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The Hawaiian star. (Honolulu [Oahu]) 1893-1912, May 04, 1893, Image 2

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(PHfi HAWAIIAN STAR, ;HUttSDA1f, MAY 4, 1808.eiX PAGES.
The Hawaiian Star.
PUBt IS11ED EVBRY AFTERNOON
EXCEPT SUNDAY,
DY TUB HAWAIIAN STAR NEWSPAPER
COMPANY, Ltd.
I)R. J. S. McliRRW,
Waitw i. Smith,
V. 1'. Tll.DEN,
- Editor-in-Chief.
Managing Editor.
iJunineM Manager.
SUBSCRIPTION KATES :
Vet Yrat In Advance,
Per Month in Advance,
$0,oo
.50
ADVERTISING RATES:
Hale? for transient anil regular advertising
mav be obtained at the publication otnee,
licll Telephone Number 237, Mutual 365.
THURSDAY,
MAY 4, 1893.
IT WAS HIS MISSION.
BLOUNT'S WITHDRAWAL
THE PROTECTORATE.
OF
Cleveland and the Cabinet Discuss the
Action in an Animated
Way.
Washington, April 14. The start
ling from news Honolulu via San Fran
cisco of the hauling down of the United
States flag, it is said, was the subject of
animated discussion at the cabinet
meeting to-day. Before going into the
Cabinet room, Secretary Grcsheni said
to a reporter that he had received no
information whatever aside from that
printed in the papers. When question
ed further as to the truth of the state
irtents contained in the special dis
patches to the Western newspapers, that
Blount was conniving at the restoration
of Queen Lihuokalani and would sup
port her return to the throne, if need
be, by the forces of the United States
steamer Boston, he knew nothing about
it and declined to express any opinion
upon the subject
In regard to the hauling down o
the United States Hag, attention
ca led to these passages in tne 111
structions issued under the previou
administration by Secretary Foster to
Minister Stevens, under date ol t'eb
ruary 11, 1893: "The phraseology of
your proclamation in announcing you
action in the assumption of the pro
tection of the Hawaiian islands in the
name of the" United States would ap
near to be- tantamount to the as
sumption of a protectorate over those
islands, in bchalt ot the united btntes.
with all the rights and obligations
which the term implies.
"To this extent it goes beyond th
necessities of the situation and the
instructions heretofore given you. So
far as your action amounts to accord
inc. at the request of the de farto
sovereign Government of the Ha
waiian islands, the co-operation of the
moral and material forces of the United
States for the protection of life and
property from apprehended disorders,
your action is commended; but so far
. as it may appear to overstep that limit
by setting the authority and power of
the United States above that of the
government of the Hawaiian Islands
in the capacity of protector, or to im
pair in any way the independent
sovereignty of the Hawaiian Govern
ment, by substituting the fljg and
power of the United States as a symbol
and manifestation of paramount author
ity, it is disavowed."
There was diplomatic reticence
around the White House concerning
the nature of the instructions given
Commissioner Blount in his mission to
Hawaii, but it is stated with some posi
tiveness that he was given authority
for hauling down the Stars and Stripes
at Honolulu prior to his departure
from Washington. It is understood
that Elount was given definite instruc
tions to withdraw the protectorate of
' the United States over Hawaii in order
that this Government might find itself
freer in dealing with the main question
of annexation; but on the day of his
departure for San Francisco he was
cautioned to confide this information to
"no person whatsoever, in order that
the motives and intentions of the ad
ministration might not be construed so
as to cause trouble among the Ha
waiians. On the afternoon of his departure
from Washington for San Francisco
Blount spent some time at the White
House. The Cabinet was iii session
and Blount was called in, and discuss
ed with the President and his official
family the manner of his course to be
pursued in Hawaii. He left fur San
Francisco that night, but the nature of
his mission leaked out before he was a
thousand miles from Washington, and
the news as telegraphed to San Fran
cisco, where Bush, Queen Liliuokalani's
agent, learned it and started immedi
ately for Honolulu. So that when
Blount arrived at his destination the
knowledge of his business had preceded
him.
