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The Indianapolis times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1922-1965, March 30, 1936, Final Home Edition, Second Section, Image 13

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TtfARCH 30, 193 ft
Hollywood's Staging of Flo Ziegfeld's
Life in Picture Form Far Out-Dazzles
Any of Glorifier's Lavish Spectacles
182 Show Girls to Be Seen
In Shots Taken of
Revolving Set.
BY HARRISON
HOLLYWOOD, March 30.
(NEA)—FIo Ziegfeld would be
proud, but perhaps a little abashed,
If he could return today and watch
the stupendous goings-on in the
vast barn-like structure which
M-G-M calls Stage 12.
The glorifler would be pained to
see that movie magic has far over
shadowed his genius for staging
spectacles on a gigantic and lavish
scale.
He would be proud becr*ose the
most astounding musical number
and settings conceived in Holly
wood constitute a scene for his own
life story.
Studio a Blaze of Lights
Here’s the effect,:
You scuttle into the place
through a small, refrigerator-like
door, and immediately are blinded
by hundreds of blazing lights. Re
turning vision reveals a dazzling
stage setting far bigger than any
ever planned by Ziegfeld. Or even
Billy Rose, for that matter.
Rising 32 feet above floor level is
a chalky white fluted column, with
a spiral pathway to the top. It is
70 feet in diameter and is mounted
on a revolving stage made of struc
tural steel.
The whole thing weighs 92 tons
and is balanced so perfectly that it
ran be turned by hand. Actually,
though, it’s operated by a syncho
nized motor.
Show Girls Play in Tableaux
Around the base are grouped
dancers and show girls in tableau
style to illustrate excerpts from
songs of the show. As the stage
turns, these, scenes come into view,
and the audience's attention spirals
In the top of the column where
poses Virginia Bruce, most beauti
ful of all the glorified gals.
In the background is a blue cylo
rama, 260 feet long and as high as
a seven-story building. Here arp
sky and stars—the latter consisting
of 6000 automobile headlight bulbs
wired in series of 36. A pilot light
for each series instantly reveals toe
location of any trouble in "Che
Milky Way.
Dance Director Seymour Felix is
ready for another take of the scene.
He barks out orders to 182 girls and
R 8 electricians, stagehands and me
chanics.
He’s Ross on Set
Felix is a little man whose wife
isn't afraid to reprimand him when
he comes home late for dinner. But
on t his set he is the big boss.
"Ready!" yells Felix. Electricians
“hit" the scene with all lights. The
stage turns, and in doing so un
winds an 1800-pound curtain con
taining 4300 yards of silk. The out
side of the curtain is a. gleaming
w'hite; the inside from white
to black in 22 shades.
The tableaux pass before the
camera, and the posing girls smile
their prettiest. Out of range of the
lens, though, they droop visibly, for
there have been almost countless
similar shots, and they're tired.
Nudity Noticeable by Absence
One of the things you notice is
Ihe absence of nudity. Florenz
Ziegfeld didn't have to worry about
the Hays office, but producers of
"The Great Ziegfeld" have been
very careful indeed.
When the stage revolves com
pletely, Felix yells. "Cut!” and then
yawns. He, too, is tired. There
have been six days of this, with
four more days of shooting required
Five weeks were needed to build the
big set and solve perplexing elec
trical problems.
This one finale number, it is
whispered about Hollywood, cost
$230,000. Yet it will occupy the
screen for less than nine minutes.
William Powell to
'Forget' Hollywood
Time* Special
HOLLYWOOD. March 30.—Wil
liam Powell is planning to drop out
of sight—somewhere in Mexico
when he completes his current star
ring picture, "The Ex-Mrs. Brad
ford.”
Because of forthcoming roles.
Powell can be away only two or
three weeks, but he is to sever all
Hollywood connections during that
time.
Jean Arthur. Powell's leading
woman, also is to take an off-the
beaten-track vacation. She is to
sail for the South Seas when the
picture is completed.
Arturs Old Friends
Ann Harding and Walter Abel,
who a nr,ear in “The Witness Chair,"
are old friends, having appeared to
gether in a Broadway production of
‘•The Taming of the Shrew."
WHERE, WHAT, WHEN
APOLLO
Colleen. musical picture with
Powell, .roan Blondell. Jack
Oakl*. Ruby Keeler and Hugh Her
bert. at 11:31. 1:31. 3:31. 5:31. 7:31.
