lionel Barrymore is in the
starring role.
The film relates the story of
Daniel Pardway, who, arriving in
Chicago immediately after the fire,
starts a little retail business that
after years develops into the city’s
greatest mercantile establishment
Assisted by Ullman, who applies
business principles to Pardway’s
flamboyant optimism, it is early
hinted that Pardway is building
everything for his children.
Following the death of Pardway’s
wife, Abigail, after four children
have been born, the establishment
waxes prosperous, endures depres
sions and grows in prestige. But
the family, in which Pardway placed
so much hope, goes astray.
The eldest son, Gene, falls for
drink and women. Phoebe, the
adored daughter, marries, divorces
and marries again, to a no-account
money-hunting prince. Thane would
rather be a window trimmer than
a general manager. Freddie, after
seducing one of the pretty girl
clerks, tells his father he wants to
become a bum and, according to
preview reports, becomes a very suc
cessful one.
Only Ullman clings to the old
ideals. When he approaches Pard
way for a share in the business that
he actually created, he is rebuffed,
but he takes advantage of the
whimsies of the children and buys
their stock.
The finale pictures the entire
family rounded up, as the father,
broken in health and spirit, realizes
he is at his end. Freddie vows to
carry on for the family.
Supporting Barrymore is Allan
Dinehart, Gloria Stuart, Eric Lin
den, William Gargan, Gregory Rat
off and Luclen Littlefield. John
Cromwell directed.
B B B
BUCK JAMES’
LATEST IS AT ALAMO
Many Buck Jones fans will get
an opportunity to see him in a com
plete departure from the usual cow
boy characterizations when he
opens today at the Alamo for a
three-day run.
In Buck’s newest picture, ’’Trea
son,” he is given an opportunity to
reveal his skill in mastering horse
manship and trick riding.
In this story Jones as a federal
representative is assigned to the
task of bringing to justice a girl
alleged to be head of a band of
government enemies and responsible
for a murder.
Jones gets his woman and finds
himself desperately in love with her.
How he gets her to surrender and
outwits justice to save her from
punishment affords the story.
B B B
FAIRBANKS’ MOVIE
DUE AT TERMINAL
Douglas Fairbanks Jr.’s latest pic
ture, “Parachute Jumper,” a comedy
romance punctuated with thrilling
air scenes, opens at the Terminal
Sunday for two days only.
Fairbanks Jr. is supported by
Bette Davis, Frank McHugh, Leo
Carrillo, Sheila Terry.
In addition to the feature Clark
and McCollough will be seen in a
comedy entitled “Hocus Pocus,” plus
a cartoon and news reel.
Actors Are Now in Alaska
Ships’ rockets are just as useful on
ice as on the ocean, Metro-Goldwyn-
Mayer’s polar expedition, filming
“Eskimo” in the Arctic, uses them
in case the dog-teams are caught
in darkness during the extremely
short daylight periods of this season.
Rockets sent up from schooner
Nanuk guide the sleds back to
shelter. Otherwise there would be
extreme danger of getting lost in
the pathless ice floes.
stfA^
and hi*
ORCHESTRA ,
I Featuring
ANDREA MARSH I
ONE NIGHT I
Sun., May 7th |
Tickets Now 75c, Incl. Tax fi
After 6 P. M. £
Sun. SI.OO Plus Tax I
Table. Available for
Reservation
k INDIANA I
Roo F I
1— Ramon Novarro is shown here in a love scene from “The Barbarian,”
which is now on view at the Palace.
2 Anny Andra has one of the leads in “One Night in Paradise,” which
opens Monday for two days at the Ohio.
3 Dickie Moore is pictured as Oliver in “Oliver Twist,” now on view
at the Circle.
STARS OF ‘FOLLOW THRU’ NOW AT THE LYRIC
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Joe Penner and Olive Olsen
The stars of the musical comedy* “Follow Thru,” now on view on
the Lyric stage, are Joe Penner, comedian, and Olive Olsen, prima
donna.
Riverside
to Be Open
Each Night
Rides and Concessions
Ready to Entertain
Crowds.
