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Sunday Chicago bee. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1925-19??, July 21, 1940, SECTION TWO, Image 15

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NEGRO COMMUNITIES PROFIT
BY RECREATIONAL PROGRAM
x_i
WASHINGTON, D. C., July 18
.—Wholesome play and profitable
1 use of leisure hours have been
made possible for thousands of
children and grownups living in
Negro communities, current re
ports on park and playground
construction projects of the Works
Projects Administration indicate.
The reports are from Missouri,
Indiana, West Virginia, Maryland,
Virginia, North Carolina, South
Carolina and Oklahoma.
Construction or improvement
in these eight states of tennis
courts, playgrounds, community
houses, swimming pools, a 4-H
club camp, and a bathing beach
show clearly what the WPA is
doing to bring higher standards
of recreation to communities
throughout the nation.
“Because of the necessity of
strengthening our national de
fense, we must look to the strength
of mind and body of all groups
of citizens within the nation,” Al
fred Edgar Smith, WPA staff ad
viser, said in reviewing the re
ports. “Upon what we do today
lor the children who will become
citizens tomorrow, rests much of
our hope of maintaining our dem
ocratic ideals and accomplish
ments. By providing recreation
al facilities and trained recreat
ional leadership, the WPA is mak
ing it possible for our young peo
ple to grow up with healthy
bodies and alert minds. It is
teaching them to think and act
quickly and in accordance with
the principles of good sportsman
ship. These are traits within
jur citizenry which will serve us
n the event of a great national
emergency.”
Outstanding among WPA con
struction projects that provide
better recreational facilities for
S, Negro communities are those re
ported from North Carolina. Seven
new athletic fields have been built
in a state-wide drive to eliminate
play hazards in densely popu
lated. areas. One field has been
reconstructed to permit more ex
tensive use. The building of one
tennis court and two recreation
al field houses, the improvement
of two parks and the completion
of two swimming pools are also
included in the North Carolina
report. •
West Virginia reports': the con
struction of a 4-H camp at a well
chosen spot near Clifftop. This
camp, sponsored by the West Vir
ginia Board of Control, affords
space and facilities for many
youths from communities where
disease and crime are said to a
hound. "
From the" state, of Oklahoma
comes the report that over 55
playgrounds for Negro children
have been improved. In this state
as in others, prominent citizens
are backing the [program. Ad
visory councils, composed of rep
resentatives of church, education
al, and civic organizations, are
mainly responsible for initiation
of the WPA projects.
Today, the recreation program
of the WPA operates in more
than 10,000 communities in 47
states, the District of Columbia,
and Hawaii. About 40,000 WPA
workers are employed in recrea
tional work throughout the coun
try.
MUSIC AS A
HEALING METHOD
REAR BUZZING BEES:
In recent times thinkers have'
offered music as a means of heal
ing certain ailments. Certain
strains on the violin have been
used to soothe those suffering from
“nerves” and music of various
other instruments have been used
in assisting sick people to return
to the normal. This is not a new
idea for man has known the
healthful qualities of music for
hundreds of years. In the days
of the Pharaohs music was used
as a remedial agent, for medical
records of some 30 centuries ago
tell of the effect of music on the
human bod1*/. Homer tells of
music stopping a hemorrhage and
one finds a record of music used
to soothe the nerves of the sore
ly tried Saul.
The Greeks and Romans em
ployed music in treating cases ol
insanity and fevers. Esculapius
claims to have cured deafness by
the sound of a trumpet and an
other doctor of the times leaves
a record of curing sciatica by soft
music.
Two centuries ago both German
and French doctors claimed they
had been able to treat with suc
cess cases of St. Vitus Dance and
other so-called nervous diseases
with music of various kinds. So
enthusiastic were the people of
the Seventeenth Century over the
theory of music therapy that they
employed it in the treatment of
tarantula bites. Kings in history
have been reported to have been
brought back to normal by music.
More recently curative concerts
nave been organized in asylums
and hospitals with interesting re
sults.
