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St. Tammany farmer. [volume] (Covington, La.) 1874-current, May 03, 1919, Image 2

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St. Tammany Farmer
D. H. MASON - - - - Editor and Proprietor
Entered at the Covington posto81ce as Second-Class Mattr
SNt'-D.IAY EXCURSIONS PUT ON.
As soon as it way learned that Sunday excursions would not be run to
Covington over the N. O. G. N. the Association of Commerce got busy.
Follow.ing an editoris, in The Farmer President Warner got in touch
with the oflicials of the read and called to their attention the very strong
srltimnEt of the people in the matter. The arguments in favor of the
excursimn were so strongly presented that the company announced the
matter had been reconsidered and Hon. M. J. McMahon, traffic manager,
sent the tcle ;ram lpublished on the first page announcing this fact'.
This is but one instance in which the Associatoin of Commerce has ren
dered valuabl : service to the town of Covington, and not only to the town
oft Covington but tc other towns of the parish. The work of this organiza
tion is beneficial to the whole parish, yet all the expense of its operation
is paid by Covington. The Association will endeavor to secure member
ships oJutside of Covington, and this is an opportune time to appeal to all
citizens of the parish to send in their applications for membership. The
more co-operation that is received from the parish the more good may ,be
accomplished for the parish. At present the project for a community rice
mill is being worked out and is in the hands of a committee.
O
INCREASED TELEýHONE RATES.
Thi Southern L:ell and Cumberland Telephone Companies have asked
for a revision of rates to meet advanced cost of operation. They present
the same arguments used by all corporations-higher cost of operating
and higher price of labor, etc., and if their statement is accepted at its
face value, as a business proposition they would be entitled to theq in
creased rates. But public opinion seems to be against the increase.
No one would demand that a business should be operated at a loss if it
is shown that the management has been in no way responsible and that
a loss is unavoidable with the present rates. If the wages of the operators
and linemen and other labor has been increased, as they should be, and
there are no overpaid officials or other unnecessary expenses and no mis
management that can be remedied, then the people will cheerfully pay
the increased rates.
But the Railroad Commission should sift the matter carefully so as to
do justice to both the people and the Telephone Companies. A deficit of
twenty million dollars is predicted by the company for 1919. The service
is one the people must have and are willing to pay a fair price for, but
they will also be very jealous of any attempt at profit-making while they
are al dy burdened with taxation and also have the hight cost of living"
to faWithou-t the benefit of any ruling that may increase their profits.
ABITA TO PULL TOGETHER FOR PROGRESS.
When there was nothing ineAbita but several hotels-not even a rail
road-when automobiles were unknown and travelers reached their desti
nation in any conveyance that could be procured, fgpm the toiling ox to
the faster moving tallyho-the place was famous for its springs of pure,
crystal and medicinal waters. Among them, the Abita Spring was credit
ed with marvelous curative properties. The stories of its wonders dated
back to the Spanish regime. The dying Indian princess who was restored
to health became almost forgotten as the miracle was extended to the
whites in numerous instances when scientific medical treatment became
as useless as the lost arts. The poetic interlude between nature's pro
vision and the capitalization of health by man was not long. The rail
road came and the town of Abita Springs grew to a health resort. Newly
built hotels accommodated -visitors and for a time Abita was a popular
resort. Then a company was formed and the water was bottled and sold
in New Orelans and other places. Perhaps many people thought they
could remain at home and still get the benefit of the water. At all events,
the hotels did not find the seasons as prosperous.
But not only did Abita have its famous spring. It had a most delight
ful and health-giving atmosphere and the quiet of country surroundings,
banked by the rustling boughs of odorous pine and carpeted with green
grass worked in nature's patterns of wild flowers and violets. These
could not be bottled and sold in cities.
'IWHEN WHAT WAS WRONG? WHY DIDN'T TIHE OROWDS POUR
IN TILL BIG, MIODERN HOTELS HAD TO'-BE ,BUILT TO ACCOMMO
DATE THEM?
The question is not so hard to 'answer. Political and, factionalhstrife,
for one thing, has tried the people sorely. Another is that the handful
of people who try to do things find it difficult to secure co-operation.
