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The Garden Island. [volume] (Lihue, Kauai, H.T.) 1902-current, May 23, 1922, Image 9

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THE GARDEN ISLAND, TUESDAY, MAY 23. 1022
9
J
MOD
and
PHOTO
SUPPLIES
Send for Catalogue
8pee!al Attention to Mall Orders
Honolulu Photo Supply Co.
"EVERYTHING PHOTOGRAPHIC"
1059 Fort Street, Honolulu
P. O. Box 2999
WAIMEA
HOTEL
Headquarter for
TRAVELING MEN and
T0URIST8
Rate per Week: $17.50, $25,
$30, and $35
Rates per Month: $65, $75,
$85 and $120
Telephone 132-W
Hotel Leonad
(Formerly Majestic)
HONOLULU
Thoroughly lenooated
Rates Reasonable
Hot and Cold Showers
and Tubs
Fort and Beretanla Streets
H. L. SHAW, Mgr.
Honolulu Paper Co.
Limited
Wholesale Paper Dealers
and Stationers.
821-823 Alakea Street
HONOLULU, HAWAII.
Alexander
&
Baldwin
Limited
8ugar Factors
Commission Merchants
Insurance Agents
AGENTS FOR
Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar
Company.
Haiku Sugar Company.
Pala Plantation.
Maul Agricultural Company.
Hawaiian Sugar Company.
Kahuku Plantation Company.
McBryde Sugar Company.
Honolua Ranch.
Kauai Railroad Company.
Kabulut Railroad Company.
Kauai Fruit & Land Company.
ak A
CALIFORNIA FEED CO.
LIMITED i
Dealers la
Hay, Grain and Chicken Supplies
SOLE AQENT8 FOR
International Stock, Poultry Fod
and other specialties. Arable for
cooling Iron Roofs. Petaluma In
cubators and Brooders.
King's Special Chick Feed
P. O. Box 451 Honolulu
HOTEL LIHUE
(The Fainriew)
Twenty-two Elegant Rooms
in Main Building
Tbreo Airy Cottages
Cuisine Unexcelled in Coun
try Districts
W. H. Rice, Jr.,
Proprietor
Of Course, Unintentional
Joe Sweets to the sweet?
Sephlne Oh, thank you; may
pass you the nuts? Goblin.
J
The University
PINEAPPLE PRICES UP
Good news to the independent pine
apple grower IS the announcement ot
higher prices to be paid this year by
the cai:nerles, an increase of nearly
20 per cent over prices of last year.
Next Step forward should be better
grading and sizing of pines by a me
chanical process at the cannery. This
would do much to insure a square
deal both to the grower and to the
cafrinery buying the fruit. We will
have more to say on this subject lat
er. THE SWEET POTATO AND
GARDEN WEEDS
With the approach of summer and
school vacations close at hand, when
school and home gardens are usually
abandoned to weeds, we ought to give
special consideration to the humble
but useful sweet potato. Teachers
and pupils, householders and farmers
who have not yet tried planting the
sweet potato as a fill-In crop would
do well to set all available land,
which would otherwise be Ideal, to
one of the rank growing varieties. We
know ot none better than the New
Era. The vines cover the ground
quickly, smother the weeds, mellow
the soil and produce a crop at little
cost, and with little attention. The
essential part Is to give the plunts
a good start by providing a fair and
clean seed bed. After this they will
take care of themselves if nevescsary.
Make your: plans now to grow sweet
potatoes in pluce of weeds during
the long dry summer months which
will soon be upon us. Select well ma
tured cuttings rather than soft suc
culent ones; unless your soil is' es
pecially mellow and fairly moist.
This 1b essential to getting a good
full stand, without which weeds are
Bure to crowd in and replace the oth
erwise universally adaptable sweet
potato.
INSECTS IN STORED FOODS
We do not know Just how much
money Is lost every year in Hawaii
from destruction of stored foods by
irsetcts, but we know the loss is en
ormous. Rice, corn, barley, flour,
beans, peas, dried fruits, dried fish,
and meats and many other kinds of
food In storage are attacked and de
voured by various kinds of insects.
