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The Indianapolis times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1922-1965, September 08, 1933, Home Edition, Second Section, Image 27

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015313/1933-09-08/ed-1/seq-27/

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SEPT. 8, 1933
& Love % €V€ feffa
BMiIV limF TODAY
FVF FAYCESS. prt*v nwUttant to
EARLE BARNES, • nrertiHn* inn*er
©: Biib'. . department store. marrW
HICK RADER a co; ‘r.nion aiperin
t>,den' trmpr.rar: aora.ng in La
f, T)ir. v ■ h- e to e•* up *ora
le b *-.<■ re:
RAM HOIEHIIRiE an <Jver*u!r.
jna*. emp'o*.'d another store, becomes
It ?•::•-** v:th ARLENE SMITH veno
tr i ■ -rr ' Bsvo • bt:' he fne;e her*
#eif e fIEOROE BUSS Hand
r< ' RfK'E t >.' been 1< .tin*
L. !>.<-• F v*> ha.* been put-
Jte >• e -r , ri j'<f’ •• mor.ev borrowed
f r MON/. ALLEN copy
- ter rttellke* Ere and tries to m*e
trr.able for her Vf.ert an error, cotm*
th# --.tor* §3 nOO. appears in an an;r
---t urner - Mo t ■■ responsible but
the \ . e fa..* on F
l>Oßf iTHY MrELHINNEY. pr**T
. ■, u o Urea on the floor
them one
5?,, .; n•• n E'e thinks the
t . f to play up to Dick
anl beromes ar.er
NOW 1.0 OV WITH THE ATOBY
CHAPTER TWENTY-NINE
AFI*ER that first evening when
• Miss McElhinney Joined Eve
nnd Dirk on the porch she re
appeared every time they sat out ot
doors.
“My name is Dorothy," she con
lid il one evening, "but I wish you'd
call me Dottie.”
■ Never: Eve told herself sevagely.
*1 suppose the next thing she’ll want
to call me husband by his given
name. I like her nerve!" And. sure
enonvh, betor' 1 loiitr Miss McElhin
liev did assume that privilege.
But Eve found Miss Leeds, who
shared the third floor apartment
with Miss McElhinney, most agree
able company. Miss Leeds seemed
to have little time and devoted most
of her evening to work she had
brought home from school or else to
studv.
•She's exactly the sort of person
who should be instructing children.”
Eve told Dick. "She takes herself and
her work seriously but at the same
time she has a sense of humor. I
like her.”
For several years Dick had sub
scribed to a magazine devoted to
pictures and stories of foreign lands.
He offered to lend Miss Leeds his
file of back copies and she was de
lighted.
"Always Ihe bitter with the sweet,
the thorn with the rase!” said Eve
one night when she and Dick had
folded their steamer chairs and gone
upstairs to their rooms. "How happy
we could be at the office if it were
not for Mona Allen. And how happy
our evenings at home would be if it
were not for Dorothy McElhinney.”
She was to remember that little
sp ch a long, long time and to look
back on those evenings that had
been comparatively free from worry.
Atlas Coupler, the stock Eve had
bought, was being discussed general
ly now by those interested in the
market and was highly recom
mended as an investment,
a a a
AND then Atlas Coupler began to
recede. The fiirst day’s slump
of two points did not disturb Eve.
Even four days of decline did not
frighten her because she had enor
mous faith in the issue. Charles,
the office boy, had instructions
from Eve to wait at the corner
each day until the stock edition
newspapers made their appearance
and then to bring her a copy with
out delay. Arlene, tense and ner
vous. could scarcely wait until Eve
banded the paper to her.
Now Atlas Coupler was down 13
points and Eve wondered what
would happen next. Eacty time it
dropped Arlene figured her loss in
terms of what, she would have pur
chased had she not invested her
money.
• There goes that Agnes hat I
craved! ’ she said first. Then. "There
goes that new three-quarter length
la pin coat I counted on.”
Eve was glad Arlene took her
losses so good-naturedly. She felt
responsible. Atlas Coupler would
surely recover within a few days,
she felt.
But Atlas Coupler did not recov
er. Eve was in conference with
Earle Barnes at 10 one morning
the following week. The advertising
manager's telephone rang and with
- THIS CURIOUS WORLD -
BBrngM .. wioeless. telegpaph
.- ' * OF EQUATORIAL AFRICAi
; rzni {T P\/\( ( the goudougoudou is a
! .tzZIZZj 1 At?GE HOLLOWED-OUT LOG, A6OUT
1 VM ™ sr * FEET LONG and three feet
FtA HERS. THICK. SIGNALS APE
IN THE EAgLV OOOAWVEO ON THE INSTRUMENT
OAN3T OF H \ WITH STICKS, ANO /AAV BE
\ HEARD SIX MILES AWAY. BV
~ jitf ' ’ , RELAXING A MESSAGE FROM
I jL. ** ONE VILLAGE TO THE NEXT,
"'3C St SK'w7 # A ojr£r ' WORD TRAVELS THROUGH THE
|l 'ewr ~ FOREST WITH INCREDIBLE SPEED.