Some time ago the value of mu
-sic was discovered as a means of
dispelling fatigue, and it is a well
known fact that music has long
been used in certain parts of the
country to speed up work. The
old familiar work songs are an
evidence of this. Some music is
found to be more soothing than
Gthe*r types. Allegro, militaire,
maestoso, the largo and andante
movements were found to pro
duce more work than allegretto
for instance.
In recent years an epidemic of
suicides in a foreign land were
said to be traced to a popular
song. Some of the modern mu
sic is known to stir up emotions
in an undesirable manner. But
good music always has had, and
always will have the power to
“soothe the savage.”
S’long until next week,
BUMBLE.
NINE HOWARD UNIVERSITY
STUDENTS PASS FLIGHT TEST
A _ . _
WASHINGTON. D. C.. July 18
—The Howard university Civil
ian Pilot Training program has
been brought to a successful con
clusion for the school year 1939
40.
Of the twelve men in the
ground course who took the Civ
il Aeronautics Authority’s writ
ten examination, all passed. Of
the ten men who constituted our
quota for flight training, one re
signed because of illness which
prevented his getting sufficient
flying experience to pass the flight
examination. The other nine suc
cessfully passed their flight ex
amination and have received pri
vate pilot’s licenses. Some of the
men passed both their written and
flight tests with high credit.
It is interesting to note that the
entire course at Howard was con
ducted by colored men, the
ground course being conducted
by Professor Addison E. Rich
mond and Darnley Howard, of
the School of Engineering and
Architecture, and the flight train
ing by C. Alfred Anderson, well
known colored pilot, who was em
ployed by the Hybla Valley Fly
ing Service for this purpose.
J The Civil Aeronautics Au
thority believing that the direc
tors of the Flight Training pro
gram could conduct the program
better if they had actual experi- ]
ence in the controlled flying
course, made available a schol
arship for eight hours of flying
instruction for such persons. The
director of the program at Ho
,ward, Professor Addison E. Rich
mond, successfully completed
I this course.
) Students who participated in
I the program are enthusiastic and
plan to continue their flying.
Two of the men have been recom
mended for advanced - training to
i (
Producer Says
War Big Threat
(Continued from page 9)
“I am willing to take such a
cut,” Mr. Small said. “I feel that
everybody else in the business
should make the same sacrifice
and make it now. If that hap
pens, we can stay in business. If
it doesn’t happen, motion pictures
will fade out as the world’s great
est medium of entertainment.”
Urges Cooperation
Small urged exhibitors to coop
erate with the production end of
business in the common good.
His proposal is for an immedi
ate “industry partnership” that
would level off all inequalities to
insure a continued flow of the
kind of product needed to sus
tain boxoffice receipts. As a plat
form for such an “industry part
nership,” Small suggests:
1., An immediate healthy cut in
all motion picture salaries, begin
ning at the top of the list; (2)
elimination of double bills, gifts
and other so-called box office
stimulants; (3) sharing of prob
lems by all branches of the in
dustry.
“The need for quick action
cannot be over stressed,” Small
concluded. “There is a real cri
sis—a life and death struggle. Too
many people have been sticking
their heads in the sand for too
long a time rather than face the
real facts.”
the Civilian Aeronautics Author
ity during the summer.
BLACK MASTERS
There were 3,777 Mark masters
of slaves in tne United States in
183ft _ , - . m - k
t'«- ^ v' ' ' . ♦ * . . ' T.: ■■ ■&. ~
®H€H yiPOlNI A TMMU MOTHE1R EULPA—I ' ' ^W.«9.SMR0&MTfr'
rm TTutinnin■i • • —3221 r r ~ ■ "i ~ • 1 ir 1 »sn ii
V4 -iG
gJjHERE WAS A WIDOW WHO HAD TWO DAUGHTERS;
ONE WAS PRETTY AND WORKED HARD FOR HER
LIVING. BUT THE OTHER WAS BOTH UGLY AND LAZY.
