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Sunday Chicago bee. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1925-19??, September 01, 1940, SECTION ONE, Image 7

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I screen Theatrical Page 7teC clubs0
Launch New Negro Theatre Movement In Hollywood
_ I
MAY PROVE THE!
ANSWER 18 A
LONG FFLT NEED!
HOLLWOOD, Aug. 29—(ANP)
—In spite of the fact that some
may think, like Clarence Muse
suggested in a column, that only
“Leftists” are interested, local
stage enthusiasts disregarding any
Communistic accusations are hop
ing that a “New Negro Theatre”
movement launched last week will
prove the answer to a long felt
need. It is also hoped that it will
rise to better results than have
preceding movements.
The inaugural meeting was
held last Thursday night at the
Music Box theatre, the new home
Hollywood Theatre alliance, which
for many months has been pre
senting “Meet the People,” with
an all-white cast. The New Ne
^ gro theatre is planned to work
in association and along the lines
of the alliance, a non-profit orga
nization, using original plays and
undiscovered non-professional tal
ent. 3
Resultant of the tireless efforts
of Mrs. Meredith Thatcher, mov
ing spirit in the Little Theatre
play, “Don’t You Want to be
Free?” written by Langston Hugh
es and played all last summer, a
large crowd of both races was
present. Some of the biggest
names of the screen entertainment
., and literary world, both colored
and white, joined hands in the
meeting, and many interesting
talks were made by the, speakers
from the stage.
Paul Robeson Sends Wire
First on the speakers’ portion
of the program was Bernard Vor
haus, noted motion picture direc
tor and member of the HT4- ex
ecutive boyid, y/ho spoke on the
nature of HTA!s< affiliation. Mr.
Vorhaus introduced Meredith
Thatcher, executive director of
the New York theatre, who read
the following telegram from Paul
Robeson:
“Am indeed glad to be a spon
sor of the New Negro theatre.
There is urgent need for such a
professional organization, present
ing plays which deal honestly
with the pressing problems of im
portant sectiop of American peo
ple and developing an audience
. t sympathetic with its aims. Of
great significance is the coopera
tion of the Hollywood Theatre al
liance. More power to you. Sorry
not there tonight. Will be there
during coming season. All best.
Paul Robeson.”
Other telegrams read by Mrs.
Hatcher included messages of sup
port from Paul R. Williams, Na
tional Negro Congress, Motion
Picture Democratic committee,
William R. Carter of the National
Youth Administration, Fay Allen
of the L. A. Board of Education
and John E. Hargrove, charman
of the Dining Car Employees’ un
ion.
Following two such celebrated
authors as Theodore Dreiser and
Cedric Belfrage, Bill ‘Bojangles”
Robinson brought the house down
many .times with his oratory a
lone. i
_DUKE SWINGS OUT
DUKE ELLINGTON, who took Chicago by storm when he arrived
here to play for the dance held Monday night at the Coliseum at
which time “Miss Bronze America” was selected.
MISS IONA VARNUM, who wen second place in the “Miss Bronze
America” contest, is being congratulated by Miss Ella Fitzgerald
for winning the title “Miss Bronze Chicago” at the Savoy Ballroom.
GOSSIP OF THE MOVIE LOTS
By MARRY LSVETTE
t , . i„- . _ . I ■ . . ■-__
3*1 i\>i i »►;.# ■ J
HOLLYV/OOD, Aug. 29—(AN
P)—The sharp double-bitted axe
of Screen Actor’s Guild fell heav
ily on 2053 heads' of all races last
week, cutting off from member
ship all who were too far delin
quent in dues up to Aug. 1. On
this date the $4.50 for the new
quarter was also due, and under
the new ruling, thei’e were to be
no more work- permits issued.
Payment in full automatically en
titles a member to work when
Other speakers preceding the
; entertainment portion of the pro
gram were Willis O. Tyler, Nor
man O. Houston, Laura Bowman
and Otis Reno. Following them,
the drive committee, headed by
Mrs. Sammie Moore, launched in
to action and signed up the audi
ence for various memberships.