Riverside amusement park will go
on its regular summer schedule
starting Sunday, and the big fun
resort will be open every evening
until the end of the season. The
children’s playground will be avail
able to the youngsters every after
noon.
When the park throws open its
gates Sunday noon it is expected
every concession will be ready to
entertain the crowds. Although Riv
erside was open last Sunday, it was
found impossible to have all the
DANCING
NEW DANCELAND
Thursday, Saturday and Sunday
To
Denny Dutton’s Band
tOl PI.ES ONLY
9TH AT CAPITOL
•TERMINAL*
_DWC.
f\- \ \ X \
MB ILLINOIS AT OHIO FIRST
ALAMOSHOWIN6!
Sat.-Sun.-Mon.
THUNDERING THROUGH
<-*.(& THRILLS and
[Treason'
2 Great Pictures
"BlU—
ufcoii
Mjj
GREATEST SERIAL' EVER MADE
THE INDIANAPOLIS TIMES
rides readq, but a big force of
mechanics, painters and electricians
has been putting in its best licks
during the past week, and promises
the fun rendezvous will be in mid
summer form tomorrow.
It appears that the new and novel
motor speedway is going to furnish
the high spot of fun and thrills this
summer. Patrons of this conces
sion are given the rare privilege of
driving a real auto of the racing
type around a circuitous board
track, and the experience is proving
highly diverting both to the young
sters and grownups.
In the event your taste runs to
motorboat racing, there is the fleet
of these craft on the lagoon all
ready for you to sit behind the
wheel and “put-put” your way
around the water course.
Rogers Gets His Contract
Charles R. Rogers has placed
Ralph Murphy under long-term con
tract as a result of the latter’s di
rection of “The Song of the Eagle.”
MOTION PICTURES
OHIO
NOW PLAYING!
1 P. 91.-II P. M. Continuous
\St
! 1 SEE THIS
mm warx
tt IX G TO
SEATS YOrXGER
fESSB GEXERA-
TIOX
THOU SHALT NOT
COMMIT ADUL TER Y
NEIGHBORHOOD
THEATERS
NORTH SIDE
MMNHPVJB Talbot at 22nd
Double Feature
John Barrvmore
“TOPAZE”
Tom Mix ‘‘Fourth Horseman”
Sun.. Eddie Cantor. Lyda Roberti
| “THE KID FROM SPAIN ’
■■■■MMnHMBM College at Noble
Double Feature
Tom Mix
Flaming Guns” “Hot Saturday”
* un -- “* Am a Fugitive From a Chain
Gang.” ‘‘Smoke Lightning.”
15110 Roosevelt
IvS NR A i MIM John Barrvmore
■MMAmM Myrna Lov
“TOPAZE"
Sun. Double Feature—Helen Hayes
“A FAREWELL TO ARMS”
Ronald Coleman “CYXARA”
vf: l.rl_LU-l Ph. HE. 1025
Leo Carrillo—Barbara Weeks
„ “DECEPTION”
Sun. Double Feature—Ann Harding
“ANIMAL KINGDOM”
Moran and Mack
“HYPNOTIZED"
WEST SIDE ~
PjMInpHPH w. Wash, and Bel.
Double Feature
j MMMIH Greta Nissen
“FNWRITTEN LAIV”
Tom Mix "Terror Trail”
Sun.. Double Feature—Noah Beerr
I ‘‘SHE DONE HIM WRONG”
Esther Ralston—“ Rome Express'*
4 Helen MaeKellar has an emotional role in “The Past f Mary
Holmes,” on the screen at the Lyric.
5 Joe E. Brown is a baseball player in “Elmer the Great,” now being
presented at the Indiana.
6 Buck Jones is the star of “Treason,” now on view at the Alamo.
7 Lionel Barrymore is the interesting star heading the cast of “Sweep
ings,” now at the Apollo.
ROUNDING ROUND
'T'TTT? A r PTTT> Q With WALTER
1 JnLiLi\ 1 LKO D. HICKMAN
EVER since Ace Berry lost his false teeth on a train somewhere be
tween New Orleans and Indianapolis, I had the suspicion that
somebody would erect a monument in his honor.
