OCR Interpretation


St. Tammany farmer. [volume] (Covington, La.) 1874-current, October 22, 1921, Image 2

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015387/1921-10-22/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 2

OH DEATH WHERE IS THY STING ?
FI RE
- ( FIRE! _
BABYFIRE
BABY FI-Y ýl
WANTS I-ygg ! HOPE
MAMA! PIT T" scHOoL
OI/O/ouss .*
*W
O~qPI' OPa1KT10J U6At R Ee
The St. Tammany Farmer
D. H MASON - - - - - dlitor and Proprietor
Entered at the Covington postoffice as Second-Class Matter.
THE PROTECTION OF THE LAW.
"Fair play" is a sentiment that sits snugly in the mind of every human
being. No matter how criminal, how debased, how defiant of law, the
sane mind is inherently responsive to its call. Aside from the finer
distinctions that balance the scales of justice, fair play is a substitute that
appeals to the most limited intelligence and the most blackened conscience
with the same force that justice appeals to the stronger mind. It is a
substitute that brings within the comprehension of the most illiterate
criminal the demands of justice-"fair play."
Did Green Rogers have fair play when he was shot down from ambusf?
Did he have a chance for his life? The testimony and the verdict of the
jury answr' that question.
tiuman imperfection makes restraint of the law necessary. Human
s(lliishness and self interest may cause crime and sometimes prevent its
puii;shmený; but it is the same sellfish instinct, aided by christian fault,
a:,d the experience of generations of civilization that demands respect for
the law. It is the law-abiding man who maintains the sanctity of ti2.
home, wh. ir the friend of churches and schools and civic betterment an
.progress.
Without a penalty, the law is useless. Crime must be punished. The
4uctrument is the people. The judge is elected by the people; the
prosecuting attorney is elected by the people; the jury is selected under
laws made by the people. It is the glory of our democracy that the people
rule. If it is a failure, thu people are responsible.
In the trial of Martin Jenkins and Ernest Pelar for the murder of
Green Rogers, the conviction is the first in the history of St. Tammany
parish that has been obtained after a mistrial. The crime was most
brutal and uncalled for, and failure of punishment for it would have been
a calamity. The jury, in its verdict, has rendered a service that will be
far-reaching in its benefits to the community. As Mr.- Morgan said in his
speech, if such crimes go unpunished, we might as well close the jail arid
burn down the courthouse. There is no brutal joy in the sentence of the
criminal. There is no vindictive delight in the retribution for the com-.
mission of the crime. It is the comforting thought that the protecting
arm of the law is thrust between the people and violence. There is sym
pathy for those who suffer innocently the grief of disgrace and long sep
aration, but there is sympathy, too, for the widowed woman who has lost
the loving care and protection of a husband.
KEEPING APACE WITH THE, TIMES.
The total population of St. Tammany parish by the census of 1920 is
20,645. Deducting, from this the population of Covington, Mandeville,
Madisonville, Slidell, Abita Springs Pearl River and Ramsay would leave
a rural population of 11,621. The populations of other towns are not
available, Lut it is, safe to say that the population of St. Tammany living
on farms is around 11,000, something more than half the entire 'popula
tion. The relation of agriculture to the prosperity of the parish can be
clearly seen. With adaptability to crops that are staple on the market,.
and with advantages that are superior in the production of some crops,
including grapes, Satsuma organges, strawberries, cane, sweet potatoes
and many vegetables, there is no reason why St. Tammany farmers should
not add much more to the wealth of the parish.
It is known that a large increase in production and proper organiza-.
tion and business management would bring buyers to us; would make us
known in the mar.,t and would secure better prices. We believe the
fasmer L. coiuing more and more to an understanding-of these things and
that a few -Fears will bring quite a change in the proitableress of agricul
tural pursuits-drainage, more acres in cultivation and the use of im
proved machinery. Thomas Walker Page, in an arAi°! in the Saturday
Evening Post. says;
* * * Eten as late as 1900, although there had been a
marked trend to the cities, the urban population was less than a third
of the whole. The recent census, however, disclosed the fact that
the cities now contain more than half, or, to be exact 5 !..3 per cent,
of the populatlin. This change of habitat signifies, if course, a
change of occupanon More of our people are engaiued in manufac-
turing, ccmmerce and personal services than in as;° 'utture In
3ther words, there are at present more than :gte as many to eat
as there aic to pmiucuce food.