IT CHANCED THAT THE WIDOW LOVED THE UGLY
DVJCHTER BETTER THAN 1 HE PRETTY ONE BECAUSE
SHE WAS HER VERY OWN. WHILE THE PRETTY
MAIDEN WAS ONLY HER STEP-DAUGHTER.
ESIDE DOING ALL THE WORK OF THE HOUSE, V
THE POOR GIR , WAS SENT EACH JAY TO SIT BESIDE |
THE WEc- AN > SPIN « BUNDLE Or r LAX INTO
YARN. SOMETIMES SHE HAD TO WukK SO HARP
THAT HER POOR LITTLE FINGERS WERE COVERED
WITH BLOOD. _
IBSNE DAY WHEN THIS HAPPENED. ftH* k t FW
DROPS OF BLOOD HAD FALLEN ON YK'- '♦FmiL'V
SHE BENT OVER THE WELL TO WASH <c» JK/m. aHmIN, »'
BUT IT SLIPPED FROM HER FINGERS KnEu ’
IN THE WATER. @ \\cQure Ncws^per SyrvVi £ jj
I |W
i
T^IHE RA.<J Kr'ltHWiS TO HER STEP-MOTHER TO
( TcLl HE-- !^\6 HAPPENED AND THE ANGRtf
I V’OVAf SCOVT'Cr, HER WITHOUT MERCY. "AS YOU
i LPT THE Si-INELfc FALL If." 8AID. "YOU MUST
' CL AND GET V 3i T ACA^C
[ _ \ OMC«-RCVV^fi BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY.
OUTLINE OF SCIENCE
by MAX HAHN
. -■ • — 7 vr/rc .—' . ..t>vVv'\rP r—• • ^ -3 — i.ifj.urmnna
TO STONE THEY HAD A WEAKNESS. THEIR EDGES
SOON BECAME BLUNT. THIS MADE IT NECES
SARY TO SHARPEN COPPER AXES AND KNIVES
FREQUENTLY._i
HJlHEN SOMETHING HAPPENED IN THE METAL
WORLD. THE NEV TOOLS DIDN’T BEND AND IT
TOOK WEEKS FOR A KNIFE TO LOSE IT SHARP
cr\pp
© McClure Newspaper Syndicate
NSW AXE HEADS WERE BfciT:.*. SOMEONE RE
MEMBERED, HOWEVER, THAT THE ORE CAME
FROM NEW MINES IN ANOTHER PART OF THE
WORLD.
lyjjE KNOW NOW THAT THE NEW ORE WAS A
COMBINATION OF TIN AND COPPER, JNSTEAD OF
PURE COPPER. THUS THE NEW MATERIAL WAS
BRONZE, NOT COPPER.
AFRICANS HOLD
PALAVER HERE
AUGUST 21-23
The World Wide Friends of i
Africa are coming to Chicago Au
gust 23-21 in one of the most
colorful international palavers or
conferences outside of Europe fea
turing in song, dance, lectures,
movies, slides in color, educators,
students and rare jewels from all
parts of the world from 71 nations.
There will be some 112 interna
tional delegates and patrons repre
senting as many organizations in
an 8-day session featuring the
contributions of Africans to all
civilizations for 10,000 years, the
present needs of the world of color
and what is their destiny during
the remainder of the century.
There will be attractions and mar
vels from Nigeria, Gold Coast,
Ethiopia, Egypt, South Africa, Li
beria, Haiti, Mexico, Brazil, India,
China, Japan, Panama, Cuba, Ja
maica, British Guiana and the
Hondurases. The national units
will each have done distinctive
contribution to make through the
Pan-American Circles, Pan-Asi
atic leagues, National Student
cubs, West Afircan Student Sa
bas, many Forums of Fellowship,
as well as West Indian Protec
tives.
A World Circus, College and
Forum for 8 Full Days
The World Wide Friends of Af
rica will have speakers, artists
and painters from all parts of the
world to deal with the theme of
the 5th biennial conference to be
held in Chicago, instead of Paris,
France. Knowledge, freedom and
peace are the watchwords, al
most every important question
imaginable will come before the'
conference, in way of seminars,
charts, movies, drama, paintings,
dealing with such matters as peace
and war, what is going to happen'
to the Jew? Catholic, Afro-Ameri
ran, after the second World War?
