OCR Interpretation


Sunday Chicago bee. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1925-19??, October 20, 1946, SECTION ONE, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015409/1946-10-20/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 2

- i« Plane Crash Near
«iUS Home
■WHITE PLAINS, N. Y. —
(ANP)—Despondency is said to!
be responsible for the airplane
death last week of Raymond J. P.
Heraux near the home of his es
tranged wife, Mrs. Harriet
“Daisy” Richardson Heraux.
A note found in Heraux’ pocket
gave police the impression the
accident was deliberate suicide. It
read: “In case of accident notify
Martin, 85 West Post road, White
Plains, N. Y.”
Heraux, who was granted a
pilot’s license on June 19,
crashed his small rented plane
into a nine-foot alleyway between
two buildings in the heart of this
city, near the home of Mrs. Zelma
Martin. His wife, with whom he
had tried to affect a reconcilia
. tion, lives in Mrs. Martin’s home
and both are employed as tele
phone operators in the White
Plains exchange of the New York
Telephone company.
Police theorized that Heraux
had attempted to kill himself in
the crash and injure or kill his
wife also, but at the last minute
had cut the engine to prevent
injuring her. Had he not cut the
motor of his plane when he went
into the fatal spin there would
have been a terrific explosion that
probably would have set his wife’s j
home afire, police declared.
Mrs. Heraux, the former wife i
of Dr. H. Binga Dismond, promi
nent New York City physician,
met Heraux in Haiti after divorc
ing Dr. Dismond. They came to:
New York and Heraux obtained
employment as a bookkeeper for .
the Moore-McCormack Lines, Inc.,
6 Broadway, New York City.
-*
FELSENTHAL
CENTER BEGINS
ACTIVITIES
The Felsenthal social center,
4101 Calumet avenue, will open
Friday evening, Oct. 18, it was
announced this week by C. L.
Cooper, school principal and di
rector of the center.
Included among the educational
and recreational activities offered
free of charge are choral music
and community singing, sewing
and needlecraft, art and handi
craft, gymnasium classes for boys
and girls, basketball and volley
ball, ping pong, interpretive danc
ing, table games such as bridge,
checkers, carom board and movies.
Capable teachers will be in
charge of all activities. This is a
■pplend’d opportunity for all-in the
community to avail themselves of
an opportunity for educational
growth and splendid recreation.
-*
THEY POSED AS POLICE
Andrew Butler, 37, of 3203 S. State, a
chauffeur, told Stanton police Sunday
that two men posing as police officers
assaulted him at 3219 S. State st. He was
treated at Michael Reese hospital for lac
erations of the scalp and multiple bruises
of the face.
JOSEPHINE
BAKER RECOVERS
By Edgar A. Wiggin*
PARIS — (ANP) — Josephine
Baker, idol of French stage, has
recovered from a serious case of
dysentery that laid her low three
months ago in Morocco, but on
the advise of her physician will
not quit the private clinic in Neuil
ly, where she was treated, until
next weekend.
Special permission was granted
by French military authorities for
an unusual decoration ceremony
held Tuesday afternoon, Oct. 8,
in which Miss Baker, in her own
private room at the clinic, deco
rated with the highest medal of
the French resistance for her serv
ices to France.
_X_
Roxborough,
Watson End
Prison Terms
JACKSON, Mich. — (ANP) —
The doors of Jackson prison opened
last Friday morning to give John
W. Roxborough and Everett E.
Watson their freedom after hav
ing served 18 months of a two to
four year term for conviction in
the policy ring case begun in
1940. Roxborough, manager of
world’s heavyweight champion Joe
Louis, was the first to leave prison,
followed 10 minutes later by Wat
son.
The two former policy kings
went into prison in 1944, after
efforts to wriggle out of the sen
tence, through appeals and de
lays, failed. The start of the end
of their regime as policy heads
began in 1940 when the Ferguson
Grand jury returned a true bill
his appearance, expressing a min
gled feeling of nervousness, relief
and happiness.
after the first. Roxborough made
against them.
Waiting at the prison gates were
Mrs. Roxborough and Mrs. Wat
son, the latter arriving 30 minutes
Reporters gathered around him
and learned he had no comment
to make on anything until he had
talked with Louis. Louis, however,
was not to be seen among the
crowd on hand to witness the tw'o
! men’s release.
