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The Indianapolis times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1922-1965, May 18, 1933, Home Edition, Image 6

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PAGE 6
Tea Events
Will Raise
Camp Fund
Family Treasures to Be
Shown at Parties by
Girl Reserves.
BY BEATRICE BI'RCiAN
Times Woman's Page l.ditor
ROMANCES of a century ago
will be revived when Girl
Reserves entertain with family
treasure teas Saturday and Sun
day in the Central Y. W. C. A. The
teas will aid in raising funds for
“campships” to Camp Delight.
An 85-year-old doll will sit prim
ly on her sofa and watch her mis-
tress, Nancy Chat
held, pour tea in
her Civil war
frock. Miss Doll
will feel quite at
home as the
guests chat of days
of their grand
mothers and she'll
long to confide
some of her se
crets, too.
A rose quilt of
Mrs. C. E. Chat
field, member of
the board, will re
call its making
lor the wedding
chest of a great-
Miss Burgan
grand aunt 125 years ago. Hours
of nimble needle plying filled the
young bride-elect’s days of waiting
for her nuptial day.
A dainty hand-made chemise
from the trousseau of Elizabeth
Reed, great-aunt of Mrs. L. R.
Cartwright, will tell the story of her
sewing skill.
In Germany, many years ago, Mrs.
Wilhemina Enners stitched and
stitched on a tulip patchwork cjuilt
which went to fill the hope chest of
the young girl who became the
grandmother of Mrs. Logan Hughes,
Woodruff Place. Mrs. Hughes is co
chairman of the committee for
Camp Delight.
Cradle Is Heirloom
More than a hundred years ago, j
Mrs. Chatfield recalls one of her
family ventured to come to Amer- i
ica from London. She brought with
her a black cashmere shawl, now
treasured by Mrs. Chatfield.
“Four generations of babies in the
Downey family have slept in the
wooden cradle of my son Bowman.”
Mrs. Brandt Downey explains. “Mr.
Downey and his grandfather both
were rocked to sleep In it by their
mothers’ lullabies.”
Exchange Anecdotes
The delightful part of the dis- |
play will be the interchange of an
ecdotes and histories of the an- j
tiques.
The tea table will be set for an !
old-fashioned high tea, with co- j
coanut cakes on high standards and j
tea served from old silver services. !
Mrs. Walter P. Morton, chairman
of the camp scholarship committee,
and Mrs. Downey will preside at
the tea. They will be assisted by
members of the committee and the
board of directors.
Card Parties
Alfarata Council 5, D. of P., will
hold a supper and card party Fri
day at Ca'pitol avenue and North
street. Supper will be served from
5 to 7:30 Mrs. Mary Doyle is chair
man.
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engi
neers and G. L. A. Division 128 and
552 will give a supper and card
party tonight at the Foodcraft shop.
Comanche Council 47, D. of p.,
will entertain with a card party
Friday night at Redmen’s hall, Mor
ris and Lee streets.
Officers of Indianapolis lodge 297.
L. A. to B R. T.. will sponsor a
card party in Trainmen hall. 1002
East Washington street, Saturday
night. Mrs. L. Thixton is chair
man. She will be assisted by Mes
dames Marie Wheeler and Anna
Johnson.
Bethel Spiritual church will give
a card party at 8 tonight at 1331
Spruce street.
Choose Pledge Officers
New pledge officers of Beta chap
ter. Theta Nu Chi sorority are Miss
Ruth Shannon, president; Miss
Francis Elrod, secretary, and Miss
Virginia Fowler, publicity chairman.
2 DAYS
ONLY
Friday • Saturday
Your Portrait
taken in our
popular studio
Lcrge 11 x 14 Size
Hand-Colored in Oils
Half s*f
Price I
So Appointment Necessary
Downstairs
at Ayres
Fashionable Wear for Afternoons
Restrained, new ways of achieving the modish
shoulder width and bodice fullness, give individual
distinction to new semi-formal afternoon things.
Left—Blacfe and white marocain are combined in
new' manner with white sleeves capped by the black
shoulders. A string belt motif and hat decoration
add interest.
Patterns
Pattern Department,
Indianapolis Times,
Indianapolis, Ind.
Enclose find 15 cents for
which send Pat- coon
tern No. D £* & if
Size
Street
City
State
Name
77
L* V/7" A
M
V... 1i j t i
11 4 1
% 5229
COTTON APRON
Economy programs are working
more and more miracles. These
days beaus are apt to shy away from
silks and satins.