The loss in the United States from
these enemies is said to be over 100
million dollars every year.
In addition to eating and destroy
ing thousands of dollars worth of food
in Hawaii, these insects' also con
taminating with their poisons the food
they do not eat. Experiments carried
on in Ohio prove that these contam
inated foods cause serious sickness.
One scientist states as his belief that
eating rice contaminated by weevils
causes beri-berl.
Protect the stored food crops which
you raise, for losses in storage from
insects may remove all your profit.
Protect also the food stuffs you buy
and keep in temporary storage, for
these may be attacked by the same
Insects and you suffer loss there, too.
How to Protect
Many experiments have shown that
beat is one of the best and cheapest
protections against these destructive
insects. A temperature of 125 or 130
degrees Fhr. Is fatal to them If main
for an hour or more, but this does
not hurt the stored foods and does not
kill the germinating power of corn
and beans. Of course, one has to be
very careful to not let the temper
ature run too high or Injury will re
sult. Another good method Is fumigation
with carbon-bisulphide, placing the
stuff to be treated in an air tight room
or chest, and putting in carbon-bisulphide
at the rate of one ounce to
25 cubic feet ot space. Carbon-bisulphide
is exposive and Inflammable
and also has a very disagreeable od
or. For small amounts of stored foods
to be treated, we believe that mild
heat in an oven is the best. It will
pay every farmer and householder to
give thought to this matter. If more
detailed information is wanted we will
be glad to furnish It. For the use of
heat on a large Bcale against de
structive insects we suggest that Bul
letin 354 of the Ohio Experiment sta
tion, Wooster, Ohio,' published Janu
ary H-22, be sent for. This gives de
tained information on building a heat
plant and its requirements.
SOME GOOD BULLETINS FOR YOU
Thru the kindness ot the late prince
the board of agriculture and forestry
has for free distribution a supply of
several good bulletins published by
the U. S. Department ot Agriculture.
These are Farmers' Bulletins and
give valuable Information on many
subjects of interest in Hawaii, it
you want copies of any of these send
you request to C. S. Judd, Board of
Agriculture and Forestry, Honolulu.
No. Title
411 Feeding Hogs in the South.
494 Lawn Soils and Lawns.
533 Good Seed Potatoes and How
To Produce Them.
002 Production ot Clean Milk.
690 The Field Pea as a Forage Crop.
893 Breeds of Dairy Cattle.
920 Milch Goats.
Extension Letter
934 Home Gardening In the South,
973 The Soy Bean; Its Culture and
Use.
743 The Feeding of Dairy Cows.
765 Breeds of Swine.
781 Tuberculosis of Hogs.
824 Home Gardening In the South.
853 Home Canning Fruits and Veg
etables. 876 Making Butter on the Farm.
874 Swine Management.
884 Saving Vegetable Seeds for the
Home and Market Garden.
984 Farm and Home Drying of Fruits
and Vegetables.
1147 Milo: A Valuable Grain Crop.
1001 Growing Fruit for Home Use.
1068 Judging Beef Cattle.
1073 Growing Beef 6n the Farm.
1117 Forestry and Farm Income.
1015 Producing Family and Farm
Supplies on the Cotton Farm.
1126 Sudan Grass.
1148 Cowpeas; Culture and Varie
ties. COMMERCIAL BANANA
VARIETIES FOR HAWAII
The successful establishment of a
crop as a new industry Is frequently
more dependent upon the selection
and development of a suitable vari
ety or varieties than upon any other
factor. The ideal variety of any crop
is one that most nearly meets (1).
the commercial requirements of the
markets where it is sold, and (2) the
cultural conditions under, which it Is
grown, such as climate, soils, ship
ping distance, etc.
