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The Garden Island. (Lihue, Kauai, H.T.) 1902-current, January 02, 1917, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015411/1917-01-02/ed-1/seq-4/

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THE GARDEN ISLAND. TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 1317.
The Story of Piilani
(Continued from last week.)
The next day they moved up the
valley nnd found a plaee where it
was good to stay as then; was plenty
of water nnd lots of wild bananas.
On that day tliey heard for the first
time 1 1 io cannon roar and they saw
shells strike their old hiding plaee.
They found lots of shrimps and
oopu in the river ami also some
wild taro. During all this time
Piilani stood guard half of the time.
AWmt a week later the shooting
stopped. They stayed in this plaee
about one month and then moved
further makai, where there was
gome knlo patches, lots of fruit nnd
more fish and opne in the river and
they stayed around there for nearly
two years nnd often saw their
friends, but their friends did mt
see them.
Always hiding in daytime and
foraging in the night, nobody knew
what had Income of them, some
thought they had been killed or
were dead from hunger, thirst and
exposure.
One day as Piilani was pulling some
tnro she heard some noise ns frin
a man coming. Hie crawled up on
n high plaee and saw Willie Kinney
coming together with Kelau and
Geo. Titeomb. She ran back to
where Koolau was hidden and told
him Koolau and family went into
hiding further back in the valley,
but when they saw who it was they
came out and shook hands with
them ami had a long talk with
them, and when they left Kinney
toll Koolau that he might shoot
any bipi that lie needed, however,
Koolau never killed any of Kinney's
cattle.
A few lays after Kinney's visit
Kelau and his wife brought some
more clothes for them.
They lived in the woods for three
years and five months and moved
.1 . 1 .1.1. .A
every tnree-iour nays, ami mai is
the lvason for their not being found
by the people looking for them and
bringing them food.
Their chilil began to show bad
signs of the dreaded disease and was
complaining a great deal about
pains in the stomach for quite a
while before he died. He died in
rinani s arms, ror a grave liu-j
cleared out a cave in Uic mountain
side and m front of same was a
large lehua tree and a lot of ferns
and wild ginger atAl they closed up
the opening with stones and dirt,
evidently in the usual Hawaiian
manner. '
For more than a year after that
they kept travelling, and then Koo
lau began to show stronger signs of
leprosy and was getting weaker am
for the last seven months of his lifi
he was sinking steadily.
One day Koolau toll his wifi
that when he died, which lie said
he expected to be very soon," that slit
should go back to her people anil
he also told her to bury him with
Ins rule. A couple of ilays after
that Koolau began toget delirious.
And a few days after that Koolau
died.
When Koolau died Piilani started
to dig a grave for him, but she
could not finish it in one day so
she went back and slept by her
dead husband's side that night and
all the following day she worked
digging the grave and in the
evening she considered the grave
deep enough. She covered the grave
inside with fern leaves and put
Koolau into it and laid his friend,
the gun, on his chest, filled the
grave half full with dirt and then a
large Hat stone and then filled tin
grave to the level of tin: ground.
That night she went makai to be
near her people, but it took her a
whole month before she could make
up her mind to carry out Koolau's
advice about going back to her own
people. One morning she started up
the pali trail again over the Kiloliana
and came to Ilalemanu, when dark
ness set in. She kept on and in the
early morning she saw again the
houses at Kekaha, lit! childhood
home and her happy home for years
after marriage. She sat down and
cried and was very dubious as to
the wisdom of her going back. She
TOR SALE
" piissenger Kurd. A- 1 condi-
I ion.
W. V.
Phone 1 l.'.-W
got up suddenly, however, and
walked down the hill and was soon
with her family there.
She was, however, scared of lcing
put in prison for assisting in Koo
lau's doings, and after she had been
at Kekaha for quite a while, she
was one day visited byfl. 11. Coney,
sheriff of Kauai, and E. Omsted,
deputy sheriff for Wnimea district.
They came to her house with Kau-
meheiwa. She told them her story
nnd answered truthfully nil their
questions nnd they assured her that
there would be no prostitution, and
from that time she counted that her
troubles were over.
It has been said that Koolau's
burial place was found and Koolau's
gun taken away but that is not true.
Piilani visited the plaee secretly
ninny times and at no time did the
graveshow any sign of having been
disturbed.
Piilani stayed with her people at
Kekaha for a year or two, then she
went back to Kalalau nnd lived
there a few years, but later she
moved back to her father's house at
Waimea, where she died as stated
before.
f was well acquainted with her
and wanted to get from her the
story of Koolau niul' his doings and
scribbled dov n items as early as
HOI and 11)02. In U.- or 11)0(5,
came to Waimea John K. Sheldon,
n well-known Hawaiian newspaper
man, and he wrote a book of ninety
pages about Koolau and Piilani.
The book is written in flowing Ha
waiian and difficult to read and
translate, ns he uses the greatest
possible amount of crooked words
t o record the simplest historical
point. I have read it through.
Piilani was of a very quiet and
reticent nature and to get her to
talk about her husband, his doings
and their wanderings in the wilds
of Kalalau was often difficult. She
never spoke of Koolau in an exult
ing manner but acted always as if
she had a secret fear of being called
to answer for her actions in staying
1 iv her husband and assisting him
in his outlaw life'.
