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The Hawaiian star. [volume] (Honolulu [Oahu]) 1893-1912, October 07, 1902, FIRST EDITION, Image 6

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THE HAWAIIAN STAR, TUESDAY, OCTOBEIl 7. 1902.
A Summer Proposition.
J, Well, now, there's the
ICE QUESTION!
You know you'll need ice; you know
Its a necessity In hot weather. We
bellevo you are anxious to get that lee
which wilt Give you satisfaction, and
we'd like to supply you. Order from
ICE Oil KElHKffiKN..
HOFFMAN AND MAItKIIAM.
(telephone JtGl Blue, rostom.ee Box COO.
Celebrated
JUST RECEIVED
EX ALAMEDA,
Craze Game
Ping Pong
Just Received
I. W. JORDAN,
10 FORf STREET
. &. IRWIN & CO., LTD..
Bib G. Lr win.. President and Manager
Daro Spreckels.... First Vlee-Presldent
IW. . Glffard.... Second Vice-President
S3. VL. Whitney, Jr..Sec'y and Treasurer
Bps. X. Ross Auditor
Sugar Factors,
Commission Agents
AGENTS OF THE
DGSiSIG STEAMSHIP COMPANY
OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL
Hirose Shoten,
M79 AALA STREET.
Gnaw goods by every steamer.
BLUE 392
P. O. BDX 885.
Oahit Tailoring Company,
MERCHANT TAILORS.
Suits Made To Order.
Cleaning, Repairing and
Pressing a Specialty.
Corner Deretanla and Emma Streets.
3x6 Sizes 6x9
FINEST QUALITIES
RICH DESIGNS
XATEST STYLES'
Direct from the Factory.
Kow Displayed
AT
HOTEL STREET STORE.
78 HOTEL STREET.
PHONE MAIN 197.
Silent Barber Shop
Hotel Street
HOT AND COLD BATHS.
BISST BARBER SHOP
EST HONOLULU.
1 6 Corsets
Ml
Waa nd la Star cost but 85 cents.
All Run Down
Whoa your vitality is low, you aro
miserablo all tho titno. Your nerves
aro weak and your appetite is poor.
You liavo no ambition, and you aro
languid and doprussod all tho tlino.
Wliat you need is a good strong tonic, as
described by Sirs. II. Austin, of Wellington,
New Zealand, Suo sends her photograph and
Bays:
" I was so weak nnd tired all tho tlmo that I
could not sleep nt nlg'.it. Or, It I did sleep, I
was as tired In tho morning as when I went to
bed. I was all run down. I then tried Ayer's
Sarsaparllla. Aftrr taking two bottles I found
myself greatly improved, and soon I was com
pletely restored to health. I think it is a
great family jucdielnc."
Sarsapanl
Thero aro many imitation " Sarsaparlllas."
Bo sure you got Ayer's.
You will lmprovo faster by using Ayer's
Pills with tlio Sarsaparilia. Take just enough
each night to have ono good, freo movement
of tho bowels tho day following.
Prepared by Dr. J. C. Ayer & Co.. Lowell, Mass., U.S.A.
EFORE
UYING
LUMBER,
DOORS,
SASH,
BLINDS,
GLASS,
PAINTS,
WALL PAPER,
OILS OR
COAL,
SEE
M
IULR
156 HOTEL STREET,
Has just received a New Line of
Papeterles and Tablets, In dainty tints
and odd shapes, which have been
MARKED DOWN from 25 to 33
BELOW THE REGULAR PRICE.
35c. and EOc. Papeterles, now 25c. and
35c.
40c. Tablets now 23c.
25c. Tablets now 15c. and 20c.
NEW BOOKS y BY EVERY LOCAL
STEAMER.
c
E
Not a natural condition of the scalp.
The itching, the irritation, the white
flakes .n the clothes, the rapid loss of
hair each indicate the disorder and
Its end baldness. No matter what
caused you dandruff, how long you
hare had It, or how severe It Is.
Pacheco'a Dandruff Killer is a posi
tive cure. Tested on supposed hope
less or stubborn cases, which for years
liad refused to yield to any treatment,
this remedy has cured.
For sale by all druggists and at the
Union B.-ber Shop. Tel. Main 232.
SERVANTS IN LONDON.
Foreign men aro supplanting servant
girls In London to a noticeable extent.
Competent natlv female help is grow
ing scarce, and the foreigners see in
the innovation a fresh chance of escap
ing proscription at home.
B
BISHOP
WRITES
OF
PRIMARY ERUPTIVE FORCE OF
VOLCANOES NOT STEAM, BUT
OCCLUDED CASES.