But just slip into a pink cotton
apron splashed all over with Low
ers and edged with frilling, and
there's nothing left to do but send
out the wedding announcements.
Here's an easy-to-make model
that's calculated to flutter hearts
and flatter figures. It’s practical,
too. because it protects your frocks
and it's equipped with deep cuffs
to match.
They'll make your hands look very
tiny and fragile as you whisk that
midnight rarebit together. And
when you are making the trousseau,
don't forget to consult the new
summer fashion book. It's full of
the most delightful fashions. Size
16 requires l’ yards 36-inch mate
rial. 5L yards frilling.
Pattern No. 5229 is designed for
sizes 16 and 20 years. 34. 38 and 42
bust.
New summer fashion book : s out!
Send for it—put check here □
and inciose 10 cents extra for book.
Price for pattern, 15 cents.
Patriots Elect
Mrs. Walter H. Green is the new
president of the Indiana Society
Daughters of Founders and Patriots
of America. Others elected were
Mrs. E. O. Ebinghouse of Wabash,
vice-president: Mrs. Ernest DeWolfe
Wales, recording secretary; Mrs. H.
C. Ketcham. corresponding secre
tary; Mrs. W. J. Hassleman. reg
istrar; Miss Carolyn E Ford of
Madison, historian, and Mrs. Sarah
F’etcher Wagne \ color bearer.
[ CORRECTION IN THE P
B ‘STAR STORE” ADVERTISEMENT Z
I In last Tuesday Times, in the “Star Store’’ advertise- ■
a meat, relative to their broadcast on WKBF every p
L Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, this advertisement F
should have read 8:30 A. M. This is anew service r
I the Star Store is using and is being well received by I
(From Jean Patou. Paris.)
Right—Brown and beige dotted crepe faconne has
bouffant sleeves which give the required shoulders, in
novel manner, and an asymetrical cut to the body
of the gown lends distinction. The brown straw hat
is trimmed with beige grosgrain.
Party Will Be
Held in Honor
of April Bride
Mrs. Robert V.. Jones, who was
Miss Elizabeth Bisseil before her
marriage April 30, will be honored
| at a party and miscellaneous shower
to be given by Miss Florence Mc
; Donald at her home Friday night.
Decorations and refreshments will
be carried out in a color scheme of
spring green and white. Assisting
the hostess will be her mother, Mrs.
Harry A. McDonald, and her sister,
Miss Marjorie McDonald.
Guests will be Mesdames. Carl F.
Hanske, Fred Keithley, William
j Frenzel, Warren Dawson, of Carmel, :
and Misses Dorothy Baldridge, Ber
nice Gaskins, Katherine Thurston,
Evelyn Todd, Rosemary Brown. Lois
! Ann Hodgin, Hilda Schmidt, Elaine
Schmidt. Eleanor June
Wurgler, Virginia White, Vivian
White, Dorothy Lawson, and Mary
Armstrong.
Personals
Mrs. Woods A. Caperton and her
sister, Miss Sara Tyce Adams, will
leave this week-end for New York
and Boston. Reily S. Adams, their
brother and a student at the Har
vard school of business, will return
to Indianapolis with them.
Mrs. W. I. Hess is visiting in
New York.
Mrs. Bertram Sanders, 328 East
Forty-seventh street, and Mrs.
George Booksthaler are visiting in
Washington for a week.
Mr. and Mrs. Clyde E. Titus, 736
Middle drive, Woodruff place, are
in Greencastle attending the grad
uation recital of their daughter.
Miss Helen Louise Titus, who is
studying voice at De Pauw univers
ity-
Senator and Mrs. Frederick Van
Nuys, who have been visiting Mr.
and Mrs. W. H. Thompson, 1321
North Meridian street, at the Mad
ison in New York, have returned
to Washington.
Miss K ornblum Hostess
The monthly meeting of Beta
chapter, Kappa Alpha Gamma,
musical sorority, will be held tonight
at the home of Miss Jennie Korn
blum, 1613 East Kelly street. Moz
keowski, the composer, will be stud
ied. Members will play and sing
his compositions.
Meeting at Home
Bonnie Briar Bunfh will meet at
2 Friday at the home of Mrs.
Augusta Sciresdale, 29 North
Keaiing avenue.