Who are the chosen people? More
jobs for the jobless, a million jobs
await the Aframerican, what is j
wrong with what is taught the!
blacks of the world by the whites 1
of the world? fellowship of reli
gions and creeds, prophecies, what
is present status of the world’s
workers, what is Africa like from j
Capetown to Cairo or Nigeria to
Ethiopia, Can Democracy succeed? |
This conference will serve as.
an educational clearing house for
international groups all over the
world. Can the African or Afro
American succeed by following
capitalism, communism, fascism, I
or Africanism? The thi’ee books'
of the year, Native Son, Black
Folks Then and Now, Famous Folk j
of Africa and African Descent,
by the writers, Richard Wright,
Dr. W. E. B. Dubois, and J. A.
Rogers, respectively, will be dis
cussed and reviewed.
Orators in Demand
One of the most far-reaching
contributions of the conference
will be the prize award to any
creators in the realm of poetry,
song, invention, lesson plans for
teaching African and. Afro-Ameri
ca, books, cook recipes, plays,
short stories, paintings as well as
prizes and presentation of all per
sons who have traveled out of the
^United States.
<4r. r * H. •? it? \% v ;
----—.--.—. . -. .\
Meharry Medical Notes j
Post-Graduate School—The an- j
nual post-graduate courses in
medicine and dentistry ended
with a dinner for those attend
ing, Friday in the hospital dining
room. Dr. W. S. Quinland, chair
man of the post-graduate com
mittee for the medical school,
presided. Speeches were made by
some of the posi-gi aduales. These
included Dr. P. A. Stephens. Chat
tanooga: Dr. W. H. Baker, Talla
hassee, Florida and Dr. .1. A Cox,
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Dr.
Cox presented pictures of the
group to Drs. E. L. Turner, W. S.
Quinland, D. H. Turpin and Miss
A. D. Vinson, dietitian. Several
members of the faculty spoke in
cluding Dr. E. L. Turner, presi
dent cf the college; Dr. D. H. Tur
pin, dean of the dental school;
Dr George Seeman, oral surgeon;
Dr. J. B. Singleton, chairman of
the dental post-graduate commit
tee; Dr. J. H. Hale, chief surgeon;
Dr. E. T. Odom of the department
of medicine; Dr. H D. West, pro
fessor of biochemistry and Dr. S.
H. Freeman, orthopedist.
Those receiving certificates
were—W. H. Baker, Tallahassee,
Florida; A. D. Brooks, Jackson,
Tpnnessf'm J. A. Cox, Oklahoma
City, Oklahoma; LeRoy Dabbs,
St. Louis. Missouri; John Frank
Evans, Pittsburg, Kansas; C. C.
Johnson, Franklin, Tennessee; J.
Edward Joice, Warren, Ohio;
Montague Lay, Martin, Tennessee;
Lawrence W. Long, Union, South
Carolina; Buford E. Majors. Nash
ville, Tennessee; W. T. Napier,
Tulsa, Oklahoma; Henry D. Pat
ton, Palestine, Texas; Ira B. Scott,
Cleveland, Ohio; P. A. Stephens,
Chattanooga, Tennessee; S. D.
Booth, DD.S., Springfield, Illinois;
Theodore E. Keith, Blytheville,
Arkansas.
Faculty Members Do Graduate
Study—Miss Heloise Bent, educa
tional director in the School of
Nursing, has left for Ann Arbor,
Michigan, where she will study
at the University of Michigan.
She will continue some work in
Public Health Nursing which she
began last year and will return
to duty next September.
Dr. W. P. Quinn has left for
New York where he will study
in the Bellevue Hospital, New
York. His work will be confined
to the diagnosis and treatment of
cancer. Dr. Quinn graduated
from Meharry in 1937. He intern
ed at George W. Hubbard Hospi
tal and served as resident in ra-'
biology and instructor in ana
tomy. Dr. Quinn served as chair
man of the Committee on Cancer
Control of the Volunteer State
Medical Association. During his
chairmanship, there was estab
lished the first Negro Division of
the Women's Field Army in Ten
nessee and the drive for control
of cancer was launched' through
out the state with great success.
