OCR Interpretation


Sunday Chicago bee. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1925-19??, June 29, 1941, SECTION ONE, Image 7

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015409/1941-06-29/ed-1/seq-7/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 7

screen Theatrical Page Mnite clubs
Cc Calloway To Play Savoy Ballroom Sunday June 29
ON AIR SUNDAY
PAUL ROBESON
One of the greatest singers of all time, will be guest artist on the
radio musical program, “The Pause that Refreshes On The Air”
Sunday, June 29. from 8 to 8:30 p.m. EDST over the Columbia net
work. Robeson’s appearance marks a ehange in time for the pro
gram sponsored by a soft drink company. Formerly presented
4:’0 to 5:15 p.m. on Sundays, it now moves into the eight o’clock spot
vacated fcy Helen Hayes. Hearing Robeson on the first program
of the n'v nighttime scries will be a real treat for radio listen
er ^ s far more than just a singer: he is a personality who pro
jects f ( deep splendor of his voice into expressive, rolling, balanc
ed phrases. His diction is clear and Le sings with a captivating
feeling of rhythm. In short—the versatile Negro bass-baritone
never fails to thrill his audicr-ces.
-d
Would You Believe It?
3
=----—
NOSEY* ■ NEWS - NUISANCE
By EMANUEL MAULDIN. Jr.
iVEDDING SUPERSTITIONS
The savage who took a wife by capture had to flee her irate fam
ily—hence the wedding trip. Among some tribes newly mated couples
drank a wine of honey for a '.month—the honey-moon ... Rice has
been thrown at newiy weds for thousands of years because the grain
is an almost universal symbol of fertility . .. Some ancient people also
thought it bad luck to stumble on the threshold so the groom still
mies his bride into 1heir new home ... The flower girls of today
are a reminder of girls who strewed grain, symbol of fertility, in the
bridal path . . . “Something old, something new, something borrowed,
something blue’’ . . . this bride’s old lace collar, new dress, borrowed
handkerchief and blue garters conform to the old Eng’ish good luck
rhyme ... The blue has been traced to the Israelites, to whom it
meant purity, love, fidelity . .. The old and borrowed clothes have
been interpreted as sympathetic magic binding the bride to the past
and her neighbors.
KJVOW NOT THYSELF TOO WELL
Do you think that it is wise for th" ordinary man to know much
of the details of how his fco: y works . . . The man who has learned
to think of his heart as a pump, w th valves that get out of order in
the way toward having a weak on ? ... Better let him think of it as
the scat of love and generosity and it will beat away happily ti 1 it
stops . . . Let him think of his stomach as where he puts his dinner,
not as a fierce chemical furnace where ac;ds are tearing up tissues and
sending up exhaust gases ... Let him think of his blood as part of
his .ineage, not as the battleground of a myriad of good an:- evil cor
puscles, sore on his side, some dead against him, and his bowels as
the bowels of compassion as gentle as the new testament . . . Any man
who has realized that he has in h:m about 25 feet of colon and semi
colon—a sort of sausage—can never think the same of himself again.
• * * * *•
COLOR-BLIND FOR THE COLORS
During U. S. Military maneuvers last summer, a trained air
corps observer and an officer of ti e field urti lery were sent up in a
pane to find out. where the “enemy” had- its artillery concealed ...
The air corps man spotted only a few of the camouflaged guns . ..
The ait liery man found them all without difficulty ... Picqued at
being shown up at its c-wn job, the air corps investigated and discov
ered that the artillery man was color blind . .. Other color blind ob
servers were sent up . . . Camouflage d dn't bother them either. . .To
tie color-conscious person peering down from a p ane, green 'painted
canvas hiding a gun looks exactly like grass surrounding it; to th'/
color blind, the paint refects light, in a different way from the grass
and the canvas shows up like a bet con light . .. The air corps has al
ways rejected co’or blind applicants for training as pilots or observers,
but now it is thumbmg through its files in search of color blind vol
unteers it once cold-shouldered.
* * *
HERE'S HOW IT STARTED
The pi rase “giving him the cold shoulder" dates back to a me
et eval custom. . . Honored guests were served hot meat dishes, but
when they overstayed their welcome or becaixe otherwise unpopular,
their host literally gave them a “cold shoulder” of beef or mutton.
