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Polynesian. [volume] (Honolulu [Oahu], Hawaii) 1844-1864, December 27, 1862, Image 2

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THE POLYNESIAN.
SATURDAY. DECEMBER 27, 18G2.
Christmas has come and gone, and the New
Year stands at the door with rosy cheeks and
bands fall of promises. We hope the holidays
feave brought gladness to many a heart, that thej
have knit friendships still closer, ha?e softened
animosities, and have left each of us with the
pure and serene consciousness that we have be
grudged none their happiness, and have been
deemed by none unworthy of our joy.
Christmas is, however, not only a season of joy,
but also of reflection. While e acknowledge
with praises and jubilee, humbly and gratefully,
the mercies vouchsafed during the past year, the
life health., strength, prosperity, singly or to
gether, let us not forget to look behind the mask
of our outward being, and 6can the status of the
inward spirit. Gentle reader : You passed safely
over the. threshold of the year now closing ; it has
borne yoa along, through good and ill in sight of
the opening portals of the coining year ; have you
so conducted yourself that you can look back with
satisfaction, look forward with hope, whether the
New Year greets you in this world or the next?
llave you been obedient to God, been loyal to con
stituted authority, been loving and kind to your
fellow-men, been true to yourself and the light
within and around you ! Have you shown mercy,
forfiearnnce, forgiveness ; have you shown justice
and rectitude, charity and toleration 1 If you
have, pass on ! Thre is light on your count
enance to guide you through the gates of death
and over the bridge of EMis, much more through
ti.e archway of a coming year. If you have, pass
on ! There can be no darkness or doubt on a
heart like yours, whether looking up to the stars
with eternity before you, or looking down upon
earth with time beneath your feet.
Victor Hugo says, aa beautifully as true : The
head which does not somestimes look back on the
fading horizons contains neither thought nor love."
Let us look back then at the receding horizon of
the past year and see how the Fates have dealt
with us as a nation and an individuals. Peace,
like the calm sunlight of a summer's day, has
lain over the land. No foreign foes nor domestic
strife have sent mourning and bitterness of heart
among the people Quietly and undisturbed by
vague alarms or cramping fear every honest calling
has been pursued and been rewarded. No plague
or pestilence has scourged the people and racked
the mind with apprehensions dire. Plenty and
peace have filled the board and seasoned the food
of industry and thrift, and no gaunt, fainine
etricken spectres have met the eye, appealing or
accusing the God above or the social condition
below. Commerce has thriven, agriculture ad
vanced, justice been faithfully administered, and
the mental activity of the people increased. Are
not these blessings enough to be thankful for as a
nation! Must we refuse the glory ot the sun-rise
because some storm-clouds of the night still linger
on the western horizon ? Shall we bargain with
God, and make the Lord our debtor ! No ! All
praise and glory for the good we have enjoyed : it
might have been greater, had we been more de
serving ; and even the loss of him, whose name
hung on every lip with love and desire, we are
bound to believe, was not wholly evil, but for some
all-wise beneficent purpose. Nations as well as
individuals grow greater in sorrow fire refines
the gold and a grief that falls on many heads
brings hearts together which but for that might
have been estranged forever.
As individuals we have all had our burdens to
bear, our crosses, misfortunes and errors to stand
up under. We may have failed and fainted in the
struggle of life, but if so, with ourselves the
fault, for the mercy of God never falters nor faints.
If there has been darkness on our path in life, that
darkness came from the heart within. Nature
still coaxes the rebellious soul with her blandest
smiles, and the stars speak their calm rebuke to
intemperate sorrow. However complicated the
burden, however cruel the cross, yet each of us
has that within him that will overcome the one
and assuage the other, would we but drop our
accursed egotism, that bastard-apple of the tree
of knowledge, on which we feed our souls, and
shutout friendship, sympathy and love; would
we but trust in God and take the chalice without
grumbling.
We have thus most briefly taken the liberty, on
the occasion of the holidays and the approach of
the New Year, to moralize to our readers. Let us
now make merry, if we can ; a joyous heart makes
the burden half. If we cannot, let us make others
merry ; true love is unselfish. Let us read to our
children, or let them read to us the following poem
by C. C. Moore, about the visit of Santa Claus.
It is a fit epilouge to Christmas musings.
'T was the night before Christina, when all thro' the house
Not a creature wai stirring, not even a moue:
Tbe stockings were hung by the chimney with care,
la hope that St. Nicholas soon would be there ;
The children were nestled all snug in their beds,
While risiom of sugarplums danced through their heads;
And mamma in ber 'kerchief, and I in my cap,
Had just settled our brains for a long winter's nap
When out on tbe lawn there roe such a clatter,
I sprang from the bed to see what was tbe matter:
A way to the window I flew like a (lath.