Among those appearing in the
following show, which was assem
bled by Alfred Grant, the. pro
duction manager of NNT were— |
Ernest R. Whiteman, .Teni LcGon,i
Clinton Roscmond and the Three
Shades.
i Attorney Ulysses S. Keys, of
the editorial department of the
Chicago Bee and president of the
Lens Camera Club is spending his
vacation in New York.
called. There' is no excuse for
bit players, and little for extras
who get any reasonable amount
of work during the year, as by
actual figures 5c a day dropped
into a small bank will pay the
year’s dues without it being miss-|
ed. Several of the bigger shot
actors have to have the studio
that calls them, pay up their duesj
for them before they can work. |
The fat checks from their last j
picture have always gone bye-bye |
with the breeze.
FOUR TONES, A IIIT
ON GOLD HOUR
As the last mellow notes of
their harmonious chant died away
last Friday evening over KGHJ,
bn the Gold Hour, the Four Tones,
famous screen, stage, and radio
quartet were greeted with re
sounding applause from the audi
ence in the new spacious audi
torium upstairs in the Gold Store.
And as proof that there were
thousands of listeners at their ra
dios, calls began pouring in. Mr.!
Adams, highly capable colored
sales manager and a number of I
other officials of the firm came to:
the auditorium and highly com-i
plimented the boys. Incidentally, I
l!Yazoo Bill,” a poem dramatized |
by the Four Tones, and Yours (
Truly, was an original one, writ
ten about a real steamboat char
acter. Margaret Chapman, Ma- j
dam A. C. Billibrew, and Floyd
Covington each did their share in
seng, news, and Emceeing, in their
usual excellent manner. The Four
Tones will be back again on Fri
day of next week over the popu
lar Gold Hour. j
EAGLETTES MAY BE
HEARD IN PICTURES
Gifted with beautiful voices,
and the earnestness of true artists
in embryo, the five girls, spon
sored by Eagle Editor Charlotta
A. Bass, have a bright future in
store for them. This is my pro
phecy after hearing them at a spe
cial program to invited guests in
tire Assembly Room of the Cali
fornia Eagle last Sunday. There
are sure to be opportunites for
them in pictures as soon as their
talents become known to the pro
ducers and directors. Leroy
Hurt, arranger for Decca, is ar
ranger for the Eaglettes, James
Carte?', their manager. The girls
| arc sure to be opportunities for
: Ac: raa Ro le:., Geraldine West and
Truth Kuykendal.
I
---
' TH YIW W S PE? PARING FOR
“W1 i i LE THOUSANDS < HEER”
i With Sept. 1 just around the
i corner, over 500 theatres through
out the country whose patronage
Ms all or in the majority colored,
are preparing for gala premieres
of “While Thousands Cheer,” new
sensational all-colored cast pic
ture, produced by Million Dollar
Productions, starring Kenny
Air Stories of
Horse s Inevcs In
Olden Days San.
— t
Radio airlanes wi'l echo thrill
ing exploits cf early days when
hersethieves were Public Enemy
No. 1 to Illinois farmers in a dra
matic broadcast to be presented
over Station WAAF at 4 p. m. on
Sunday, Sept. 1. It is to be the
46th in the popular series of ra
dio dramatizations of “Legends of
Illinois.”
The series has proven of re
markable interest because it au
thentically portrays legends ol
historical background in the early
history of the state. Sciipts of
all the dramatizations are prepar
ed by the Illinois Writers’ Pro
ject, WPA, after painstaking re
search to insure accuracy and fi
delity to fact.
The current number is entitled,
“How Billy Caught the Horse
Thieves ac Thief’s Hollow. Two
miles north of the historic Indian
caves at Bourbannais is a dry
creek bed, still locally known as
“Thief’s Hollow.” On the south
bank of this gully, hidden by a
large reck formation, is a huge
cave. This in early days was
used as a hide-away by horse
thieves. Raiding farms in that
locality at night, they secreted
the horses underground until
they were able safely to spirit
the horses out of the section.
In 1834 a settler named Caleb
Arscnau lived in the vicinity. He
had a young son named Billy.
Gredt grandchildren rf Billy An
derson, who still live around
Bcurbonnais, recount the story of
how Billy discovered the hidden
cave and how he and his father,
Caleb, captured “Rattlesnake,”
ringleader of the band of horse
thieves that, preyed upon the lo
cality.
Washington, it will be hailed as
“1940's Big Parade of Human
Emotions,” according to produc
tion officials from three major
studios who have previewed it.
Even before the beautiful new
press books describing the feature
had been mailed out, orders had
started pouring in and John Jen
kins, in charge of Atlanta distri
bution offices had signed up a
number of contracts for its screen
ing in thirteen southern states.