CIRCLE
' Give Os This Night.” screen
ope re 11 with Jan Ktcpura and
SWArtOtlt, at 11. 1:45. 4:30.
T2O and 10:10. "Preview Murder
Mystery. with Reginald Dennv.
J? r *„ k !l„ #nd Gail Patrick. at
12.45, 3:30, 6 20 and 9:05.
_ ENGLISH’S
Personal Appearance or How Far
Is the Barn." with Gladys George.
Mer"a Pace, at * 20
INDIANA
“Love Before Breakfast." with
Carole Lombard and Preston Foster
*• 1:01. 4:07. 7:13. 10:19 Also First
KEITHS
“The Brat,," Federal Plavers pro
duction with New LeFevre. Jack Du
val, Betty Anne Brown, at 8:15.
LOEWS
"Robin Hood of El Dorado ” with
Warner Baxter and Ann Lortng. at
11, 1:45, 430 7:15 10 Also "You
May Be Next." with Ann Sothern
and Lloyd Nolan, at 12:30, 3:15, 6.
1:50.
LYRIC
"Snowed Under." on screen, with
George Brent. Glenda Farrell. Gene
vieve Tobin, at 11:23. 2 21. 5:14, 8:07,
10.39
Ooing Hollywood." on stage, with
Harry Howard. 1:00 3:53. 4. 9 39.
issmrsns
I Today—Tomorrow |
Joe Penner, Jack Oakie In |
_ COLLEGIATE" t
Fill*—"lf You Could Only Cook** I
* tfm,
WL& § ■
~ mm
HP £
§
jjl
Hr
Seen floating through the air with the greatest of ease is Harriett
Hoctor. one of the principal dancers in “The Great Ziegfeld” movie
story based on the life of the famous showman. The picture may be
brought he. e soon as a road show attraction.
Stage Turns to News Scene in Federal Theater
Projects Factual Playlets, 'Living Newspaper'
BY WILLIS THORNTON
CLEVELAND, March 30.—(NEA)
—A brand -new' w'ay of presenting
news is being tried out by the Fed
eral Theater prlect’s “Living News
paper.”
Short playlets, written around ac
tual new's events detailed in news
papers, are being put on in several
cities, such as New York and Cleve
land. Directors hope they will in
terest people not used to the regular
theater, and also give practice to
young writers in writing plays.
The “Living Newspaper” playlets
are written and acted by people on
the WPA theater projects, w'ho in
clude unemployed actors, stage
hands. playwrights, newspaper men
and directors.
Stick Closely to Facts
A group g**ts together under a di
rector or an instructor, and each
suggests news stories of the day,
about which he thinks he could
write a short play. The best news
“plots” are chosen, and the writer
turns to and writes his short play,
keeping to the facts and dialogue
of the news story as far as they
are available.
A conscientious effort is made to
keep to the facts and the spirit of
the actual event. Then a cast is
chosen ,to play the parts, scenery
and costumes are hastily gotten
together, and the play is put on.
Edward Reveaux, supervisor of
the Cleveland project, believes such
a playlet can be put on within 24
hours, although they have never
done it that fast.
Veterans of 30 years in the com
mercial theater, gray and grizzled
stagehands w’ho have pulled the
ropes for 40 years, youngsters w'ho
Large Film Studios Have Edge,
Asserts Independent Producer
Big Companies Control Best of Actors, Writers and
Directors, Says Edward Small, Retiring.
'Times Special
HOLLYWOOD. March 30.—Large studios have a grip on almost all
of the better craftsmen in acting, writing and directorial fields, ham
stringing the independent producer, according to Edw-ard Small, who
after 14 years in the business is making his last picture as an independent
producer.
According to this producer, the
essentials for any movie production
venture ar<\ A good-sized bank ac
count. a theatrical background for
training in showmanship, ability to
select proper stories and writers,
availability of "name” players and a
good releasing organization.
“Independent production makes
old men out of youths,” Small said.
"So mapy elements enter into the
making of a film that it is necessary
for the producer to work with the
writers on the story, select the cast,
work on the set with the director
and cut U\e final picture. Other
wise,. it would not be possible to
make every penny of your budget
count.
“As to players, talent and ability
to draw at the box-office are neces
sary. Very often an independent
producer must wait for weeks for a
studio to finish with a certain player.
More weeks would be lost if the
ENGLISH —TONIGHT
ms., WED. NITES-Popular Mat. Wed.