Tore open the shutters and threw op the sash.
Tbe moon, on the breast of the new-fallen snow.
Cave the lustre of mid-day to objects below.
When, what to my wondering evgs should appear
Bat a miniature sleigh and eight tiy reindeer,
With a little old driver, so lively and quick,
I knew in a moment it must be St. Nick.
More rapid tlian eagles his coursers they came,
And be whistled, and shouted, and called them by name:
" Now, Dasher ! now. Dancer ! now, Prancer t now. Vixen !
On 1 Comet, on! Cupid, on! Ponder and Bliien
To tbe top ol tbe porch ! to tbe top of the wall '
Nov, dash away, dash away, dasb airay all ! " jf
As leaves that before the wild hurricane fls?
When they meet with an obstacle, moo f -ky.
So, up to the house-top the course rsy flew.
With tbe sleigh full of toys and St Nicholas too.
And then in a twinkling I heard on tbe roof
Tbe prancing and pawing of each little hoot
As 1 drew in my bead, and was turning around,
Town the chimney St. Nirbolas came with a bound.
He was dressed all in far, from bis bead to his loot.
And bis clothes were all tarnished with ashes and soot;
A bundle of toys he bad flung on his back,
And be looked like a peddler just opening bis pack.
His eys bow tbey twinkled ! his dimples, how merry !
His cheeks were like rose, his note like a f terry ;
His droU little mouth was drawn up like a bow
And tbe beard on bis cbia was as white as the snow.
Tbe stump of a pipe be held tight in bis teeth.
And the smoke, it encircled bis bead like a wreath.
He had a round face and a little round belly
That shook, when be laughed, like a I o vl full of jelly.
He was chubby and plump ; a right jolly old elf
And I laughed when I saw him, in spite of myself.
A wink of bis eye, and a twist of bis head,
8oon gave me to know I had nothing to dread.
He spoke not a Word but went straight to bis work,
And filled all the stockings ; then turned with a jerk.
And laying bis finger aside cf his nose,
And giving a nod, np tbe chimney he rose.
He sprang to his sleigh, to bis team gave a whistle.
And away they all flew like the down of a thistle,
But I heard him exclaim, ere be drove out of sight,
Happy Christinas to all, aud to all a good night !"
Froew Tahiti.
By the arrival of the bark Damtitta from London via
Tahiti, we have news from the latter place up to
Nov. 20.
The most prominent subject of iutercst from that
country is the nefarious attempt of certain Peruvian
vessels to kidnap a cumber of the Gambier islanders
for the purpose of selling them to the guano proprie
tors ou the Chincha Islands. Information having
reached the Protectorate Government of this new phase
of the slave trade, the Government steamer Latouche
Trtville had been dispatched to the Tuamotu group to
look after aud defeat this inhuman enterprise. In the
meantime the Peruvian bark SerpienU Marina, mho h;id
ventured into the very harbor of Papeete, had been
seized by the Protectorate Government as guilty of car
rying on this species of tiaffic in human flesh, and the
trial was progressing at last advices. Other news ar
rived at Tahiti report that similar attempts to kidnap
natives had been made at Mangariva and the Marque
sas and that a number of vessels were at this moment
cruising among the Polynesian Islands for the purpose
of recruiting laborers for the Chinchas.
We have been requested by Mr. de Varigny, Acting
Consul aud Commissi'-ner of France in this place, to
Etate that any information tuuchiug this subject .-ul
which may lead to the detection and defeat of the guilty
parties in their operations among the Poly nesi.m Islands,
whether civilized or barbarous, will be gratefully re
ceived by him.
In the name of humanity we think that the most effi
cient measure to nip this crime in the bud, would be
lor the French aud English GoveintneUs to joiutly and
peremptorily demand of the Peruvian Government the
restitution of every Polynesian islander thus brought
to the Chincha Islands. It is through such acts of in
famy and barbarity that commerce is imperilled and
innocent vessels cut off by deceived and outraged tribes
upon the thousands of islands and groups of Poly
nesia.
We leirn further through the politeness of Mr.de
Varigny that the Protectorate Government intends to
hold a great Polynesian Industrial Exhibition at Ta
hiti on or about the loth of August next year, to which
this and other independent island Slates of Polynesia
will be invited to contribute. A la bonne heure ! while
acknowledging tbe eourtesy, we feel sure that Hawaii
will not fail to maintain her rank as " the Heart of the
Pacific."