It was not the intention to keep
secret what that business was, with the
exception of the fact that the Commis
sioner had authority to declare the pro
tectorate at an end. The exception
was guarded carefully by Blount for the
"reason uiven, it is saul, by the l resident,
that if the fact that the American flag
would be hauled down became known
- it might cieate trouble and bloodslud,
and also offer temptation to foreign
nations to step in tind secure the prize
' before the Uuitcd States could offer an
adequate explanation for its course.
Blount followed his instruct! ms to
the letter. He waited until the excite
ment incident to his arrival had com
pletely died out and affairs were in a
tranquil state before making known
that the protectorate was at an end.
He also made it known at a safe time
that the United States would still con
, sider Hawaii and the Hawaiians under
its guardianship as far as outside inter
ference was concerned, and in this also nolulu. It was his business to select
showed the caution which Cleveland j the best time and means of abandon
and Gitftham had impressed 011 him, 'ing the protectorate and throwing the
to deprive the announcement of any
tinge of sensationalism. lliesc arc
said to be the facts in the matter with
reference to the instructions of Blount.
Congressman Springer was a White
House caller this morning, and before
he left the mansion he said that Mr.
Blount's action in hauling down the
American Hag at Honolulu was in ac
cordance with instructions and was un
doubtedly the proper thing to do under
the circumstances. He said that if
this Government desires to treat with
Hawaii on the plane of equality the
first step would be to lemovc the pro
tectorate. President Harrison's ad
ministration had disavowed the protect
orate and the piesent administration
simply carries the disavowal into effect.
Congressman Stevens of Massachu
setts was one cf the callers at the White
House this morning, and he was asked
what he thought of Mr. Blount's action
in hauling down the flag.
"At first blush it seemed like a step
backward," he replied, "but upon think
ing it over it seemed to be the propel
thini: if we are to negotiate with the
Hawaiians for annexation. You uon t
want to tie a man hand and foot and
then negotiate with him, but let him be
free to move if you are treating on a
fair basis,"
VIEWS OF THE SENATORS.
How Blount's Action Is Regarded in the
Upper House.
Washington, April 14. Up to the
hour of closing in the Department of
State no information had been received
there regarding the action of Commis
sioner Blount in Honolulu. In the
course of the i.fternoon Carter, the An
nexation Commissioner from Hawaii,
had an interview with Secretary Grcsh
am which he said was "quite satis
factory," He reiterated the statement
that the removal of the flag was due to
the condition of affairs in Honolulu
which no longer warranted its floating
over the Government Buildings.
"the Provisional tjovernment can
and ought to sustain itself," he said
"I am not at all discouraged ever the
situation and believe that we shall tome
out a'l right in the end."
The news from Hawaii attracted i
great deal of attention among the Sena
tors, although there was much reticence
manifested when an effort was made to
draw them out. Demccr.its refrained
from giving utterance to what appeared
to be their real sentiments, and Repub
licans, equally cautious, said more for
private ears than they will see repro
duced in cold type. The members of
the Foreign Affairs Committee are
naturally averse to any discussion of
the matteis over which, as such com
mittee, they have jurisdiction when the
Senate is call upon to act.
Senator Palmer of Illinois sees no
reason for alarm in the action of Com
missioner Blount. " I can scarcely
sec, said the Senator, "that the act o
Blount can be construed as an aban
donment on the part of the present ad
ministration of our intentions concern
ing the islands."
lVlornll dries not condemn the iio
ceedings unqualifiedly, but it is easy to
see that he disapproves the act which
resulted in the lowering of the American
colors.
Senator Cullom deprecated the act
of the commissioner and said : "I am
not surprised that the present Demo
cratic administiation should order th
Stars and Stripes to be hauled down
They have taken the flag down when
ever they had an opportunity and there
was a time when they had it down in
several States for quite a while.
" I am opposed to annexation," said
est, "but I do not see anything in th
action of Blount that affects the subjec
one way or another.