PEMBERTON PRIZE PLAY
“PERSONAL
APPEARANCE ”
or “HOW FAR IS THE BARIT
GLADYS GEORGE— n! r J° Vast
504 limn in N.Y.—IOO Tlnw In Chicago
YEAR’S COMEDY SMASH
Nttee, sdo to Si.2o. Mat., 85c to *1.85
IXCL. TAX
TELEPHONE
Ik Ell Xfl 9 Lincoln 9000
TONIGHT AT 8:IS
Federal Players
in “THE BRAT”
NIGHTS—ISc, Sir. 40e I
BAT. MAT.—lOc, 20c, 80c |
j_NgXT_WEEK—"THE BARKER”
have had only a taste of theater
experience, ambitious writers who
have not yet quite succeeded in
getting plays produced—all these
and many others mingle in the
pre-curtain confusion in “little the
aters” as finishing touches are put
on the playlets.
Very few standard plays are tried
—the idea is to, give the waiter
as well as the actor a break.
All’s grist that comes to the Fed
eral Theater’s mill. Here is a short
playlet of tw r o scenes based on the
silicosis tragedy at Gauley’s Bridge.
Here is a dramatization of the de
bate between A1 Smith and Joe
Robinson.
‘AAA Plowed Under’
Here is “AAA Plowed Under,” a
dramatic version of the Supreme
Court’s momentous decision making
the farm program unlawful. Here
is a little comic touch about a gro
cery boy, infatuated with Jean Har
low, who telephoned her long dis
tance from a customer’s house.
Here is Ann Cooper-Hewltt tell
ing her pitiful story of conflict
with her mother as a spotlight re
veals her emotion.
Here ®re—no, there w?ere—Mus
solini and Haile Selassie, im
personated to the life on the stage,
stating their conflicting points of
view on Ethiopia.
Repercursion Feared
Were, because this play was
hastily withdrawn on account of
fears that presenting such plays
with Federal funds and under Fed
eial authority might offend foreign
governments.
When Mussolini and Haile Se
lassie withdrew from the Federal
Theater's “Living Newspaper,” so
script had to be rewritten for some
one else.”
Mr. Small considers himself lucky
that in 14 years of picture-making
he has had only one. failure, and
that was due to his inability to get
the cast, director and writers he
wanted.
Ex-Mannikin in Role
Maxine Jennings, appearing cur
rently with Fred Stone in "Farmer
in the Dell,” was at one time a
mannikin for Jean Patou, noted
Parisian designer.
Ini *
pi o^4\>l
IjISIsL 9*
A CLASSIC OF Jf
ENTERTAINMENT
ME ARE FROUD TO
SHOW AGAIN! ’B,
g| WILL
Rogers
MARK TWAIN’S !
“A CONNECTI- | Brought
CUT YANKEE” l
THE TNDIANAPOLIS TIMES
DRAMA THRIVES IN
RUSSIA, WRITER SAYS
BY JOHN W. THOMPSON
A place where there are no un
employed actors, where audiences
never boo nor hiss, where experi
mental theatricals are welcomed and
where all flops are paid for by the
state, would sound like heaven to
most would-be thespians who tramp
Broadway pavements looking for
work.
But one would gather from Norris
Houghton’s excellently written new
book. “Moscow Rehearsals,” which
deals with what goes on back of the
footlights in Russia, that the busi
ness end of the drama in that coun
try is quite idealistic. That, how
ever, seems to be about as far as the
Utopianism goes.
Mr. Houghton, now acting as stage
manager for the surprisingly suc
cessful Broadway production, “Libel,”
at Henry Miller’s Theater, is an In
dianapolis boy who left Princeton in
the early 1930’s to seek his fortune
in the world of grease-paint.
Received Fellowship
He set “Carrie Nation” and was
Theater Guild’s “Both Your Houses”
stage manager for the New York
before he landed a Guggenheim
Fellowship to look into the Russian
theater.
Mr. Houghton always has been in
terested in dramatics. Several years
ago while in Shortridge High School
we can remember his sketching
stage designs during debating class.
These interludes didn’t detract from
Mr. Hougthon’s scholastic achieve
ment, however, because he is one
of those rare men who can suc
cessfully keep many irons in the
fire.
From Shortridge he w-ent to
Princeton, made his mark there with
the Theater Intime and the Tri
angle Club. # ln 1934 he set forth
for Russia, armed wirh a fair knowl
edge of the language and a super
normal inquisitiveness.