She may have been wrong in as
sisting him according to the ethics
of some people; she may.tiave been
guilty according to the construction
'that some legal lights put on tin
law, but, in two respects sue can
stand as an example for any woman
in the world in her devotion to her
husband through all his troubles,
and she deserves unlimited praise
for her courage in standing guard
at day or night and for travelling
up and down the old Kalalau trail
from Waimea, which I consider :
Psevere test for the stoutest heart
She did it twice and once all alone
II. Ml I IV,
Waimea .
2i.
NOTICE
LOST Passbook No. Find
er pi east' return to Garden Inland
Pub. Co or The P.ank of Hawaii.
WAIMEA HOTEL
Waimra, Kauai
jt j Jt
Breakfast
Lunch
Dinner
Room
F .50
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1 .00
1.00
. Jt
FRANK COX, Manager
it
A
Glovey" Shoe
that will wear you can
gut it by mail if you or
der of us.
Women's White Oxfords
and Sport Shoes in ean-
vas and buckskin.
White Lace Hoots i n
Buck and Reignkip.
Special attention given
your mail order,
j j jt
REGAL SHOE STORE
Honolulu
HOTEL I.II1UE
(The Fairview)
Twenty t,vo elegant rooms
In Main Building
Thrat Airy Cottages
Cuisine unexcelled in country
districts
W. H. Rice, Jr.,
Proprietor
!
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I
it
CALIFORNIA FEED CO
LIMITED.
Dealers in
Hay, Grain and Chicken
SrrrLiKS.
Sole Agents for
IiiteriiHtinlinl Stock, Poultry Food
mid other xpcciiiltie. Arabic, for
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King's SrKCiAi. Chick Food
P. O. Box 452, Honolulu
," . .I'd .,. i.t,.i .. 1
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Kcv-cst.rno'ffst Hotel in Hawaii
fort Street Honolulu
JAS. . MORGAN
Working For Stainback
(Special currcspniiileiice of Tin; (i.utHKN
Island. )
Washington, D. C, Dee. 14 II
W. Breckons, of Honolulu, who i.-
in Washington representing several
Honolulu clients before the depart
liients, is aiding the Delegate in hi
elTorts to secutc the appointment of
Ingram M. Stainback to sueeeei
Judge Edward M. Watson, resigned
The 'appointment of Stainback
urged by practically the entire
of Honolulu, regardless of party af
filiations.
Snow White
Faultlessly
finished linen is produced
for good peonle all over
the Territory by the
FRENCH LAUNDRY
Careful, conscientious
clothes-cleaning is given
every article of wearing
apparel submitted to us.
Send your clothes direct.
tl 1
J. ABADIE
Proprietor.
Honolulu
Co. Ltd.
Stocks, Bonds,
Real Estate and Insurance
NO. 125 -131 MERCHANT vST
P.O.Box No 594 Honolulu
IF
IN DOUBT
BUY
Frying
CRISCO
For Frying--For Shortening
For Cake Making
There Is no stnok nor odor. Fried foods are free from
the taste of grease. They now are tasty and crisp.
They are marie more digestible, for Crisco is all vege
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Shortening
Crisco gives pastry a new flakiness and digestibility.
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It's uniform quality makes for uniform results.
CaJc Maying
Crisco gives richness at smaller cost, It brings cake
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j Waimea Stables)
LIMITED "
Up-to-date Livery, Draying and Boarding Stable and Auto
Livery Business.
AUTOMOBILE STAGE-LINE
BETWEEN LIHUE and KEKAHA
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Leaving Kekaha every Tuesday. Thursday and Saturday. . , I
ARRIVING AT THEIR DESTINATION IN THREE HOURS I
F. WEBER Manager. , . J
Telephone 43 W Waimea P. O. Box 71
ALBERGER PUMPS
I
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Condensers,.
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"The House of Houseware"
r:;-;ti tUNC STKKKT, HONOLULU.
Pamphlet of Poems
Heibet M. Ay res has isued a very
neat edition of his poems under the
title of the "Trade Wind Lyrics,"
the work "being done, by the Hawaii
an (iazetle Company.
5 ""jW.
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TERRITORY OF HAWAII ffj M
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Catton, Neill, & Co., Ltd,
ENGINEERS
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Ltd.
HONOLULU
DIED
.Martin In ls .ngeies, t;ilitor-
nia, November L'L l'.Hi. Mrs. T.
(). Martin, formerly .M iss' F.vange-j
line Silva of Honolulu, a native of
Honolulu, twenty-two yenis old;'
sir-ter of Mis. M. V. K : naiel. s o'
Makawcli, Kauai.
Henry Waterhouse Trust Co.; Ltd.
buys and sI!s
REAL ESTATE und
STOCKS and BONUS
rind rents SAFE DEr)Tf BOXES
Fort and Merchant Sts.
Honolulu
Griiif ulktf
ii i mill ot
sciiititie Soil-Uiig.
Does lot
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soae -
Tmm0r , ; ' 1 1
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Each cake
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For Sale at
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