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The Idaho world. [volume] (Idaho City, Idaho Territory) 1864-1918, September 22, 1866, Image 1

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Idaho World.
"THE NOBLEST MOTIVE IS THE PUBLIC GOOD.'*
Vol. a. IDAHO CITY, BOISE COUNTY, IDAHO TERRITORY, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1866.
No. 48.
>Mo öölorid,
PCBLISH3T) EVERY SATURDAY HORNING BY
I v II. BOWMAN & CO.
II. Cv STREET, Editor.
TERMS INVARIABLY in ADVANCE
Bates of Subscription e
Ofteyear,.........................................................$12 00
Six months,,.................. 7 00
Three months........................... ••................ 4 00
giltgie copies,................................................... 50
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Per square, ten linos or less, first insertion,.............. $ 5
" *• " " " each subsequent inser.... 2
Owe-fighth rtf A column, per quarter, .................. 25
quarter " " " " 40
- thfrrl « " " " 50
« half " " " " 60
One column, per qnarter,.................................... 100
Business cards, ten lines or less, thaee months.......... 10
FENIAN SONG.
The harp that long iu Tara's lialls
IlatH sad and silent lain,
Khali sound again within those walls,
To freedom's lofty strain;
And grand and clear the note shall swell
Iu music on the gale,
To greet the old green Hag so well,
With sougstf lunisfail!
«
0 Erirt ! thou loved land of song !
— Thy sun is veiled, not set !
Thy spirit that hath slept so long,
Shall wake in thunder Vet!
And round thy lonely s(tores Loch Lein,
And by the silvery Lee,
True Irish swords shall fl:ish again
And Ireland shall be free !

A spirit stirs within my blcod—
It shall not stir amiss!
It feels the strife beyond the flood
That parts thy |hore from this. •
Columbia sows war's dragon teeth,
lty many a lull aud fen,
Nor recks how on the Irish heat)*
They spring up armed men !
From Antrim to the Southern lake,
From Tralee to Kildare,
One silent spirit walk% and wakes
The lion in his lair!
From Arraghmore's far stormy steep,
To Carlow and Kinsale,
Thou risest, giant like, from sleep ;
Arise ! strike home! prevail \ •
DOES EAGER BEER INTOXICATE!
DtARY OF A MAN WHO TESTS IT.
"Does lager beer intoxicate?" That is a
question which bas agitated this country for
years—courts and communities being divided
ugon it. As a scientific experiment, and for
the purpose of satisfying my mind upon the
subject, I went among the beer gardens and
beer saloons yesterday, keeping a journal of
my progress, which I herewith append:
9 a. M. —Took a glass of lager at a Third
street saloon. Exceedingly cooling to the
system. It diffuses a -gentle and agreeable
exhilaration throughout the brain.
9.05 a. m. —Took another glass with brown
bread, salt, and cardaman seeds. Thoughts
run in agreeable channels. Disposed to look
leniently upon the frailties of humanity.—
Wouldn't refuse to receive cash in full from a
debtor, or force money upon a-man I owed.
Fat the head of a little Dutch baby that tod
dles by me. Am carried back in imagination
to the days of my youth, (which the nights of
my maturl years had put out of my head
somewhat.) I remember my early love, and
muse in a kindly vein (all in vain) upon the
morning of my existence. Dad had some
annoyances iu the morning which vanished
with the froth of the beer, and some life-long
troubles went with them, for a time at least.
9.10 a.m. —*Took another glass, joined by
a friend. A kindly feeling toward the friend.
1 allow him to pay tor the beer, however, re
taining my presence of mind. We indulge in
cheerful conversation. I become eloquent
on German literature. Quote trom Gœthe,
Schiller, and glow at the mention of Rem
brandt. Other friends enter. I allow them
to pay for beer al$o.
10 a. m.— I call for more beer, and tell the
bar-keeper that lie is 'in.' Ask a stranger to
'join us.' Another member of the party calls
vociferously for 'hard-boiled eggs.' I check
him and feel a sympathy for a man who
'show s his beer.'