A Day’s Menu j
Breakfast — j
Chilled tomato juice, ce- j
real, cream, coddled eggs, j
crisp toast, milk, coffee.
Luncheon —
Lentil soup, cheese sticks, j
rhubarb tapioca pudding, •
milk. tea. i
Dinner — ’
Broiled salt water herring, j
scalloped potatoes, green j
beans, cottage cheese and |
onion salad, shredded ,
fresh pineapple, mock an
gel cake, milk, coffee.
j PERMANENTS
j The Heantifnl
Wave. complete
i Miampoo. Self- 1
Setting Wave vl
. BEAUTE ARTES
I LI, 06t0 601 ROOSEVELT BI.PG.
THE INDIANAPOLIS TIMES
Individuality
Now the Rule
for Coiffure
THE day has passed when it was
a smart woman’s ambition to
look as if she had just stepped
forth from hfr hairdresser’s, every
hair, every curl plastered into its
appointed spot. The informality of
summer clothes does not harmonize
with such a put-in-its-spot. effect.
This may sound like a break for
the girl who loathes every minute
spent under the
dryer, but if she
dislikes looking
like some mad
species of chrys
anthemum, it will
prove something
of a trick to ap
pear casually well
coiffed and not
carelessly so.
This requires
subtlety in the
work of the hair
dresser, who must
Cluster Curls
get his effects without stickum or
lacquering to keep wild hairs in
place.
o n a
INDIVIDUALITY is the rule for
the coiffure now. One’s hair
must be done to suit one’s hats,
which vary from the flat-crowned
sailor to those turned-up*-in-the
back affairs which leave a generous
crop of curls exposed, and to Afri
can fezes which crush down over
one ear.
These call for a nice assortment
of curls that seem to defy nature in
the way they
behave, never,
never most cer
tainly never,
wilting into the
back of one’s
neck.
The favorite
coiffure just
now is one in
which the hair
is drawn back
from the face
with one or
two soft waves
Waved Swirl
falling over the temple and ending
in a cascade of short curls halfway
up the back of the head or at the
natural hairline.
The ends barely may be long
enough to curve upward or long
enough to roll about the finger.
Above all, the effect must be one
of softness. Whatever style of
coiffure you choose, let its .waves
and ringlets look as if you had just
naturally brushed them into place
that morning.
You probably will have spent your
usual quota of hours having them
“set,” but that should be your secret.
C- AND RUTH, MY CLOTHES 1 (RINSO IS SIMPLY GRANiTT AND THERE'S NO V \
CAME FROM THE WASHING / JUT DON'T THINK)-;- FOR WASHING DISHES ) , s SOAP L,KE R(NSO PO M / r~" * N
MACHINE AT LEAST THAT RINSO IS V ( WILL YOU LOOK AT ) f { V WASHING WOODWORK. I \ | WHY, I THOUGHT |
4OR 5 SHADES WHITER! JUST FOR WASH-1 \\ ) THAT GREASE GO! ( /J jII JUST WASHED THESE )I W THEY" WERE ]
KM THINK RINSO'S MARVELOUSX I USE RINSO FOR EVERYTHING —ITs\ Makers of tIICSO 40 faiTloll Wqc L
FOR PORCELAIN AND TILE. IN ( \SO EASY ON THE HANDS. IT'S THE ( frp . „ >vaSHerS
% FACT, ITS CREAMY SUDS MAKE J I PERFECT HARO-WATER SOAP ) Sc V 9 IiIDSO lOr SafWvf”
1 k Vi AU CLEANING EASIER V - ABC Cinder,* C V*
'A ijlSo- , > ]/ Amerion Betutr Conloa H*** "190 CT
1; mLTY/ JfclV ' / Br,S f*3u ggMi— th": m<k
% it—hr l RUTH! WOW SIU.Y I’VE ’ t!$~~ gJSS, tjSJS" S®f~ I
Session of
Altrusa to
Be at Club
Vocational Dinner Event
to Be Attended by
U. S. Head.
National president of Altrusa Club
heads of Indiana and Illinois units,
the governor of District 5 of the
national association and delegates
will attend the educational and
vocational guidance dinner-meeting
Saturday night at the Columbia
club.