Higglns, (in Bulletin 7, Hawaii Ex
periment station, 1904) enumerates at
least ten introduced varieties of ba
nanas and double that number of na
tive sorts growing in Hawaii. Most
of these, while they succeed well un
der favorable conditions' and are us
ed more or less extensively here, have
not thus far Lee:i considered consid
ered as commercial varieties, except
ign the Chinese or, Canary Island va
riety (Musa Cavendishil). This is a
dwarf type of very fine q'isili'y sue
ceeding wherever bananas grow in
Hawaii. It is said to have been Intro
duced from Tahiti about 1855. Its
habit of low growth is much in its
favor, especially when grown in win
dy places. It bears large bunches un
der favorable conditions of soil mois
ture and exposure, its flavor and tex
ture is considered superior to that
of most other varieties to be eaten
out of the hand. Its only drawback is
that it requires very careful handling
in shipping, but with reasonable care
it stands shipment well. It is higl
ly esteemed in San Francisco and
other Pacific coast markets, even
though the retail dealers find fault
with its keeping qualities. This vari
ety would appear to be safe one to
plant extensively by all who contem
plate growing bananas commercially
in Hawaii.
The Jamaican or, BJuefield banana
also known as Martinique (M. saplen
tum) was introduced into Hawaii In
1903 by Phillip Peck of Hilo, and al
so by the territorial board of agricul
ture and forestry In the same year.
This is the chief commercial variety
of the world and the principal one of
the American trade. It Is the princi
pal variety grown in Central Ameri
ca and Jamaica and forms the great
bulk of the United Fruit company's
trade. The chief merit of the Blue
field banana is its remarkable ship
ping quality and the fine appearance
of its well developed bunches. How
ever, its flavor Is' only fair and its
texture is coarse compared with the
dwarf Chinese variety, which, is so
firmly and favorably established in
Hawaii. The plants of the Bluefield
are very large and tall, which is a
cultural disadvntage in windward lo
cations, as the plunts are likely to
go down in a strong wind. In well
sheltered rich lands it grows to a
Ligh state of perfection in Hawaii,
and we have seen bunches weighing
up to 100 pounds grown locally. It
would probably not be wise to grow
this variety extensively excepting in
well favored localities.
The Red Spanish or Jamaican Red,
also called Cuban Red. is a handsome
fruit and a few bananas are occasion
ally shipped to the Sun Francisco
market from Honolulu at a good
price.
In discussing banana varieties, we
would lay particular stress upon the
possibilities of developing superior
strains of the local Chinese variety
and possibly other types, thru bud se
lection, such ad 'is being done with
sugar tune and pineapples ink Hawaii
and with citrus and other crops else
where. Untold possibilities are In
store for the breeder, of a superior
strain of bananas.
HONOLULU MARKET PRICES
Beef and pork prices are about as
last week.
Eggs are firm at 65 cents a doz.
with the supply becoming gradually
more scarce and a tendency toward
higher prices, though the present quo
tation Is expected to hold for several
weeks.
Bununus vary in price a good deal
according to quality, averaging from
3 to 4 cents per lb., with 5 cents of
fered by some for extra quality
bunches.
Cabbage is up a little just now,
around 2 cents per lb., but It is not
steady.
Papayas are firm at 2 and 2 1-2
cents per lb.
Sweet potatoes bring from 2 to 2 1-2
cents per lb.
White potatoes (California) cost
about 2 cents per lb laid down in
Honolulu, but Island grown white po-1
tutoes bring a little higher than that. J
Watermelons are abundant now, '
dealers paying 3 to 3 1-2 cents per '
pound.
Everybody's Doing It
Lots of folks that laugh, because It
takes 5,000,000 rubles to buy a pair
ot shoes in Russia are saving cigar
coupons over here to get a grand
piano. Life.
Local Color
Poet I am out here to get local
color for a pastoral poem.
Farmer I reckon you're gettln' It,
mister. I painted that settee only
this morning.' Boston Transcript.
TENDER FOR MACADAMIZING
OLOHENA ROAD
The Board of Supervisors ot the
County of Kauai will receive bids
up to 10 o'clock of June 7th, 1922,
for furnishing all material, tools and
equipment necessary for the grad
ing and macadamizing of approxi
mately 3 miles of the Olohena road,
District of Kawalhau.