It is obvious tha; for the reduced fraction of the ;bouliat :,:i en
gage1 in ef-nrcubre to continue feeding our owu ueaple and produc
ing a surplus tf aeil abroad, one or both of two tho'es must occur:
The labei needed must be substituted by improved machinery, im
piements and other labor-saving devices; and greater skill and more
scientific methods must be applied to extract a larger'yield from
the land In fact, both these things have been taking. place in sub
stantial measure. * * *
I. F. Wl(hrli has been doing some excellent work in demonstrating the
value of f rnm meachixiery in preparing the ground and putting in crops.
He is agent for the Fcrdson tractor and its numerous attachments for
planting an- cultivating the soil, and he has put his machinery in prac
tical operation on various farms around Covington. In this way all
guess-work is eliminated. The accomplishments of the machinery is
before the eyus.
The greatest obstacle in the use of machinery is stumps; but here again
the value of machinery is illustrated. To overcome this, Mr. Wehrli is
offering to furnish a stump puller to any farmer who wishes to pot
machinery on the farm and is confronted by the stump problem.
We belie'.e work of this kind is good, constructiv'e business and of
public benefit. The future of St. Tammany rests largely in agricuiture.
THE PARISH FAIR.
The St. Tammany Parish Fair was financially successful, and in soeine
of its departments excoedud that of other years, but it wvas by no mean,
what it would have been with proper co-operation of the farmers an 1
stock growers. The agricultural department showed the hack of a farm
agent. The exhibits were of good quality, but the amount of space cover
ed was not half what it should have been. There was iiothing ini it to
compare with the exhibits made by G. C. Alexius when he was living nand
took an interest in showing what could be accomplished on the farm.
The exhibit of Paul Friedlander was a new enterprise, devoted to citra3
fruits.. His display of native grown oranges, Satsum~as and kumquats
was a revelation of of what might be accomplished in this parish in this
line. His 'york will ultimately be of great value to St. Tammany.
The -poultry department was 'better than ever, which is saying a great
deal, for few fairs In the state can equal us in raising -fine, chickens, but
the stock Oopnrtnment was a most discouraging illustration of what tick
CLEAN-UP SQUAD IS COMING IN
SEARCH OF DISABLED
VETERANS.
(Continued from page 1)
you Awere lucky and came out better
thaf you went in and know some guy
that didn't come out "Jake", you
look up your buddy and tell him all
about this clean-up squad and what
they intend to do. They will help
him file his claim for compensation
or for vocational training, and if he
is sick, there will be a competent doc
tor on the squad who will examine
him and if he has never filed a claim
for compensation, he will help him
file it and he will then give him
transportation and send him to one
of Uncle Sam's hospitals for treat
ment and keep him there until he
is well.
Isn't that a fine thing to do? That
is what the clean-up squad is going
to do. So it's up to you and all the
old gang that wore the 0. D., the
blue and the white, to help find the
chap that came out in a bad way and
get him fixed up. Talk to your Red
Cross Chapter, your American Legion
infestation means to a parish. Outside of a few loyal exhibitors, there
was no stoca show. Owners of fine stock who had before brought cattle
into the parish for exhibition could not bhing them into tick infected terri
tory, and ticky cattle did not seem to appeal very strongly even to the
home stock raiser. The tick seems to have played the mischief with an
industry that awhile back, believing tick eradication would be accom
plished, was promising to St. Tammany.
Under all the difficulties encountered, President Warner and Secretary
Minckler and their co-worliers have earned the appreciation of*the public,
as have the ladies who worked hard in their departments and in some
instances made improvements over last year.
It talkes money to run a fair, even with the co-operation of every one- -
farmers and town folks. We understand Hammond is putting about
$75,000 into their fair this year, and with a man like Will Houlton at the
head of it, it will be a fair worth seei~ng.' We hope St. Tammany will' re
turn the compliment of Hammond people, who visited our fair in large
numbers. There will be stock there that will repay the trouble.
Florida arish esF air
HAMMOND, LOUISIANA
OCTOBER 24 TO OCTOBER 29
AN EXPOSITION OF THE AGRICULTURAL, HORTICULTURAL,
LIVESTOCK AND INDUSTRIAL RESOURCES
OF THE FLORIDA PARISHES
6-DAYS AND NIGHTS-6.
FEATURED BY AN EDUCATIONAL RAND ENTERTAINMENT
PROGRAM OF UNSURPASSED MERIT AND CHARACTER
EDUCATIONAL - Blue Ribbon Poultry, Boys Corn Clubs, Girls Canning Clubs, Community Fair Ex
hibits, Better Babies, Graphic School Exhibits, Domestic Science and Art, Comprehensive Display of
Women's Work, Tractor Demonstrations, Labor Saving Machiiery for Home and Farm Work, Pure
Ared Swine, and Fine Dairy Cattle.