Miss Janette Briggs of Kalamazoo,
Mich., national president, Miss
Georgia Davis of Richmond, gover
nor of District 5, with delegates
from Richmond will attend. Others
will include Miss Phoebe Farlin,
Peoria, 111.; Miss Fanny Finch, Ko
komo; Miss Amelia Deuser, New
Albany; Mrs. F. R. Davis. Muncie;
Miss Virginia Thomas, Richmond;
Miss Bess Goodykoontz, Anderson;
Miss Estelle Kimmel, Lafayette; Mrs.
Charlotte Burford, Terre Haute,
and delegates. Mrs. Louise Weber
will represent the Huntington club.
Mrs. Chase Going Woodhouse,
personnel director of women's col
lege, University of North Carolina,
will speak on “Vocational Guidance
and Planned Prosperity.” Mrs.
Woodhouse for three years was in
charge of the division of economics.
U. S. Bureau of Home Economics,
in Washington. She is a candidate
for president of the National Asso
ciation of Altrusa Clubs.
Teachers of the civics classes at
Arsenal Technical high school, who
co-operate in the program of the
club, will be special guests: Misses
Olive R. Beckington, Louise Brax
ton, Sara Ewing and Hazel Howe.
Misses Georgia Bauman, Virginia
Leyenberger and Gertrude Free will
provide music during the dinner.
0. E. S. MATRON IS
LUNCHEON GUEST
Mrs. Harold Trusler entertained
Wednesday with a rose luncheon at
her home,' 651 East Twenty-third
street, for Mrs. £ewis Malcolm,
worthy grand matron of the O. E.
S., and Mrs. Blanche Reggitt, grand
secretary.
Appointments were in rose, and
favors, shoulder corsages of roses.
Other guests were Mesdames Frank
Bomburg, Walter Boemler, W. F.
Wooe, Gus Meister, Frank Kinzie,
Floyd Wright, Estel Roberts, John
Van Sickle, Raymond Neer and
Charles Blake.
BRIDE-ELECT TO BE
GIVEN PARTY
Miss Jane Hamilton will entertain
tonight at her home, 3001 Broadway,
in honor of Miss Marjorie Nelson,
whose marriage to Walter Richard
Spencer Jr. will take place May 27.
The hostess will be assisted by her
mother, Mrs. Mary Hamilton, and
appointments will be in blue and
pink. Guests with the bride-elect
will be Mesdames Mabel W. Nelson,
mother of the bride-elect; Gladys
Gale, Dorothy Thomas and Misses
Gaybern Hines, Betty Armstrong,
Janet Giffin, Clara Moorehead,
Gladys Park. Polly Moore of Nobles
ville, and Eleanor Jane Meredith of
Chicago.
Club's Head Chosen
Mrs. B. F. Watson is the president
of the Oct Dahl club. Officers were
elected at the luncheon-meeting
Wednesday afternoon at the home
of Mrs. May Brooks Miller, 2343
College avenue. Miss Kathryn
Bayne assisted the hostess. Mrs.
Stanley Warren was named vice
president; Mrs. Charles Hogate,
treasurer; Mrs. Charles Stevens,
corresponding secretary, and Mrs.
Miller, recording secretary.
Dinner Is at Club
Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Walsh will
be honored tonight at a dinner to
be given by Mrs. Fred A. Herring
ton at the Columbia Club. Guests
will include members of the Con
tract Club, of which the hostess is a
member, and their husbands:
Messrs, and Mesdame Scott Deming,
Arthur Bradshaw, C. D. Brackett,
J. Hart Laird. Carl Weyl, George
Q. Bruce, B. M. Forbes, C. O. Bray;
Mesdames D. L. Kahn, Maurice J.
Moore, and Louise Marsh.
Benefit Party Set
Mrs. Regene Cain 'McGuire is
chairman of the benefit dance and
card party to be held Saturday in
the K. of C. auditorium. The affair
is sponsored by the committee of the
Mary Magdalene Circle. The pub
licis invited.
DIRECTS SALE
jjm
liliililclifiii- SH
Miss Sarah M. Boland
Miss Sarah Boland is chair
man of the ticket committee for
the tea and style show to be held
Saturday by graduates of the
Saint John academy.
Pioneer Group
Will Be Feted
at May Dinner
Mr. and Mrs. Charles J“TLynn will
entertain members of the Society of
Indiana Pioneers, their wives and
i husbands and out-of-town guests, at
I the May party Saturday at their
home, 5600 Sunset lane.