Contribution Important
What Mr. Haughton brought
back about the Russians and dra
matics, learned in the six months he
w’as there, is an important contribu
tion to American producers.
Os the 40 Moscow theaters, Mr.
Houghton chose four to investigate
thoroughly. His book contains in
teresting details about them all. Un
like many reporters w'ho have w'rit-
did Elmer Rice. This well-known
playwright had been regional
director for New York, where near
ly 5000 people have been given work
under the theater division of WPA
in 49 performing groups.
Rice cried loudly against “censor
ship" when the Mussolini Selassie
play was called off. and he had
encountered resistance to other
plays he had planned on the share
cropper situation and lynching.
Censorship is Denied
Jacob Baker, assistant WPA ad
ministrator in charge of spending
the $6,700,000 of art project funds
which are allotted to the theater,
denied censorship.
In his behalf it was pointed out
that there is some difference be
tween censorship that prohibits any
one putting on any play he pleases,
and *hat in which the government
decides what kind of plays it is go
ing to put on with the taxpayers’
money.
Objection was also made to “AAA
Plowed Under.” but criticism sub
sided somewhat on revelation that
some lines objected to were quoted
directly from Agriculture Secretary
Wallace's speeches on the issue.
Charge “Propaganda”
“Propaganda” is freely charged,
especially in such plays as “Class of
1929.” This speculates on the
thoughts and feelings of un
employed youth. “Radical propa
ganda” was charged and denied
with equal emphasis. One man’s
facts are another man’s propa
ganda.
Thus the “Living Newspaper” has
traveled the same rough road as the
printed one.
More than 10,000 people have
been paid from S7O to $155 a month
during the winter for their activities
in the “Living Newspaper” and in
the other dramatic ventures
clustered around it in the Federal
Theater Project.
Most Come From Relief Rolls
A few experienced actors, direc
tors and administrators who were
not on relief have been hired. The
number varies from 10 to 25 per
cent on various projects. That was
to give a leaven of experienced
workers to guide and' aid the others.
More than 75.000 people in New
York alone have seen the free per
formances given. Tickets for some
of the “Living Newspaper” and
other plays given by the WPA are
distributed free among those who
can not pay to attend regular thea
ters. Other projects charge from
15 to 55 cents for seats at their
productions.
The “Living Newspaper” and the
rest of the theater projects are
paralleled by other similar relief
projects for dancers, radio perform
ers and writers. A regular WPA
radio program Ls now on the air
from Washington, and the New
York dance unit has put on several
programs.
15.0VE BEFORE
BREAKFAST "
I-. 11 PRESTON FOSTER
UF llMt _
rtisslt MATTHEWS^
F 1 Romance!
SWARTHOUI
■yV JAR KIIPURA Mystery!
PRRVKW
\Jhti Nicfkf.
HimUTTIM o-Btr
ten of Russia in magazine articles
and travelogs, Mr. Houghton went
in the back door of the Russian
theaters, explored their basements
as well as the parlors.
At the Meierhold Theater Mr.
Houghton saw what makes people
talk about that group, the strange
philosophy of one man completely
dominating a theater’s activities.
Meierhold, founder and director, be
lieves that the audience should never
be allowed to imagine it is not a
theater. So he dresses the actors in
denim overalls, lets the audience see
all the lighting equipment, the stage
scaffolding and hopes they will not
forget where they are.
Meierhold Interprets
The inflection, the action which
Meierhold actors go through are not
of their own interpretation, but
Meierhold’s. He tells them how he
would read the lines and they are
read that way.
At the Vakhtankov Theater Mr.
Haughton saw “Intervention,” a
Russian spy play with plot laid in
Odessa in 1920. The outstanding
characteristic of this group is a
gross caricature. If men have long
noses, the noses are very long, wom
en’s large hats are very large and
fat persons are extremely fat. Mr.
Houghton likens the Vakhtangov
players to Peter Arno cartoons come
to life.
One of the few people ever to in
terview the great Stanislavski at
work, Mr. Houghton watched him
direct his Moscow Art Theater actors
in “The Days of the Turbins.” Here,
according to Mr. Houghton, is the
most conservative atmosphere to be
found in any of Moscow’s temples
of the drama. Rhythm and move
'ment are the assentials at the Mos
cow Art rehearsals.