(From Nature, Sept. 4, 1902.)
The recent destructive eruption In
Martinique has revived Interest In the
question of the causes of volcanic ac
tion. Only lately have I become sensi
ble of the peculiar value or some ob
servations of my own as evidence of
the primary force which impels the as
cent of lava from its Interior habitat,
us distinguished from the explosive
violence caused by steam generated by
tlie encounter of the ascending lava
with ocean and other surface waters.
I have long believed the primary
force to reside In the expansion of the
gases originally occluded In the mag
ma, ever since its first condensation
from the nebula. Whenever released
from solidifying pressure by disturb
ances of the superincumbent crust, the
Intensely hot magma bursts Into a vis
cid foam and pushes upwards. In a
quiet volcano like our Kllauea, meet
ing no water to generate explosive
steam, the lava wells up continuously
and steadily In a comparatively gentle
fountain, which displays effervescence
only on the surface.
In support of this opinion I beg to
offer positive evidence contained In cer
tain facts observed by myself In Kl
lauea during April S-14, 181)2, unrt on
August 28, 1891. The volcano had been
In very steady nnd uniform action for
nearly two years before the earlier
date, and so continued until a short
time after the latter date, or nearly
live years In all of a quiet, continuous
and rather copious welling up of lava,
wholly unattended by any explosive ac
tion. On" the earlier date I carefully ob
served the then existing lava-lake dur
ing six successive days. This lake oc
cupied the center of the inner crater,
called Hulemaumau, or Fern-hut. The
main crater called Kllauea Is nine
miles in circumference, averaging 400
feet In depth, and rather unevenly
llooretf with recent lava. South-west of
the center Is the Inner pit of Halemau
mau. This pit was at that time nearly
circular and 2400 feet In diameter, with
vertical sides averaging 150 feet down
to the talus. Before the welling up of
lava began in 1SU0, the pit had been
about 700 feet deep. In two years the
lava had risen 4U0 feet, and stood with
in 300 feet of the rim and main iloor.
A lake of liquid lava, covered by a
thin, spongy lllin, occupied the center
of the pit. This lake was nearly cir
cular, averaging S50 feet in diameter.
It was bordered by a low dyke, which
partially restrained Its frequent over
Hows. Outside of the dyke, freshly
congealed lava sloped away to the ta
lus. By day the crust-film was giey to
the eye, but by night a deep red. It
was traversed by numerous fissures of
while fire. During the whole time
three fountains of lava were welling up
with somewhat regular lntermittence,
and three smaller ones at Irregular in
tervals. There was no explosive action
whatever.
Tlte largest fountain was about 120
feet south-east of the center of the
lake. It played with great regularity
about three times In a minute,-rising
in a round billow 25 feet high and 50
feet in diameter, bursting at the top
and falling back to level, its discharge
moving in u broad stream from its
summit rose to 40 or 50 feet above the
level.
West of this central fountain were
two others of very different character,
being more spasmodic In activity, but
never long quiet. Occasionally they
would unite their forces for half an
hour at a time, forming a stationary
line of 130 feet of spraying billow much
like a surf-comber with Hying spray.
This stationary, surf-wave was 15 feet
high, incessantly flinging Its spray 10
feet higher along Us whole length. In
the night, the effect of these fountains
was extremely brilliant and was at
tended by loud metallic crashing.
The other three fountains were small
er, near the borders of the lake, and
often quiet for hours together.
During the thirty months' Interval
between my two visits, the gradual
elevation of the flre-lake continued
quite uniformly, as attested by occa
sional photographs. By Its frequent
overllows It had built itself up to a
height of fully 50 feet above the previ
ous main floor of Kllauea, so that It
formed an extremely low truncated
cone, surmounted by the level lake, to
the edge of which visitors dally ap
proached. About March, 1894, a recession began,
which ended In a final collapse of activ
ity. The lake soon sank some hun
dreds of feet, carrying with It the sides
of a circular pit, about 1400 feet In dia
meter, and central to the original 2400
foot pit. When I saw it In the follow
ing September, the flre-lake was not
less than 500 feet below the rim. Dur
ing the evening, masses of rock fre
quently crashed In, driving heavy sur
ges of Are far up the talus. There was
a good deal of steam-cloud slowly ris
ing, charged with sulphur. During my
previous visit, all vapour had seemed
to be absent, and I made the circuit of
the pit without encountering sulphur.
Subsequent photographs had also In
dicated the absence of vapour from the
lnj'e.