Tbe Protectorate Government had commenced a gen
eral, thorough survey of the Tahitian Islands, embrac
ing every individual land, district and island, with
accompanying descriptions ; a work whose usefulness
will be invaluable. A similar survey of the Hawaiian
Islands has long been a desideratum, but our Legisla
ture has not yet perceived its necessity, nor found the
means to defray its expenses, though repeatedly urged
to do so.
The fourth son of Queen Pomare, Tuariva, has been
sent to France to complete his education. He went as
passenger on board of the frigate Iris, which left for
France on the 3d Nov.
By a law of the SOth October last, we s e that in
struction in the French language has become obligatory
in the common schools of Tahiti, to be taught equally
with the Tahitian language, and that schools for girls
are to be separated from i-chools for boys, and that un
til proper arrangements could be made, the classes of
each sex should be kept separate and at differ en t
hours.
We congratulate our Tahitian neighbors on this
measure. We have talked 1 ng enough about it, but
ours has been " a v.ice in the wilderness' for many
years and as yet no Emanuel has appeared on the edu
cational horizon. The last Legislature unexpectedly
screwed its courage up to enact a law for tbe separation
of the sexes in school, but, wherever the fault may lie,
from that day to this the Act has bee a cox el preterea
nihil. We confess to a feeling of annoy -nee that the
Tahitian should take the step of us in those matters
which exclusively belong to the improvement and civ
ilization of the indigenous inhabitants. From what we
can learn of Tahitian legislation and Tahitian execu
tive, an Act ordered to take effect " from and after the
day of its publication' is not often permitted to gather
cobwebs for four months in Government Bureaus.
A table published in the Messager de Tahiti of Nov.
9 gives the value of foreign coins at Tahiti, viz :
An American Gold Eagle 51 fr. C5c
" " " DoiL.r 5 fr. 15c
An English Sovereign 25 fr. 20c
United States Dime 53c
Spanish Douro, Brazilian. South American
and New Granadian piastre .... 5fr.-30c
Sp mish Real 66c
English Shilling 1 fr. 10c
Chilian Peso 5 fr.
The population cf Tahiti continues in a moat satis
factory sanitary condition. From statistical (official)
tables we notice that " births " for the nine months,
ending Oct. 1, bore to " deaths " nearly the proportion
of 7 to 4, or, closer, 186 to 114. Of births, the fe
males were to the male as 107 to 79. Of deaths the
proportion was 58 females to 56 males. This showing
of a Bister country is suggestive of many serious
thoughts, when compared with our own, where deaths
seem to preponderate over births in such an unnatural
ratio ; and that leads us to ask again what has become
of tbe Sanitary Commission that was, or was to be
appointed ? We certaiuly must give the Tahitian Go
ernment the credit of being better posted on the sani
tary condition of its people, its official returns on this
subject being far better compiled and more lull than
ours.
Grammar Scbaal a ad Kducnlioa.
We notice with pleasure that the Rev. Geo. Mason,
M. A., will open a Grammar School on the 12th of
January next. It is another index of social advance,
and one of the means of advancing others. While
we most heartily recommend every measure of this
kind, and honor those who untiringly devote them
selves to the education of the young, we must again
call upon the Government not to wait for private
benevolence or accidental opportunities to supply the
educational wants of this pe.ple, but to take the sub
ject in hand with a will and at once, on a large com
prehensive scale that shall embrace every part of the
country. The silence of the Board of Education on
this subject is unaccountable.
Aactian Sales.
This evening there will be a sale of fancy articles,
toys, et-M for New Year's presents, at the new auc
tion room ol H. W. Severance, on Queen street ; and
on Tuesday next the last evening sale for the year
comes off at J. H. Cole's sales-room, on the same
street. That will be the last opportunity to procure
those little tokens of lore and affection with which
civilized people are accustomed to rtmember their
friends.
Christ snae ia Haaalala.