& * 4 '
Eight years ago—Dr. Albert E. Forsythe and C. Alfred Anderson
V 01 die first Negroes to cross the American continent in their own
plane. f
FLLNESS DELAYS
NEW FILM
Departure of company of col
ored piaycrs drilled for soldiers
in Walter Wanger’s “Sundown”,
delayed last week account of ill
ness of the very necessary head
'vardrobe man. . . . Stage show
at Lincoln affording large work
ing field for vaudeville perform
e., . . . Last Sunday it was the
‘Three Chocolateers” Bobbie
Gwynn, Fulton Alexander, Nellie
Lutcher, the Four Chocolate Drops
and Dootsie Williams’ band. . . .
Clotilde Woodson into the Rhum
Boogie last week as producer of
the chorus numbers. . . . Lovey
Lane, star of the as yet unreleased
feature “Take My Life” closed at
the It club after a seven weeks
engagement.
Ellington Is
Called Music
Master And Man
By NELL DODSON
NEW YORK, June 26— (ANP)
— New York was hearing a differ
ent kind of music during the hot,
sultry summer of 1926. A six
man combination at the Kentucky
club, just off Times Square, was
bringing new, never-before-heard
rthythms to the musical world.
A good looking fellow named
Duke Ellington had the combo,
and most of the music they play
ed was Ellington’s own composi
tions and so entirely different and
tricky were they that New York’s
best bandleaders, arrangers and
composers came to the Kentucky
club to bring away notes and new
ideas scribbled on the backs of
menus.
Duke Ellington and his Ken
tucky club outfit came in at a
much needed time in the music
profession. Jazz had changed
irom the original Dixieland style
and had settled down to an unin
teresting, polite style. Ellington’s
indigo blues and torrid tempos
opened up a new horizon.
Irving Mills, one of the biggest
music executives downtown at the
time, was so impressed with the
possibilities of this new band of
brownskin music makers that he
placed Ellington under contract,
and aided him in enlarging his
combination to 12 men. He made
them available for recordings.
“Mood Indigo,” “Black and Tan
Fantasy”, “The Jungle Band”,
“The Washingtonians,” “The Har
lem Footwarmers,” “The Harlem
Music Masters,” “Joe Turner’s
Memphis Men,” “Sonny Greer’s
Memphis Men” and “The Whoopee
Makers” all Ellington, were so
sensational on records for small
er companies that three of the
larger companies began to bat
lie tooth and nail to issue Elling
ton discs.
Irving Mills, also seeing ex
ploitation possibilities in the Her
iem Cotton Club, brought Duke
uptown, run a Columbia wire in
to the club, and soon the ermine
trade of Park avenue was rub
bing elbows nightly at the place
with Broadway.
Duke Ellington became a mu
sical sensation. Maurice Cheva
lier, the French star, making his
first appearance on an American
stage at the Fulton theatre, se
lected Duke to share billing with
him, and occupy the stage alone
the entire first half of the con
cert. Florenz Ziegfeld, the Glo
rious Flo, used Ellington rhythms
in “Show Girl’. Radio pictures
picked Duke and his band to pro
vide the musical accompaniment
for the Amos n’ Andy movie,
“Check and Double Check”, and
“Ring Dem Bells,” was born.
Starting with “Mood Indigo’
and “Black and Tan Fantasy,”
Duke Ellington’s contributions to
music have been extraordinary.
His “Sophisticated Lady” must be
mentioned also in the group of his
greatest hits. Duke Ellington has
freed American popular music
from the text. His compositions
consist of two types, the strongly,
rhythmed pure dance stuff, and
the slower lyrical pieces with a
less forcefully rhythmed dance
bass, on the “Mood Indigo” ord
er. Sometimes the two are com
bined for great effectiveness.
As a musician Duke Ellington
is a genius whose works will al
ways be played; he ranks with
Rudolf Friml, George Gershwin,
Victor Herbert, asi a music immor
tal.
As a man and a leader, Duke is
in a class by himself. In spite of
his phenomenal personal success,
he is friendly and unassuming,
never too busy to talk to even
complete strangers. I won’t for
get the day soon after I came to
New York when he met me back
stage at the Apollo theatre. 1
had been introduced to him a
bout six years previously, but as
he had met hundreds of people
since then, I hardly expected him
to remember me. Surprisingly,
he stopped me, extended his hand,
and said: “Hello, there, Minneapo
lis! How long have you been in
the Big Town?” Duke, bless him,
not only remembered me, but
where he had met me!