“FOUR MOTHERS” AT
WARNERS-FIRST NATIONAL
Starring the Lane sisters, and
diiected by Wm. Keighley of
Green Pastures” fame, “Four
Mothers” is about half finished at
Warner Brothers-First National.
Howard Washington and Richard
Coleman, two well-known movie
players were with the company
on location at San Gabriel last
week.
JESSE LEE BROOKS
AT REPUBLIC
The never-to-be-forgotten min
ister of the year long stage per
formance of “Run Little Chillun”,
Jesse Lee Brooks, had a nice bit
in Republic’s Hit Parade of 1941.1
It is a musical starring Frances
Langford and Kenny Baker.
MOVIE STARS PREPARE
FOR WINTER LEAGUE
Beautiful season passes will
soon be in the mail for the sepia
luminaries of the movie colony
making them honor guests as usu
al, during the Winter League
baseball season. Their presence
is highly appreciated and they j
show their appreciation of the in-!
vitations by always attending. A
glance down the line of boxes on1
the first base line most any Sun
day is a veritable living picture
of “Who’s Who,” in Tan Holly
wood. Bill Robinson never miss
es a game, and among those who
miss but few are Ernest Whitman,
Louise Beavers, Hattie McDaniel,
Sam McDaniel, Reginald Hender
son and many others.
Suitable candidates for the mo
SING AT FESTIVAL
The SOUTHERNAiRES, well known male chorus, popular on
<he airways, who sang at Soldiers Field Sunday at the Negro Mu
sic Festival. j
STARS OF TOMORROW
Heading the list of the Board
of Judges and the Steering
Committee of the W. C. Handy
New York Urban League “Stars
of Tomorrow” concert
held at Town Hall on September .
29th are W. C. Handy (upper
left), Edna Thomas and Fred*
Washington, Notde sissle. Paul
Whiteman (lower Jell) Lillian
. JK I __
Sha^p Hunter and James II.
Hubert, executive director of
t^e N. Y. Urban League and
chairman of the Steering Com
mittee of “Stars of Tomorrow.’’
vies were revealed “like flowers
that blush unseen,” in the beauty
contest, so excellently staged at
Cal Verde last Sunday. Under
the direction of Fay M. Jackson,
publicity manager for the resort,
and Josephine Brown, it was one
of the fairest judged ever staged
on the coast.
Instead of mere facial beauty
and figure proportions, general
health was stressed for the pur
pose of promoting high standards
of health and wholesome recrea
tion. The five judges made their
decisions based on physical health,
charrfi, personality, and grace, a
warding first prize, a trip to the
Golden Gate World’s Fair with all
the trimmings, to Twinkle Hoi
bert. Janet Cato was second,
Anita Turner, third; Suzanne
Young, fourth, while Sarah Mit
chell, and Nell Boyd tied for fifth
place.
The judges were Dr. Warner
Wright, Misses Nora Holt and
Sadie Louise Davidson, Tommy
Martin, British heavyweight
champion, and Mrs. Grace Fisher
Atkins. Over 2,000 visitors en
joyed the contest and the various
pleasure activities.
Inspired by a poem he read
while flying on the Clipper from
London to New York, Producer
Alexander Korda has written an
criginal screen play for his wife,
Merle Oberon, who will star in
the film production to be titled “I
Have Been Here Before,” it was
announced this week.
You must have heard, of course,
[hat talking pictures are made in
absolute silence; that a colored
filter (really a piece of tinted
*lass) in front of a camera’s lens
can make a star black as Ham or
white as a ghost, but stranger still
is this seeming nonsensity uncov
ered during the making of Frank
Lloyd’s “Two Howards of Vir
ginia.” Long shorts, requiring;
people to fade into perspective are j
best achieved when midgets are,
placed in the background.
---- ' i
Have You Heard
BEE s weekly Radio Forums? i
Tune in Tucs., 1:15 p. m., WHIP ,
1480 on your dial.
THEA TRES
QT A TlrV Q STREET
O 1 Jt\ A 3507 SO. STATE
Fri. & Sat., Aug. 30-31—
•‘BOYS OF THE CITY” with
the East Side Kids, Bobby Jor
dan and Leo Goreey“THE MAN
FROM THE TUMBLEWEEDS”
with Bill Elliott and Iris Mere
dith; “ON THEIR OWN” with the
Jones Family.