THE GOUDOUGOUDOU usually is placed in the middle of the vil
lage. just in front of the chief's hut, where there will be no delay when
a message is to be sent. The sticks used in pounding out the signals,
are tipped in natural rubber, which gives more volume to the sounds.
W hen placed on the bank of a river, the goudougoudou can sometimes
be heard ten miles.
NEXT—Does a bird's beak stop growing at maturity?
letS wll ,l
together/
1a frown of annoyance, he lifted the
receiver and clipped a brief "yes?”
"It's for you,” he said, handing
the Instrument to Eve.
j . "Sloan Sanford Company speak
ing.” boomed a stern, masculine
voice. "Atlas Coupler has reached a
new low and to all appearances it
going lower. We must be fn position
to know that you will cover your
interest or we shall be obliged to
make other disposition of the stock.”
man
I'' VE'S face blanched to the lips.
Barnes must have heard, be
raiise the voice over the wire car
ried so clearly.
Why—why!” she stammered,
i What do you advise me to do?”
"If we can rely on you to send
your check for S2OO within the next
twenty-four hours we can keep you
on our books. Otherwise we will
have to sell your holdings, which
j w ill mean a .total loss to you.”
Eve thought rapidly.
I "I'll be in this noon to cover my
interest,”'sh° promised.
Barnes looked at her quizzically.
No doubt he was curious about
what had happened. Eve thought.
Immediately she tried to concen
trate on Barnes’ plan for a June
campaign featuring sports goods.
He was talking about improvising
a log cabin on the third floor and
having Mrs. Penney paint the scene
ry. "Heavens,thought Eve, "w r here
will I get that $200?"
Wh°n the conference was over
Eve departed, hoping she had missed 1
no details of Barnes’ plan.
Eve hurried to her desk telephone :
and called Dick's number. She had
no reserve fund; her money was all
invested in Atlas Coupler. She had
even borrowed from hpr mother,
j "Dick." Eve begged, "can you come
I downtown and meet, me at the City
bank at noon? It's very Impor
tant.”
"I'll be waiting for you in the
lobby.” he answered briefly.
Dick must be busy, Eve thought.
Perhaps there was someone with
! him or he would have said mor®.
Arlene finally reappeared with her
notebook and pencil. “I’ll never be
able to read these hieroglyphics,”
she said as she sat down at her
! typewriter to transcribe tne notes.
["Barnes is in a hurry for these let
ters and I'm as nervous as a cat!
I I'll see you later.”
Eve gathered up several sheets
of copy paper and a pencil and then
went to the sports goods department
to lay plans for the June campaign.
When she returned Barnes was
j standing at Arlene’s desk, taking
'up the letters as rapidly as she
j transcribed them. Poor Arlene!
That act in itself was enough to
make a stenographer nervous. It
was Just 12 o'clock. Eat hurried
out of the building to keep her ap
pointment. with Dick. She would
have to wait until later to talk to
I Arlene.
She entered the revolving door of
the bank. And then she saw him!
Dick's face lighted with a glad
I smile but Eve's froze in horror. It
was not because he was smoking
his old briar pipe in a nonchalant
j manner.
Here, in the midst of hurrying,
well-groomed men and women, Dick
had the temerity to be wearing his
old slouch hat, baggy trousers and
blue flannel shirt. And his coat had
a streak of paint on one sleeve.
What was more, he seemed entirely
unconscious of his shocking appear
ance and was coming toward her.
j "Dick!” Eve reproached him. "I
didn't dream you'd come down in
those old clothes!”
"Well.” he said easily, “there was
concrete to pour today so I didn't
wear my tuxedo to work. Anyhow.
I didn't have time to go home to
I change.”
(To Be Continued)
The Pinnacles National Monu
ment in California is one of the
last strongholds and breeding places
of the California condor, largest
bird in the state.