10.30 a. m.— We have indulged in more
beer. Disposition on the part of some to tell
old anecdotes, at which the party laugh in
ordinately. The bar keeper 'smiles' at our
expense. Some one proposes that wé go up
Pine street. Another gluts of beer, and wo

11a. m. —Shook hands with every acquain
tance we met on toe street coming here. Re
member patting one or two particular frieuds
on the back, and urging them to 'go 'long.'
Gave a newsboy twerfty-five cents for a morn
ing paper that I had read, and declined to
lake any change back. Had a glass of beer.
12 m—T he party gets larger and fuller.
All talk together, as a general thing. Through
some perfectly inexplicable process, beer
mugs that were empty at ono moment, stare
me in the face at another moment full. Some
one calls for cigars. One man in the party
looks pale, becomes silent and meditative,
and then makes bis feeble way towards the
back yard, from which retched sounds pro
ceed.
1 p. m. —We are 'over the Rhine,' though I
have little recollection about coming here.
Think we stopped twice on the way and
drank beer. One man has left the party. He
said he had 'business' to attend to. Remem
ber feeling a sort of admiration for the man
who had nerve to leave a party and go about
his business. Wisbl had some business and
had the nerve to go about it. Thought that
there was a bare possibility that I drank too
much beer. Concluded to have some more
beer
2jp r . m. —More beer. Some of us leave a
half a glass undrank, while others order
•kline' glasses. One naan 'switches off' oh
whisky, and another 'takes a cigar in hts'n.'
2 30 p. m. —Another round. T tell my sto
ries over twice, and just as I reach the point
in the story a friend breaks in with—'that re
minds of a little incident,' &c.
3 p M.—As near as I can recollect, I called
for more beer. One man in the party, who
bad been very boisterous up to that moment,
grows suddenly silent, his head drops over
on his shoulder and he goes to sleep. Another
man sings a song. We all join in the chorus
without any particular regard to the key.
more beer.
3.30 p. m. —'Sixty-six' is introduced. We
play for the beer, and the beer continues to
play the deuce for ns. Two or three suspi
cious looking strangers, whom we wouldn't
admit to our fellowship under other circum
stances, wormed themselves into the parly.
They laughed extravagantly at all my stories,
and call for the beer which is applied to my
account.
4 p. m. —A man who had been silently
drinking bis beer for some time, suddenly
breaks out in violent denunciation of some
individual who is absent, and whom none of
us know. We immediately sympathize with
him, and proceed to denounce the absent in
dividual with great warmth, all talking to
gether. More beer.
5 p. m.— I sing a song, forgetting the third
line in the second verse, and nearly go to
sleep in trying to recall it.
5.30 p. m. —I insist upon paying for all
we've had. A total siranger borrows five
dollars of me until he can -see Stofe.' The
glasses are filled up again by order of a party
at the other end of the room.
6 p. M.—Men with their coats off, vociferat
ing violently. Everybody in intense perspir
ation; disposition to spill beer ou our shirt
bosoms and our clothes. Beer mugs knock'd
off the table. Bar-keeper gets excited and
wastes his German on the desert air, the des
ert air not understanding it. I imagine that
be is asking us all to drink, and accept the
invitation. It is charged to me.
I p. m.—M ore beer spilled on our shirt
bosoms. More fellows grow pale and go out
in the back yard, and more men suddenly
recollect that they have business to attend to,
going about their business as though it was
the 'rail fence' business.
Lager beer won't intoxicate 1
Man asleep across Qie table. Another man
off, rs to 'rassle' any one in the party for the
beer, (having 'rassied' a large quantity of
beer.) A stranger takes it up, the 'rassle'
proceeds—and 1 go under. More beer.
10 p. m. —More men sleep. I embrace two
or three Dutchmen at the uext table—telling
them 'your my friend.' Look round and
discover all of a sudden, that my party has
changed. All gone 'wot I knowd,'.and a lot
of strangers there. That it is time to go
home. Drink a glass of beer and go it.
II p. M.—Am rudely awakened by some
one. Open my eyes and see a couple of
watchmen. 1 am on a door-step on Pine
street. The watchman says 'You don't want
to sleep here.' 'The devil I don't. Do you
suppose I would be (hie) foolish enough to
lay down and go to sleep here if I didn't want
to?' 'Butyou can't sleep here.' 'That's a
different thing altogether. You said I didn't
want to, and (hic) I never wanted to so bad
in my life before.'