Senator Dolph of Oregon, who is
pronounced in his vitws in favor u
annexation, said : " 1 am as strongly
in favor of taking care of those island
as I ever have been, and would be very
sorry to see anything done that wculd
frustrate' their annexation to the United
States. I have been afraid that the
withdrawal of the Hawaiian treaty and
other arts of this administration hav
been detrimental to the end and I can
not, in the light of the press dispatches
say what effect Blount's action will have
I hope it will come out all righ
Blount's action may be simply the re
suit of a desire on Cleveland s p tri to
put negotiations on a basis from wliicl
he can deal with the native authorities
anew. I do not care to say anything
that will prejudice the case and know
little of the effect of the removal of the
protectorate."
CLEVELAND AND ANNEXATION,
The Chicago "Herald" Says the Presi
dent Favors It.
Chicago, April 14. The Chicago
Herald's Washington correspondent
sends the following: Piesident Cleve
land and Secretary Gresham are in
favor of the annexation of Hawaii The
annexation of the Pacific Islands is to
be a part of the policy of the present
Administration. The announcement is
unofficial, but may be accepted with
.out question. It is correct. President
Cleveland and his Cabinet did not
hastily reach the conclusion that it was
their duty to favor the annexation of
Hawaii. They considered the matter
fully and carefully, looked into all
collateral questions as to the past
policy of the Government, the attitude
of other powers and future government
of the islands. Their conclusion was
that annexation is the only way out of
the present dilemma, but they are not
in favor of annexation in haste. Nor
do they favor treating with the Provis
ional government, a government that
may not be able to uphold itself.
They very early ptrceived the im
propriety of negofating annexation
with a Government that was main
tained virtually by force of American
arms and the presence of American
men-of-war in the harb r. Hence
Commissioner Blount was sent to In
Provisional Government upon its own
resources. It the Provisional iiovcrn-
mcnt shall he able to maintain its
authority unassisted, and in autumn
still demands annexation with this
country, President Cleveland will be
ready to place the matter before Con
gress with f.t voi able if commendations.
But it has been finally held that
leater considerations than the mere
success or profit of the sugar ring, such
the bioadening of the national
policy, the acquisition of strongholds in
the waters of the Pacific, which in
twenty five years are to bear commerce
as great as that of the Atlantic, and the
elfare of the Democratic party, which
n the opinion of the President would
suffer if annexation were rejected by
1111, have now anscn tn demand at
tention and to dwarf into comparative
insignificance the sugtr scheme. Pres
ident Cleveland s thoroughly convinced
that the present temper of the people
demands a broader national policy
and ihc acquisition of more territory,
nd he thinks the people would punish
ny party which should lcject Hawaii's
proffer to become part of our territory.
It was expected thut a full report
would be received from Commissioner
Blount during the day, and Secretary
iresham hoped it would come in time
to be discussed at the Cabinet meeting.
No such report, however, was icceivcd
up to 1 1 o'clock, but in the absence of
the document the Hawai'an affair formed
one of the topics of discussion at the
Cabinet table. The reasons which in
duced Commissioner Blount to order
the American flag to be hauled down
are very simple. While his instructions
gave him certain latitude of discretion,
it was the President's expressed wish
that the American protectorate over the
islands should be ended as soon as
possible, if such a thing could be done
without leading to disorder. Ihc Presi
dent favored this course of action be
cause he regarded it as an anomalous
state of things for the United States to
be negotiating with a government that
was upheld and perhaps practically
maintained in power by the physical
support ot the United btates. bo lar
as the Administration knew the Dole
Government existed only because the
marines and blue jackets of the Boston,
with their galling guns, were encamped
in the streets of Honolulu.
NO WORRY ABOUT HAWAII.
The Administration Favors a Sort of
Protectorate.
Ni:v York, April 16. The Herald's'
Washington correspondent telegraphs:
1 he administration appears to prefer
an independent form of government
tor Hawaii, with a treaty whereby this
country, in consideration of certain
exclusive rights for the use of land,
etc., for military purposes, guarantees
moral support to Hawaii, or, in shoit,
soit of protection. But it is still
further believed that if terms nnnot be
agreed to on these lines with the Pro
visional Government, and there is dan
ger ot an appeal ueing made to some
other country, Mr. Blount has instruc
tions which will enable him to make an
agreement on annexation terms.