Two members of the Meharry
faculty, Dr. E. L. Turner and Dr.
W. A. Beck, have published a
study on amebic dysentery which
appears in the current issue of the
Journal of the Tennessee State
Medical Association.
Miss M. L. Holloway, acting
dean of the Nursing School, vis
ited Oakwood Junior College at
Huntsville, Alabama to interview
prospective freshmen for the class
in nursing. While there, she
spoke to the student body on the
history of nursing
Volunteer State Medical Socie
ty—The Volunteer State Medical
Society completed its thirty-sixth
annual session, Wednesday, June
19, at Meharry Medical College.
The session was the best attend
ed in the history of the organiza
tcin. I rom a standpoint of scien
tific achievement it was also un
surpassed. Many exc'dl^nf pa
pers were heard. Taking a prom
inent. part in the program was the
i Meharry faculty and staff. The
members of the society were also
privileged to attend the ward
rounds and clinics.
During the address of the pres
ident, Dr. W. A. Bisscn of Mem
phis, he suggested that the body
send a telegram to the president
cf the United States assuring him
cf the support of the Society dur
ing this emergency. This was
done.
Officers elected to serve during
the coming year are: J. W. Jones,
Nashville, president; N. A. Hen
derson, Knoxville, vice president
from East Tennessee; F. McClen
ton, Nashville, vice-president
from Middle Tennessee; L. G.
Patterson, Memphis, vice-presi
dent. from West Tennessee; D. T.
Rolfe, Nashville, executive secre
tary; F. L Russell, Cleveland, re
cording secretary; W. H. Astrapp,
South Pittsburg, treasurer; W. A.
Bisson, Memphis, chairman of the
executive committee. Members
of the Executive Committee: O.
B. Taylor, Knoxville; J. W. Max
well; A L. Coppedge, Memphis.
Members of the Election Commit
tee: S. M. Clark, Knoxville; R.
Hernandez, Nashville; M. V.
Lynk, Memphis. Chairman of
Program Committee: M. J. Bent,
Nashville; chairman of Finance
Committee: W. J. Astrapp, South
Pittsburg; Chairman of Commit
tee on Resolutions: E.. A. Davis,
Murfreesboro; Chairman of Hos
pital Committee: R. T. Burt of
Clarksville: Chairman of Legis
lative Committee, M. V. Lynk,
Memphis.
This society will meet in Nash
ville in 1941.
National Medical Association—
Each member of the graduating
class in medicine received a mem
bership certificate for the Nation
al Medical Association and a
year’s subscription to the Jour
nal of the N. M. A.
This gift was announced to the
class by Dr. E, L, Turner who re
ceived notice of it from the pres
ident of the Association, Dr, A.
W. Dumas of Natchez, Mississippi.
CHICAGO CHOIR PRAISED
DECATUR, 111., July 18—(ANP)
Receiving wide praise when they
sang at the annual district con
vention of the Church of the Liv
ing Gcd recently was the choir
of Prof. C. Edwin Brown, direc
tor of music at Temple No. 210
in Chicago. Singing a program
of spirituals and anthems, the
choir was declared one of the best
in the midwest by those in at
tendance at the convention.
A JIM CROW LAW
It has been decided that the
Oklahoma statute requires sep
arate entrances to railroad coach- '
cs, including a separate step box
wherever necessary—For Negroes
Only. _ _ .
„ i
- I ' - ': ' - *
$ rri
NEW ORLEANS, La., July 18—
(By Lepri Lewis lor ANP)—The
one man Republican party oi
Louisiana, John E. Jackson, com
mitteeman, was bitterly assailed
this week for having state dele
gates pre-instrucied to vote for
1'ait and holding to these in
structions through five ballots,
when it was evident that “Will
kie was the man.” The criticisms
came from R. E. Baird, an alter
nate to the convention from Lou
isiana.