Audience Is Secondary**
In “The Iron Flood.” which he
saw at the Realstic Theater, the
audience sat right out on the bat
tlefield. The wounded and dying
were dragged over one’s feet, the
bombs burst near one’s chair. The
entire theater became the stage, with
the audience of secondary impor
tance.
Russian actors never are con
cerned over the size of the sala
ries. They get what the state pays,
them. So it is with playwrights,
scene painters and every one else
connected with the drama.
Almost any one in Russia who
has a yearning to become an actor
or actress will get the chance, ac
cording to Mr. Houghton, whether
he happens to be working in a steel
factory or baker’s shop. A strange
harmony exists among the various
theaters of the country, a harmony
which Mr. Hougthon ascribes to the
fact that "people in Moscow know
what they are trying to do.”
He does not think that the Rus
sian system could be transferred
immediately to America, but hints
that some of the ideas might work
well here.
Writer to Speak Here
The success of the Russian the
ater project can be traced directly
to the audiences. In his six months
in Russia, during which he attend
ed a theater almost every night, the
writer says he saw no more than a
dozen empty seats in any theater.
When he has time off from stage
managing “Libel.” Mr. Houghton
lectures on the Russian theater. Re
cently he spoke before the National
Convention of Junior Leagues in
Washington.
“What is next on the boards for
me I don’t know,” he wrote us re
cently, “I've come back more in
terested in directing than in de
signing and I'm hoping to do some
directing in summer theaters this
summer.”
Mr. Houghton is scheduled to
speak at Tabernacle Presbyterian
Church next month. He is the son
of Mrs. Grace N. Houghton, 134
E. 36th-st.
(His book, published by Harcourt,
Brace X Cos., sells for $2.75.)
Miss Clark's' Pupils
to Present Recital
Pupils of Miss Pauline Clark, as
sisted by Myrtle Hardwickes Burres,
soprano, are to give a piano recital
in Washington Street Presbyterian
Church at 8 Friday night.
Those to take part are Shirley
Ann Newton. Dorothy Peters, Gene
via Moore, Geraldine Terhune, Wil
ma Jean Adams. Josephine Osborne.
Marie Barker, Geraldine Butz, Vic
toria Stevens and Russell Terhune.
Jr.venile Star Featured
John Arledge. juvenile lead in
“Two In Revolt,” scored last sea
son in the stage hit, “Tobacco
Road” with Henry Hull.
Another Villain Role
J. Carrol Naish has another of
his sinister villain roles in the new
Richard Dix starring picture, “Spe
cial Investigator.”
‘BgiiiLHooD of€l Dorado*
' and a race of p
■g ' build the Great Pyramid? Are the
tales of the sunken continents of Atlantis
' apc * Lcm-jria legend or scientific sact 7 Do you know
abo’Jt the strange culture and wisdom which these
peoples of the lost races left behind them 7 The secrets of
the ancient-mystery schools live on. Learn the truth about the
EjSjjfy hidden power of mind and the strange forces of life and soul. wSSu
XjjSjgy These are but some of the fascinating subjects of this lecture. '■S'L®
■.FREE LECTURE ♦ SSffi M
' v ■ All Are Welcome Come and bring a friend to hear Mr. CA. Poole, ffjSjtf
I National Rosicrucian lecturer, make this forceful address. Also, SEE ftg|||
and HEAR the motion pictures. “The Human Crucible" and jjjpl|
jjn "Lemuna, Tne Lost ContinenL" Tnere are no fees or collections jHIK
jB Tomorrow MASONIC TEMPLE AUDITORIUM
H Night North and Illinois Streets. Marrh 31
8 P. M. North Street Entrance. .
ROSICRUCIANS ~(AMORC)^4^
Bach Works
Are Sung in
Full Beauty
Lutheran Choir Pleases Its
Listeners in First
of Concerts.
BY JAMES THRASHER
The opportunity to hear Bach’s
larger choral works done in our own
city seems probable with the ap
pearance of the newly organized
Lutheran Bach Choir. In their first
full concert at St. Paul's Lutheran
Church yesterday afternoon, the
choristers, under the direction of
William J. Kirchoff, rewarded a
large audience with fine singing and
the promise of greater things to
come.
Bach never is revealed more inti
mately than in his sacred choral
music, and the result, when com
petently performed, is both spiritu
ally and musically satisfying. Yes
terday’s singing of the cantata,
“God’s Time Is the Best,” really
achieved this result, and with less
shortcomings than might be ex
pected from the first concert of a
non-professional group.
