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The Indianapolis times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1922-1965, July 06, 1933, Home Edition, Image 3

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JULY 6, 10331
INSURANCE SUIT
NEW TANGLE IN
MYSTERY DEATH
Father of ‘Bridge Fatality’
Victim Takes Action
for $7,000.
Renewal of the investigation of
the mysterious death of Von D.
Taylor, local insurance salesman
and former athlete, whose body,
with head crushed, was found near
his home March 18, was indicaated
today, when suit was filed to collect
$7,00 judgment on his insurance
policy.
The suit, naming the Travelers
Insurance Company, former em
ployer of Taylor, with whom the
policy was written, was filed in the
name of Henry J. Taylor, his father,
administrator of the estate.
Widow Is Named
Mrs. Kathryn Taylor, pretty wi
dow, also was named defendant.
She is said to be beneficiary of the
$6,000 insurance policy.
The suit alleges that the admin
istrator was appointed in probate
court June 12. and that the insur
ance company refused to pay the
claim. The policy was written
March 20, 19300, the suit claims.
Death of Taylor was investigated
by detectives, Coroner William E.
Arbuckle and Deputy Coroner J. E.
Wyttenbach for several weeks. Re
cently an open verdict was returned
by the coroner, giving skull fracture
as cause of death.
Mystery in Death
After Taylor's death, March 19,
the day after he was found uncon
scious in front of his home at 923
Leland avenue, numerous purported
clews were followed by authorities,
in an attempt to shed light on pre
ceding events.
Testimony of Mrs. Taylor and an
other couple, all of whom were par
ticipants in a bridge game the night
Taylor was found, was that they
had fled from the house after a
quarrel, leaving Taylor alone in an
alleged intoxicated condition.
The suit was filed by Robert Dal
ton and George A. Anderson, attor
neys for the administrator.
TROTH BROKEN: WINS $1
Californian Finds Market Value On
Lost Romance Is Low.
By United Press
SAN FRANCISCO, July 6.—Exact
ly $1 was the market value on bro
ken engagements fixed by the
United States circuit court here to
day.
That sum was awarded to Hershell
E. Aldridge for the loss of a girl who
broke their engagement when she
learned he was a divorced man.
SESSION TO DRAW 3.000
Municipal Ownership Section Is
Planned by Indiana League.
By I nited Press
RICHMONO, Ind„ July 6.—Plans
for organizing a municipal owner
ship of the Indiana Municipal
League at a meeting here July 12
and 13 were announced today by
D. C. Hess, manager of the Rich
mond Light and Power Company,
and vice-president of the league.
More than 300 offiials of Indiana
cities and towns are expected to
attend.
BOYS TO SEE QUARRIES
Central Y. M. C. A. Campers Also
Visit State Park.
Boy members of the Central
Y. M. C. A. will visit Spring Mills
state park, the Bedford stone quar
ries and Donaldson’s cave as part of
a two-day camping and sightseeing
tour July 19 and 20.
Under the leadership of R. C. Al
ford, younger boys’ secretary of the
Y. M. C. A. the boys will make
their headquarters at Camp Bed
ford.
PRINTERS STUDY CODE
Suggested System Is Presented to
Employers at Meeting.
Employing printers in central and
southern Indiana were presented
with the suggested code of fair com
petiton for the printing business to
gether with copies of the suggested
form of presentation to the federal
administrator, at a meeting in the
Lincoln. Wednesday.
Arthur J. Randall, president of
the Indianapolis Typothetae, pre
sided.
NEW RESIDENTS ‘FETED’
San Mateo, Cal., Has Official Host
ess; Gifts Are Given.
By United Press
SAN MATEO. Cal.. July 6.—New
residents in this city are greeted
by an official “hostess” who en
deavors to acquaint them with the
facilities which the city has to
offer.
Newcomers are presented with
gifts from several local merchanis
and a two weeks complimentary
subscription to the local newspaper.
TURNS IN GOLD CHARM
Californian Hands Bank Watchfob;
“No Hoarder," Says He.
By Uniti and Press
PORTERVILLE. Cal., July 6.—A
citizen walked into the bank here
and handed his watchfob over to
the teller saying, "they can’t class
me as a hoarder.” The charm was
a $5 gold piece surrounded by a
metal band.
Lost your Watch? Lost ads ac
cepted as late as 8 a. m. will appear
in the very FIRST EDITION on
the same day. People will be read
ing about it before noon. Riley 5551.
CulicuraOinlment
SoolllCS and Theols
skin irritations quickly and easily.
Let it be your first thought in treat
ing itching, burning affections, ede
ma, pimples and other disfiguring
blotches. No household should be
without it.