Jackson denied having been re
sponsible for the blunder that
Baird said “would not do Louisiana
any good.” When the Louisiana
delegation was chosen they pledg
ed support to Johnnie Jackson,
the national committeeman. All
were previously instructed to vote
for Taft. But when the entire
convention seemed to shift to
\Villkie, the Louisiana delegation
under order of Jackson held their
support to Taft.
For years the GOP delegation
of Louisiana has hinged on
Jackson and has consistently
polled less than a thousand votes,
with about 85 per cent of those
being Negro. Jackson has been
followed by James E. Lewis, Jr.,
and. Dr. J. A. Hardin, both Walter
Cohen proteges. This has been
the main faction in the one party
setup.
This year was the first time in
the history of the state that a
primary election was held ir> the
Republican ranks. John E. Jack
son attempted to block this ven
ture that was instituted by James
Woods in attempts to build up
the Republican party and promote
interest in the party activity in
Ihe state. Jackson bitterly fought
Woods because he wanted to
build up the party and used his
influence to get Negroes register
ed as Republicans. More than 75
percent of the Republican votes
cast by Negroes were the fruits
of Woods’ efforts.
Johnnie Jackson met with pub
lic criticism when he stated in a
local political meeting before a
group of Negroes of the Seventh
ward that he would not raise one
finger to help get Negroes regis
tered. Negroes were being turn
ed away from the registration of
fice by the hundreds in a city
wide registration bar. Dr. Har
din and Mr. Lewis supported him
in this and thereby remained his
chief cohorts.
Attorney Baird feels that their
actions at the Philadelphia con
vention, this year will not help
this state if it be a Republican
victory year and that Willkie is
not elatefi over their voted objec
tion to his nomination. /
Future participation in the' na
tional party activity by the Lou
isiana delegation is threatened
with the ruling in the convention
that districts would have to poll
over 1,000 votes to have delegates
icpresented at the convention
The one party system of the state
will continue in control and the
one party OOP’s wiU be forced
info oblivion unless some other
leader takes over and organizes
a representative Republican re
I gime in Louisiana.
| Classified Ads
FOR RENT
KITCHENETTE APTS FOR RESPEC
table people; reasonable rent. J. H.
Malone, 4444 St. Lawrence ave. Phone
OAK. 2683.
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$4.00; 4447 Vincennes ave, 3rd apt.
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FOR RENT —'"FURNISHED ROOM
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NEWLY DEC. 1-2-3-4 ROOM FURN
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rent. Modern Kitchenettes, Inc., 127
E. 20th st.
4924 Michigan Ave.
Eleven newly completed 1 and 2 room
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ROOMS FOR REM-tw-0144 CARPENTER
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good references required; reasonable
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FOR SALE AND RENT TO DEPEND
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LOST PERSONS BUREAU
Anyone knowing the whereabouts of
HOWARD, ELMER and EARL HART,
also a sister, HAZEL, who were last
heard of in Moline, Illinois—these are
the children of Lee and Elmer Hart—
please notify their aunt, Mrs. Cora
Johnson^ at 715 First avenue, Peoria,
111.
wanted”
CARE rOR CHILDREN WHILE
work. Take and return. Went. 1602.
Mrs. Clark.
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS FOR SALE;
Two Reed Organa suitable for chapel,
church or home; very reasonable; Prone
Spaulding 1900.
FOR SALE
BUILDING FOR SALE OR FOR RENT
—Store ilafc, located at 86 th and
Wentworth ave. Call owner, Morns al
(840.
Lot on 92nd street, between Michigan
tnd Wabash avenue; can be handled for
$10.00 down and $8.00 a month. S.
ABERG REALTY CO.. 179 W. Washing
ton st„ Room 710; Dear. 8562.
"7 HELP WANTED
WOMEN SOLICITORS — SOLICIT
weekly insurance; commissions and
weekly allowance. See MR. JONES,
6452 South State street, 9.-30 a. m.
HELP WANTED — Expel ienced single
needle operators on skirt* and jackets;
general sports wear. Aptly 2218 W.