Plans and specifications may be
obtained from the undersigned.
Each bid to be accomponied by a
certified check for 5 per cent of
amount bid.
The Board of Supervisors reserves
the right to reject any or all bids.
R. F. MIDDLETON,
County Engineer.
(Muy9-16-23-30)
TENDER FOR PIPE
The Board of Supervisors of the
County of Kauai, will receive bids up
to 10 o'clock of May 25, 1922, for
furnishing the following separate
bids to be submitted on each list:
100 feet 4 inch redwood pipe,
100 feet 4 Inch wood pipe, 100
feet head;
3,000 feet 3 Inch wood pipe, 100
feet head;
700 feet 2 inch wood pipe, 100
feet head;
F. O. B. Pot Allen, Kauai; and on
2200 feet 2 inch galvanized water
pipe, F. O. B. Lihue Grammar School
grounds.
Prospective bidders may obtain
blank proposals from the undersign
ed. The Board of Supervisors reserves
the right to reject any or, all bids.
R. F. MIDDLETON,
County Engineer.
(May6-16-23)
TENDER FOR FIXTURES
The Board of Supervisors of the
County of Kauai will receive bids
up to 10 o'clock ot May 25, 1922,
for furnishing the following:
48 water closet combinations com
plete, with seat-action flush valve
device, F. O. B. Port Allen, Kauai.
For. information and blank pro
posal apply to the undersigned.
The Board of Supervisors reserv
es the right to reject any or all
bids.
R. F. MIDDLETON,
County Engineer.
(MayG 16-23)
TENDER FOR CONSTRUCTION OF
LIHUE SCHOOL UNITS
The Board of Supervisors ot the
County of Kauai will receive bids
up to 10 o'clock of June 7th, 1922,
for furnishing all labor and tools
necessary for the construction and
full completion of:
(1) 6 Units, ot 3 classrooms each,
(2) 8 Units, of 3 classrooms each,
on the Llhue Grammar School new
grounds.
Each of the above to constitute
a separate bid and the Board of
Supervisors reserves the right to
reject any or all bids.
Each bid to be accompanied by a
certified check of 5 per cent of
amount bid.
Plans and specifications may be
obtained by prospective bidders up
on application to the undersigned.
R. F. MIDDLETON.
County Engineer.
(April 25-May2-9-16-23-30.)
TENDER FOR MATERIAL
LIHUE SCHOOL UNITS
The Board of Supervisors of the
County of Kauai, will receive bids
up to 10 o'clock of May 25th, 1922,
fur furnishing all material needed
in the construction of:
(1) 6 Units of 3 classrooms each.
(2) 8 Units of 3 classrooms each,
on the Lihue Grammar School new
grounds.
Each of the above to constitute a
separate bid and the Board of Su
pervisors reserves the right to re
ject any or all bids.
A full list of material in bid form
may be obtained upon application
to the undersigned.
R. F. MIDDLETON,
County Engineer.
(April 25May2 9-1623)
CIRCUIT COURT, FIFTH CIRCUI
TERRITORY OF HAWAII
Estate of William Werner, Late if
Hanalui, Kauai, Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
All creditors of said deceased aie
hereby notified to present their
claims with proper vouchers or duly
authenticated copies thereof, even .f j
the claim Is secured by mortgage :
upon real estate, to the undersign-1
ed, the duly appointed, and qnp.U-'
fled. Administrator of the es:atj f
said deceased, at his office i.t V-1
inlha, Hanalet, Kauai, within' si : j
months from the date of the first ,
publication of this notice, to-wit:
May 2nd, 1922, in the Garden lslan '..
newspaper, or they will be forep
barred. And all persons indebted to
said estite are hereby dennndo I
to make Immediate payment to said '
Administrator at the abovo at!-
dress.
Walniha, Hanalel, Kauai, May 2n'.,
1922.