Price 25c and 50c
Sample each free. Address: “ Cuticara."
Depu 4G, Malden, Maas.
r-~- ~
i I
When a gas well in Refugio county, Texas, caught fire recently it immediately “cratered,” forming the
blazing pit pictured at the left 160 feet long, 100 feet wide and 60 feet deep, and swa]lowing a 122-foot
derrick and all drilling machinery. The photo of the crater was taken from the top of the derrick at the right,
a neighboring duplicate of the one swallowed up in the flaming well.
AVERS LIGHT EXISTS
IN DEPTHS OF OCEAN
Well-Developed Eyes of Fish Cited
as Proof by Biologist.
Py Science Seri ice
WASHINGTON, July 6.—Despite
the failure of highly sensitive
photographic plates to record any
light in the far depths of the sea,
Dr. Paul Bartsch, well-known
marine biologist of the United
States national museum, ic not con
vinced that animals of the deeps
live in everlasting darkness.
“Most of the deep sea fishes have
splendidly developed eyes—usually
larger than those of species living
in shallower water,” declared Dr.
Bartsch, speaking of regions of the
sea, 32,000 feet or more below the
surface. “Os what use would these
eyes be if Stygian darkness pre
vailed?”
Moreover, he added, most marine
creatures are phosphorescent, and
many if not all are more or less
fluorescent; that is, they glow when
actuated by ultraviolet rays. Enorm
ous numbers of these living lamps,
however, tiny, surely would make
some impression on the olackness,
Dr. Bartsch believes.
850,000 AUTO DRIVER
LICENSES ARE SOLD
Concerted drive of state and
municipal police against driver
license dodgers has resulted in the
sale of 850,000 licenses since March 1,
it was revealed today by Mark Ro
denbeck, assistant director of the
auto license division.
This figure represents $425,000 at
50 cents a license and exceeds by
100.000 licenses the original sale esti
mate. Approximately 300,000 licenses
were sold in June. Recent arrests
by both state and Indianapolis po
lice have reached as high as thirty
a day.
, — v When the Snow Flies You’ll Thank
Your Lucky Stars You Bought Now!
!9!^!59
V. ' ‘ '{ : Delivers This
. y igaa hlndiaZ
' S ® Trade In Your
KJMJHBI
*%3S: 211-215 w. Washington St. £%£.
DERRICK IS SWALLOWED BY GAS WELL
It’s News Now
‘Expectant Papa’ Puts It
ih the Paper—as a
Paid Ad.
81l United Press
T\4TUSKEGON, Mich., July 6.
The city editor of the Mus
kegon Chronicle was unim
pressed when William W. Worth
ing brought in news that Mrs.
Worthing was an expectant
mother.
“We don't print that kind of
news,” the editor explained.
“How about the Tunneys? How
about the empress of Japan?
Worthing demanded. But the ed
itor was adamant. So Worthing
inserted the following advertise
ment in the Chronicle:
“Notice: Mr. and Mrs. William
E. Worthing of 1933 Valley street,
wish to announce that they are
expecting their first baby in No
vember.—Mr. and Mrs. William
E. Worthing.”
GIRL TO BE DOCTOR
Star Olympic Athlete Planning to
Study Medicine.
By United Press
PHILADELPHIA, July 6.—Jean
Shiley, the 22-year-old Olympic high
jump record breaker, is planning to
study medicine.
Graduated from Temple univer
sity, she is spending the summer as
swimming and tennis instructor of
the Brookline Country Club.
“I want to be a physician,” she
said, “but I’ll have to work my way
through medical school. So for that
reason I am not saying that I’ll
start studying medicine in the fall.”
THE INDIANAPOLIS TIMES
RESERVE OFFICERS MAY
GET SIXTY DAYS DUTY
Optimistic Tinge Given to Outlook
for 3,000 Troopers.
The prospect for restricted reserve
officer activities this summer was
given a more optimistic tinge to
day when it was learned approxi
mately three thousand reserve of
ficers may replace regular army of
ficers attending service schools or
normally assigned to organized re
serve duty.
Under the plan contemplated,
these regular army officers will be
ordered back to their regular sta
tions about Sept. 1, thus allowing
reserve officers sixty days civilian
conservation corps duty.
Funds allocated for reserve offi
cers active duty in connection with
the C. M. T. C. have been curtailed
sharply. A total of only 198 field
officers and 121 company grade of
ficers will be assigned to this four
teen-day duty in the Fifth army
corps area, which is composed of
Indiana, Ohio, West Virginia and
Kentucky.
SUES FOR CEREAL BURNS
Unusual Court Action Filed After
Biscuit Cos. Product Explodes.