More than common efforts, proceeding from different
directions, having been made to celebrate Christmas in
Honolulu this year, in a Christian, civilized, proper
ad becoming manner, it is mete that we should notice,
so far as space permits, the manner in which this great
Festival was kept
Public notice having been issued by order of the
Government that tbe day would be kept as a public
holiday, and all public offices closed, Christmas Eve
came with due warning to usher in the day of all days
that should fill the Christian heart with joy andJad
ness. An extraordinary inquiry and preparatil
prevailed for some time previous after ChrbtmasSfys
and Christmas presents, to gladden the young and sur
prise the old ; and, as the evening shadows began to
fall, young hearts began to flutter, old faces grew mys
terious. The air was ominous of something ; but
whether of a snow-storm or of Santa Claus, was the
question young minds tried to solve, though opinions
leaned strongly in favor of the latter. Christmas trees
were dressed in various quarters of the town ; the cus
tom, we are glad to see, is gradually increasing and
promises to become a permanent institution in our
community. Of those that fell under our notice, we
will mention a few, as a memento for future times, end
hope we will be forgiven for bringing private matters
to the public gtze. The Christmas tree in the vestry
roorn of the Fort Street Church was the perl of the
evening, both as regards size, the number of its re
ceivers and the variety of its gifts. To Mr. Brewster,
the teacher of the Fort Street School, belongs the credit
of the enterprise and the arrangement All his schol
ars, numbering about 70, were present with their pa
rents and friends, and a brighter, happier set of juve
niles it would be difficult to find, search the world over.
Equally tastefully arranged and gorgeously loaded with
presents was the Christmas tree at Mrs. Dominis',
Washington Place. To Mrs. Dominis fairly belongs
the honor of having started the institution of Christmas
trees in Honolulu. For several years, when indiffer
ence or stupidity bnnihed tbe day nnd its hallowed
associations from the memory of childhood, her house
alone resounded to the gleesome voices of t he young,
gathered around her well-dressed Christmas tn-e and
her hospitable board, until now. when the custom may
be considered as fairly established. At Judge Robert
sou's, Emma Square, was another well-arranged and
numerously attended Christmas tree. At Mr. de Va
rigny's, at Mr. Wicke's, at Mrs. Lowell Smith's at Dr.
Judd's, at Mr. W. II. Dimond's, Christmas trees were
also erected, and sheil their bmign influence overall
who attended the n. God's blessings on the young,
whatever their fate in after life ! God's blessings on
the old who thus seek to store the mind of childhood
with happy recollections of the spring of life, to en
hance the pleasures or off-t the storms of riper years !
At midnight religious service was held at the Episco
palian Church, and Grand Mass at the Catholic Cathe
dral. The former, although a temporary structure,
was richly decorated with evergreens and wreaths and
splendidly lighted. Tbe Bishop of Honolulu and his
clergy officiating, and their Majesties, the King and
Queen attending. Tbe Catholic Church was illuminat
ed with a profuseness and taste truly astonishing for
Honolulu, and from pavement to dome wsb a blaze of
lights, the roup Truil from the main entrance being th
most magnificent ever witnessed here ; and the wreaths
of light, high up in the air, round tbe tower of 'he
church, had a most imposing effect in the still dark
uight, like wardens aloft announcing to mankind that
' a child was born, in whose name all nations shall be
blessed," and pointing silently upward to the realms of
peace, " where the wicked cease from troubling and the
weary are at rest." After the service was finished at
the Episcopal Church, a grand torch-light procession
was formed by the congregatioiwn which their Ma
jesties, the Bishop and his clergy .nglish Commis
sioner, and many others participial, proceeding
through several streets of the city, singing Christmas
e siuctrclyrejuffce at this first attempt toopularise
the celebration of Christmas on a large scale in this
country. Tbe native population swarmed in thousands,
quiet, rapt spectators, apprehending in a vivid manner
that religion has its pleasant aspect even on this side
of the grave, and that devotion does not exclude the
pleasurable emotions of tbe senses, given by God to per
ceive His presence in the flower as well aa iu the thun
der storm.
Christmas-day was kept comparatively quiet as a
day of family rejoicings, and, with the exception of the
Catholic nnd Episcopal churches aud the church
at Kawaiihao, no religious services were held by
the churches of the other denominations. In the
evening, however, there was a grand party at the
German Club, of which Dr. E. Hoffmann is the
President, where Christmas cheer was most abundaut,
and where in speeches and songs " das alte Yaterland
was as tenderly remembered as if the convives had sat
on the banks of the Elbe or the top of the Brocken.
Tbe German Club justly merits something more than
a passing notice when speaking of Christmas holidays
The Club was commenced some nine years ago by the
German residents of this city. Besides the ordinary
purposes of a Club, it has faitJsRlly subserved two
noble ends which were perh not contemplated at
the formation of the but nevertheless flowed
naturally from the puTious education and customs of
its members we min the keeping alive the Jiamma
sacra of their ojp. nationality, and the liberalizing the
public spirit Ci tbe community in which they lived.