ENTERTAINMENT - Auto Races, Horse Races, Auto Polo, Aeroplane Carrying Passengers, Football
Saturday, Circus Aerial Acts, Snapp Bros. Modern Midway, Newton's Fireworks four nights, The Del
more Trio big vaudeville Act, Smith's Bears and Monkeys, Three Bands of Music, Dancing every night.
SOMETHING TO PLEASE EVERBODY ON THEFLO-PASH GLADWAY-BUY SEASON TICK
ET AND SEE IT ALL-COME AND GO WHEN YOU PLEASE.
SCHOOL DAY-Monday, October 24. Everyone who goes to school or teaches in the &Florida Par
ishes Admitted Free.
A SPECIAL FEATURE-Dedication of the new home of the Fair by Governor John M. Parker, Pres
ident Charles M. Markhom of the-Illinois Central Railway, and Commissioner; of Agriculture Harry D.
Wilson, following the school Parade.
REDUCED RATES from New Orleans and McComb, Baton Rouge, Covington and Intermediate
Points. Ask your ticket Agent.
SPECIAL TRAINS-Monday Night to McComb City and Baton Rouge.
For Free Premium List or Special Information write Mort L. Bixier, Secty., I3ox 757, Hammond, La.
ADMISSION: Adults, .50 cents; Children, 25 cents; Season Tickets, $3
GEN'UINE'
"BUL 1
DURHAM
tobacco makes 50
good cigarettes for
1Oc
We want you to have the
best paper for "BULL."
So now you can receive
with each package a book
of 24 leaves of 4YLIIc.
- the very finest cigarette
paper in the world.
Post, your postmaster, your Chamber
of Commerce, your minister; ask
them-they know all about it. Read
the papers, they are going to keep
you informed; watch them closely
for the itenerary telling you just
when the squad will be in your town
or parish. Watch for the big red
posters on the telephone poles and
the little hand bills telling you all
about it.
Uncle Sam wants to find every man
that has a claim against him so that
he can pay the claim and if you
haven't a claim you can help Uncle
Sam just as you used to do, by going
out and finding the chap that has
the claim and by telling him of the
clean-up squad that is coming to help
him.
The squad will be at the court
house in Covington on Friday and
Saturday, November 4th and 5th.
I ASK<ED YOU IF SOME GUY IN W HALL
HOUSE WAS D4 BD. GAVE MOM A RING ONCE
I 'le
D I -o
V HoME
S byF Parks
R
I rHOUG6r VEiA! POP SAtD
so!! HE AN'MOM WAS
BOTH ENGAGED
Iýfd (D<R! Iý
EC
ICLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS
Foreign Advertising Representative
THE AMERICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION
Advertising in The Farmer pays.
FOR SALE-The Willie Magee
farm, crop, stock and all plows and
hay tools; 169 -acres, 40 in field, for
$4000; $2500 case, balance on time.
Crop, stock, tools, new gasoline cane
mill and pan go free with the place,
wgrth at leant $2500. Sickness, of
my wife forces me to sell. Give
possession at once. W. R. Long, at
Lacombe. Half m'ie from school.
FARM WANTED-Want to hear
from owner of a farm or good land
for style; price reasonable. L. Jones,
Box 551, Olney, Ill. oc22*
LOST or .STRAYED--A red bone
hound, near Covington, La. Dog is
reddish brown, has foiur white feet
and yhite under neck and stomach;
weighs about 65 pounds; answers to
name of 'Rush." A reward of five
($5.00) dollars will be paid for- his
return or definite information lead
ing to his recovery, by Harvey E.
E:lis, Covington, La. oc22
We are headquarters for the best
of everything in Vegetable Seeds.
Now is the time to start your Fall
Ga den and plant. Dwarf Peas, Car
rots, Cabbage, Beuts, Mustard, Ler
tuce, Turnips, Radish, Parsley, Shal
lots, Onion Sets, Reuter's Red Creoip
Onion Seed. Send us a list of your
requirements and we guarantee sat
isfaction. Marsoaln's Store, Cov
ington, La. s17-nov15
Advertising in The Farmer pays.
BOARDERS WANTED-In pri
vate family. Two nice, large rooms
with all modern conveniences; board
by week. Would rather steady
boarders for winter. Can give best
of references. Call at corner of 24th
and Madison, or ring .phone 252.
FOR SALE--Six hound puppies;
mother and father the best running
and blooded stock in the pairish.
Price $10.00 each. Ernest Prieto,
Mandeville, La. oc22-3t
LOS'l-On road between Coving
ton and Sun, a leather hand-bag, con
taining ladies apparel. Reward if
returned to S. D. Anderson, 902 21st
Avenue, Covington. oc22*
LOST-At the fair grounds, last
Friday, 'tSchopl Day," a child's blue
serge coat. Return to Mrs. J. P.