I he administration, however, seems
to have little concern about the Pro
visional Government extending its
hand to some ether foreign power.
It is agreed on all sides that annexa
tion to any other country is out of the
question. A protectorate is the most
that is expected, and should the Pro
visional Government decide to ask fur
this form of foreign control, it is be-
ieved that it would give the first
chance to the United States.
How long Mr. Blount's stay in Ho
nolulu will continue is largely a mat
ter of conjecture, but when he left
here he expected to return in time to
attend the annual examination of cadets
at the Naval Academy as a member of
the Advisory Board.
MOTT SMITH ASTOUNDED.
The
Hawaiian Minister Talks
Blount's Action.
About
BovroN, April 14. J. Mott Smith,
Hawaiian Minister to this country, was
dumbfounded by the news from Hawaii
to day. He said that the withdrawal
of the United States protectorate ovt-r
the islands opened a wide range of
possibilities. An impregnable position
had been surrendered and the United
States could not now protect the islands
in case of an uprising. The Provisional
Government might appeal for aid to
the English or German or Japanese
Minister, and should the latter's coun
try give assistance, it would occupy the
very position which this country has
just abandoned. What Hawaii needed
was a stable g vernment and it would
not be surprising if the Provisional
Government should turn to some other
quarter to secure it.
STEVENS COMING HOME.
The
Hawaiian Minister Takes Blount's
Action to Heart.
Washington, April 21. A private
letter received here to-day from a mem
ber of the family of Minister Stevens
brings information that the Minister,
with his wife and daughter, will leave
Honolulu on May 24th. Mr. Stevens
had, according to this letter, made ar
rangements to depart on that date be
fore he knew that Mr. Blount was to
be sent to the islands.
At the State Department it is said
that no decision has been reached in
regard to Minister Stevens, successor,
but that will not interfere with Mr.
Stevens leaving Hawaii at the time he
wished. With Mr. Blount in control
the administration feels that it can get
along without the Minister if it becomes
necessary. It is expected, however,
that the appointment of a new Minister
to Hawaii will be among the nrst tie
cided upon after the President returns
from his World's hair trip.
The letter referred to shows that the
Stevens family feels keenly the revoca
tion of the Minister's act in regard to
the hoisting of the flig, and the pre
diction is made of disaster as a result,
BY AUTHORITY.
SALE OF LEASE OF A GOVERNMENT
LAND IN 1IANA, MAUI.
On TUESDAY, May lOtli. 1893, at 12
o'clock noon, at the front entrance of Aliiolani
Hale, will he sold at Public Auction, Ihe lease
of a tract of Government land in Hana, Maui,
containing an area of 2,Soo acres, .1 little mote
or less.
Term Lease for 15 years.
Upset price, $200 per annum, payable semi
annually in advance.
J. A. KIlMi,
Minister of ihe Interior.
Interior Office, April 17th, iSgv
The above sale is indefinitely postponed.
J. A. KING,
Minister of the Interior.
Interior Office, May 3rd, 1S93. 33 3'
GOVERNMENT POUND NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given, that the Govern
ment Pound at Waikapu, has been discontin
ued, and hereafter, all Estrajs taken up in
that locality, will he impounded in the Gove
rnment Pound at WailuliU, Maui.
J. A. KING,
Minister cf the Interior.
Interim Office,
May 3rd, 1S93.
32 3t
NOTICE.
Mr. D. M. Kapalau has this day been
appointed Poumlniastcr for the Government
Pound at Ilceia, Koolaupoko, Oaliti, vice J,
M. Avva, resigned.
J. A. KING,
Minister of the Interior.
Interior Office, May 1, 1S90, 30-31
SALE OF GOVERNMENT LOTS 76 AND
77, ESPLANADE.
On Wednesday, May 24th, 1S93, at the
front entrance of Aliiolani Hale, at 12 o'clock
noon, will he sold at public auction the lea:e
of Lots 76 and 77, on the Esplanade, Hono
lulu, Oahu.
Term Lease for 10 ycais. Upset price,
$300 per annum, payable .semi-annually in
advance.
