OCR Interpretation


Sunday Chicago bee. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1925-19??, October 20, 1946, SECTION ONE, Image 6

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015409/1946-10-20/ed-1/seq-6/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 6

Bilbo Under Probe by
War Profits Group
WASHINGTON. — The recent)
disclosure that Sen. Theodore C. '
Bilbo is being investigated by a !
special Senate committee on
charges that he received a $5,000 !
contribution from a Mississippi
war contractor, leads Negroes and
liberal leaders to believe that their i
long time fight to have, him re
moved from public office will soor
be concluded.
The alleged investigation of Bil
bo was brought to light Sunday
when Sen. Ferguson, Michigan Re
publican who is a member of the
Senate committee which has been
probing war contracts, told an in
terviewer in Detroit that his com
mittee had been “delving into cer
tain phases” of complaints re
ceived against the Mississippi sen
ator.
“When our preliminary work is
completed little doubt exists that
Senator Bilbo will be invited to ap
pear before us,” he added.
Francis D. Flanagan, assistant
committee counsel, declined to re
veal details of the inquiry, but it
was reported that investigators
had been sent to Mississippi for a
check of the charges.
In the meantime, the Supreme
Court, in the first working session
of its new term Monday refused
to enjoin Sen. Bilbo from taking
his seat in January. The injunc
tion was sought by James L. F.
Rumble of New York, who said
Bilbo had urged disfranchisement
of Negroes.
The charges that Bilbo received
war profits were made during the
1946 Mississippi primary cam
paign by Ross Collins, former rep
resentative and one of the three
men Bilbo defeated for the nomi
nation for his third six year term
in the Senate.
No hearing on the charges
against Bilbo has been set by the
committee. If the preliminary in
vestigation should warrant hear
ings, they will be scheduled after
the November election, because
Chairman Kilgore and other mem
. bers of the committee are cam
paigning for reelection.
-★
MORGAN BEARS
TRIP DELAWARE
DOVER, Del. — (ANP)—The
Morgan Bears pried the lid off
their 1946 football season here by
trouncing a surprisingly touch
Delaware State College eleven,
22-6 in a hard fought contest that
saw Coach “Tank” Conrad’s pro
teges battle freely in a valiant
but vain endeavor to bring their
nientor a realization of his fond
est dream, to score a victory over
the team coached by his former
tutor.
The gritty pre-game underdogs
fought heroically to stem the tide
of battle, but Coach Hurt’s Charg
es, with their sights lined up for
the titanic set-to with West Vir
ginia State next weekend, just
were not in the mood for being
upset and grimly ground a gallant
foe underfoot.
♦ --if-.
Only the shell of the crown of
some baby teeth falls out of a
child’s mouth and the root i* ab
sorbed, according to the Encyclo
paedia Britannica. This is true of
the central milk incisors which
generally fall out during the sev
enth year.
STUDS TERKEL
TO BROADCAST
IN VOTE DRIVE
For the first time in the history
of the Midwest, four independent
organizations have united to
sponsor a series of pre-election
broadcasts.
Independent Citizens Commit
tee of the Arts, Sciences and
Professions, Independent Voters
of Illinois, CIO Political Action
Committee, and National Citizens
Political Action Committee, are
sponsoring a series of broadcasts
by Studs Terkel over WMAQ en
dorsing liberal candidates and
issues.
Terkel, well known radio actor,
platter jockey on “Wax Museum”,
Torpedo of “Captain Midnight”,
has also long been prominent in
Chicago as one of radio’s fighting
liberals.
His series of broadcasts include
the inside story on the meat situ
ation, with affirmation for OPA;
a broadside against the rebirth
of the America First group under
the name of American Action,
Inc., and endorsements for candi
dates Resa, Sabath, Douglas,
Rowan and Link.
-★
Hoey Awards'
Go to Negro,
White Laymen
NEW YORK—(ANP)—Winners
of the James J. Hoey awards for
interracial justice for 1946 are
Charles L. Rawlings, president of
the Catholic Interracial council of
Detroit and Richard Reid, white
editor of Catholic News, New
York, it was announced here last
Friday by the Catholic Interracial
council.