With Mrs. Roxborough and her
brother, Radford Morris, the re
leased men started immeriately
j for Detroit, •
Unlike Roxborough, Watson
came out of the gate, shook hands
| with Prison Chaplain Rev. Mr.
j Wells, said “Goodbye” and made
‘ a sudden exit from the scene. He
walked erect with rapid strides to
his car, so fast that photographers
had difficulty in getting pictures
of him. Mrs. Watson drove him
j to their farm east of Jackson.
-+
TWO KILLED IN
ELEVATOR FALLS
Two south siders were killed
this -week in falls from elevators
where they were employed. Stan
ley Hudson, 29, of 5844 S. LaSalle
street, died Monday following a
fall from a freight elevator on
the fifth floor of the Sun Shoe
Manufacturing Co., 820 W. Erie
street. Also dead in a similar fall
was Ollis Colly, 50, of 6052 Prai
rie, w'ho fell eight floors down
a service elevator shaft at 430 S.
Michigan, where he was employer
in preparing the structure for
conversion from the Auditorium
Service Men’s center to Roosevelt
College quarters.
-A
JOE PAYS OFF
Heavyweight champion Joe Louis
agreed Wednesday to pay Bindley
E. Cyrus, former lawyer for his
ex-wife Marva, $2,000 for services
rendered in a 1941 divorce suit,
which ended in reconciliation.
The agreement was reached in
the chambers of Circuit Judge
Harry M. Fisher. Atty. Cyrus had
sued the champion for $10,000.
-★
SHOT BY JEALOUS SUITOR
A suitor jealous of the attentions of
another man was held responsible by
Stanton police for the shooting Friday
of Ruby Elrod Childs, 33, at her home at
3850 S. State st. Miss Childs was wound
ed in the right breast.
§ -'%coiotnm)
m «) JO JET BUCK \
If your hair Is doll, faded,
burnt, gray, graying or dis
colored, one 60c bottle of
BLACK STRAND will
color your entire head of hair
'to a smooth, even, lustrous, jet
black shade. Ail you need to keep
ryour hair always looking black and
lovely is Black Strand. Whether
it’s all your hair, or just to touch-up
your hair at roots, parting, temples
or the streaks, you'll find BLACK
, , STRAND economical and wonder
fully effective. Ask your druggist today for
60e BLACK STRAND on the guarantee re
sults must please you or your money back.
CAUTION: — Black Strand is to be
used only as directed.
BLACK STRAND
the IET BLACK HAIR COLORING
HACK STRAND CO., 305 W. Adams. Chicago 6. III.
SUNDAY *
Chicago Bee
Greatest NEGRO Newspaper
Vol. 37—No. 42—Sunday, Oct. 20, 1946
National Independent T7eekly Published
Every Week by the
BEE PUBLISHING COMPANY. Inc.
Chicago Office: 3655 So. State St.
Phone: BOUlevard 7002
Price 10c Per Copy Everywhere
$4.00 Per Year in the United State*
$4.60 in Foreign Countries
Advertising Rates on Request
Entered as Second Class Matter August 1
14, 1929. at Chicago, Illinois, under the !
Act of March 3 1879 J
hT i 1 « .
w I fl 1 1 I L
4 11111 l * 1 Li I */ji J»| 114|ij
FIRST TIME OFFERED SINCE
THE WAR. Every stove a genuine
Pre-War stove. Beautiful metal
construction. Visible flame heats
quick. Simple to clean. Should last
a lifetime. Everybody wants but
supply limited so don’t be disappointed. Rush
$1.00 and pay postman balance of only $3.50
plus C.O.D. on arrival. Satisfaction guaranteed or money back Newbro
Manufacturing Company, 199 Walker. Dept. 000. Atlanta', Ga. I
WED IN IMPRESSIVE NUPTIALS. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Jacques Jr., who repeated marriage vows at Cosmopoli
tan Community church on Oct. 6. Dr. Mary B. Evans, min
ister, read the impressive service. The bride is the daugh
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Chapman, 5650 Indiana; the
groom, a Marine veteran is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
G. Jacques Sr., of Robbins, 111.— (Patton photo).
of Viotnon
« «he SloPnfl ® siding
P*obe ^ecco BuiWin9
In W ^eCC
(Continued from Page 1)
quested be withheld to aid their
probe of the slaying stated that
she heard a violent altercation in
the apartment Monday morning.
A man’s voice was loud and
abusive, but she could not under
! stand what was being said.
In the struggle that followed,
she heaid Mrs. Vaughn making
several attempts to escape, only to
be dragged back inside. She
thought she heard the dead wom
an shout for help before the apart
ment quieted down.