11.30 p. m. —I reached home. Experienced
a good deal of difficulty in unlocking the
hall door with a lead pencil. Try a pocket
knife, and then blunder upon the night key.
Suddenly remember that I have got tbe hic
cups, and getting under the ball gas-light,
I try to cure them by seeing bow near I can
put my two little fingers together without
touching them. I 'job' them by each other,
clear up to tbe elbow. Then experience a
glow of triumph as I hold them very near to
gether, TWO FEET APART.
11 55 p. m. —The hiccups cured. Congrat
ulate myself on the cure a3 I go up stairs.
Think of taking out a license to practice in
that line. I open tbe door—give a hiccup
that starts the roof, and nearly throws my
head off. Wife starts up in bed, and says :
' Drunk again !'
I protest that I am (hie) not. I was digni
fied and learned, and ask her if she (hie) un
derstands the diag (hie) nosis of hiccups.
She says she had ought to ; she had seen me
have them often enough.
Siÿd I, in an injured voice: 'Do you know
Madam, that (hie) hiccups come from (hicj—
comes from a eold (hie) 3toraach V' She said
she thought it came from a beer cellar down
street. I insisted that a cold lit of (hie)
hiccups often comes from a severe stomach,
and remember wandering off into a disserta
tion upon the intoxicating properties of
quails, while she was pulling off my boots.
Lagor-beer won't intoxicate. Ob, no !
HuNKr-Kl-DO-RI.
Prairie du Chein, Wisconsin, the oldest
town on the Upper Mississippi, besides being
tbe terminus of railroads, is noted for the
sleepy beaqty of its location, its old fort,
(Crawford) and for being tbe place whence
Jeff. Davis, then a Lieutenant in the United
States Army, eloped with the daughter of ex
President Taylor, then Colonel in command
of our forces at Fort Crawford. Here was
Davis' first secession exploit. He loved the
handsome daughter of Col. Taylor. That
love was returned. Col. Taylor would not
consent to their marriage, so Lieut. Davis se
ceded trom Prairie du Chein and went to an
other union. By the means of a rope ladder
the girl let herself down from the upper win
dow of the commandant's bouse at the fort ;
in the darkness of tbe night they went to the
edge of the river; a trusty Indian took the
lovers into his canoe, and off down tbe stream
they went and were married at St. Louis as
soon as they could reach that point. Joff.'s
relics, including portions of his old Lieuten
ant's uniform, are, with other curiosities, now
preserved in a cabinet of curiosities at La
Crosse, Wisconsin.—[Exchange.
a
Montana Miking BnL—We recently had
occasion to refer to the President's veto of
tbe bill authorizing the Montana Mining and
.Manufacturing Company to purchase a cer
tain amount of tbe public lauds not now in
market. The veto message exposed the at
tempt to carve out of the public domain an
immense estate for a private incorporation,
with scarcely any outlay to tbe speculators
concerned, and in a manner contrary to our
land laws, as it discriminated unjustly in fa
vor of speculators against pioneers and ac
tual settlers seeking homes in our western
territory.
The National Intelligencer, in the course
of an able article referring to this job, says
that the exposition of this job by the Execu
tive was so withering that no attempt was
made to obtain the two-thirds vote necessary
to pass the bill, notwithstanding the veto.—
But the job was not to be so easily abandon
ed. A few days afterwards it was revived,
revamped and passed by Congress, under the
title of ''An Act Creating the Territory of
Montana into a Surveying District, au(! for
other purposes." These "other purposes."
which formed, in fact, the whole gist of the
bill, were almost a literal copy of tbe vetoed
Montana bill, conferring exclusive, unjustand
unlawful privileges upon this private com
pany.
The only purpose of the clause in the new
bill, appointing surveyors, receivers and reg
istrars there, was to introduce the original
odions job already vetoed by tbe President,
and to make these public officers, with sala
ries from the federal government, simply tbe
favorite agents of a company of private spec
ulators. But this artifice did not escape the
vigilance of President Johnson. It was met
promptly by another veto. It ought not to
escape the attention and condemnation of the
people.
Its passage a second time, under a differ
ent title, is an irrefutable proof of the delib
erate persistence o? Congress in an attempt,
with full knowledge of its oulrageousness, to
consummate a foul wrong and an infamous
fraud.— [Mining Index.