By United Press
MONROE, La., July 6.—One of
the most unusual suits ever filed in
district court here is that of Miss
Beatrice Rhymes against the Na
tional Biscuit Company and the
Louisiana Stores, Inc.
The woman is seeking $5,150
damages for burns alleged to have
been received when a cereal pur
chased from the store, and manu
factured by the National Biscuit
Company, exploded.
According to the petition, the
cereal exploded while it was being
cooked, burning Miss Rhymes seri
ously.
The oldest known medical school
was founded by the Persian con
STONE FIGURES
‘atrocious; so
SUIT ISJACED
Sculptor to Bring Action
Against Philadelphia
School Board.
By United Press
PHILADELPHIA, July 6. —Jules A.
Melioden, sculptor, thinks the execu
tion of bronze and stone figures on
the new Philadelphia education
building is “atrocious,” and has so
degraded his reputation, that he will
sue the school district for $500,000.
Under a contract price, Melioden
and his son designed the lifesized
models for the exterior of the
“Palace of Education.”
Despite his suggestion of several
firms of stone-cutters, he said Irwin
Catherine, superintendent of build
ings for the education board, con
tracted the firm of Harry Liva of
Bedford, Ind.
This resulted in the work being
done without his apaproval, Meiio
Super-Value Women’s WQM. BROADCLOTH I
BIAS CUT SUPS PAJAMAS I
Lace Trimmed or Tailored WA ■ i I9 J FAST COLOR PRINTS
IH H Ml AL
made bias cut IjH B m ft SB H Ia t st
aL%Mc erf
wear and jfßßl ~J81!ir x and ol> rs. jlgr
311*315 “WEST-WASHINGTON'ST.
fl Gl s rl H oTt S JIT OK WOMEN’S COOL WOMEN'S SUMMER
I Good quality rayon £ J RAYON UNDIES
4 39, GIRLS' RIYOH SUPS <\Qzfl RRFQCFC iTs •* M-,!™
Also Nainsook - {l l "L 5 i-J CL *LJ! CL f\ $ •-n r ins
Tailor.,l or r„M J. \ WIH ■*■■■• W W fjMj
A 50c GIRLS' COMBINATIONS U; N*4 Hj , I
Rayon or Mesh Am v J msm si.oo cretonne
I nations. Sizes 2to 'S c I / i \ HI | OVERDRAPES j 1
A NET GARTER BELTS // 4 | w |i 59c 111| I
Cool for Summer ( / ! I COOL, CRISP DRESSES PA,R
I Cool summer garter M M \/ , \\ CM A DTI V C TVrr*n Good look.ng r E KCin 1
I holts of net with / Ij| \\ oMAKI LI SIYLLU! cretonne over- hjf *HJ * f
II four good hose sup- 'l\ ~ . I drapes in very ’-3 it Etil I.R
I porters. All sizes. V* Tl l e s . ty l e ® are vf>ry newest and the colorful pat- :3 ffcj £1 |J
iWVyNI ~rlce 18 th “ very lowest; shop as you will, terns * rSlt V eM*! Jsl M
msr l\Jj will not he able !o ;ind dresses like this I ' Bl
vi V 1 anywhere near this price.
A WOM. CHARDONESE HOSE |K
first quality I MEN S SHIRTS H W MEN’S BALBRIGGAN li
15 C A 0R SHORTS ■ m shirts-drawers 1
hHHHKr m v. ALL SIZES ~1 A If SHORT SLEEVES f% F M
Jtmmmm — ■iruii mi—. hroadrloth shorts or I ■IA Mens M m
A WOMEN’S COOL GOWNS K MAIN' n ni,H I | RA.