Harmony and co-operation joined with energy and thought-everybody a
booster and everybody a friend to his neighbor and interested in his com
munity, realizing his moral responsibility and his social obligations
have never failed to bring satisfactory results in the upbuilding of a town,
with the possibilities for a~pbuilding such as are enjoyed ,by Abita. Not,
that Abita is a lonely example in being thus handicapped. M.any towns have
had .a similar experience. It is an unfortunate condition sometimes
brought about by a disagreement as to which policy is best in the accom
plishment of things for a town. The damage is done when a minority
fails to join a majority in working out plans adopted against the wishes
of the minority. There is but one platform for a town--BOOST AND
BUILD UP. THERE WILL ALWAYS BE DIFIERE~NCES OF OPI·ION
AS TO JUST HOW THIS MAY BE AOCOMPLISHED, BUT AS A MA
JORlITY IMAY NOT ,BE EXPE3CTED TO GIVE WAY FOR THE MINORI
TY, THE BASIC PRILNOIPLES OF DEMOCSRACY SHOULD BE ACCEPT
ED AND THE SENTIMENT UPHELD IN THE CO-OPERATION OF ALLI
THE FORCES THAT CAN BE BROUGHT TO B/EAR IN ACCOMP~IASH
ING THE OBJECiT DESTIRED.
Abita to-day is entering upon a new era of development. Its citizens
are coming together to work harmoniously for future upbuilding and to
take advantage of the reconstruction period to gather whatever fruit may
ripen in the field that is now open to it. An election will shortly be held
to vote a bond issue of $10,000.00 for municipal improvement and munici
pal ownership of its own light plant. With good hard-surfaced streets
electrically lighted, with comfort and entertainment for visitors and every
effort made to make their visit pleasant, Abita should become a popular
resort for people visiting this side of the lake.
It is said that the election will carry, and there is no reason why it
should not. It is up to the people.
CARD OF THLNKS.
We wish to express our heartfelt
thanks to our frends and neighbors
for their kindnesses shown us at the
death of our darling baby, Willie
Davis Ellerman, and special thanks
to Mrs. Mattie Williams for her kind
assistance, also to Father Ault for
his spiritual consolation.
FATHER, MOTHER, BROTHERS
AND SISTERS.
For the best results advertise in
The Farmer.
BICYCLES, REPAIRING AND
ACCESSSORIES
510 Lockwood St. Covington, La.
W. V. EASTON.
N OTES FROM THE SHIPYARD.
(Continued t om age 1)
Some married men that handed
the preacher ten dollars are under
the impression that they were short
changed nine dollars and seventy
cents.
A philosopher once said, "Modesty
is the maiden's necklace." Nowa
days the maidens think it is too hot
to wear even a necklace.
The other day a swimmer broke
pO 0
SAVING S
SERMONETTE
Number Eight
THRITI'Y WOMEN
IMarriage is a partnership
in which husband and wife
share responsibility. The
wife is as important as the
husband, at least we would
not care to suggest to the
well ordered housewife that
she isn't, and the net in
come of man and wife in
the well-regulated house
hold usually belongs to both.
The wife who has a fixed
income for household pur
poses is in very much the
same position as the wo
man who earns a weekly
salary, and Should manage
to lay aside a 'fixed sum each
week in the Savings Bank,
and so help to make pro
vision for the future needs
of herself and family. It
frequently happens that a
thrifty woman, unknown to
other members of the house
hold, will manage to save a
dollar here and there where
a man could not. Many a
family has been carried over
periods of misfortune by,the
foresight of the wife and
mother.
the record for staying under water.
That's' nothing, -the prohis expect us
to live under water for the next
twenty-years.
IMdny a dressmaker is good at
'figures 'but doesn't know a thing
about fractions.
If fish really is brain food it cer
tainly is wased on some people.
iBoots Bohning thus ekxlains the
high cost of living: Eggs are high
because ,,rain to feed tile hens is
high. Grains to feed the hens is
high because it costs so much for
labor to operate the farms Labor
to operate the farms is high because
it costs the laborers so much to buy
eggs for their 'families.
We trust this full explanation will
make everything quite clear to you.
A great many men have good mem
ories, but unfortunately they are not
the men who lfbrrowed money from
you.