The affair will be held from 3 to
5 with Mrs. John T. Wheeler, chair
man of the committee on arrange
ments, in charge. An outdoor pro
gram will be held.
Officers of the society is William
H. Insley, president; Almus G. Rud
dell, vice-president; Miss Katherine
M. Graydon. registrar; Mrs. Walter
H. Montgomery, secretary, and Her
bert Foltz, treasurer. Object of the
society is to honor the memory and
work of the pioneers who opened
Indiana to civilization.
Committee chairmen, recently ap
pointed, are Miss Anna Sickels,
chairman of membership; W. H.
Insley, eligibility; Miller Hamilton,
pulbicity; Benjamin D. Hitz, year
book; Mrs. Wheeler, arrangements,
and Mr. Lynn, program.
CL UB TO SPONSOR
CHILDREN’S PARTY
Indiana Wellesley Club will hold
its annual children's party at the
home of Mrs. James Gipe, May 3,
instead of next Saturday as previ
ously arranged.
The committee in charge will be
Miss Lucetta Ohr, chairman, as
sisted by Mrs. Carl Koons and Mrs.
Henry Atkins.
Mothers Are Hosts
Members of the active chapter of
Sigma Chi fraternity, faculty mem
bers of Butler university and friends'
will be guests of the Mothers Club
of the fraternity at 8 Friday night
at the Arthur Jordan Memorial
hall. Mrs. Kathryn Turney Garten
will review “Beveridge and the Pro
gressive Era.”
Recital Arranged
Crescendo Club of the Junior Fed
eration of Music Clubs sponsored
by Mrs. Edythe K. Cordes, will pre
sent a recital Friday night in the
Wilking Music Cos.
Club Holds Session
Buddie-etts Club met at 7:30
Wednesday night in the Communal
building.
Daily Recipe
POTATO PUDDING
Have a pound and a half
of mealy potatoes that have
been boiled, peeled and
rubbed through a sieve. Stir
a tablespoon of flour into two
tablespoons of melted butter,
add a cup of milk and let it
heat slowly. Put the potatoes
back on the fire, then, a little
at a time, stir in the hot milk.
Add a cup of sugar, a tea
spoon of salt and a tablespoon
of chopped lemon peel. When
these ingredients are thor
oughly mixed, remove from
the fire, stir in the slightly
beaten yolks of six eggs, then
fold in the stiffly beaten
whites.
Put into a buttered baking
dish and bake in a moderate
oven for twenty minutes.
Sears to Show Entries
in Century of Progress
Quilting Prize Contest
Exhibit, Opening Wednesday, Will Close with'
Selections by Judges for Chicago
Fair Honors.
BY HELEN LUD&¥.
SIXTY quilts have been entered in tne Century of Progress Quilt con
test at Sears. Roebuck and Company. The exhibit, which opened
Wednesday morning, will continue through Saturday.
On Friday, a committee headed by Mrs. Chantilla White will judge
the quilts, selecting the ones to be sent to Chicago to compete for a place
of honor in the Sears building at the exposition.
A total of $7,500 is offered in the contest, and the quilt winning the
?rand prize will be presented to Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt, as a gilt to
:he white House.
Serving on the committee with Mrs. White will bo
Mesdames A. C. Zaring. E. Forger, and C. Hammel, all
members of the Sunnyside Guild.
In the display are quilts of colonial patterns, as well
as designs which have been made especially for this
contest. Prominent among the older patterns are
"Delectable Mountain,” "Seth Thomas Rose," "Rose of
Sharon,” and the "Lafayette Orange Peel."
The most unusual of the original designs is the
"Century of Progress Compass Quilt,’ designed by M F.
Rogers, of 1029 East Southern avenue, and made by Mrs.
Ethel Lee Rogers. It has fifty-three blocks, each con
taining twenty-five pieces, and required sixteen weeks
for its completion.
The center block carries the United States emblem,
while on the other fifty-two blocks are symbols of man
made progress in machinery; natural resources and
scientific discoveries; famous landmarks, or subjects
peculiar to certain sections ol the world or ages in history.
Among other original designs presented are "Wheels or Progress,” by
Mrs. Fern Graham, Fortville, Ind.; a flower garden quilt developed in
padded satin stitch, with an original border, by Gladys B. Lett, 2217
North Talbot street, and a rose and white quilt, original in design, and
named by its maker, Mrs. Albert Hines, R. R. 6, "Triangle Delight."