There were rough spots, to be
sure, insecurity of attack and in
sufficient vocal power in the cli
maxes, but Mr. Kirchhoff evident
ly knows what he is about and im
parted much of his intelligent and
sincere conception of the music to
his singers.
In the cantata and the three
chorales that preceded it were found
beauty of pharsing, lovely pianissi
mos and clear diction. Best of all.
however, was the fact that the per
formance was completely “in char
acter.” The stateliness and de/*p
conviction of the music were ever
present, perhaps because the sing
ers are of the Lutheran Church, for
which so much of Bach’s greatest
music was written.
Take Solo Tarts
Solo parts in the cantata were
done by Miss Mildred Rdmer. so
prano, Miss Mildred Baumgart, con
tralto, and Frank Scharfe. bass—
and done excellently. Good, too.
were the organ solos by A. E. R.
Mueller, who played the choral
prelude, “Ich Ruf’ zu Dir, Herr Jesu
Christ,” and the last movement of
the second Trio Sonata, whose dif
ficulties preclude its frequent per
formance.
The chorus was fortunate to have
the services of Miss Marie Zorn ps
accompanist and soloist. Those who
have heard this gifted pianist know
that her Each playing is of exqui
site loveliness. Her solos yester
day consisted of three choral-pre
ludes: Rummel’s transcriptions of
“Thee Have I Ever Loved” and
“Now Jesus Christ—ls Risen"; and
“Now Cheer Our Hearts This Even
tide.” transcribed by Vaughn Wil
liams. Not many Bach interpre
ters have penetrated more deeply
into the spiritual essence of the
composer’s meaning than Miss Zorn,
nor given it to us with greater
artistry.
It is good to know that the Lu
theran Bach Chorus is established
on a. firm basis through the spon
sorship of the Federation of Evan
gelical Lutheran Churches of In
dianapolis and vicinity. Assured of
a continued existence, it should do
much toward familiarizing the pub
lic with great compositions too sol
dom heard.
Joan Crawford to
Play in Irish Role
Times Special,
HOLLYWOOD, March 30.—With
Joan Crawford as its star, “Parnell,”
stirring Irish drama and . out
standing stage success, soon is to go
before the cameras.
It is to be Miss Crawford’s first
costume picture role—different from
any she has played before.
The actress is to play Katie
O'Shea, whose love for Charles
Stewart Parnell, great Irish leader
in the struggle for Irish home rule,
left an everlasting impression upon
the history of that country.
Ford Directs Hepburn
John Ford, recently acclaimed by
the Academy of Motion Picture!
Arts and Sciences as the best di- j
rector of the year, is currently di- j
recting Katharine Hepburn and;
Fredric March in “Mary of Scot
land.”
irw€oC
“GOING N
HOLLYWOOD”/
Dnffy Musical Revue With
HARRY HOWARD M
“America's Crazy Man”
______
BA LLE r . IS BLUE M
Europe’s Latest Hit M
!Seats 2$ e +67lit&s 4o-
A BUZZARD C
[MM OF BLONDES
GEORGE BRENT W
GENEVIEVE TOBIN %
GLENDA FARRELL J
PATRICIA ELLIS f
FRANK McHUGH l
I MU i 111111|1111 k 111 31 ■
Opening Tonight
x
'■'*•■ : ‘ : ' w • y yHBfcsOT^SBBWB
it 4b
Principals in two local legiti
mate productions opening tonight
are Betty Anne Brown (upper),
who is to be seen in the Federal
Players’ “The Brat.” on Keith's
stage, and Merna Pace, in the
cast of “Personal Appearance" at
English’s.
Oberlin Women
Will Sing Here
Glee Club Is to Appear at
Church Tonight.
Under the leadership of John E.
Wirkler, founder and director, the
Oberlin College Women’s Glee Club,
Oberlin, 0., is to give a concert to
night in First Congregational
Church. The Woman's Club of the
church is sponsoring the appear
ance.
Mr. Wirkler also conducts the
Men’s Glee Club at the college,
which in 1928-29 celebrated its fif
tieth season and its twenty-fifth un->
der Mr. Wirkler.
Tonight's concert is included on a
10-day tour of Ohio, Indiana and
Illinois. Soloists are to be Misses
Alice Shriver, soprano; Edith Ly
man. violinist, and Magaret Rudd,
pianist. Mrs. E. E. Spacy Is chair
man of the sponsors.