"Red" Heughan says it's a difficult
matter to pick out a straw hat this
year. :Everybody is watching.
Valdin reminds one of the cow's
husband.
The only establishment that makes
money without advertising is the
mint.
We don't care which room Davis
sleeps in, but the next time he pulls
that fire stunt we intend to put him
out.
A real diplomat is the fellow who
can make his wife believe that the
machine only had male occupants
when it turned over.
When the sponsor broke the bottle
of champagne on the Pontchartrain
who was the fellow that stood under
the ways with the bucket
What is weant by the expression,
"giving comfort to the enemy"?
Ludlow: Paying alimony.
MaDougal: I feel like 60 cents.
Dietrich: You mean 30 cents.
MoDougal: No, 60 cents, you
know everything has been marked
Ludlow: Why did you use such
language last night?
CalecaB: I had on a suit of com
binaton underwear.
Ludlow: Did that cause it?
Calecas: Yes, I lost the combina
tion.
I notice that lately the boys at the
Trouble Inn do not play the little
game called "Indigestion."
Dan: What sort of reading is
'ad for the eyes?
Faller: Volumes of smokeA
MdCary: What business always
goes to the wall?
Baxter: Paperhagning, of course.
Calecas: Will you go to my girl's
>irthday party?
Davis: How old is she?
Calecas: Eighteen.
Davis: I was at that party six
years ago.
VITAL STATISTICS.
Births.
Mrs. M. H. Horton, Covington,
white, a girl, July 18, 1918.
'Mrs. W. H. Nichols, Covington,
white, a boy, April 23, 1919.
IMrs. Sidney A. Ragan, Covington,
white, a boy, April 24, 19T-9.
No deaths reported this week
PRINTING
The kind that is done in the better
class shops in New- Orleans can be
obtained at the
W. H. Kentzel
Printing House - - COVINGTON
RIGL
A Flavor for
every taste
!/
ALL sealed air-tight and
impurity-proof, in the wax
wrapped, safety packages.
Be sure to get
WRIGLEYS
because it is supreme
in quality. '
The Flavor Lasts
FOUN)TAIN PATRONS START PAY
ING WAR TAXES.
Washington, April 29-Soda water
ice cream, sundaes, root beer and all
other soda fountain drinks become
taxable Thursday under the revenue
act. Five and ten cent drinks or
dishes will be taxed 1 cent, while 15
and 20 cent drinks will be taxed 2
cents, and the tax will be collected
from the purchaser, unless the soda
fountain keeper chooses to reduce his
prices to include the extra tax item.
The question of when drinks are
taxable and when-they may not be
taxable, and the precise method of
collecting the tax, were discussed at
length in a statement issued today
by the Internal Revenue Bureau for
guidance of proprietors and patrons
of soda fountains.
These examples were given of tax
able drinks when mixed add sold at
the fountain for conspmption on the
premiess:
"Orange, lemonade, pineapple juice
coca cola, root beer, moxie, phos
phates, fruit and flavoring syrups
mixed with carbonated water or plain
water, milk shakes, malted milk
shakes, cream and egg shakes, ice
cream, ice cream sodas, sundaes, ice
cream sandwiches, flavored tces."
These drinks are taxable: Hot
beef tea., coffee, tea, buttermilk, hot
chocolate, hot clam broth, tomato
bouillon and bottled drinks sold di
rect from the container. Separate
manufacturers' taxes are imposed on
drinks of the latter class.
Ice cream is not taxable when sold
in containers to be carried away from
the selling place to be eaten. Ice
VWEl,'IA ATTRACT YOUR EYE
if you but give us half a chance.
You are sure to find what you
want here in brooches, rings, ear
rings, hwatceis and all other kinds
of jewelry. We care not how dis
c'riminating in taste you may be.
We conform to the most exacting.
Engagenent rings set to exact
specilicat ions.
(.. E. SURCI,
Quality Jeweler
Southern Hotel Building,
COVINGTON, LA.
cream cones are taxable. Bromo
seltzer, ro:,helle salts, seidlitz powd
ers, castor oil, epsom salts, and simi
lar medicines' often served at soda
fountains are not subject to the tax.