The Hoey wards, established in
1942 by the family of the late
James J. Hoey, co-founder and
first president of CIC, consist of
two silver medals conferred each
i year at the Feast of Christ the
King upon a white and Negro lay
man who in the judgment of the
i committee, made the most out
j standing contribution to the cause
of interracial justice during the
' year.
Rawlings is one of the organiz
ers and charter members of the
Detroit council, while Reid is the
i former president of the Catholic
Press association and, for a num
i ber of years, editor of the Bulletin,
i published by the Catholic Lay
' men’s League of Georgia.
Award presentation will be made
at Carroll club, New York, Sun
day, Oct. 27. "Speakers scheduled
to address the presentation meet
1 include the Rev. John LaFargo,
■ S.J., editor of America and chap
lain of the council; and Charles
A. Brigmingham, president.
The interracial award has pre
viously been given to Frank A.
Hall, director of NCWC News
service; Edward LaSalle, Kansas
City; Philip Murray, president,
CIO; Ralph H. Metcalfe and John
Yancey, Chicago; the late Mrs.
Edward Morell of Philadelphia;
Richmond Barthe, distinguished
Negro sculptor, and Paul D. Wil
liams, president of the Southern
Regional council.
SISTERS FETE ANOTHER AT GALA PARTY. The Overton sisters were hostesses
last Saturday night at a gala informal party in their home at 5200 So. Wabash av., for
members of the young social set. The occasion marked the birthday of Miss Sheila
Overton (second from left). Pictured around a tastefully appointed table are Frank
Mitchell, freshman student at the University of Illinois and son of BEE city editor Ma
rion M. Campfield; the honoree, Misses Doris, Victoria and Sandra Overton, the host-*
esses and Jack Sealton, also a freshman student at the University of Illinois.
lawyers Group Backs Judge
O’Connell for Re-Election
_
Organization of the Lawyers
Non-Partisan committee to work
for the re-election of Probate
Judge John F. O’Connell was an
nounced Monday by its chairman,
John D. Black.
The committee includes seven
former presidents of the Chicago
Bar association. Among the 175
well known lawyers listed in the
organizing group are two promi
: nent South Siders, Attys. Sydney
I P. Brown and James B. Cashin.
“This committee will strive to
maintain the tradition that only
i the ablest jurists shall be elected
to the Probate Court of Cook
County, and that politics shall not
interfere with the re-election of
our probate judge,” Chairman
Black said. “The public has es
1 tablished that great tradition, and
we of the bar must do our part
to maintain it.
“Judge O’Connell was first
elected to the Probate bench in
1933. During the past thirteen
years he has demonstrated ca
pacity for distinguished judicial
service. He is an able executive,
and during the years of his in
cumbency he has given the court
splendid administration. It is the
purpose of this committee to put
forth a sustained effort during the
coming month to insure his re
election.”
Besides Chairman Black, the
officers of the committee include
Laird Bell, Joseph B. Fleming,
Edgar B. Tolman, Austin L. Wy
man, Oscar D. Stern, Ernest S.
Ballard, Paul M. Godehn, Hamil
ton Moses, John P. Wilson, Thom
as S. Edmonds, Russell Whitman,
Percy B. Eckhart and Conrad H.
Poppenhusen, who are vice chair
men. Stephen A. Mitchell is sec
retary.
Included in the group who are
actively engaged in aiding Judge
O’Connell are seven former Chi
cago Bar Association presidents.
They are the chairman, John D.
Black, and William Tracy Alden,
Francis X. Busch, Harry N. Gott
lieb, Carl R. Latham, Edgar B.
Tolman and Russell Whitman.
Other members of the commit
tee include: Sydney P. Brown,
James B. Cashin, Edwin C. Austin,
Henry E. Cutler, Charles T. B.
-----I
Ooodspeed, Roy D. Keehn, Ed- j
ward C. Kohlsaat, Frank H. Me- j
Culloch, Alexander F. Reichmann,
Ralph M. Shaw, Orville J. Taylor,
Emil C. Wetten and others.
Judge O’Connell is the Demo
cratic candidate. Many of the
committee members have long
been identified with Republican
party activities in national affairs.