OUR BOARDING HOUSE
fUIF I THINK YOU BIT OFF TOO EGIT IS QUITE
J 3VG A CHUNK OF PLUG WUEN LIK&UV THAT THE *"
/jf you SOL'D Tui "PARROT TO THAT >1 WILL BE "RETICEMT* FOR
HER \% A MOMTW OR
SHE COULD TEACH IT FRENCH , T IccflHPl Hh
m —o ITALIAN* WHY, hruTC 1 T(^
B’O HAVE TO GET THAT
FOR SOONP.JUST J Ar A.M )
>r: wait'll swe - wjk . ? j
A\N‘ BUT SQUAWKS*
FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS
WHAT 1 call & FIRST NOTICE THAT I OUT AMD IW ABOUT g| WHAT DID Jj§j§ ASKED HIM WHAT TO DO-HE SAID - , vrilfA J I DON'T THINK I s
REAL PAL-TAKIM' SOMETH IMG WAG , TEN MINUTES SHE || you 00 ffj|l TO GIVE HER A LARGE OOSE OF AMY CLUES J| £v£R Aw OKJt 0F f
- CARE OF POODLE WRONG WITH- CAME RUNNIN' IN THE (§ 2 TABLE SALT IN HOT WATER -THEN, J n-rM?' A THOe>E THEV •
THROUGH ALL OF MER? HOUSE AN - SHRIEKIN’ IpljL’ LATER HE CAME OVER AN' TOLD y; s| ANYTHING LIKE ! L
THIt i y I SOMETHIN 'AWFUL — I ME POODLE WAS POISONED j gb* . FLEAS? /
KNEW SOMETHING WAStf* POOR OL POODLE T. f J: i V> —==? „ K /■_' ,
T 7 V WRONG
—j . “ ■
WASHINGTON TUBBS II
RUECwTW AND BULLET / NEVER Ml ND. f MURDERED / NOT BAD. 9 YEAR?} /u)ELL,THG PLOOR UJAS\ C SE WHW? WHY, Af / WHY, GOLDt of CDUPSEi 60LD DUGt Y
, 6 AIL | I HOLES THRU (1 DID YOU MARE OF IN THEIR. '* TO BE ELK ACT. WHAT TORN UP, AS THO MONEV- X *RECKON- J / WAS SPILLED ALL OVER THE FLOOR. /
IN A 1 THEIR SKULLS. P j IT? .BUNKS. (ELSE DIO YOU NOTICE? THEY MIGHT O' BEEN
...... Ww ll I .... \ .... ..... (T I .s..—•.
ALLEY OOP,
/Utvi 4T
Ar, r THEVS TWO BLO6S OKAY ' ■
1 out here that*s<sotF Jzh , W
BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES
TARZAN THE APE MAN
Jean s disappearance was a total mystery to
her father. In the excitement of the pigmies’
sudden coming and going, she might have cried
out and he had not heard. Frantic, he ran about
calling loudly: "Jean! Jean!” Riano was about
to shoot Into the woods.
You Can Buy EVERYTHING Your Family Needs at
THRIFT Prices In Ayres Downstairs Store < s " ! * >
-der t
THE >NDIANAPOLIS TIMES ;
Knocking Rianos gun down, Parker cried:
•‘Don't shoot —you fool!” Then, amazed, he caught
sight of a bronzed body swinging through the trees.
It was the ape-man! Parker saw him toss Jean
up to an ape. perched on a higher limb. The girl
was apparently unconscious.
—By Ahern
OUT OUR WAY
I-T UCXDKS uvce\ w. _ | l MENTAL \
- ' IT. W/AG j i [ Co€LTV J
ORA S
= I n Lot aswincr,! s /Tw
'--H “ hi 6or vcov< '" r j\ v
-=> l_J II \ "TV-V V-vkiOß ON \
\ Mis, Dome. / \ Op l V4[f i
y
KING; Y ( Ae
. WE SAW’EM-BIG ONES' \ 7 Nv ;,'’ A AVliftyr#'
COMING THIS WAV'VUH I V i &■ < Jt!.'*, .wbl fIV"V ,
BETTER DO SUMPIN./
Y POLICE f '
\ ° --frftWtu / % 1 1933 BY NtA SERVICE, >NC
f =n
*LOW<b,HKTC\E
L I <d± ~v^Bv U NE>Pvicr,mcj
The ape caught the limp body and disappeared.
They saw the ape-man follow. Parker ran. his
men behind him. For a while they were able to
follow the flight of Tarzan. but presently they
lost track. As they stood listening. Holt came
runnfng to the scene, calling excitedly: "Parker!
What is it?"
—By Edgar Rice Burroughs
Jean’s father was too stunned to reply. Holt
shook him, yelling: "What's happened?" All
Parker could gasp, was: “Jean! Jean! Riano
pointed up into the trees. Holt saw nothing but
the darkened jungle's green. And then, suddenly,
he understood! The girl he loved had been stolen
by the ape-man!
PAGE 27
—By Williams
—By Blosser,
—By Crane
—By Hamlin
—By Martin

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