He’s like that. His men would
go to hades and back for him.
And, incidentally, they’re a grand
bunch of fellows. Sam Manton,
Sonny Greer, Fred Guy, Otto
Hardwick were with Duke’s ori
ginal band at the Kentucky club.
Art Whetsel, who was also with
the Kentucky club combination,
died much too young and with
too much ahead of him, but the
beys haven’t forgotten him.
Born Edward Kennedy Elling
ton in Washington, D. C., and tag
ged with the nickname of “Duke”
in high school, Ellington was a
soda clerk at the “Poddle Dog”,
where he sat ir. for the regular
The orchestra world was buzz
ing iast week with the report
that Cab Calloway, His Royal
Highness of Hi De Ho, had shat
tered the attendance records in
his initial hotel engagement in the
world famous Panther Room of
the Hotel Sherman. While some
skeptics expressed doubt of the
Sherman date, the mark rung up
by Calloway erased any such mis
givings. Calloway opened on De
coration Day in the midst of a
typical mid-west heat wave, and
the natural expectation was for
business to be off.
Opening night found the dining
room and the adjacent bar packed
to capacity and at 11 p. m. the
ropes had to be put up with scores
of people waiting patiently in the
lobby for hours before they could
be admitted. With the heat wave
continuing business was still ex
pected to taper off. Instead it
rose to mountainous proportions
with the dinner sessions always
full and the evening sessions]
jammed with the younger element.
Particularly gratifying to Cal
loway were the comments of the
patrons in the dining room, re
garding the musicianship of his
orhestra. They all agreed that
they were most pleasantly sur
prised that the Calloway orches
tra was equally adept at playing
‘sweet’ tunes as well as the jive
pieces.
Following the Sherman engage
ment Calloway will play a one
night, dance date at the Savoy
Ballroom Sunday, June 29. Fea
tured with the band are Cozy
Cole, Chu Berry and The Four
Cab Jivers, all of them creating
riotous sensations wherever the
Cab Calloway orchestra makes an
appearance.
CAB CALLOWAY
GOSSIP OF THE MOVIE LOTS
i --
By HARRY LEVETTE
HOLLYWOOD, June 2fi— (AN
p)—Back again with the OJ’ Kol
yum! And a promise to the faith
ful Joan, talented movie contest
place winner, that it will not be
absent again without advance
notice. She very indignantly
phoned complaining of the nickels
she had spent on the issues of the
local A. N. P. paper from which
it was missing. “Oh, the rest,of
the paper was all right,” she ex
plained, “but we movie and stage
folk are more interested in the
inside lowdown of our own world,
than, in Hitler, Stalin, Mussolini,
the Fourth Dimension, or the gla
ciers on Mars.”
Hold on to Your Hats, We’re Off!
When you gotta go, you gotta go,
so to make up for lost time we’ll
have wheels. Short, snappy, con
densed tiny tid bits; mere prom
ises of news is what you’re going
to get so rapidly it’ll make your
head swim. Have too rryipji to
say and too little time to do it
in.
Biggest event of the week; the
Gay Caballeros summer dance at
the Elks last Saturday night;—
‘ Cabin in the Sky” proved sensa
(Continued or* page 8.)
THE A TRES
CTATP^ 3507 so- state
1 /A i JLJ STREET
Fri, and Sat., June 2728—
“THE MAN WHO LOST HIM
SELF” with Brian Ahcrne and
Kay Francis; “DANGEROUS
GAME” with Richard Aden and
Andy Devine; “KING OF THE
ZOMBIES” with Dick Purcell.
Sun. and Mon., June 29-vO—
“THE BLACK CAT” with Basil
Rathbone, Hugh Herbert, Brod
Crawford and Bela Lugosi;
“SCOTLAND YARD” with Nancy
Kelly, Edmund Gwenn, and John
Loder.
Tues., Wed. and Thurs., July 1-2
•>
O—
“SO ENDS OUR NIGHT" with
Frederic March, Margaret Sulli
van, Frances Dee; “TOPPER RE
TURNS” with Joan Blondell, Ro
land Young, Billie Burke and Ed
die “Rochester” Anderson.