Rausch, Abita Springs, and receive
reward. oc22
FOR SALE-Three good milk cows.
Apply at Rest Awhile, Mandeville.,
For first-class mechanics at Star
Garage. Phone 181. Head of depot
FOR SALE-A second-hand surry
in first class condition. Price $30.
Will take' wood in exchange. See
G. E. Lansing, Covington. ocl5-2t
FOR SALE-Well seasoned stove
wood and pine knots, any length, at
$1.50 per load, up Call phone 143.
G. E. Lansing, Covington. ocl5-4t
SETTING EGGS-Anconais, White
Leghorns, $1.50 per setting qf 15.
B. W. Brown, Chinchuba La., Man
deville Road. oe*
FOR SALE-One sound, gentle
horse, ride or drive; price $50.00.
Apply to William Meeks, Oaklawn,
La. oc1-2t*
Tor, service phone 181. Star Ga
rage. Head of Depot.
FOR SALE or RENT-3 houses in
Abita; will sell all kinds of good
hogs, also sugar cane, any amount.
Call at Lazard Schaywre, Abita, or
at mill on old Motor Car Line.
FO SALE-Stove wood and tat
pine. 200 fat pine post. W. R.
Badon. 415 Lockwood street, Cov
ingon. 1e12.
666
quickly relieves Constipation, bilious
tess, Loss of Appetite and headaches
due to Torpid Liver. jel8-16t
FOR RENT-Two furnished cot
tages; all modern. Ready for Oct.
1st. A. D. Schwartz. s17
FOR .SALE--Pure bred female
Collie pups, $7.50 each. Barney
Oarey, Abita Springs. oc8-2t
FOR SALE or RENT--A 6-room
house with dal}; partly ,furnished;
3 squares of ground; also horse sur
ry, wagon and harness. See 5aeob
Zeigler, 319- Boston street, Coving
ton, La. oc3-4t"
SELF-RELLANCE GOES
BANKRUPT.
Thin Blood Saps Energy; Gude's
Pepto-Mangan Rebuilds
the Blood.
Wrestling with a wea'ken'ed condi
tion of the blood is a desperate strug
gle. Thin, watery blood deprives
the body of .energy and 'causes a play
ed-out ,feeling *not unlike utter ex-;:
haustion. A man with weak blood
has not the full use of his powers..
He lacks decision, and vacillate until
he loses self-confidence.
Some men, and women too, go fal .
tering along for months tearcely real
izing that they need Gude's Pepto
Mangan, the blood-builder. But
when 'they have taken it for a whil3,
what a difference there is in the feel
ings! The old-time vigor and the
red-blooded hue of good health re
turn. The new rich blood gets to
work, building, fortifying, lifting the
spirit up to its normal standard.
Phypicians have prescribed Guda's "y
Pepto-Mangan for years as a blood
builder., Druggists sell it in liquid
and tablet form. Look for the name
"Gude's Pepto-Mangan" on the pack
age.-Advertisement.
CAT OMEL GOOD BUT
AWFULLY TREACHEROUS
Next Dose May Salivate, Shock Liver
or Attack Your Bones.
You know what calomel is. It's
mercury; quicksilver. Calomel ,is-.1
dangerous. It crashes into sour btl'
Tike dynamite, crimping and sicken
ing you. 'Calomel attacks the bones
and should never be put into your
system.
If you feel bilious, headachy, con- :'
stipated and all knocked out, just
go to your druggist and get a bottle:
of Dodson's Liver Tone for a few
cents which is a harmless vegetable
substitute for dangerous calomel.
Take a spoonful. and,' if it doesn' 4
start your liver and straighten you.
up better and quicker than nasty'
calomel an dwithout making you sick
you just go back and get your money.
* Don't take calomel. It makes you
sick the next day; it loses you a day's
work. Dodson's Liver Tone straight
ens you right up and you feel great.
No salts necessary. Give it' to the
children because it is perfectly harm
less and can not salivate.-Adver
tisement. 2
NOTICE.
In the Matter of Tutorship of MiP
dred J. Smith, John K. Smiti,
Clifford K. Smith and Lydia C.
Smith, Minors.
No. 133.
'rwenty-Sixth Judicial District Court.
Parish of St. Tammany,
Louisiana.
Notice is hereby given to all par
sons herein interested to show cause
(if any they have or can) why the
final account as presented by Alton
E. Smith, Dative Tutor of, the afore
said minors, should not be approved
and'homologated, and said Tutor di"
chuarged from his trust as therein
prayed for.
By order of the Court.
W. B. BLOSSMAN,
oc22-3t Clerk of Cont.

xml | txt