Later she said, a man phoned
her apartment and asked to speak
to “Minnie”. She told police he
apparently was the same man who
had been in the apartment earlier.
When she knocked at the door she
?yceived no ahswerj f
She stated that she didn’t be
come alarmed until the dead wom
an’s daughter told her the next
morning that her mother had not
come home the night before.
-★
GETS $840 REWARD
FOR JEWELS’ RETURN
NEW YORK—An $840 reward
was given Richard R. Holmes, a
Grand Central Station red cap,
this week for recovering $15,000;
worth of jewels which dropped!
fro^i a taxicab.
--*
The Library of Congress is the
largest and the most costly library
building in the world, according to
the Encyclopaedia Britannica. The ■
original cost was nearly $7,000,- i
000.
_
URGE MURRAY TO
STAY AT POST
DETROIT—The resignation of
Philip Murray as president of the
CIO "would be a blow not only
to the CIO and to the labor move
ment but to the nation,” Walter
P. Reuther, UAW-CIO president,
said in his President’s Column in
the October issue of The United
Automobile Worker, official union
publicjftion.
Virgin Islands Laboratory of
Human Relations Hastie Says
WASHINGTON — (ANP) —
More than 800 Washingtonians
heard Gov. William H. Hastie of
the Virgin Islands tell of the
people who reside there and of
their relationship with each other,
as compared to our “race tension”
here in America, on Monday eve
ning at the John Wesley AME
Zion church.
Principal speaker at the 33rd
annual Alliance Day and Memorial
celebration, sponsored by the
Washington Branch of the Na
tional Alliance of Postal employes,
Hastie called them “a laboratory
of human relations” which he
hopes will be “for the good of
the islanders, the nation, and
mankind as a whole.”
That the Islands ^illiteracy is
very low, the Governor said, was
proven when the Selective Ser
vice act was extended to the na
tives. The men all easily qualified
for various branches of the ser
vice and met all standards of edu
cation as were required.
Gov. Hastie told of an incident
which took place on his return
to America not long ago from
the islands.
On being asked how many men
were in the local legislature, and
replying that there were 16, the
governor said the next question
asked was how many were white
and how many coloi'ed.
“This might sound funny to you,
or you might think I am trying
to be funny”, the governor told
the audience, “but I actually had
to stop and count and try to re
member -who was who.”
The reason for this, he ex
plained, was that there were no
such thing as electing a white
man or a Negro, but simply elect
ing an individual.
“In the Virgin islands the race
is not important, for we are
cilivized there. There is no prob
lem of race tension, and one goes
into a store, the banks, or visits
his or her neighbor, and there is
no thought of what the texture
of the person’s skin may be.”
The islands were further cited
as an example to this nation of
how people of different races can
live under our flag, and Hawaii
was also compared with the Vir
gin islands.
Jim Crow Bus
Case Headed
For High Court
RICHMOND, Va. — (ANP) —
Another jim crow bus suit is head
ed for the U. S. Supreme court.
Following the rules of Judge
Willis D. Miller in law and equity
court here Tuesday against Mrs.
Ethel New, who was ejected from
a Greyhound bus in Lynchburg on
June 10, 1944, because she refused
to take a rear seat, Mrs. New’s
lawyers indicated they will appeal
the case.
Judge Miller’s decision confirmed
a previous jury decision against
Mrs. New, a Kentucky citizen,
and is expected to be upheld by
the Virginia Supreme court, which
means that the case will then be
appealed to the U. S Supreme
court.
Last June, the U. S. Supreme
court differed with the Virginia
Supreme court in th£ case of Mrs. ;
Irene Morgan, who was fined $10
for refusing to take a back seat
on a Greyhound bus, and ruled;
against racial segregation in in
terstate bus travel.
Mi's. New’s case differs from
Mrs. Morgan’s on the point of de
parture and point of intended ar
rival. Mrs. Morgan bought a ticket
from Norfolk to Baltimore. Mrs.
New’s ticket indicated two points
within the state, although she said
it was part of an intended trip to
Lynch, Ky.
Mrs. New suffered a miscarriage
on June 18, which she attributes:
to the struggle to eject her from
the bus. She is suing the Atlantic
Greyhound lines and W. N. Smith,
Lynchburg policeman, for $10,000
damages.