Before the first we reverently bow our head A n
United Gebmant will yt have a page in the world's
and we now honor those sentinels of its
Avatar who keep their watch-fires burning abroad
and at home. With the second, we enter not less sym-
pathizingly, but more practically, in communion, nnd
freely accord much, if not most, of the development of
liberal sentiments in this community to the German
element of its residents. Ordinarily quiet and unob
trusive, correcttin their deportment, courteous and
blithe, the Germans are ever found foremost on all
proper occasions of music, song and dance, clinging to
time-honored festivals and innocent amusements, and,
what is best of all, showing by their own example, hew
to nix the utile dulci of this world in proper propor
tions. With them Christmas day has ever been kept
and commemorated as a rallying point in time, a re
membrancer of the land of their birth, a beacon in
life where hope is kindled and faith grows firmer.
Of the party ia question we have but space to speak
in general terms. The table was laid with that good
taste and scrupulous attention to every possible wish,
that always is a mute but most eloquent introduction
to a banquet. The wine teas from the Rhine. Mirth
and Humor expanded every countenance. Of tbe
toasts, the three first were" The Land of our Birth,"
appropriately and feelingly proposed by the President
of the Club, Dr. Hoffmann ; Their Majesties of the
Hawaii in Islands ; " under whose benign rule foreign
era enjoyed a freedom unparalleled elsewhere, and who
themselves were the patrons and partakers of every
liberal sentiment, of every onward movement that
looked to the happiness of others;" "Our Guests." In
a word, it was as pleasant an evening as heart could
desire, and our wish is that the German Club may
prosper and its social influences for good prevail.
We cannot close this notice of an agreeable Christ
mas party without acknowledging the successful efforts
of the Vice-President, Mr. Banning, and the humorous
sallies of tbe worthy Secretarius of the Club, Mr.
Schultz.
To add to the gala appearance of the town, flags were
displayed in every direction ashore and on tbe shipping
in the haibor.
Foreign Extract.
Vanity Fair thinks the popular dances for 1S63 will
be squad-drilles-
A foreign journal says the Austian ladies have re
solved to give crinoline a deed cut, and have intimated
to the managers of the Vienna theatres that they will
not patronize the house where the actresses wear crin
oline. At the thousandth birth day of Russia, celebrated at
Novgorod, the Emperor made a speech, declaring bis
inteution to hold firmly to the course he has marked
out in relation to the serts.
It is openly charged in Washington that army sur
geons are constantly bribed to allow men to go on the
ground of physical disability, and that the army is
rapidly growing less through the dishonest operation,
A Cherokee Indian has been admitted as a delegate
in tbe Rebel House of Representatives from the Chero
kee Nation.
In Cleveland a b"j of seventeen was accepted as a
substitute for a drafted man, and received 2'X bonus.
He spent the money, and then obtained his discharge
on a writ of habeas corpus, on the ground that he was
under the age prescribed for recruits.
Substitutes are offered in Cincinnati as low as twelve
dollars.
The correspondent of the London Times tells the fol
lowing of our honored President : A supplicant for
office of more than ordinary pretensions, called upon
hi in lately, nnd presuming on the activity be hid shown
on Mr. Lincoln's behalf during tbe election that raised
him to the Chief Magistracy, asserted, as a reason why
the office he desired should be given to him, that be bad
made him President. You made me President, did
you?" said Mr. Lincoln, with a twinkle of his eye.
I think I did." said the applicant. "Then a pre
cious mt-ss you've got me into, that's all," replied Mr.
Lincoln, and closed the discussion.
CoMlribnlioiia la I lie (hurra's llonpitnl. Trans
May 30tli, 1801, la Dec. ZOtli, 1802.
Lady Jane Franklin $".0 00
July 3 O. 11. C. Ingrahain 5 IH
Sept 12 H. it. White. M. !., (Laliaiua,) 64) W
liki.