1 now have to add an Important ob
servation. To my great surprise, at
this last visit, I perceived that the
three fountains above described were
In full activity and In the same rela
tive position as before, although during
the thirty months the level of the lake
had risen 350 feet and had then fallen
S00 feet. By what system of supply
ducts such fountains had been so long
maintained was a mystery concealed
In tho fire-depths, But tho fact of a
marvellous steadiness and uniformity
of action was obvious. For a long per
iod a uniform and gentle outpour of
effervescence had been maintained, It
had persisted for two years and a half,
throughout all the Immense changes.
I submit as the unavoidable conclu
sion that the source of supply for this
five years' outpour of gently efferves
cing lava was in an Interior magma
which itself contained the Impelling
force In its own originally occluded
gases. For Us activity this source was
wholly Independent of any encounter
with water to generate Bteam. Ex
panding steam evidently had no part
in that steady, quiet, persistent activ
ity In the flre-lake of Kllauea.
I would add that the exceptionally
quiet and uniform activity of Kllauea
seems to render It one of the most Im
portant of all volcanoes for study. I
regret to say that since the collapse
nearly eight years ago no Java has ap-
VOLCANOES
THE TYPEWRITER
IS NOTJOjMODERR
RAPID RUN INTO FAVOR OF THE
INGENIOUS LITTLE TIME-SAVING
MACHINE.
To show how comparatively new a
convenience is the typewriter, In spite
of its now almost unlversui ute, the
first person to do practical nork with
such a machine has been taking the
current census ns "chief statistics for
manufacturers. S. N. D. North, who
was an editor In Utlca, N. Y in 1872
says: "I have often wished that I had
kept that original machine, for It would
have Illustrated better than any other
mechanism with which I am familiar
the marvelous rapidity with which Am
erican Ingenuity advances to 'the point
of perfection any labor-saving Instru
ment, the underlying principle of which
has been worked out. This machine
was heavy and cumbersome in com
parison with the delicate mechanism
of today, but the principle of construc
tion was essentlaily the same, except
that the carriage, instead of being re
stored to position by the hand at the
end of each line as now, was brought
back by means of a foot pedal, and it
came with a Jar 'that made the machine
tremble In every part. My machine
did neither uniform nor elegant work,
but after a week or two I was enabled
to accomplish all my editorial work on
It, and I began to realize what tin un
speakable boon to all weak-eyed per
sons lay here In embryo."
The llrst American typewriter pa
tent was Issued In 1829 to William Aus
tin Burt of Detroit, Mich., who was ul
so the Inventor of the solar compass.
Ho called his writing machine a "ty
pographer." Like several which fol
lowed It, this form was too slow for
practical results. About 1S17 A Ely
Beach of New York patented all the
essential features of the modern type
writer. Three Milwaukee men C. La
tham Sholes, -Samuel W. Soule and
Carlos Glidden did much to make
typewriting practicable. They worked
out the machine which furnishes the
basis for the most generally used com
mercial product of today.
At lint the typewriter was received
by the public with suspicion. It seem
ed subversive of existing conditions.
A court gave the first public recogni
tion to the merits of 'the machine, be
cause a court reporter found It conve
nient for making duplicate minutes of J
me proceeaings. inese came unuer
iho attention of the Judges, and It waj
not long before they expressed a pref
erence for typewritten papers. Tho
lawyers next found the use of type
writers a great h3lp In the business of
fices, and the large commercial con
cerns, always ready to adopt time
saving devices when assured that they
are such, began to use machines In
their correspondence. The letters sen;
out of them resulted In a wide adver
tisement of the typewriter, which soon
then came Into general use. It was
not until 1897 that diplomatic commu
nications general'.' could be written
with a machine, though the American
Department of State set the example
of using the typewriter In Its domestic
correspondence as earlv as 1895. Even
now all highly ceremonious letters and
addresses have to be done by hand
with pen and Ink.
New York ranks llrst and Chicago
second In the number of typewriter
manufacturing establishments. In the
whole country this Industry now turns
out a product valued at more than $6,
000,000 a year, and gives employment
to C000 people.
THE FISHERY CASES.
Unusual State of Affairs In Connection
With Circuit Judges.
The calling of Circuit Judges de Bolt
nnd Robinson to the Supreme bench to
hear the fishery rights cases will result
In an unusual state of affairs If the 70
odd cases awaiting trial should come
up for hearings lefore them as circuit
Judges. The circuit judges will be sup
posed to take the law from the Su
preme Court, which will settle 'the law
for all the cases. In the two cases now
being heard. Under the rule that a
Judge may not sit In a matter on which
ho has rendered a judgment, they would
be disqualified, but as any circuit judge
would have to follow the higher court,
the disqualification, It Is said, will not
exist. The circuit judges will therefore
simply have to follow In the lower
court their own decisions as substitute
Supreme Justices; and the judges of all
the other circuits will have to take the
same line of rulings. Judge Robinson
was substituted for Gear yesterday af
ternoon, when Gear announced during
the argument that he thought the court
was Illegally constituted, and would
withdraw. Gear was one of those who
appeared before the Senate commission
and objected to the system of calling
substitutes to the Supreme bench.