I Hand Embroidered MAINE LOOK ■ IP drawers to match. —P
I Hand embroidered
in cool nainsook, in flh M B __
I colors. tea Blv Bft _ Jffl
\: OfßLJLiJtja
WOMEH'SSILK^BRASSIEHES
! zzl Salem summer sporToxfords 1
GOODS FRIDAY PERFORATED VAMP jA
I LARGE SUE g
| BAY RUM SHAVING CREAM COOL AND SOMFY BBB| M'jSf - - (Rv
Traveling MANICURE SETS ZZ„' I S2Z _ W/BI ’ ' MW 1
2 BARS FLOATING SOAP JLT'S, TSJS ■MwIUMMI
Bi| r ""'i 1 g
CHILDREN’S SANDALS . W
A MEN’S OVERALLS SIZES TO 2 MA /g -If M£ N’S
BLUE DENIM Brown and elk; leather" M /? ** • M black
■ Men’s overalls :r.a<le Am C or fabric, oizes to 2. M M HDTC C
I of good quality blue
TENNIS SHOES f *•- OXFORDS
A MEN'S, BOYS’ POLO SHIRTS suntan. Hea v y a igr £££:s 1.24
I with, zipper mA±. JjP® •—, A
I Mens or boys shirts sizes to 6. to 11. Main Floor
in white or pastel
I colors, zippers. | ■ wjg
HhHHHHH9K3HHF si cretonne overjrapes | men’s—boys’ white caps |
Smart, good looking I Made of white duck 4 gW
A 25c SUMMER TIES cretonne overdrapes. ® I with full sweat band. JH ||
H Men’s new WBt
I summer patterns of ■ S I j
GIRLS’FAST COLOR | HERE ARE VALUES
"gg™!g \i ? SHEER SMART WASH FOR THE BABY
A CHILD’S PLAY SUITS w* mm ,
SHORT SLEEVE II DLVV CC? f J* N
“ofcovS %9c UlltvwCu nnrl
CJ~~ mm M /H c V&fa rnm I
S fiiv* mmmQ W ■ B . BABlES'rubber pants
m /•>' babies’ quilted pads
—^r Iift SIZES 7 TO 14 FLANNELETTE GOWNS
■'/ SIZES 2 TO 6 FLANNELETTE GERTRUDES
nainsook ,1 1L I rffl Wl ™ PANT,ES FLANNELETTE KIMONOS |
1.. . JR / L / ( Girls’ pretty wash BABY BINDERS
lof good quality Lain- \ \ \ \ in the sweet ? st BABY’S QUALITY VESTS
I sook. ~ \ /111 sheer summer styles
\\ I LJ we have ever seen. All TRAINING PANTS
1 & guaranteed fast colors. yOUR CHOICE 9C EACH
! den said, and the figures as com- j
| pleted are “atrocities.”
! In one instance the sculptor
pointed out. the stone-cutters failed
ito follow the model, and placed
! one hand of a figure if! such a
! position as to cause “an unjustified
j opinion of the sculptor's morality.”
RHINE VALLEY YIELDS
PRIMITIVE BONE TOOLS
Implements Used 100.000 Years Ago
Found by Museum Head.
BERLIN. July 6.—Bone tools
made by primitive dwellers in the
Rhine valley 400.000 years ago, be
fore even the low-browed Neander
thalers lived there, have been dis
covered anc* described by Dr. Otto
Schmidtgen, director of the Mainz
Museum of Natural History.
When they were first found, even
their discoverer was skeptical of
them, because it always has been
held that the first bone implements
were made by the much later men
of the Cro-Magnon type, who lived
in the Aurignacian period. How
ever, so many of them have now
been unearthed in the sand beds
at Mosbach, near Mainz, that there
seems to be no further doubt of
their antiquity.
The materials used were bones of
horses and elephants, and they were
shaped into borers, scrapers and
points .
FOREST WASTE
MAY BE BANNED
BY TRADE CODE
Recovery Act Likely to Be
Club to Put End to
Ruthless Cutting.
BY RUTH FINNEY
Times Sitecial Writer
WASHINGTON. July 6.—The na
tional industrial recovery adminis
tration may be made the basis of
a sweeping conservation movement
for protection of forests and water
and soil resources, it developed to
day.
When a code of fair competition
for the lumber industry comes up
for hearing—probably within the
next two weeks —the American For
estry Association will ask that it be
approved, only with provisions de
signed to prevent devastation of for
est areas by private lumber compa
nies without provision for scientific
replanting.
Conservation schemes proposed so
PAGE 3
far have covered only 175,000,000
acres of forest land the total
amount held by the federal govern*
m?nt, states and municipalities.
Private owners hold 495,000,000
acres of forest land and the gov*
ernment has been powerless, so far,
to force reforestation where timber
was cut ruthlessly, or was allowed
to burn.
Rehabilitation of the lumber in
dustry merely to continue destruc
; tive lumbering and the pyramiding
i of cut-over land would be a tempo
rary palliative, and one that will
tend to aggravate and postpone ulti
mate solution of the nation’s forest
| problem, the American Forestry
! Association said today,
j Although lumber, steel, oil, coal
and woolen codes all probably will
be presented this week, the women's
apparel industry will be the next
code up for hearing and approval, it
was indicated today. Hearings may
be set for next week.
Meanwhile, the cotton textile code,
first to be presented, probably will
go to President Roosevelt some
, time this week. The recovery ad
ministration staff is hard at work
preparing a detailed report for the
President’s consideration, and rec
ommendations to go with it.
The code will be submitted in the
form proposed by the industry, with
;hese recommendations,

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