Jan. 2 His Majesty Kamehaiiieha IV .. SO 01)
Her M: jemy tjueen Emma ..... .. .10 00
H. It. H. the Prince Ot Hawaii 50 00
Win. Webster 10 (HJ
Jan. 4 Wm. L. Green....- .. 25 00
Morrison a 00
From tlie Protestant and Catholic Churches, in
anwer to the call of the Trustees for Contri
butions nn the secoml Sunday in January 309 91
Jan. 13 From a person, or persons, unknown to the
Treasurer, by haml of Rev. 8. C. Daniun. 317 (U
14 Win. Hillebrauil, M D 40 O l
lti Geo. I. Mcl-Hll "i INI
20 Kev. J. F. Pogue 10 00
22-F. W. Hutchinson, M D 10 i
Hughes Ic Ohlson ... ... 5 00
May 3 M. S. Hayes. (5 note.) ... 25 ml
July 23 His LoroNhip liishnp .Maigret 11! 50
Aus- 1 Contributions through the hand of Her Majesty
Hueen Kinina .. 20, 00
Spt. 10 Legacy of the late Robert W Holt 500 00
Dec. I Lady Jane Franklin 25 t0
$1,680 44
Amount received in money from subscribers, etc., pre
vious to May 8!J, I8ti! .. I2.S25 02
Total coutrib. In money fin individuals and Societies...! 1 4.505 4ii
Valuable contributions of beef, etc., have been acknowledged
elsewhere.
C. R. Bishop,
Honolulu, December 20, 1S2. Secretary.
Special Notices.
HAWAIIAN CATHEDRAL GRAMMAR
SCHOOL.
Visitor, Right Revd. the Lord Itishop of Honolulu.
Warden, Revd. G. Mason, M. A., of the University of Oxfor 1.
THE OBJECT OF Til IS SCHOOL. IS TO
afford a sound religious and liberal education to the sons of
gentlemen.
The course of study will comprise the usual English branches,
together with instruction iu Latin, Greek and Mathematics,
Mechanics and Natural I'hilosophy, and if required, in French
and German.
The requirements of different pupils will be taken into consid
eration in the choice of their studies.
The year will be divided into Four terms. The first term
commences on Monday, January 12th, and will end on Satur
day, March 28th.
A payment of $12 in advance to the Treasurer of the Mission,
will be reqiiireunasaagamipil under 12 years, per term, and
$15 abuve that age. SpecPfcaimeiit3 c.-.n be ma le in case
of more than one pupil from the samel5!!aa
The Warden will receive a limited number of bolTA
The School will be conducted for the present at the Parsonage
House. Kukui Street.
Applications to be made by parents and guardians to Revd
G. Mason, before January 12th. 35
NOTICE.
THE ANNUAL RENTING OF THE SLIPS AND SITTINGS
ia the Fort Street Church will take place on Monday evening,
December 29th, at 7X o'clock.
W. GOODALE.
85 It Secretary of Trustees.
iXOTICK.
SZT KXGLISII PRAYER HOOKS, FOR VSE IX
the Church, may be obtained on Thursday, Friday and Saturday
evenings, from 8 P. M. to 9 P. M., at the Parsouage, Kuku
Street. Prices, 75, and 31. V cents each. 32
NOTICE The aaderaiard brg Irare Is no
tify their customers and the public generally, that hereafter they
intend to abandon the practice of opening their respective stores
on Sunday mornings but instead will keep open until S o'clock
Saturday evenings, or later if found necessary. They hope this
will meet the favorable views of their patrons, and that they will
uphold them in carrying it out.
S. SAVIDGE,
301m A. D. CARTWRIGIIT.
LECAL NOTICE.
t7The anderaitfued alters his profriiannl
services to the public in the Courts of the Hawaiian Kingdom
For the present, he may be consulted at the office, 2d story,
Makee's Building, corner of Queen and Kaahumanu streets, over
Bishop & Co. s Bank. Entrance on Queen street.
Nov. 14, 1802. 29 tf D. L. GREGG.
A. F. & A. 31.
LE PROGRES DE L'OCEANIE LODGE, HO
124, under ths jurisdiction of the Supreme Counci
of the Grand Central Lodge of France, working ia
the ancient Scotch Kite, holds its Regular Meetings on the
first Wednesday nearet the full tuoou of every month, at the
old Lodge Room in King Street.
Visiting brethrenrespectfully invited to attend.
By order of W. M. 16-tt Jso. II. BROWN, Sec'y.
CH1T1S IS Mill IE-!
BUT BUUGESS CANDIES
TO THE PUBLIC :
Man, Woman and Child; Old,
Young and Middle-Aged!
yiULE THE UNDERSIGNED HAS NOT
the least doubt, that every Parent and Housekeeper ia the City
will not omit to celebrate, in a proper, Christian and civi'iied
manner, the approaching Holydays, yet he thinks it his duty to
inform the public, that in every thing pertaining to the Confec
tionery line, Cakes, Candles and Paltry, they will find
the fullest, most varied, and best assortment at
E. BCRGESS's, Fort Street.
lTr Orders from tbe other Islands respectfully requested, and
.liberal measure in dealing with Juvenile Customer.