Better than a monument has come to this general manager of the
Indiana and Circle theaters.
He is now named as a regular character in the nightly adventures
of Amos and Andy, Kingfish and the others who have become famous
over the air.
Amos and Andy, in their private capacity, have always been close
friends to Berry and their recent two-day appearance at the Indiana
made stronger that friendship. —— ———-
Last week-end when the radio
team played Ft. Wayne, Ace visited
that city. And to make the event
more important from a friendship
standpoint, Tom Brown and his
saxophone act was on the bill. That
put four good friends together.
Indianapolis was startled the
other night when the Amos and
Andy followers tuned in to learn
that anew character had joined
the impersonations of Amos and
Andy.
They named him “Ace Berry,” a
lawyer who talks with his hands
and demands a hundred dollar fee
but never gets it from Andy.
And now I know they will build
a monument to Ace one of these
days.
tt B B
The Indiana chapter of the Amer
ican Guild of Organists will hold its
annual election of officers Tuesday
evening, May 9, at 6:15 in St. John’s
Evangelical church, Sanders and
Leonard streets.
The organ service which will fol
low the dinner is open to the pub
lic. Amy Cleary Morrison, organist,
will be assisted by Mrs. Ovid H.
Dunn, soloist.
The program follows:
Invocation Rev. Ernst A. Piepenbrok
“Sonata in F Sharp Minor (First
Movement! Josef Rheinberger
“Arioso” in the ancient style..J. H. Rogers
“Prelude and Fugue in A Minor ...
Johann Sebastian Bach
“Like as the Hart . . . Desireth
the Water-brooks” Harker
Mrs. Ovid Dunn.
Finale (Modern Suite) Opus 37
Guiseppe Ferrata
“Song of Consolation”.. .Rossetter G. Cole
Silver Offering
“Cantiiene” R. Huntington Woodman
“Toccata in E Major” .. .Homer M. Bartlett
Benediction. .The Rev. Ernst A. Piepenbrok
B b tt
Eugene O’Neill, creator of
“Strange Interlude,” and Anna
Christie,” has opened another story
which forms the basis of “Constant
Woman,” opening at the Terminal
beginning Tuesday for a three-day
engagement.
Told against a back-ground of a
circus and tent show life, it re
volves about the influence which
one woman wields—even after her
death —over the lives of three per
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sons, her son, her husband, and a
sympathetic actress whom she had
known.
When it is discovered that the
wife had been unfaithful, and that
her sons’ father was not her own
husband, the latter loses his grip
on life and becomes a derelict.
The young son, resenting the care
which the other woman lavished
on his doubtful father, suspects
their motives a s an affront to his
mother’s memory.
When a dramatic climax proves
that the “other woman” is willing
to risk her own life to save his, the
boy understands and forgives.
Beatty to
Head Big
Circus
Hagenbeck-Wallace Show
to Be Here for Two
Performances.
On Thursday, May 18, on the old
ball park grounds on West Wash
ington street, the Hagenbeck-Wal
lace circus will give two perform
ances.
The Hagenbeck - Wallace show
boasts of countless new features
this season, many of them impor
tations from Europe and neew to
America.
Clyde Beatty, wild animal trainer,
again heads the list of stellalr at
tractions.
Twice daily this fearlesss youth
gives battle to forty snarling and
ferocious lions and tigers.
Performances are scheduled at 2
and 8 p. m„ with the main gates
opening one hour earlier in each in
stance, allowing time for leisurely
inspection of the menagrie.
MOTION PICTURES
Joe Penner and Olive Olsen Top Cast of Fifty Singers and
Dancers in This Show, Which Has Several Song
Hits as Well as Comedy Scenes.
OPERATING under anew stage and screen policy, the Lyric theater
reopened Friday with the musical comedy extravaganza, “Follow
Thru," on its stage four times daily for an entire week.
On the screen is the RKO-Radio talking picture version of a favorite
Rex Beach novel.