Coming Sun. and Mon., July 6-7—
“FOOTSTEPS IN THE DARK”
with Errol Flynn, Brenda Mar
shall, Ralph Bellamy and Alan
Hale; “BACK IN THE SADDLE”
with Smiley Burnette, Mary Lee
and Edward Morris.
OWL 4653 SOUTH STATE
S I K E £. i
Sen., Mon., and Tues., June 29
39 and July 1—
Giant double feature: Roches
>er in “TOPPER RETURNS” with
Joan Blondell, Roland Young; al
so “THE BLACK CAT,” Basil
Rathbone, Bela Lugosi. Added
episode No. 3 of ‘the new thrilling
serial, “ADVENTURES OF CAPT.
MARVEL” and Donald Duck car
toon.
Wed. and Thurs., July 2-3—
Two giant hits: “SO ENDS
OUR NIGHT” Frederick March
Margaret Sullavan; also “SCOT
LAND YARD”, Nancy Kelly, Ed
mund Gwenn.
Fri. and Sat., July 4-5—
Three great features: “CON
VOY”, Clive Brook; “KING OF
the ZOMBIES” and “SHERIFF
OF TOMBSTONE. Added come
dy, “RAGGEDY ANN.”
Coming Sun., Mon., and Tues.,
July 6, 7, 8—
“ROAD TO ZANZIBAR”, Bing
Crosby, Bob Hope, Dorothy La
mour; also “SLEEPERS WEST.”
ELLA FITZGERALD
, The “Tisket-Tasket” girl of ra
dio, stage and records, w<;o has
been signed by Universal Pic
tures for a pait in the Abbott
and Costello film, “Ride ’Em
Cowboy,” which goes into pro
duction on June 30. The singer’s
band will rot be used but will
probably be located for the four
weeks in a Los Ange'es night
club, which wil! enable Ella to
work with the band each eve- '
ning.
piano player when the latter took
on a heavy load of fire water and
couldn’t make the job. Duke
played by ear, rather than by in
struction, and so when the ar
rangements of the piano players
Duke used to listen to became too
involved for his uninstructed ears,
he began to improvise.
Oliver Perry heard Duke one
day, and was so impressed he en
couraged him to study, also giv
ing him personal instruction.
Russell Wooding gave him a job
on the condition that Duke would
stick to legitimate piano and not
go in for Ellington musical shi
nanegans. Duke stuck to legiti
mate piano all through one con
cert,—almost. But as the music
paused he put in a strictly Elling
lon break, and Wooding fired him.
Duke studied some mere, went to
Perry and got a job directing on
his bands. In 1923, he joined
Wilbur Sweatman’s band, but left
in two years to come to New
York with five of his own men.
Died — Mrs. Isabelle Crum, of
Chicago, mother of Mrs. Katheryr
South, wife of Eddie South, fam
us violinist.
The Chicago Bee has more net
paid circulation than any other,
local newspaper.
TO MAKE PICTURE
Wmmmm mm&mm
LOS ANGELES, Cal.—Broadway to Hol ywood is truly reverse Eng
lish, to what theatrical terminology citing one’s ascendancy was a
couple of decades ago.. Yet, that is the case of Katherine Dunham
stellar terpsicli orean artist, current with the operatic fantasy “Ca
bin in the Sky,” who is starred in a Warror Bros, studio short sub
ject film entitled “La Bahama.”. The piece boasts of a South Amer
ican atmosphere and is contemplated to usher in a new cycle of
plays of the Latin America's that are not all typed as musical play
selections. With Bliss Dunham ix* Bahama, goes the 24 dancers
from the Cabin in the Sky, light opera, to make the picture. Bliss
Dunham has proven to be one of the most fascinating dancers ever
seen on a coast theatre stage. Stanley Martin directs the Warner
Bros, short subject.
FOOTLIGHT FLICKERS
By ALVIN MOSES
| A GOOD WILL AMBASSADOR
WITHOUT PORTFOLIO
JuH.
NEW YORK, June 26--(ANP)
'“—Since the first world war Bill
(Bojangles) Robinson has led all
entertainers, irrespective of color,
in the matter of donating his ser
I vice freely for benefits . . . the
Negro press has honored Bill as
he so richly deserves year in and
out since the years when Kaiser
Wilhelm acted the role of bogey
rnan now taken over by that pa
,i;an, Adolf Hitler. . . . This pen
sketch, however, does not concern
itself with “Bo”, but with a much
less known favorite son of Har
lem . . . LUTHER CHERRY . .