Fresh preserved Citrons of home manufacture, on hand,
and defying competition with any imported, ia price or
iuality. 33
Neto Cattucrtiscmen!
in
CHAMPAGNE !
Of the celebrated brand of
RUINART PERE & FILS, REIMS,
I
ALSO, OF
Jacqucson & Fik Chalons L'M,
IN QCART3 A PINTS.
Just received aud for sale by
ZZ. XZackfcld & Co.
35 3m
JUST RECEIVED !
PCI JJlll'lsT fclZsiiiiiott3iV
mOIYI LONDON !
XD FOR SALE BY THE UNDER SIGNED,
Some very superior Paper Hangings,
Cambric Handkerchiefs,
Jaconet Gauntlett Setts, tie..
Jaconet Collars, Bands, lc
Book Collars.
35 1m JANION. GREEN & CO.
WANTED!
THE UNDERSIGNED, RECEXTLV FROM
Victoria, V. I., would he rlad to obtain a situation, either
In town or country, to take care of a horse or horsrs. Having
had irreat experience in that line, he feels confident of giving
satisfaction.
Any other light nut door work would be acceptable, should he
not obtain the above
JT" Wage not so much an ubject as employment. May be
heard of at this Office.
33 tf THO. COOPER.
MARSHALS S A LE !
IN VIRTUE OF A.N OltDER ISSUED BY JAMES
W. Austin, Ej., Acting Polii-e Justice of Honolulu, I shall on
the 29d day of January next, at the Auction Room of H V.
Severance, s-ll at Public Am linn two boats, seized for violation
or Section 107 of the Civil Code.
W. C. PARKE,
Marshal II. L
Marshal's Office, Dec 23, 1863. 35 4t
LOST !
ANEW BLACK I5ROA DCLOTII FROCK
COAT, was dropped ont from a carriage on the Nuuauu
ltad, on Monday morning. A suitable reward will be given to
the piirty leaving it at the store of Messrs. A. S. Grinhanm
Co., Queen street- g5 It
vonHOLT k HEUGK!
HAVE..
JUST OPENED
A LARGE AND VARIED ASSORTMENT
OF
FANCY ARTICLES !
AND
TOYS!
.. FOR ..
GHRISTMyS & NEW YEARS
GIFTS !
Viz.:
New and Elegant Styles of
33 ead Work,
CONSISTING OF
Wall Baskets,
Suspending ISiiskets,
Made for Lamps and Scent bottles.
Card Baskets,
Fruit Baskets, &c,
DOLLS OF ALL KINDS!
Toys in fi'osit variety
-ALSO -
A FEW SUPERIOR SILK COVERS, for Beas, Tables, ic.
FINE CCT GLASSWARE,
WATER COOLERS,
TABLE BELLS,
INDIA RUBBER POOR MATS, 4c. tc.
For sale at reasonable prices.
S4 3t CORNER FORT AND MERCHANT STREETS.
FOR SYDNEY!
The fast sailing Hawaiian Bark
..- KATHLEEN:
W. CAMPBELL, Master,
Will have immediate dispatch for the above port, touching at
Palmyra Island on the route.
tV For freight or passage, having the principal part of her
cargo on board, apply to me,
34 2t J. WILKINSON.
FOR BATAVIA, DIRECT!
The A I Dutch Ship
Capt. vas der MEY,
Will have immediate titleh.
$3T For freight or passage, apply to
S3 MELCHERS Co.
FOR BREMEN !
DIRECT!
THE OLDEN BCRG BARK
& SYLPHIDE &
Capt. OSSENB RUGGER,
Having most of her cargo onboard, will have immedigte des
patch for the above port.
Apply to
G. THOMS, or
82 MELCIIR3 It Co
Fine Martell's Brandy, qr. casks
Rochelle Cognac '
Baskets and Cases of Superior
Holland Gin.
250 casks Pale Ale, in pts.&qts
For sale by
33 jU p. s. PRATT &. Co.
MESS BEEF !
11UT CP BV Mr. D. McimiDE. ON KALAI,
an article lavorably known ou board of
WHALESHIPS
During the last right years. Quality warranted. Only
lOO Barrels
Not disponed of, and for sale by
30 1m Eo. HOFFSCHLAEGER A STAPENHORST.
ROUND VOLUMES.
FfOUND VOLUMES OF THE "POLYNESIAN" FOR 1861-62
( Vol XV HI) and back volumes, for sale this at Office.
Price $.
CARTE
Mil
jLVcu) ttoettiscmcnt5.