A. MENEFOGLIO.
Administrator of the Estate
of William Werner, Ueceap
ed.
J. Mahlai Kaneakua,
Attorney for Estate.
May2-9-16-23-30,1922)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
TERRITORY OF HAWAII
At Chambers. In Probate
In the Matter of the Application
of GEORGE KAHEANA KAIAWE I
and KEAIU MAKANANI KAIAWE
his wife, for leave to adopt
MALU FRANCIS WALKER and
ICANEHEKILA WALKER, Mi
nor Children.
SUMMONS
THE TERRITORY OF HAWAII,
To J. E. WALKER, father of the
above-named minors, Greeting:
You are hereby summoned, to ap
pear on Friday, the 23rd day of Juue,
1922, at 9:30 o'clock A. M., at the
courtroom of the above entitled
court, in the County Building, in
Lihue, County of Kauai, Territory
of Hawaii, to answer or respond to
an application and petition herein
filed by GEORGE KAHEANA KAIA
WE and KEAHI MAKANANI KAIA
WE, his wife, for leave to adopt
MALU FRANCIS WALKER, and
KANEHEKILA WALKER, your min
or children;
And you are hereby notified, that,
you may then and there, at the time
and place aforesaid, show cause, if
any you have, why the power of said
petition should not be granted and
an order be made by said Court de
claring that, from that date, to all
legal intents and purposes, such
children are the children of said
petitioners and that their names be
thereby changed to MALU FRANCIS
KAIAWE, and KANEHEKILA KA
IAWE, respectively.
WITNESS the Honorable William
C. AchI, Jr., Judge of the Circuit
Court of the Fifth Judicial Circuit,
at Llhue, Territory of Hawaii, this
10th day of April, 1922.
(Sgd.) J. C. CULLEN,
(Seal) Clerk.
(April U-18-25-Muy 2-9-16-23-1T22)
NOTICE OF SALE OF GOVERN
MENT GENERAL LEASE
Notice is hereby given that at 1
o'clock P, M., Friday, June 16, 1922,
at the office of the Sub-Land Agent,
Mr. J. M. Lydgate, Lihue, Kauai, T.
II., there will be sold at public auc
tion to the highest bidder, under the
provisions of Section 73 of the Ha
waiian Organic Act and Section 380
of the Revised Laws of Hawaii of
1915, a General Lease of the follow
ing Government land:
Lot No. 232-B, Kapaa Home
steads, 4th Series, Puna, Kauai,
containing an area of 3.84 acres,
more or less; term ot lease, 10
years from June 16, 1922; upset
rental, $60.00 per annum, payable
semi-annually In advance.
The purchaser shall immediately
after the sale, pay the first six
months' rental, together with the costs
of advertising and all other charges
In connection with the preparation
ot the said lease.
The sale of the above General
Lease is subject to all the terms and
conditions of Government General
Lease Issued by the office ot the
Commissioner of Public Lands.
Map ot land to be leased and form
of Government General Leuse are on .
file and may be seen at the office
of the Sub-Land Agent, County Build
ing, Lihue, Kauai, T. II., or at the
office of the Commissioner of Public
Lands, Capitol Building, Honolulu, T.
H.
For general information apply at
the office of the Sub-Land Agent, Mr.
J. M. Lydgute, County Building, Li
hue, Kauai, T. II., or at the office
of the Commissioner of Public Lands,
Capitol Building, Honolulu, T. II.
C. T. BAILEY,
Commissioner of Public Lands.
Laud Office,
Honolulu, T. II.
May 15. 1922.
NOTICE OF SALE OF GOVERN-
MENT GENERAL LEASES
Public Notice is hereby given that
at 1 o'clock P. M., Monday, June 5,
1922, at the front door of the Hana
pepe Postofflce, Hanapppe, Kauai.