We who have spent the better por
tion of our lives in theatre and
nightclub coverage, have since
1930, looked upon Luther as a
sort of good will ambassador, serv
ing the community without any
particular official designation.—
Most of us can do a grand job
when the band is playing ....
when the stadium is crowded to
the gates with gay and avid spec
tators eager to applaud the . . .
exhibitionist, town-crier, or plain
buncombe artist . . . but Luther
needs no such window dressing.
. . . He lends his best which
means working 24 hours a day)
to fostering education as he did
last month at Lido ballroom, for
a nationally known Negro school,
in bringing to the public atten
tion characters like Daniel Bur
rows, youthful Democratic leader
of the 19th Assembly district, and
Lc lending his full support to
church benefits, like the one all
Harlem is rallying to in the in
terest of THE AFRICAN ORTHO
DOX CHURCH of which Arch
bishop William Ernest, Ph. D. is
chairman. . . . Bessed with a
sunny disposition, Cherry is on
speaking terms with not less than
15,000 people of the “do some
thing” class, which serves to make
him an invaluable adjunct to
any organization. . . . We sin
cerely believe that Mr. Cherry de
serves a spot in the week’s news.
Next Saturday night, the best
known Negro members of stage,
jOUTDOORS - INDOORS
DANCE
j SUN., JUNE 29
Direct From
| Panther Room- Hotel Sherman
AND HIS ORCHESTRA
featuring
COZY . CHU
COLE BERRY
FOUR CAB JIVES
2 BANDS
ADMISSION 75c
Before 8:30 Continuous
j Tax incl. Dancing: 8 to 2 a-m.
C A V O Y
^ Ballroom *
So. Parkway at 47lh Street
The Swinging Rays of Rhythm
of Piney Woods college, the
world’s largest sepia all girl dance
band, started hitting its stride in
Louisiana and Texas last winter,
is now being called everywhere
the Bounce and Jump of Boogie
Woogie Land.
Record breaking crowds greets
ed their return by “public- de
mand” in their recent tour of
Florida within ninety days.
But if the occasion demands,
these “Swinging Rays” bririg out
music of rhythmic sweetness that
brings to mind the slogan “‘The
sweetest music this side of heav
en.”
Their schedule picks up a few
dates in Georgia and Alabama be-:
fore their eastern dates that takes
them as far North as Boston.
screen and radio will converge on
LIDO BALLROOM, to prove that
“Negroes can, and WILL under
write and support their own in
stitutions under the sweet banner
of charity.” ... . Miss Eleanor
Hinds writes us that she has def
inite assurances that such celebri
ties as CANAGATA (Canada)
Lee, the actor of 1941 whose per
formance in “Native Sop” has
earned him ranking with the
leading American thespians of the
past 40 years, will be on hand; as
will MAXINE SULLIVAN, WIL- _
LIAM C. (“Father of the RJues”)
Handy,— ORLANDO (matchless
voice) ROBESON, EDDIE GREEN,
funniest comedian the stage and
radio has known in many, many
years,—JOE BOSTIC, great
young radio commentator—DAN
BURLEY, crack writer of the Am
sterdam Star-News,— CLAUDE
HOPKINS, FRANK A. BEASLEY,
M ARNETT MOORE, ALLEN
DREW, HELEN STEWART,
MOSS AND HARRISON,
GEORGE STEWART, Al.Bube
WALLACE, and many others.
. . . Let’s make it our business
td h_ld a box office for this “Night
of Stars” Theatre show, and don’t
force us to employ any pressure
politics in beseeching one and all
to come out that night and . . .
“jump with Dan Burley and—Al
Moses.”_ *•..,»
EVERYBODY
Swing Swing Swing
WITH
America s /Vo„ 1
SWING PROGRAM
1520 K.C. . 5000 Watts
RADIO STATION
W-H-I-P
Rockin’ In Rhythm
TUES., THURS., AND SAT.
-4 -■
1:30 p. m. to 2 p. m.
. <m *
_ •
Eddie Honesty Jr. D. S. D. Belliney

xml | txt