INDICT FIVE IN
FLOGGING DEATH
LEXINGTON, Miss.—(ANP) —
Indictments for manslaughter were
returned against five white men
by a Holmes County grand jury
in connection with the flogging
death last July of a Negro ten
nant farmer, it was revealed here
last Wednesday by Sheriff W. L.
Murtagh.
Manslaughter warrants have
been sworn out for the arrest of
the five men, the sheriff declared.!
They are accused of beating 35-;
year-old Leon McAttee to death. I
Four of the five assailants have
been arrested and released under
$1,000 bonds each. The four are
Jeff Dodds Jr., 35; D. C. Roberts.
41; Spencer Ellis, 62; and Jeff
Dodd Sr., 65. The fifth refendant, j
Pvt. James E, Roberts, 19, was
on duty at an army base and had
not been arrested.
McAttee was a tenant on the
Dodd’s 300-acre farm.
-★
RADIO CONFAB AT
HOTEL CONTINENTAL
An important School Bi’oadcast
Conference will be held October
21-23 at the Hotel Continental,
it was announced last week by
Russell B, Babcock, director, De
partment of Public Information
and Education of the Mayoi-’s
Commission on Human Relations.
S. SIDE LANDLORDS
MUST PAY REFUNDS
Two southside landlords were
ordered to pay damages of $341.
96, and one to refund $291.96 to
overcharged tenants Tuesday
morning by Circuit Judge R. Je
rome Dunee.
An injunction restraining fur
ther overcharges was ordered
against Mrs. Estelle Dick, 3207
Rhodes avenue, who also had to
pay $291.96 in damages and to re
fund a like amount.
The other southside landlord
against whom court action was
taken is Mrs. Pauline Lampton,
4641 Calumet, who wTas ordered to
pay damages of $50. She was also
Army Uses First Negro
To Try War Criminals
FLORENCE, Italy — (ANP —
The first instance of a Negro try
ing war criminals is happening
here.
Lt. Clarence W. Burks, Pitts
burgh, is the assistant trial judge
advocate who is pushing the gov
ernment’s case against Capt. Italo
Simonitti, Italian army officer,
charged with the wanton murder
of an American army pilot on
Feb. 8, 1945.
According to information
brought out during the trial, the
murdered pilot was a member of
the 57th Fighter group. He was
captured near Castelnuovo about
5:30 p.m. on "Feb. 8, after para
chuting from his plane. Brought
to the Monte Rosa division, he was
questioned by Capt. Simonitti and
his US army officers identification
card, plus small amounts of |
French and Italian money were i
taken from him.
About 11 p.m., according to a
witness, the pilot was marched
to a hole previously dug behind
the local cemetery. He was shot
twice by Pvt. Benedetto Pilon,
once while standing and again
when he had fallen to the ground.
In addition to Pilon’s two bullets
i in his body, two more shots were
fired in the body by Capt. Simon
itti and himself, the witness said.
Lt. Burks himself was captured ;
by the same Italian outfit two
days later and was brought be
fore Capt. Simonitti as a war
prisoner. Burks did not know of
the graveyard incident, he said,
but Italian partisans helped him
and two of his friends escape the
airmen’s fate.
His role in the case has been
questioning of the defendants,
i which include Gen. Mario Carloni,
in addition to Pilon and Simonitti.
ordered to refrain from further
overcharges on a house at 5344
Wentworth.
A former 92nd division infantry
man, Burks said the murdered
airman came from Kansas City,
Mo. Gen. Carloni’s Monte Rosa
division continued to fight with
the German army until the end
of the war in Italy.
The defense is headed by Maj.
George J. Banegan, Buffalo, N. Y.,
who recently defended German
Lt. Gen. Kurt Maeltzer, who re
ceived a 10-year sentence in the
February, 1944, “march through
Rome” war crimes trial which
ended on Sept. 14. "
The three Italians went on trial
here in the extraordinary court
of Assizes, an Italian court which
the military has been given per
mission to use to try war crimi
nals, on Sept. 25. Burke is the
first Negro the government has
used thus far in the war crimes
trial.