J. A. KING,
Minister of the Interior.
Interior Office, Apr. 24, 1S93. 25 3t
NOTICE.
The new sur-charged stamps of the Provis
ional Government will be on sale at the Pest
Office, on or about May 20, 1S93, after which
date the present issue, and sale of same, will
cease, and none of the old issue will be there
after sold for postal purposes.
JOS. M. OAT,
20 if Postmaster-General.
NOTICE.
DEPARTMENT OJ- FINANCE,
Honolulu, II. I., April, 1S93.
Notice is hereby given that bids will now
be received at the Treasury Department for
the New Hawaiian Loan lor $750,000 U. S
Gold Bonds, authorized by an Act of the Ha
vvaiian Legislature, appioved January nth
1S93, and also by an Act of the Provisional
Government of the Hawaiian Islands, ap
piov-cd Februaiy lS, 1S93, for INTERNAL
IMPROVEMENTS, up to the amount of
Two Hundied and Fifty Thousand Dollars
(1250,000) or any part thereof.
These Bonds arc of the denomination of
One Thousand Dollars (Si.ooo) each, running
not less than Five (5) nor more than Twenty
(20) years, are all dated April 1st, 1893, bear
ing sk per cent, interest per annum, payabl
semi-annually in U. S. Gold, and are free
from taxation.
The principal and interest to be paid in
Gold Coin of the United Stales of America or
its equivalent at its present standard of weight
and fineness.
The Minister of Finance does not bind him
self to accept the highest or any bid.
Receipts will be given .to all parlies whose
bids arc accepted, guaranteeing the delivery
of the Bonds on their arrival in Honolulu.
THEO. C. PORTER,
Minister of Finance.
22 151
IRRIGATION NOTICE.
Holders of Water Privileges, or those pay
ing Walcr Rales, are hereby notified that the
hours for using. water for irrigation purposes.
are Irom o to SS oclock A.M., ami 4 to
o'clock p.m., until further notice.
ANDREW BROWN,
Supt. Honolulu Water Works.
pproved :
J. A. Kino,
Minister of the Interior.
Honolulu, II. I., April 1st, 1893.
O-tf
(General Jlbbcrtiscmcnts.
Base Ball
Hawaiis
vs.
Kamehamehas.
SATURDAY, MAY
At 3:30 p.m.
6th
Hawaiian Basebal
Assn. Grounds.
A DM rSSlON:
Adults, 20 cents.; Oliihlreu, 10 cents
27 tf-
(5cnct'iil Jlblict'liocmcntB.
SELLING OUT
MRS. TUOS. LACK is Selling Out her
large stock of first-class
SPORTING AND FANCY GOODS,
Sewing Machines, etc.
Ten tier cent, off on all purchases of
ive Dollars or over! five per cent, off for all
under.
STORK TO HE LET JUNE lsi.
IS tf
California Feed Go.
T. J. Kino and J. N. WRinin.
Have just received the Larg
est Stock of HAY and GRAIN
ever imported by any firm in
rlonolulu, by any one vessel.
his stock was personally se
eded by our Manager T. 1.
ing during his recent trip to
the coast, and is first class in
every particular. We guaran
tee satisfaction in quality and
ijrice.
Give us a Trial.
KING & WRIGHT.
Telephones 121.
Prompt Delivery.
18 tr
To Gain and to Keep
Flesh and Strength !
Emulsion!
We have just received 288
Bottles direct from Factory,
50 cts. and $1.00 per Bottle.
Ten per cent. Discount for Cash
MO GAFFE1NE
FOR
BrahiWorkers
Fresh Stock, Fresh from
Factory. Prices 10 cts., 75 cts,
and $1.00.
Ten per cent. Discount for Cash
Hobron, Newman & Co
Agents for Hood's Sarsaparilla.
18 tf
MILLINERY
Just Received per "Australia," a
Full Line of
New Millinery Goods
Ladies' and Children's
HATS,
RIBBONS AND FLOWERS,
LEGHORNS AND SAILORS
for both Ladies and Children.