Madison street,
LINOLEUM LAID'FREE — REP. 5214!
Felt base, 39c; Inlaid style, 69c; In
laid, 98c.
1TANTSD — i. if - h TO rj_£3
charge of coal and wood. Apply 8686
Dearborn. Must have cash aat>ei of from
$60 to $100.
WANTED — MULATTO YOUNG MAN
to travel and -work on Btage as as
sistant to Hindu mcntalist. Dr. F. H.
RulmJ, 2015 Broadway, Gary, Ind.
MALE OR FEMALE HELP
WANTED
Sell beautiful Fashion Frock*; liberal
commission; free dresses; no invaetmr *
—full or part time. 820 East 68th stT
(Inside “L”). Wentworth 2068
GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY—Wanted_
Agents to sell to consumers, Face Pow
ders, Cold Creams, Perfumes and othey
compete with American prices,
cosmetics. French formula. Prices to
L’AZUKMER PERFUMERS
Chicago, 111.: Agency, Post Office Box
6337.
AGENTS WANTED
SITUATION WANTED—General Hous*
work; regular. Won’t stay on place.
Will do washing, ironing. Call Atlantia
2488.
INTELLIGENT WOMEN TO SOLICIT
for Mnsic School. Call between 1 and
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'"ichigan, Side entrance, Room 2.
Make Quick Money
WHY LOOK FOR JOBS WHEN YOU
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week and up selling our Fast Money
making old established line of Toilet
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repeater. Men, women and student*.
Whole or part time. Experience not nec
essary. House to house agents wanted
in or out of the city. Write today 1
THE OVERTON-HYGIENIC MFG. CO.
State and 36th Streets
Chicago. Illinois
WANTED—MEN AND WOMEN—BOYS
and girls over fourteen, to take sub
scriptions for the CHICAGO BEE. in and
out of the city. Good pay.
CHICAGO BEE
8666 South St^te SL, Chicago. HI.
If the kind of business you want to
buy is not offered for sale today, or if
you want to sell your busniess, why noi
advertise in the BUSINESS OPPOR
TUNITY classified column? The charge ?»
only 3c per word. Stop in today at tha
CHICAGO BEE OFFICE, or phone Blvd.
7002—ask for an Ad Taker. _ -
$5,000 A~YEAR
SALESMEN WANTED FOR EVERY
large city in the U. S. to stl! tha
Booker T. Washington brand of cigars
to stores, cafes, taverns, restaurant*,
etc. Must be intelligent, neat, of •
pleasing personality, willing to work and
a Live Wire.
AFRO-AMERICAN CIGAR COMPANY
Chicago, HL
PARCEL POST & EXPRESS
BARGAINS IN QUILT PIECES. RA«
rugs material. Postal for price lieti
!0o for bample. Remnant Store, Dept
B-21, Makanda, 111.
SALESMEN *
WE SUPPLY ALL LEADS "
The largest Toilet Preparation Manu
facturing company can place two man
between the ages of 26-45. Possibility
of earning $40' to $60 per week. Men
selected will be trained in the field «a
well as in the sales meeting. Percencaga
basis to start. Future opportunity un
limited, due to expansion that is now
, under way.
Address: S-14* care CHICAGO BED
Coffee Salesman Wanted
TO SELL COFFEE, TEAS AND EX
TRACTS—to stores, cafea and restau
rants. Write for liberal proposition, glu
ing experience and references in Aral
letter.
ETHIOPIAN - LIBERIAN COFFEE 0*
(Not Inc.) Chicago, III.
PERSONAL
HELP WANTED. SITUATTON WANT?
*d. Persons, Lost and Found, Rooma
jind Apartments for Rent, 3c ner woid
Tn Memoriam, Cards of Thanks, Lost
Relatives,, 2c per word.
The CHICAGO RLE does not know*
S-Ccspi Hslp -irVia * ~Via*l

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