-★
HEART ATTACK FATAL
Under treatment for three weeks for a
heart ailment, Mrs. Lucinda Smith, 66,
of 653 E. 45th st., succumbed to a heart
attack at her home Monday morning, Wa
bash police stated. She failed to respond
to first aid Administered by Fire Depart
ment Inhatator Squad No. 3.
CORA BOS I ILK, born in Atlanta, Ga.,
wife of Jack Bostick, 4028 Dearborn
Street, died Oct. 1. Funeral services
were conducted Oct. 7tb.
BESSIE JOHNSON, born in Homes
ville, Miss., mother of Louise Martin,
6135 Eberhart Avenue, died Oct. 1. Fu
neral services were conducted on Oct.
?th,
ARLENA DANIELS, horn in Chicago,
Illinois, daughter of Mary York, 453 E.
46th Street, died Oct. 3. Funeral services
were conducted Oct. 7th.
FRANK HARLSTON, born in Atlanta.
Georgia, brother of James Harlston, 4346
Michigan Avenue, died Oct. 4. Funeral
•ervices were conducted Oct. 7th.
WALTER WATSON, born in Natchez,
Miss., husband of Ermaline Watson, 4625
Calumet Avenue, died Oct. 3. Funeral
•ervices were conducted Oct. 7th.
MARY FRANKLIN, born in Delhigh,
Luisiana. mother of William Franklin,
6009 Calumet Avenue, died Oct. 2. Fu
neral services were held at Olivet Bap
tist Church on Oct. 7th.
WILLIE WILKINS, bom in Montgo
mery, Ala., sister of Martin Wilkins,
322 E. 46th St., died Oct. 2. Funeral
services were held at Liberty Baptist
Church on Oct. 7th.
CELIA GREGORY, born in Tylertown,
Miss., mother-in-law of Ollie Gregory,
4639 Wabash Avenue, died Sept. 29.
Funeral services conducted Oct. 7th.
Ta m >
Air Conditioned Funeral I
Care for the Use of Those I
We Servo.
|| At the Service of the Entire Public
B “^^METROPOLITAN funeral for your loved
ONES IS A LASTING CONSOLATION FOR YOU.”
The following Funerals were held from the Metropolitan Funeral
Parlors, 4445 South Parkway: The Metropolitan Quintet ■
BURIALS ARE BETWEEN OCT. 7 AND OCT. 12 **“*«« ”2S,C ** ■
Ail service* V
RUTH BOLDS, born in Roanoke, Vir
ginia, wife of Fred Bolds, 4714 South
Parkway, died Oct. 4. Funeral services
were conducted Oct. 8th.
OLA MAE BARTON, cousin of S. M.
Swoops. 1343 vV. 61st Street, died Oct.
3. Funeral services w*ere conducted Oct.
8th.
LILLIAN M. HENDERSON, born in
Chicago, Illinois, daughter of Clementine
Henderson, 5828 Lafayette Avenue, died
Oct. 3. Funeral services were conducted
Oct. 8th.
EDWARD A. FRANKS, born in New
borne, N. C., husband of Gladys Franks,
6739 Rhodes Avenue, died October 6.
Funeral services were conducted Oct.
9th.
FRANCES WILLIAMS, born in Nash
ville, Tenn., sister of John Coles, 4431
Langley Avenue, died Oct. 5. Funeral
services were conducted Oct. 9th.
ELBERT C. WILLIAMS, born in
Hamilton, Georgia, brother of Mamie
Oliver, 2311 Dearborn Street, died Oct.
5. Funeral services were conducted Oct.
9th.
WILLIAM BLAND, father of Lucille
V. Lewis. 1358 W. 112th Place, died
Oct. 3. Funeral services were conducted
Oct. 9th.
GEORGE B. SMITH, born in Chicago,
Illinois, son of Emma Smith, 3618 Mich
igan Avenue, died Oct. 5. Funeral serv
j ices were conducted Oct. 9th.
THOMAS ALLEN, born in Earl, Ark.,
i brother of Frances Hurt, 121 E. 46th St.,
died October 7. Funeral services were
conducted October 10th.
MARTIN GREEN, born in Henderson.