Soft drink stands or push carts
enterprises are subject to the tax,
but restaurants or other placeJsserv
ing ice cream or soft dr;nks as an
inciden:al feature of the ,business are
not required to collect or to pay the
tax. Church "sociables" and clubs
are exempt, but booths at country
fairs, circuses or ball games must col
lect the tax.
Monthly returns must be made to
the district revenue collector by the
soda fountain proprietor, and daily
records kept by a cash register or I
otherwise. If the proprietor has no
register, he is advised to rkeep his
tax pennies separate.
The Revenue Bureau also issued
today preliminary regulations gov
erning assessment of new taxes
against so-called "luxuries'' such as
expensive carpets, picture frames.
valises, umbrellas, smoking jackes.
silk hosiery, fancy waistcoats, men's
and women's dresses and hats, also
effective Thursday, iMay 1. This tax
is figured at the rate of l0-per cent
on the amount paid by the purchaser
in excess of certain prices mentioned
in the act for each article.
A retailer, in stating the price of ah
article, mug give its actual selling
price and the tax extra. He may not
sta'e a price which includes the tax.
Careful records must be kept by
the merchant. Returns for both the
luxury tax and the soda water tax
must be made on the last day of the
month following the month for which
the return is made. Thus, May busi
ness must be reported June 30.
SAvY 1'MMY,wHATS TMATS 50 FOLKS,
THEM FOOTPRINTS IN WILL KNOWWHE_
- - T MHE PAPER To &ETT.TE
AL .THE >'
\ TIME FOR SES5
--- -
PATECEK SAYS:
Buy your shoes here---your
feet will get the habit of
coming to cur store.
AND WHAT PATECEK SAYS IS SO.
IAsten to any conversation about polite
footwear. You will flld that the folks of
this town have unanimously agreed upon
C C one thing, viz., the folks who buy a pair
of shoes from us become our friendly cus
Stimers. They are our vocal advertising
of the best footwear thatls made today.
Fi'RN K pAT E C F
GENTS FURNISHINGS
COVINGTON LA.
L'y
CLASSIFIED ADS.
FOR SALE---Four bread wagons,
harness, one carriage and two b'ug
giest Apply Mrs. Chas. Schellhaas,
corner Claiborne and Gerard streets,
Mandeville, La. my3-3t*
$25.00 REWARD.
For information lealing to the ar
rest and conviction of the party or
parties who destroyed property of
this Association and who broke open
the store room and stole therefrom
dishes, tubs and utgflsils. St. Tam
many Parish Fair Association, J. H.
Warner, Presilent. ap5
FOR SALE-1000-pound capacity
refrigerator; 7 counter show cases;
3 silent salesmen cases; 3 computing
scales; 1 single drawer National cash,
register; 1 three-drawer National
cash register; 2 Victor patent iron
safes; 1 horse and wagon. All in
good condition. Apply to Dinkins
Bros., Ramsay, La. ap2,6-2t*
LOST-Seven (7) notes dated
June 10, 1918, made payable to J. H.
Burns and signed by H. L. Webb,
four (4) for the sum of $25.00 each
and three' (3) for the sum of $50.00
each, the first made payable on the
1st day of November, 1918, and the
remaining six on the 1st day of each
and every month thereafter, the last
maturing on March 1st, 1919, said
notes drawing 8 per cent per annum
interest from date and 10 per cent
attarney's fees.
Said notes were either lost or mis
laid and are the property of J. H.
Burns, and all parties are warned
and instructed not to negotiate for
the same. apl2
STENOGRAPHER - Miss Gladys
Soniat, public stenographer, office at
Soniat's Book Store, legal and com
mercial work promptly attended to.
Your patronage solicited. apl9
FOR SALE-Women's Progressive
Union Hall, Mandeville, La., half
square from beach. Apply to Mrs.
W. S. Fassman, Mandeville. apl9
WHEN YOU SUFFER
FROM RHEUMATISM
Almost any man will tell you
that Sloan's Liniment
means relief
For praticaly every man has used
It who has uffered from rheumatic
aches, soreness of muscles, stiffness of
joints, the results of weather exposure.
Women, tool by the hundreds of
thousands, use it for relievig euriti
lame backs, neuralgia, aick headache.