A large assortment of
FINK VELVETS, GAUZES, TIPS
and all the Latest Novelties at
MRS. GOOD'S,
9 im Fort Street
P. O, Box 197. Telephone o.
LEWIS & CO.
IMPORTERS
Naval Supplies: Wholesale and Retail
Dealers in Groceries, Provisions, Etc.
in Fort St., Honolulu, H. I,
ie Scott :
1)11
tclu ,3lbi3ct'ticcmcnt0.
Dr. 6. JAEGER'S
Sanitary
Underwear
I desire to call the attention
of persons eointr abroad to
1 WW
these celebrated sanitary pro-
uctions. for which I am Sole
Agent for the Islands.
Its to your advantage both
nancially and Physically, to
supply yourself with a Full
Outfit before leaving. I have
. t
just imported a iresh supply
direct from Germany of Dr,
aeger's
UNDERWEAR,
For men.
PAJAMA SUITS,
. HOSIERY,
NORMAL BELTS,
A cholera preventive.
COMBINATION
SUITS,
For ladies
Jaeger
Gauze
By the yard, for making or re
pairing garments.
Also, a few pairs remaining o
Jaeger
Blankets
Just the thing for Tourists.
Your
nspection
nvited
M. GOLDBERG
Sole Agent for
Dr. G. Jaf.ger's Production
21 if
Sm ucvtiscmcntc.
Aim at the Drake
And you are bound lo hit some of the
ducks. This is precisely Ihe same with
Wampole's
Tasteless
Preparation
OF
?od Liver Oil.
It aims to cure Consumption,
Hits the Mark, too, and it
most effectually breaks upColds,
Coughs, Hoarseness and all
hroat and Lung troubles that
cause this disease.
It is natural logic to conclude
tat if Wam pole's Preparation
Or
Cod Liver Uil has power
to prevent Consumption, it sure-
y is able to cure these lesser
emergencies.
This vigor-making, fat pro
ucing preparation is Absolute
1 Tasteless, in so far as Cod
,iver Oil is concerned. All
011 notice is a delightful flavor
f Wild Cherry and Anise.
But the purest Norwegian
Cod Liver Oil is there all the
T
same, it is a creat blood en-
richer. Best of all it is a natu
ral food that in its stomachic
effects, actually assists its own
assimilation.
In Pulmonary or Bronchial
troubles it is unequalled. No
one doubts the value ot L,od
Jver Oil, but not every one is
ble to take it.
WAMPOLE'S PREPARATION
removes the nauseous objection
and actually makes Cod Liver
Oil palatable.
KEPT IN STOCK AND SOLD BY
HOLLISTER & Co.
IOC) Fout Strkkt, Honoi.ui.it.
Phonograph
With all the
Latest and Most Popular Airs !
Vocal and Instrumental, by the leading
and hum celebrated Artists.
YOUR CHOICE FOR 10 Cts
From g A.M. to rj p.m.,
at the Phonograph Muic Uooms, Thomas'
lllock, Kmg street, between Nuuanu
and lielhel streets.
Sim
C. STOECKLE, Manager.
Hard Times Mean Close Prices
To House Keepers.
If you are in need of any New or Second
hand FURNITURE, RUGS, STOVES,
SEWING MACHINES, Etc., call at the
I X L
Furniture & Commission ifouse;
Comer Nuuanu and King streets.
18 tf
BLIGHT
EXTERMINATOR
Orders on the Commissioner of Agriculture
for Insecticide Wash in five gallon quart
titics, can be obtained at the
PACIFIC HARDWARE CO.
17 tf
M. SJ.EVY.
The U. S. S. Rush fe-away,,
but the Rush for Japanese;
Crepe, is just as large as the
Annexation Roll.
A New Line of Japanese
Crepe arrived on the S. S.
China.
M. Si LEVY,
75 Mc Inernv Block 75
17
C. L. BRITO,
Guitar and Repairing Shop
No. 52 Nuuanu St., below Hotel.
Having secured the services of a good me
chanic, I will keep on hand a fine lot of
Guitars of all Sizes,
Made of Hawaiian wood.
Special attention will he given to Instru
ments made to order, 6 tf

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