W.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.VV.V
peared In the crater, except a small
I quantity last June, which has again
igone out of sight.
I Having seen no European notice of
the fact, I would report that twelve
days after the Martinique eruption
very vivid afterglows appeared here,
about as bright as those seen here af
ter the first two weeks of the Kraka
toa glows in September, 1883. They
have not yet wholly disappeared. The
solar corona, or "Bishop's Ring," Is
I still conspicuous. It Is worth stating
that the Krakatoa glows reached Ho
nolulu In ten days, coming twice the
distance of the Martinique glows in
twelve days.
S. E. BISHOP.
Honolulu, July 31.
A LESSON.
Magistrate Now, H'l let you off this
time, but It should be a lesson for you
not to be In bad company again. Pris
oner Qee whizz! It ain't my fault that
jl 'here; the cops made me come. Phil
adelphia Record.
NOTICE
Notice Is hereby given to all persons
having horses In the pasture known as
the Palama pasture mauka of Kame
hameha school, that unless the pastu
rage on same Is paid within 15 days
from date they will be Bold at auction.
ANTONE COSTA.
Dated September 30, 1902.
LOST.
Draft No. 462 for $232.17 in favor of
Mrs. Emma Hall, drawn by Loulsson
Bros, on M. S. Grlnbaum & Co., Ltd.,
has been lost, and payment of same
has been stopped.
. " aV aV aV V aV V , .V V laV.V
Within
a V
W.
. o:
:?.:
?!
mm
o.".:.
. :
' V
Sometimes It is hard to get dollars
and after you have them you want
them to go as far as they will. Wo
want to help you scheme to get the
greatest value for what you spend. Our
plan Insures satisfaction In the buying
You can get cash worth here In ex
change for your money. Try It on.
HARDWARE,
SPORTING GOODS,
BICYCLES,
S. W. P.
Or any of the various lines we
handle.
L 0. HALL
'a,'.
Ot.t
I
Denman
Creamery
Butter
Telephones :
22, 24, 92
H. MAY
THE POPULAR GROCERY.
PANAMA HATS
Genuine
SOLD AT LOWEST PRICES.
K. ISOSHIHA
KING STREET, NEXT
Sayegusa
1121 NUUANU ST. AND COR. KING AND LILIHA.
Importer and Dealer In
JAPANESE SILK GOODS, HANDKERCHIEFS, KIMONAS, MATTING,
BAMBOO WARE AND AMERICAN DRY GOODS.
Wholesale Japanese Provisions
Fancy Goods Received by Every Steamer and Island Orders Promptly At
tended to.
TELEPHONES WHITE 3271 and BLUE 1561.
Arrived on
SILK AND COTTON KIMONAS, SCREENS OF ALL KINDS,
SMOKING JACKETS, FANCY JAPANESE GLOVE AND HAND
KERCHIEF BOXES, TRAYS; JEWELRY BOXES, ETC.
ROBINSON BLOCK.
PHONE WHITE 2421,
14 HOTEL STREET.
A Feast of New Books
New stories by well known authors Just received.
Olympian Nights Bangs
Tho Vultures H.S. Merriman
Out of the West Elizabeth Hlgglns
The Fortunes of Oliver Horn F. Hopklnson Smith
The One Before Barry Pain
The Maid at Arms R. W. Chambers
The Ship of Dreams , Louise Forsslund
Ransom's Folly Richard Harding Davis
Captain Macklln Richard Harding Davis
A Pasteboard Crown...... , Clara Morris
The Shadow of the Rope Hornung
All for sale by
Hawaiian News Co.,
Xyiixiiteci
Merchant Street
Star Want ada pay at nce.
Reach
!?
Statf
Va
..
..?
.v.:
::
v.-v.
.o
& SON, LTD
From the pasture to the churn and
throughout the whole process of mak-
lng, only the most approved methods
are employed and every precaution 13
taken to ensure and maintain without
variation the highest possible quality
In Denman Creamery Butter. It Is tho
finest butter in the Honolulu market
today. New stock received by the Ventura.
& CO., Ltd
Boston
Block,
Fort St.
Article
CALL AND SEE OUR STOCK AT
TO CASTLE & COOKE.
P. O. BOX 88S.
" Doric "
Shoten.
Want ads lr Star cost but 26 oenU.

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