Clean, refreshing,soothing, economical,
quickly effective. Say 'Sloan's Lini.
ment' to your druggist. Get it today.
Rub-My-Tism is a powerful anti
septic; it kills the poison caused from
infected cuts, cures old sores, tet
ter, etc.-Adv.
1
s Os
V. bed
a -i
CLASSIFIED ADS. :
.$5,00 REWARD--Strayed, a
red covP, branded D on shoulder.
turn to E. M. Chaze, 1510 15th avr;t
Covington. mS*
We are proud of the confide .e
doctors, druggists and the public hast
in 666 Chill and Fever Tonic.--Ad
FOR SALE---One walnut orgab.
with mirror, price $30. Also burea.u
with mirror, and washstand, botsh
for $1.0. 905 22d avenue.
WANTED--Old building ma~erieal
and furniture. Dr. Stevenson. m$
FOR SALE-Registered Dnrou
Jerseys, one boar and two sowsn
three sows, unregistered, and [email protected]
boar pigs. Elwood Nilson, Coving4
ton, La. f22tf
ATTENTION !
BEGINNING APRIL 5 WE W'I,'
HAVE HORSES AND MULES FOB'.
SALE FROM $30 UP. APPLY TO
SCEROLER & MITCHELL,
ap5 LACOMBE, LA.
HAULING-I am now prepared too;
do all kinds of hauling, freight, mov
ing, heaving machinery, or anything,,
Prompt attention given to order;a
Also wood for sald, delivered o
notice. W. N. Patrick, Covingt
La., Phone 27. mrln
FOR SALE-Stove and dreplace
wood. Ed. Brunet, Phone 243, Cov
ington, La. mrl5.ap5
JUST RLECEIVED-New shipment:
of Fertilizers for Spring planting.. .'
Alexius Bros. & Co.
WVANTED--Yard man, middle agae.
Dr. Stevenson, Covla Park. apUts
JUST RECEIVEI-New shi.pmeat
of Fertilizer for Spring planting. 2
Alexius Bros. & Co.
HORSES FOR SALE.
Fifteen good gentle horses for sal&
cheap. Saddle or harness. E. Jl
LeBlanc, 19th AVenue and Moaroe
Street, Covington, La., Phone 2. 8.
WANTED-For prompt shipment,
everal hundred sticks long leaf yel-"
:ow pine piling, 95 feet long, 6 inelf
tips, bark on. We inspect and pay,
cash as loaded. Quote your best'
price f. o. b. cars, naming loadln:
point and how much you coulp:
handle the next 30 days. AddrA8i
AAA-1, care this -paper. mrS
FOR SALE-Horses, mares and
mules. Ed. Brunet, Phone 341, Cov4:!
ingtoh, La. mrl5-ap*
NOTICE. i
Notice is hereby given to the ser*i
eral banks located in St. Tammipn
parish that the police jury will i&
reive sealed bids at a meeting P1,
Tuesday, May 13, at 10 a. m., for t.
fiscal depository for the parish fuLa
for the next two ensuing years, sum`
iect to the said depositories complyp
ng to all the requisites of the law.
J. B. HOWZE.
President.
F. J. MARTINDALE.
Secretary.
WANTED-To by Liberty Benu.`i
Fair price will be paid by J. [email protected]
Smith, Covington, La. mrtl
WANTED-Position as bookke6
er by competent young lady.
of references. Apply A-2, care
this ofRce. m3-*
FOR SALF-+One mule, cheap. A
)ly Pineland Springs Bottling Cols
pany. m3tf
FY)O S.UE-Attrr'ctive residenc.s
on 22d Avenue, containing parlor,:
dining room, three bedrooms, batil,
kitchen. elec'ric lights and water,
pump well, fruit and shade treer,
'rrn. grounds 300x150. House fu?-.
nished or unfurnished, contents pr5;
tically new. Apoly N. Trepagnier,
Box 141, Covington, La. m3-4t
FOR SALE--One American adding
mach'ne: one Whi'e sewing machine.
,ee Postmaster, Covington. apl'
WANTEDI-20 men to take out
stumps. Apply to Harvey E. Ellia,
Covlngton, La. Ja25-tf

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