KILAUEA!
WILL LEAVE HONOLULU
On mOPTDAY, Jan. 5, 1863
At 1-2 past 4 o'clock P. M
FOR
LAHAIXA,
KALEPOLEPO,
3IAKEJTS LANDING
EEALAKEEUA,
KA1LUA,
KAWAIIIAK,
IIONOIPU, and
IIHO !
Tlie Steamer
"AfflE LAURIE!
WILL LEAVE FOIi
On Monday, - Dec.
At 1-2 past 4 P. ZVX.,
And thenceforward she will leave for KOLOA every Thursdaj
and for NAWILIWI LI every Monday.
JANION. GREEN A CO ,
29 Agents Hawaiian S. N. Co.
A. S. GLEG HORN!
HAS
02NT JE30JJSTjD
A O
JUST RECEIVED!
PLR a
"Laura it Louisa," "Sylliide,'1
AND DUTCH SHIP
GrYHILEI,"
I.ARCE AXD FULL ASSORTMENT OF
assorted new styles and patterns of
PRINTS :
Suitable for tlie
FOREIGN & NATIVE TRADE!
Bleached Cottons,
Unbleached Cottons,
Turkey lied,
ColM Cotton Velvets,
Fancy u
HEAVY C0TT0 & LIXEX SIIEETIGS,
Fancy, and Black and White!
Pearl River Denims,
Bags in-, ,
Card .Matches,
Cheap 3Iirrors,
Handle Axes,
Sheath Knives,
JACK KNIVES, CHEAP TABLE do.
0- A. S. C. begs to eall the attention or the Country Mer
chants to his large and ud usual varied Stock, as he feela as
sured they can be well suited in
QUANTITY, QUALITY & PRICES i
AT THE FIRE PROOF STORE,
Comer Kaahumanu & Queen Streets
OX THE WHARF I ALSO.
IW RETAIL ESTABLISHMENT, on Nunann Street, above
King Street. y
WANTED !
$1000 to 3000 on Bottomry!
On the Columbian Brig
W .: BENEDICT, Master, baaad to AJe-
V laide, Australia. Lumber loaded.
This Brig stands in San Francisco A IX, and is 6 years old;
is built of African on k, for an Austrian Krig of War. Survey
ors' certificates and Register can be seen by applying to
... , . . CAPT. BENEDICT,
Master of Brig "Lopud," and Agent for owner and
" underwriters.
English Scythe Hooks.
JrST RmWnl ex Galilei" a few Patei.t Srythe
Hooks, the best article for cutting rice ever yet imported,
" A. 8. CLEGHCRN,
32 0 the IVbarf.
Xiii-iiitm-e !
i;asy CIIAIK;
la Rocking Chairs, cane seat,
Uock iug Chairs, hair cloth.
Bedsteads.
F or sale by f30 c. BREWER A CO.
Cement! Kaolin! Pipe Clay!
;X "RADCGA." Faraalaky
E
30
C. BREWER k CO.
Executor's Notice.
THE UNDERSIGNED HAVING BEEN APPOINTED BT
the Mo a. II. L, Sheldon, Circut Judge, a executor ot t
last will and testament of James M. VVhittier, of Honalo,
North Kona, tlxwaii, deceased, bereh aotities all persons is
debied to said estate to make Immediate pavmenl, and thiw
having claims against tbe same to prrsent them for settlemest
F. A. SHERWOOD, Eiecut. r.
Honalo, North Kona, Hawaii, Dee. 13, I8C2. 34 31
Co-Partnership Notice.
rpiIR I XDERSIGNF.D IIERKBT CIVK 0
A tice that they have entered into a co-partnership for a
limited period, under the style of 1ANDAGE & WHITE, fr
the sale of General Merchandise at this place, said eo-partner-ship
to date from September 3d. 1861.
S. F.CAVDAGE,
ALEX. WHITE
llanalei. Kauai, Dec 13, ISC 84 Im
NOTICE.
PROPER application having been made to n-
Hon. (i. M. Robertson, Associate Justice of the ?'prem
Court, by R. Boyd, for probate of the will of Frederick Mill. "
Honolulu, late deceased : Notice is hereby given to all persons
whom it may concern, that Tuesday, the 80th day of Pecemb'
Inst., at 9 o'clock in the forenoon, is a day and hour appointed
for hearing proof of said will, and all objections that may be
made thereto, at the Court House in the town of Honolulu.
JNO. R. BARNARD, Clerk Supreme Court.
Honolulu, Dec. 16, 1S62. 34 -H

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