Tues.. Wed. & Thiirs., Sept. 3-4-5—
“TORRID ZONE” with James
Cagney* Ann Sheridan, and Pat
O’Brien; “’TIL WE MEET A
GAIN” with Merle Oberon, and
George Brent.
Sun., Sept. 1—
“TEAR GAS SQUAD’ with
Dennis Morgan, John Payne, and
Gloria Dickson; “LOVE, HONOR
AND OH! BABY”, with Donald
Woods; “THE RANGER AND THE
LADY” with Roy Rogers; “WIN-1
NERS OF THE WEST.”
Mon., Sept. 2—
“BULLET CODE” with George
O’Brien; “DOOMED TO DIE”|
with Boris Karloff; “MAD MEN
OF EUROPE.”
All/! 4653 SOUTH STATE
KJry La STREET

Sun., Mon., & Tues., Sept. 1-2-3—
Big double feature. “TORRID
i a a mi h m 11
WALTER
MIS GREAT BAND
— ALSO —
‘STARS OF TOMORROW’
Giant Amateur
Talent Show
7T
ADM. 40c to" S-30—GOc
After
| BALLROOM
| SOUTH PARKWAY AT 47TH
V . . —__/
ZONE” with James Cagney, Ann
Sheridan, Pat O'Brien; also
“DOOMED TO DIE” with Boris
Karloff. Added latest episode of
“DRUMS OF FU MANCIIU” and
latest cartoon “SOCIETY DOG
SHOW.”
Wed. & Thurs., Sept. 4-5—
Giant double feature. “I WAS
AN ADVENTURESS” with Zo
rina and Richard Greene; also
“BEYOND TOMORR/DW” with
Chas. Winninger, also cartoon.
Fri. & Sat., Sept. 6-7—
Three big features: “MAD MEN
OF EUROPE”, “LOVE, HONOR
AND OH! BABY”, also “RANG- :
ER AND THE LADY.”
Coming Sun., Mon., & Tues., Sept.
8-0-10—
; “FOUR SONS” ' with Don ,
Ameche; “GHOST BREAK
ERS” with Bob Hope.
EVERYBODY
Swing Swing Swing
WITH
America s TVo. 1
*
SWING PROGRAM
1480 K. C. 5000 Watts
ft
RADIO STATION
W-H-I-P
I
Rockin’ In Rhythm
I TUES., THURS., AND SAT.
1:30 p. in. to 2 p. m.
Eddie Honesty Jr. D. S. D. Belliney
!
_
A gay holiday -iance opening
the fall season will get under
way Monday, Sept. 2nd (Labor
Day) at the Savoy Ballroom
South Parkway at 47th street,
with the music of Walter Fuller
and his Tone Masters as the ace
attraction.
Fuller, is by no means a new
name to music lovers, as he is
famed himself as a musician and
composer ot songs, “Rosetta” be
ing about his most popular.
This will be Fuller’s first ap
pearance at the head of a big
dance band—but from advance
previews his new arrangements
f numbers for dancing and en
tertainment will make him go far
in the music field.
An addea attraction will be the
presentation of the 2nd edition
of Search for Talent contest
among the amateur singers,
dancers, impersonators, etc., of
Chicago. “Doubles” of Ethel Wa
ters, Bill Rcbinson, ‘Cab’, Paul
Robeson, Marian Anderson,
Duke’, Fetchit and other stars
will parade before you in Sa
voy's Stars of Tomorrow Show.
Cash prizes to the final winners,
a chance for a career on the
stage, radio and screen will be
the opportunity given young and
old in the Savoy’s contest. Lead
ing theatrical agents and talent
scouts have been invited to at
tend these shows. The audience
and dancers will be royally en
tertained with this extra treat of
fun, frolic and song.
SHACKLEFORD DOUBLES
FOR REX INGRAM
Because part of Alexander Kor
da's new independently produced
picture was made east, addition
al scenes to a number in winch
Rex Ingram worked, could not
so made here without hurriedly
'lying the former “Lawd,” of
‘Green Pastures,” to the coast.
i>o when Chas. Butler was called
ipon to produce a double he sent
Floyd Shackleford who passed
jerfectly. However, he had to cut
3!s hair close just as Ingram’s
lad been in the other scenes made
n person.
—- ' •: —:-~~ ~~—.-- I

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