* tt a a a a
Block's Emphasizes Cotton
NATIONAL cotton week, which ends May 20, is being observed in
all Indianapolis stores, with a special showing of cotton frocks
and cotton fabrics.
The William H. Block Company has an unusual window display of
cotton, and is showing in the cotton fabric department a wide assort
ment of piques, in plain colors and plaids.
If a u a tt a
Gold Sport 'Jewelry Featured
FOURTEEN karat gold has been used in the development of sport
jewelry, shown at Julius C Walk's. Pins to be used on new sport
hats are in Scottie and wire-haired terrier design-
Bracelets are made of tiny stirrups of bits, fastened together, with
horses' heads on enamel or decoration. Pins are shown as riding crops,
or dog collars.
Tiny horse heads decorate the first, while the dog collars have small
figures of Scotties to complete them.
State Assembly Women Name
Officers at Guest Luncheon
Mrs. James E. Mendenhall was
re-elected president of the Indian
apolis branch, State Assembly Wom
an’s Club at its luncheon and guest
day meeting Wednesday in the
Marott. Other re-elections includ
ed: Mrs. Arthur Gilliom, vice-presi
dent, and Mrs. Alfred Hogston,
treasurer. Mrs. H. K. Cuthbertson
was chosen secretary to replace Mrs.
J. H. Hewitt.
The committee in charge ar
ranged a display of collections of
antiques and foreign objects. The
committee was composed of Mrs.
Walter J. Behmer, chairman, and
Mesdames George H. Batchelor, Joe
Rand Beckett. J. W. Ebaugh, Clyde
C. Karrer, Julia Nelson, O. U. New
man, Charles F. Remy, Walter E.
Sororities
Kappa Gamma Tau sorority will
meet Monday night at the home of
Miss Kathryn Martin, 116 North
Gladstone avenue. All members are
urged to be present.
Epsilon chapter of the Epsilon
Sigma Alpha sorority will hold a
business meeting tonight at the I
Washington. Miss Ruth Henby will
have charge of the educational pro- i
gram.
Delta Omega sorority will meet to
night at the home of Miss Martha !
Rogers, 3815 North Capitol avenue.
Pi Gamma sorority will meet to
night at the home of Miss Peggy j
Taylor, 2324 North New Jersey
street.
Sigma Phi Gamma sorority will 1
meet for a supper at 6 Friday at the
Lincoln. A business meeting will
folow.
Misses Sue Aldrich and Martha
Yelvington were pledged at the
meeting of the Beta chapter of the
Omega Kappa sorority Wednesday
night at the home of Miss Charlotte j
Twietmeyer, 3523 North Illinois
street.
O. E. S. to Meet
Prospect auxiliary, 452, O. E. S..
will hold a business meeting at 2
Friday afternoon at the Masonic
hall, Prospect street and State ave- j
nue.
MAY IS, 1933
:\ > Jam
r' &iimma
Mrs. Lindsay
Treanor, Floyd E. Williamson and
George C. Cole.
Mrs. Behmer, Mrs. Karrer, Mrs.
C. J. Buchanan, Mrs. George H.
Batchelor were among those dis
playing collections. Mrs. Batchelor
loaned a sampler made by her
great-grandmother in 1823. Mrs.
Lena Davenport gave an illustrated
lecture of the Century of Progress
exposition.
The luncheon <• tables were ar
ranged with basket of spring flowers.
Place cards were paper coasters, de
signed with colonial scenes in orchid
and green.
PERMA^m^^
The Popular
Standard Wave.
Each head waved | y
to suit the indi- jpr
vidual curly ft
ringlet ends that mr*
are sure to ” joV'-’
please. -.£9
2 Waves, $1.91
i 25c ,r:. 44c i
Brin* a Crlpnil .
| 2 II oily wood S2 Waves. $2.01 !
I 2 I‘nri- tit *’ SB.QI I
O E Marcel AP
jC f* Manicure %K r*
WW ” Eyebrow ArchlJO''
Alvetla Maria “Push Ip,” st>.so
Mrk ffllfgTr, PERMANENT
”WAVE SYSTEM
Phone U. mss .fig WAITINfi
•I3 Roosevelt Bid*. r<w
hubOPEN KVKRV EVEMN(, —m

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