T. H., there will be sold at public
auction to the highest bidders un
der the provisions of Section 73 of
the Hawaiian Organic Act and Sec
tion 380 of the Revised Laws of Ha
v.aii of lfl5, General Leases of the
fi Mowing parcels of Government
(11 Lot No. 33, Hauapepc Rice and
K'lla Lots, Hanape, Waimea,
Kauai, containing an urea of 3.40
Ui.l'M. more or less; term of leas ,
10 ;i-:ii'i, from June E, 1922, up.'et
rental, $Go pur annum, payable
semi-annually in advance;
(2) Lot No. 74B, Hanapppe Town
Lots, Hanapepe, Waimea, Kauai,
containing an area of 4,340 square
f. t, more or less; term of lease,
10 years from June 5, 1922; upse?
rental. $25 per annum, payable
semi-annually in advance;
(3) Portion of the Government Land
in Nuulolo Valley, below the For
est Rese'-ve, Nuulolo, Waimea, Ka
uai, containing un area of 80 acres,
more or lefts; term of lease, 10
years from June 5, 1922; upset
rental, $50.00 per annum, payable
semi-annually in advance.
The purihaser:. shall Immediately
Hi'ter the Rale pay tho first six
months rental, together with costs,
of advertising and all other charges
in connection with the preparation
of said leases.
Tho Bale of the above General
Lilises is subject to all the terms
and conditions of Government Gen
oral Lease issued by the office of
the Commissioner of Public Lands.
Maps of the lands to be leased
and form of Government General
Leas'., are on file and they may be
seen at the office of the Sub-Land
Agent, Lihue, Kauai, T. H., or at
the office of the Commissioner of
Public Lands, Capitol Building, Ho
nolulu, T. H.
For general information, apply at
the office of the Sub-Land Agent,
Mr. J. M. Lydgate, County Building.
Lihue, Kauai, T. II., or at the office
of the Commissioner of Public Lands,
Capitol Building, Honolulu, T. H.
C. T. BAILEY,
Commissioner of Public Lands.
Land Office, Honolulu,
May 1, 1922.
(May9-16-23-30.)
NOTICE OF SALE OF
GOVERNMENT LOT
Public Notice is hereby given that
at 1 o'clock P. M., Monday, June
5. 1922, at the front door of the
Hanapepe Post Office, Hanapepe,
Kauui, T. II., there will be sold at
Public Auction to the highest bid
der under the provisions of Section
73 of the Hawaiian Organic Act and
Act 143. Session Laws of 1917, the
following Government Lot:
Lot No. 55, Hanapepe Town Lots.
Hanapepe, Waimea, Kauai, contain
ing an area of 9,750 square feet,
more or less; upset price $4,000.00.
The conditions of sale of the a
bove lot are:
(a) Only citizens of the United
States or persons who have declar
ed their Intention to become citi
zens of the United States may be
ccme the purchaser;
(b) Terms, cash at the drop of the
hammer;
(c) The purchaser bhall pay tho
costs of advertising immediately af
ter the sale,.
Map of this lot is on file and may
be seen at the office of the Sub
Land Agent at Lihue, Kauai, T. H.,
or at the office of the Commission
er of Public Lands, Capitol Building,
Honolulu, T. II.
For general information, apply at
the office of the Sub-Land Agtut,
Mr. J. M. Lydgate, County Building,
Lihue. Kauai, T. H, or at the office
of the Commissioner of Public
Lands, Capitol Building, Honolulu.
T. H.
C. T. BAILEY,
Commissioner of Public Lands.
Land Office, Honolulu,
May 1, 1922.
(May9-16-23-30)
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The undersigned has been appoint
ed as administrator of the estate of
Renichl Nagatu, deceased, late uf
Pakala. In the District of Waimea,
CoiMity of Kauui, all persons are
hereby notified, having any claim
against said estate to file them with
in six mouths after the first publi
cation of this notice, to-wit: the 2nd
day of May, 1922, at his offico
in Waimea, Kuuui, or the same will
be forever burred; and all those in
debted to said estate to make pay
ment without fail.
WILLIAM O. CROWELL,
Administrator,
Estate of Renichl NagaU,
deceased.
Lihue, May 2, 1922.
(May2 9 16 23)

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