A very Romantic (bct not very moral)
Episode in a Returned Californian's Life—
She Got him at Last. —Tbe New Albany
(Ind.) Ledger of a recent date bas tbe follow
ing : Ladoga, on the Louisville, New Albany
and Chicago railroad, has been the theatre of
a rather romantic domestic scene Nine
years ago, Ira Lord courted and deeply loved
a young lady in Michigan. They wanted to
marry, but the parents objected becauseLord
was poor. He determined to go to California,
and in the golden mines of that State digout
a fartune that would mollify the parents, and
entitle him to the daughter's bawd. Mutual
vows of enduring love intermingled with
those endearing tokens of affection which
lovers alone understand, were passed, and
Lord took his departure. After be had been
gone for a time the parents fixed up a match
tor the daughter with a man named Reynolds,
and compelled her to marry him. Some
weeks ago Lord returned from California,
learned the facts in the case, and met the
lady. The old flame which bad burned with
so much ardor in their youthful hearts was
rekindled. They atterwaids met clandes
tinely, and soon arranged an elopement,
which was carried out in a few days after,
the lady taking her two children of her mar
riage witfl her. The parties finally arrived at
Ladogo, where Lord rented a farm tempo
rarily, having bargained for a large and pro
ductive one tobe delivered when tbe crops
were gathered. He fitted up his house in
good style, for he had plenty of shining dust,
and was living in the bliss which lovers only
realize. Reynolds, the husband, however,
got upon the track of his fugitive wife, and
suddenly dropped in upon Lord and her.
Neither party was belligerently demonstrative;
there was indeed more sorrow than anger.
They talked the matter over, the wife declar
ing her love for Lord, and telling Reynolds
that it was impossible tor her to love him
and make a true wife. Reynolds was con
vinced; the matter was compromised, and
Reynolds agreed to give the wife a bill of
divorce, she to keep the children on condition
that Lord settled enough on them to insure
their comfortable support. They all returned
to Michigan together, and soon Lord will be
legally married to the love of his youth, for
whom be had endured great privation. Such
is one of life's chapters in this age of civili
zation.
Taking a Position —The Boise Statesman
hes heretofore measurably sustained the.Pre
sident, and at the same time seen nothing
particularly objectionable in the course pur
sued by Congress. In other words, our co
temporary attempted the difficult feat known
as the two-horse act. This performance was
mainly intended to operate upon the election,
and now that the sovereigns have spoken,
our namesake no longer attempts to straddle
the chasm that separates Congress from the
President, but boldly takes sides with tbe
Radicals and chimes in with Stevens, Sumner
& Co. We mention this fact as showing that
tbe crystalizing process is going on, and that
tbe true Union men of the country are rapid
ly being separated from those who failing to
rule tbe Government are determined to ruin
it.—[Walla Walla Statesman.
The following notice recently appeared on
the west end of a country meeting house:
"Anyone sticking bills against this church
will be prosecuted according to law or any
other nuisance." -
The best defence of lying that we ever
read, is tbe remark o\ Charles Lamb, related
by Leigh Hunt, that truth was precious and
not to be wasted on everybody.
CODY'S EXCHANGE!
Cor. Main and Wall Streets,
i
—IDAHO CITY,—
JOHN CODY,---Proprietor.
I WOULD RESPECTFULLY INFORM MY
numerous friends and the public generally,
that I have this day assumed the proprietorship of the
above Popular Saloon. At considerable expense, I
have recently fitted up the above premises in a style
inferior to none North of San Francisco.
In a few days, I will receive direct from the well
known house of Nudd, Lord & Co., of San Francisco, a
largo addition to my already extensive stock of
FIRST CUSS LIQUORS !
Consisting in part of
Otard Dupuy fy Cos Old Sazarac, Champagne Pro
prietors , H. Sutton, Pelvo sim and other Brandies,
Old (Government,Essence old Virginia, MU! er,
Cutter and other Whiskies; Old Burgundy
and Hudson Bay Port ; Fine Old Duff
Gordon and Harmony Sherry; London
Jockey Club. Bininger. Hofland , and
other favorite brands of Gin, Ja
maica, St. Croix a» d Santa Crus
Rum; together with a fine as
soi'lmenx of Berger fy Pernod
Absenlka; Cnraso. Mai is
chend, Angusthura, Sell
ner.Baker, Boonekamp,
Salutaris , Oringe,
and other Bitters, fyc.. fyc., <$-r.