Jordan Plans
Summer Work
Six-Week Term to Be Held
June 16 to July 28,
Dates for the summer session at
Arthur Jordan Conservatory of Mu
sic have been set by school officials.
The six-week term is to open June
16 and close July 28.
Two special short terms of 10
days each have been announced.
The first is to be held June 3 to 14,
and the second, July 29 to Aug. 8.
The summer session curiculum is
to include private lessons in music,
dramatic art and dancing, as well
as a wide range of academic classes
in music education, theory, ensem
ble and speech. The session is ex
pected to attract public school mu
sic teachers who wish to meet li
cense requirements and earn ad
vance degrees.
;■ ■ ll i.,", ,
i^tsENTATIONS
■ NEISHBORHOOP f HiffrTfE"Sj
WEST SIDE
n m i m r 2702 W. !oth St.
S A K Double Feature
± XX A U Jean Har)pw
“RIFF RAFF”
“SEVEN KEYS TO BALDPATE"
BELMONT *SS" ont
inaL/mvm Eddie Ci , ntor
“STRIKE ME PINK”
"PADDY O’DAY”
Da In it 2540 W. Mich. St.
A\Y Double Feature
4 a a u a Rochelle Hudson
"SHOW .NO MERCY’"
‘FRESHMAN LOVE”
NORTH SIDE
Rl m f-m Illinois at 34th
11/. Double Feature
* A John Bolea
"ROSE OF THE RANCHO”
"EXCLUSIVE STORY”
UPTOWN
f Irene Dunne
“MAGNIFICENT OBSESSION”
“EVERY SATURDAY NIGHT”
g~\ a r| i/'Yfr 30th and Illinni*
CjAKRICK D , onb “ *' ttaT '
Janies Cagney
“FRISCO KID”
“TRANSATLANTIC TUNNEL”
riffs /"i* a in St. Clair A Ft. Wayne
ST. CLAIR
“MAGNIFICENT OBSESSION”
"PROFESSIONAL SOLDIER”
• 30th at Northw’t'n
Kf.X Double Feature
Wallace Berry
"AH WILDERNESS”
__ “HEBE COOKIE”
rjs a f Drt'r'r Talbot A 22nd
lALBOII noubl ' Fr * tar
Bette Davii
“DANGEROUS”
“RIFF RAFF"
STRATFORD Double Feature
Myrna Lot
‘ WHIPSAW”
“SHIP CAFE”
Mr p p t Noble A Mass.
LUCA Fe *‘°. r
Wendy Barrie
“MILLIONS IN THE AIR"
“BAR 20 RIDE g AGAIN"
ivn a a a 2301 Station St.
L>KLAM ”? obl
Wallare Berry
“AH WILDERNESS"
“TWO FOR TONIGHT”
' EAST SIDE
RI VOLT "'•iSSJS
A* J. T VLiL Ed<Jje c>Btor
"STRIKE ME PINK”
“ROSE OF JTHE RANCHO”
mi TvrT"'TArv 4020 F.. New York
IUXLDO Double Feature
Jean Harlew
“RIFF RAFF”
“IF TOP COULD ONLY COOK”
ejs a p/\lg a 2443 E- Wash. SL
TACOMA *7Sgssr
"COLLFGIATE”
“MARY BURNS, FUGITIVE'
PAGE 13
Players Go
to Pastures
Less Green
Work Ended on Negro Play;
Some Actors Little
Better Off.
HOLLYWOOD. March 30 fNEA)
—They have finished filming “The
Green Pastures” and the black
angels and chocolate cherubs, the
magicians and the prophets and all
the rest, including "De Lawd" him
self. have scattered to pastures less
green.
Pretty nice while it lasted
working in the movies. Mighty
pleasant to drop into the dingy little
nighteries along Centra 1-av of a
balmy evening and talk of the
screen ana, in terms of nostalgia,
Harlem.
Right gratifying it was to be an
actor of such importance that one's
traveling expenses were paid clear
across the continent.
Their Money Gone
That's all over now. An immor
tal play has been transferred to
deatnless celluloid. Some of the
players who have been a little* im
provident with their Hollywood sal
aries may not get Pack at all. Only
Edna Harris, who played "Zeba.”
has a subsequent picture engage
ment.
Others have returned to inter
rupted tasks. Pauline Myers is
back in her Lenox-av beauty parlor.