N. C„ husband of Mamie Green, 743
East 50th St., died October 7. Funeral
services were conducted October 10th
ANNIE MAE MORGAN, sister of Wil
liam Rooks, 562 East 51st Street, died
October 8. Body was shipped to Mem
phis, Tenn., for funeral services and j
burial.
GEORGE A. SNOW, born in Galves
ton, Texas, husband of Ollie Snow. 441
Bowen Ave., died Oct. 6. Funeral serv
ices were conducted Oct. 12th.
ETHEL FIELDS, born in Wheeling.
West Virginia, resided at 426 E. 42nd
Place, died Oct. 7. Funeral services were
conducted at Metropolitan Community
Church Oct. 12th.
MILDRED ROBERTSON, born in Boli
var. Tenn., wife of Ephriam Robertson,
4501 Prairie Ave., died Oct. 8. Funeral
services were conducted at St. Elizabeth
Catholic Church. Oct. 12th.
THOMAS SIMMONS, born in Hatties
burg, Miss., husband of Ruby Simmons,
3020 So. Michigan Ave., died Oct. 6. Fu
neral services were conducted Oct. 12.
JAMES MOSES GREEN, born in Mont
gomery, Ala., father of Lewis H. Green,
13057 So. Ellis Ave., died Oct, 8. Funeral
services were conducted Oct. 12th.
RICHARD RENFRO, born in Madison
ville, Tenn.. husband of Virginia Renfro.
21 East 47t.h St., died Oct. 6. Funeral
services were conducted Oct. 12th. I
4%
VOTE
FOR
#
DALE FURNITURE CO.
COMPLETE HOME FURNISHINGS
CEILING PRICE 32.95
LOW 45 OUR OCk 95
$1.25 PRICE...
A WEEK
16" Wheel
Base —
Heavy
Rubber
Tires
Ball
Bearing
Wheels
USE
OUR
LAY
AWAY
PLAN
4833-35 S. ASHLAND YAR. 4848
4228 WEST MADISON NEV. 5515
. Re-Elect Our Fighting Congressman
VOTE
FOR
Cong. WILLIAM L. DAWSON
(1st District) ON HIS RECORD
HE VOTED FOR LABOR AND THE NATION’S WIN-THE
WAR PROGRAM ON THE FOLLOWING ISSUES:
—Soldier’s Vote—Taxes—Polltax Repeal.
—Introduced a bill for a permanent Fair Employment Practice
Committee.
—Made strong and successful appeal for increased Public Housing.
Dawson is a man of experience and is well equipped to protect the inter
ests of the people and in solving the great problems of the peace.
VOTE STRAIGHT® DEMOCRATIC
AMATEUR BOXING and WRESTLING
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 9 P.M. SHARP
PEORIA, ILL
MID-STATE BOXING CHAMPIONS
VS.
SAVOY A. C.
PLUS 6 THREE ROUND BOUTS
2 WRESTLING MATCHES ON EVERY CARD
CALL KENWOOD 3673 For Reservations
Admission—Ladies $1.00 — Men $1.15
Tax Included
SAVOY
OUTDOOR ARENA
SOUTH PARKWAY AT 47th STREET
..MEN! WOMEN! CHILDREN!..
STRAIGHTEN
YOUR HAIR
This NEW, EASY WAY with
PERMA-STRATE
★ Just ONE Application '
Lasts 3 to 6 Months ★
Will Not Burn! Makes Hair Look Longer!
PERMA-STRATE straightens your hair in an entirely
new, astounding way. fust ONE application makes
your hair straight — and then your hair will stay
straight for from 3 to 6 months. PERMA-STRATE
works equally well for men, women, and children.
It is fully guaranteed to please you and is sold on
a money back guarantee — backed by a $1,000 U. S.
Government Bond. Get a package today at your drug
store —— you’ll be delighted with PERMA-STRATE.
Buy PERMA-STRATI Today
at YOUR DRUGGIST
MONEY BACK GUARANTEE
BACKED BY $1,000 BOND
B AFTER I
BEFORE AFTER
If Your Druggist Does Not
Have PERMA-STRATE, Write:
PERMA-STRATE
MSTMBUTOR
159 E. CHICACO AVENUE
CHICAGO 11, ILL

xml | txt