I have also secured the services of Mr. ED. PHILLIPS,
whoso reputation as a first-class Bar Keeper is widely
known here as well as in Sun Francisco. Sacramento,
and other large cities, whose attention and gentlemanly
bearing will always be appreciated by a disciiminating
public. JOHN CODY.
Idaho city, April 28n27tf
JAMES S. CRAIG.
(Successor to Craig & Mix.)
Wholesale and Retail Druggist,
Main Street, Idaho City.
H as on hand a full and complete
assortment of
Chemicals, Acids. Soaps,
PERFUMEE Y,
PATENT MEDICINES,
and all goods usually found in a first c ass store
Prescriptions prepared with care and neatness.
JAMES S. CRAIG.
Idaho City, June 1st. 1866.n36tf.
EXCHANGE STABLE
I) A. 1ST. DRAKE.
(Successor to L. B. Lindsay.)
LIVERY, FEED AND SALE STABLE !
Main street, between 7th and 8th,
Boise City,
H ORSES kept by the night, week or month.
Gentle horses to let. and Carriages always
on hand at the shortest notice. A share of the
public patronage is solicited.
D. D. DRAKE.
Boise City. April 19th. 1866.n27m6.
DRIDE'S
Livery Stable & Corral,
Montgomeiy Street.
Between Comnieroial and Wallula streets,
IDAHO CITY.
BUGGY, SADDLE AM) CARRIAGE
TICURSIES.
"VT EW AND FASHIONABLE BUGGIFS AND
J.! Carnages always ready, day or night, at a
minute's notice.
Horses received on board per day or month
at reduced rates.- DKYDKN McCLINTOCK,
49 SAM STEWART.
H. M. ELLSWORTH.
D. CRAM.
OVERLAND HOUSE,
Corner Main aud Eighth sts, Boise City ,
T his popular hotel has recently
been thoroughly refitted and improved by
the present proprietors, who flatter themselves
that they can entertain the traveling public in a
manner not to be surpassed in this Territory.
QPEN AT ALL HOURS.
We have made large additions to the sleeping
apartments, and furnished them with the
Best Beds in the Territory.
r We solicit a share of pnblic patronage.
At this House may be found the General Stage
Office ofjthe Overland, Walla Walla, Umatilla, Sail
Lake, Owjbee, Idaho City, and South Boise lines.
n51 ELLS WORTH A CRAM. Proprietors.
International Hotel!
AND GENERAL STAGE OFFICE,
Placer ville,
THOMAS B. HART, PROPRIETOR.
This well-known Hotel
HAS BEEN RE-OPENED
and the traveler will now find
*3- EXCELLENT ACCOMMODATIONS -O
in everything he may require.
The Beds & Bedding are New,
and the TABLE well supplied. n4Itf.
P0UJADE HOUSE,
AND GENERAL STAGE OFFICE*
Comer of Main and ('ommereial Streets.
THIS well known Hotel is again opened and
ready for the accommodation of tbe public whom
we will be happy to make as comfortable as pos
sible.
34td C. POUJADE Proprietor.
ALONZO P. TURNER,
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR BOISE COUNTY.
WALL STREET, FOUR DOORS BELOW MONTGOMERY,
IDAHO CITY. 1. T. 22tf
!
a
a
DR. E. EVANS.
F amily physician and accoucheur.
Particular attention to diseases of Women
«lid Children. Office on Wall st. 3 doors below
Cody's Exchange, Idaho City, I. T. n35tf.
J. W. TALBOTT,
T>HYSICIAN & SURGEON. Office at Chip
JL man's Drugstore, corner of Wall & Main at«.
Residence City Hotel. n34tf.
J. L. McGOWND,
A TTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW.
jl\ Office over Centerville Brewery, sonth side
Wall St. All business intrusted to his care will
meet immediate attention, and prompt remittan
ces made. n34tf
FRED. W. BELL,
XPOTARY PUBLIC AND CONVEYANCER.