Bertha Wright, the Slender Angel,
has resumed her study of interior
decorating.
Lanky Oscar Polk, who was Ga
briel. thankfully laid down his
trumpet of doom and hurried back
♦o “de stage.” Wasn't quite sure
w'hat he'd do there.
Back as Porter.
Abraham Gleaves. the Archangel,
has turned in his wings and gone
back to Pullman portering. Gleaves
is 53 and has been railroading 30
years, although he always wanted to
be an actor.
Marc Connelly, author and co-di
rector of “The Green Pastures.”
spotted the tall Negro on a crack
transcontinental flyer and offered
him the role. When his leave of
absence expired. Gleaves said:
"Thank you, Mistuh Connelly, for
a very pleasant engagement.”
Some of the final scenes deal
with the defense of Jerusalem
against an infield army. The dusky
Children of Israel were in prettv
bad shape, and were fighting with
everything from razors to Spring
field rifles and French 75's.
Worried About Future
The head defender of Jerusalem
was a fellow called Hezdrel, an
apocryphal character invented by
Connelly. The actor was Rex In
gram. who also plays the role of
“De Lawd.”
Ingram was worried about what
he was going to do next. After
this taste of glory, following in the
distinguished footsteps of the late
Richard B. Harrison, he can’t bear
to go back to Broadway and maybe
take some minor part in a musical
comedy.
What he hopes is that “The Green
Pastures” soon will be revived as a
stage play, and will resume its tour
of America. It has already been
produced in 203 cities.
“De Lawd” Tangles With Law
“De Lawd” has had rather a
tough time of it in Hollywood, be
cause his salary has been tied up by
a lawsuit. So he has had to go
around borrowing money from Noah
and Moses and Joshua, and even
that sinful unbeliever, Ol’ King
Phoraoh.
He manifests an almost childish
delight in the flexibility of the
movies. In fact, his naivete got him
into trouble when he was attempt
ing to direct this picture: he fell so
far behind that the Brothers War
ner assigned the experienced Wil
liam Keighley as co-director.
Roark Bradford never did come
to Hollywood. And not much credit is
being saved hereabouts for the man
whose book. “Ol’ Man Adam an’ His
Chillun,” suggested the mood and
contained a great deal of the actual
substance of the Connelly master
piece, or adaptation, or whatever
you want to call it.
EAST SIDE
| n it i ii p 5507 E. Wash. St.
IK V I N (i Double Feature
a av t in VI All-Star Cast
"CAPTAIN BLOOD’
_ “IF YOU COULD ONLY COOK"
EMERSON" '
“KING OF BURLESOUF”
"EXCLUSIVE STORY”
HAMILTON SSjt/r
Franehot Tone
“EXCLUSIVE STORY"
"THE INFORMER’^
Pi n 1/ U D 2036 E. 10th Stf
AKK L R Doubl * rH,M
it i\ it LI Wallace Berry
“AH WILDERNESS”
“CURLY TOP”
Sm n . XT rv 4332 E. Wash. St.”
I R A N D „ D ? nb '
Richard MeLaglea
“PROFESSIONAL SOLDIER”
“YOUR UNCLE DUDLEY”
RA V V 2 ‘ - ’ 1 E - Wash. St, ”
II A Y Double Feature
Will Rogers
“IN OLD KENTUCKY”
“TO BEAT THE BAND"
Paramount 411 F,. Wash.
TWO GIANT FEATURES
SHIRLEY TEMPLE
“The Littlest Rebel”
Spencer Tracy—Myrna Loy
“Whipsaw”
POPEYE COMEDY
SOUTH SIDE
FOUNTAIN SQUARE
Double Feature John Bale*
•ROSE OF THF RANCHO"
“THE CALLING OF DAN MATHEWS”
ts a Xirtrn n 41 Fountain Square
bANDLRS
U Helen Tweleetreea
“SPANISH CAPE MYSTERY’
"KENTUCKY BLUE STREAK"
Air a i rv si Prospeet-Churchman
VAL (l N 0n,,,,,
Y It GVJ il Roehelle Hudson
"WAY DOWN EAST"
“BROADWAY HOSTESS”
rvrv ipv.ni a . JIW S. Meridian SI.
ORIENTAL
••COLLEGIATE”
“THIS IS THE LIFE”
~ - 2283 Shelhy St. "*
GARFIELD
“AH WILDERNESS"
j.. "MARY BURNS, FUGITIVE’*

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