TEA TIME AT BLACKSTONE hotel found Women’s Di
vision leaders relaxing before the opening of the Commu
nity Fund residential solicitation canvass which begins
Oct. 15. They are (from left) Mrs. Brady B. Cole, chair
man of the north regions; Mrs. Loyal Davis, chairman
Woman’s Division; Mrs. Sue Wilson Turner, chariman of
south regions and Mrs. Daisy McGuire, west regions
chairman.
CPA APPROVES
NEW HOSPITAL
NORFOLK, Va. — (ANP) —
Among the projects approved for
construction by the Civilian Pro
duction administration was a $75,
000 community hospital for Ne
groes at Martinsville, it was
announced hy District Manager
O. M. McCullough here last Fri
day.
Chartered as a nonprofit com
munity project for Negroes, the
Martinsville hospital will be a one
story brick building with concrete
floors and wooden roof framing.
Serving Negroes of Henry county
and Martinsville, it was approved
because the nearest similar facili
ties are in Roanoke, 50 miles
away.
--
NAACP YOUTH
TO HOLD MEET
NEW YORK — NAACP youth
groups from 13 states have al
ready indicated that their dele
gates will be at the 8th annual
youth conference to be held in
New Orleans Nov. 21 through
Nov. 24. All of the southern states
will be represented and some dele
gates are coming from as far
away as California, Indiana and
Connecticut.
ALLIED ARTS CORP.
Presents in
Orchestra Hall
the World Famous Contralto
MARIAN
ANDERSON
Sunday, Nov. 3, at 3:30
Seats Now Selling: $1.20, $1.80, $2.40,
$3.00, $3.60, $4.20 (Tax Inc.)
at Orchestra Hall Box Office. 216 So.
Michigan. Mail Orders Receive Prompt
Attention. Enclose Stamped, Self-Ad
dressed Envelope. Ph. Info. Ran. 6933
OHIOAN TO USES 1
NATIONAL POST I
WASHINGTON — Kenneth E
Banks, former War Manpowei
Commission Minority Groups su
pervisor for the State of Ohio
has been named technical advisoi
in the minority groups section of
the United States Employmeni
Service, Robert C. Goodwin, di
rector, announced last week.
Banks is now attached to the
office of Mrs. Thomasina Walkei
Johnson, chief of the minority
groups section. His new duties
will include assisting Mrs. John
son in program development and
staff training directed toward the
promotion of equitable employ
ment opportunities for members
of minority groups.
doses l
only |
I OVERTON’S I
High Brown Hair Dressing
For the many purposes re
quired of a good hair dressing:
For straightening or pressing
it gives thorough satisfaction:
As a daily hairdressing it adds
lustre and beauty. t
Overton’s High Brown Hair 1
Dressing contains highly meri- J
torious ingredients and will do I
everything that a properly V
made hair dressing can do to ^
maintain a healthy scalp and
well groomed hair* It contains
nothing considered harmful
under normal conditions.
The
Overton-Hygienic
Mfg. Co.
Chicago
* \
500
WINTER COATS
All Wool! All Clean!
All Sizes
95,595
$995
MEN'S
833 E. 43rd St.
LADIES'
1050V2 E. 43rd St.
Saturday, Oct. 19th, 10 a.m.
*
Don’t take chances on your
$ health, there is nothing like
! a routine physical examina
tion to ease your mind, or you
11 may want one for a marriage
license, a new job or to show
1 you to be in good shape, or
y tell you what steps should be
Vj taken to get you back in
condition.
Physicians of the post grad
uate hospital are prepared to
examine you at any time be
tween 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.,
daily, Saturdays 9:00 a.m. to A
12:00 p.m., Sundays excepted. '
The hospital was estab
lished fifty years ago as a
corporation “not for profit,”
and asks but $1.50 for a phy
sical examination. The exam
ination includes careful ve- A
nereal tests as well as a check r
up of your heart, lungs, eye,
ear, nose, throat, teeth, blood
pressure, etc. Any further
visits will be but 50c. _
* / FOOT CLINIC \ *
\ (CHIROPODY) ✓ 11
MONDAYS AT 9 A.M. — FRIDAYS AT 2 P.M. /
> postIraduatThospual ^
2400 S. DEARBORN ST., CHICAGO, ILL. — VIC. 3520
For Efficient Public Service
RE-ELECT
EDWARD M. SNEED
FOR
COUNTY COMMISSIONER
•j
Security and Prosperity for All
Election Day, Nov. 5, 1946
VOTE STRAIGHT ©DEMOCRATIC
-1 j
4 "

xml | txt