±1 Office at Sheriff's Office. Idaho City. [32tf
WM. W. HABERSHAM,
VTOTARY PUBLICA CONVEY.NCER. Par
■1 v ticular attention given to drawing Deeds and
other instruments of writing. Office — At tbe
Boise Bakery on Wall Ht. Idaho City. 14tt
GILBERT & HENLEY,
A TTORNEYS & COUNSELORS AT LAW
Office on Main st. over Clark A Dunn's. 43
GANAHL & KNOWLES.
A TTORNEYS & COUNSELORS AT l.AW, ÎDAHO
XX City» Office adjoining the Sheriff's office.
n39tf.
J. B. ROSOBOROUGH.
A TTORNEY at Law. Office on Wall street,
x\ Idaho City. n8
V. S. ANDERSON,
i TTORNEY AND COUNSELOR JP£ LAW,
A Rocky Bar, Alturas county. I. T. n40tf
JONAS W. BROWN. .
A TTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW.
XjLOffice on Montgomery st. [32
MAY & McGRAW,
A TTORNEYS & COUNSELORS AT
XjL Law. Office on Montgomery st. [29.
C. SIMS,
A TTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW.
Xu. Office at City Hotel, Idaho City. [24tt|
C. B. WAITE,
A TTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW,
XjL Office on Main street, opposite Schee
line's store. (n30tf
SAM'L A. MERRITT.
A TTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW,
XL Office on Harris street, between Main
and Montgomery, rear of Harris' Drug store 20
GEORGE AINSLIE,
A TTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW,
XL Centerville, Idaho Territory. [28m3
* CHAS. C. DUDLEY,
A TTORNEY COUNSELOR AT LAW,
1 X Pioneer City, Idaho Territory. n23tf
J. M. BETTS,
/BOUNTY PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office one door south of Fitzgerald's Store,
Main street, Idaho City, I. T. Particular atten
tion to surgery. n3Qtf.
DR. C W KIRCHNER,
/GERMAN PHYSICIAN, SURGEON AND
VJT Accoucheur. Consultations in French, Spa
isti, German and English. Office in Craig & Mix's
Drug store, Main street, Idaho cty. n25tf
DB. I>. WIJ.LIS,
Offick— In Cbipman's Drug Store, corner of
Wall and Main streets, Idaho City. 28tf
WELLS. FARGO & CO.
NEW YORK AND CALIFORNIA
Express and Exchange Company !
'17I7ELLS, FARGO & CO. having recently estai«.
Tv lished Offices at Boise City, Ruby City, and
Rocky Bar, are prepared to forward Freight,
Packages and Letters from those point to all parts
of the world ; also, Collections and Commissions
attended to. [44tf{
/4 ClC'SCl POUNDS OF BARLEY
Ojvlv-'VJ At 14 cts., by tbe Sack,
for sale at ROSENBAUM'S WAREHOUSE.
4-0 and 5-0 Duck For sale at
8. G. ROSENBAUM'S.
Idaho City, May 26, 1866. n3ltf.
jkc: mz
FOR SALE BY GEORGE GANS.
WJ T LL BE DELIVERED DAILY FROM THE
VV waon a t
5 CENTS J?i£IL POUND.
Orders received at the wagon or at Gans' Saloon,
Main Street., Idaho City.
Idaho Cit v M«v on n31tf.
LUMBER.
T P. LAMBING HAS ÔN HAND AT HIS
I . Steam Saw Mill, a very large stock of LOGS
iro:n 10 to 36 feet long, and is prepared to fill
orders for any amount at reasonable rates for
Cash. xguOrders left with J. V. Wood & Co.
or at the Mill receive prompt attention. £nl7tf
REMO VA.IL
M. F. B1ECK,
Practical Tailor.
AN be found opposite • 'Miners' Brewe
ry," Main Street. I return thanks ÄA
for favors received. 1 warrant prompt UUu
and reasonable services to my patrons. r
n2tf.
LUMBER OFFICE.
A- H.ROBIE.
X UMBER YARD at tbe Bear run railroad—of*
JLd ßc« on Main street, in front of tbe yard, 36.
I DAHO LODGE KO. 35, F. à A. M. MEETS
every Saturday Evening at o'cloek
Stated communications on Saturday preceding
full moon. All Masons in good standing are
nvited. By order of tbe W. II.

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