Its title is “The Past of Mary Holmes.” and it has in its cast Eric
Linden, Jean Arthur, Skeets Gallagher, Helen MaeKellar, Rosco Ates,
and Ivan Simpson.
“Follow Thru." hailed as the most ambitious stage production ever
offered at the Lyric, has been produced by Schwab and Mandel—makers
of such other successes as "Good i
News," “The Desert Song.” and
“New Moon.”
Its cast of more than fifty per
formers is headed by Joe Penner,
famous “wanna-buy-a-duck” come
dian, and by Olive Olsen. Broadway
comedienne.
Other principals of note include
Franklyn Farnum, Helen Wright,
Jerry Ross. Alita Duncan. Eddie
Tamblyn. Madeline Sheffield, Dee
Loretta, Bill Halligan, and Eddie
Maestro.
"Follow Thru,” which is unfolded
in eleven scenes and two acts, runs
for approximately ninety minutes at
each performance. All the original
songs and dances are on hand, in
cluding the catchy "Button Up Your
Overcoat,” “I Wanna Be Bad,” and
“You Wouldn’t Fool Me, Would
You?”
The story of “Follow Thru” con
cerns a pretty feminine golfing
champion, her love for the club pro
fessional, and her troubles with an
equally lovely golfing rival.
The comedy highlight of the pro
duction is said to be provided in the
girls’ locker room scene by Joe Pen
ner, who appears as a young man
who is very much afraid of women.
The entire production has been
staged by Leroy Prinz, recently di
rector of Earl Carroll’s “Vanities.”
“The Past of Mary Holmes,” on
the screen portion of the Lyric’s
opening bill, presents Helen Mac-
Kellar in a characterization as an
opera singer who has become a dis
solute recluse brooding over her
glamorous past. Her eccentricities
and mad desire for publicity embroil
her son and his sweetheart in an in
tense drama.
Music by the Lyric orchestra and
organ, a news reel, and a comedy
complete the Lyric's list of program
features.
Many Names in Cast
Leyland Hodgson, Russell Scott,
Kenneth Howell and Forrester
Harvey, veteran stage and screen
actors, and Captain O. C. “Boots”
Boutellier, Lieutenant Carlie Taylor
and Sergeant Major Russel Scott,
World war aces, have joined the
cast of “The Eagle and the Hawk,”
a story of war aviation featuring
Fredric March, Cary Grant, Jack
Oakie, Carole Lombard, Sir Guy
Standing, Captain Sterling Camp
bell and Captain Thomas Watton,
also aces, are acting as technical
advisors on this Jonk Monk Sanders
story. Stuart Walker and Mitchell
Leison will co-direct.
MOTION PICTURES
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PAGE 5
Weems to
Play Here
Sunday
Famous Orchestra Will
Feature Many Popular
Melodies.
Activities on the Indiana Roof are
centered on preparations for the one
night engagement which Weems
and his orchestra are to play there
Sunday night.
Appearing with Weems will be the
“Cinderella of Song,” Andrea Marsh.
The Weems orchestra’s engage
ment will by no means be a “one
man show.” according to Tom De
vine of the Roof, who states that
besides sharing the spotlight with
Miss Marsh, *Weems shares honors
with each individual in his band, in
cluding his brother Art.
Included in the nationally famous
orchestra’s program for tomorrow
evening will be many of the num
bers which they have made popular.
Among them are ‘ ‘Piccolo Pete,”
"Harmonica Harry,” “Man From
the South” and Miss Marsh’s theme,
“Rock-a-Bye Moon.”
Dancing will start at 8:30 p. m.
and continue until 1 a. m., which is
one-half hour later than the Roof’s
regular Sunday night schedule.
Currently featured on the Indiana
Roof are the Detroiters, a dance unit
which needs no introduction locally,
having played several engagements
in the ballroom during the last
three years.
They will furnish dance accom
paniment for persons who enter the
third preliminary of the Roof’s
Waltz Championship contest next
Wednesday evening.
MOTION PICTURES
r 7 '
Li CAN YOU WARE
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Indiana fe-
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