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The Hawaiian star. [volume] (Honolulu [Oahu]) 1893-1912, May 11, 1903, Image 3

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Tim HAWAIIAN STAR, MOMUT, 4fA 11, iOU. THRBB I
iv
4
lMlYSKJIAN AM) HUIKIKON.
Dr. deorgo W. Burgwis 1M7 Fort
street, corner Vineyard. 10 n. m. to 3
p. m. and 7 p. m. Telophono Mnln 133.
ROOSEVELT AS 11 COLLEGE PRESIDENT
WILLIAM E. l'AIKULI
Kuaklnt Street, near Llllha.
PAINTER, PAPERHANQER, ETC.
All -work done carefully and promptly
and at very reasonable prices.
TELEPHONE WHITE 271.
HENRY E.HIGIITON,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
HOW THE SUGGESTION THAT HE ASPIRES TO SIXCEEI
PRESIDENT ELIOT AS THE HEAD OI HARVARD
UNIVERSITY IS RECEIVED, AS INDICATED UY THE
TREATMENT OE THE SUBJECT IN NEWSPAPERS.
Southwest Corner Port and King Sts.
Honolulu, II. T.
DR. M. J. J. MARLIER DE ROUTON,
DENTIST
Rooms 27 and 28 Young Building. Be
tween Hotel and Kins streets. Hours
9 to 5. "Will return on May 22.
Gonoml Employment OIHco.
M. SHIROKANE.
Japanese and Chinese laborers, etc.,
upplled at short notice. Contract
' work of every kind undertake.!.
Corner Emma and Beretanla streets.
Jno. W. Cathcart,
LAW OFFICES.
Ill AND 315 STANGENWALD BLDG.
Moana Hotel
Waikiki
Beach
Rapid Transit Electric Cars arrive
at, and depart from, the main entrance
of the Moana Hotel every ten minutes.
MOANA HOTEL CO., LTD.
T. K. JAMES.
Manager.
PIANO AND ORGAN TUNER
Henry C. Davles. Address, P. O. Box
30, Honolulu, Oahu.
Telephones,
MAIX 32 A.IVr 31
HACKS Nos. 3, 7, 24, 63, 236, 59, 51,
186.
M. PHILLIPS & CO.,
Wholesale Importers
1 And Jobbers of
AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN DRY GOODS
Corner of Fort and Queen Sts.
Iter NEWSPAPERS fliftT
I a. '
fHARHY-R88ERTS
PACAMA.
'K0bxr:86:
Orpheum Theatre
The Bill of
The Season
MONDAY AND TUEoDAY
LOST TN NEW YORK
Jessie Norton
THE POPULAR,
FAVORITE
WILL APPEAR
Prices as Usual
"I Can't Go
I've such a terrible headache," need
never be said again. Dr. Miles' Anti
Pain Pills quickly cure and positively
prevent headache and all bodily pain.
No ojilates. uon-lhxatlve. noversoldlii built.
Quarontred. All driipgUta. 25 tloses 15 cunts.
lm. MU.E3 Medical Co., Elkhart, lnd.
A NEW HUI.
WAILUKU. 'May 9. The fishing hul
at Maalaea Bay, consisting: of Jack
Nelll and the Valpoori brothers have
,about completed preliminaries, and fat
Jleep.sea llsh from Kahoolawe may soon
be expected In the Wailuku market.
Haul News.
A NEAT 'FENCE.
WAILUKU, 'May 9. Contractor Bur
lem has completed the fence around
the new school lot, the front fence be
ing a neat picket. A stone embank
ment will be built along the entire
front of the lot Just outside the fence,
Maul News.
The most startling rumor to be launched just now is that put forth by
The Springfield Republican that President Roosevelt is ambitious to
succeed the venerable head of Harvard, Dr. Eliot. President Roosevelt
was never supposed to be a profound scholar in any department, but he
is backed by plenty of degrees, and that he is something of a thinker is
shown by his brilliant ideas on "race suicide." But as President Roose
velt proposes to wait till after he has finished his second term at the
White House, there is no cause for immediate alarm at this, strange in
novation. The idea of a man of President Roosevelt's stamp assuming to cover
so grave an academic function is not, after all, so strange as it would
have been formerly. The president of a modem college is not the over
awing personality that he formerly was. His office is now more a busi
ness one than a strictly academic. He is supposed to be a shrewd care
taker of the college securities and properties and to preside over a mul
titude of concerns that formerly had no existence.
Some may think PrcsidentsRoosevclt a little too strenuous and too
much addicted to limiting and other undignified sports, but as an adver
tising card for athletics he would prove a prize. But Dr. Eliot believes
that a typical scholar would most dignify the president's chair at Har
vard, and there "are lots of old fogies that probably think so, too. Bos
ton Globe.
How much longer will Dr. Eliot of Harvard, the septuagenarian col
lege president, hold his position as head of the Crimson university?
This is the question called forth by a recent editorial in The Springfield
Republican to the. effect that President Roosevelt aspires to succeed
President Eliot in Cambridge when his career in national politics comes
to an end.
Up to the present time few people connected with Harvard have even
thought of President Eliot retiring. So hale and hearty is the grand old
president that the idea has seemed to prevail that he would live on in
definitely like those who, in olden times, drank at the fountain of eter
nal youth. Now, however, every one has suddenly awakened to the
fact that President Eliot ts far beyond the age when college presidents
are usually expected to retire. Three years ago the corporation, hi
strict accordance to custom, could have asked him to resign. But they
did not do so, and even today have never considered a single candidate
to succeed himself in his important place.
Every Harvard undergraduate thinks Roosevelt would make a great
Harvard president. "He would be strong for athletics." "He would
speak to the fellows" (which Dr. Eliot doesn't do). "He would ge a
great hustler." These are only a few of the comments which his name
suggests to Crimson students, each and all of whom hope that there is
truth in the rumor that some dav he will be over them. President Eliot
himself is at the present time out of town. According to the state
I ment of Mr. Green, his secretary, yesterday, there is no foundation for
the rumor that President Roosevelt has even been thought of to succeed
him. Boston Post.
It is hardly pretended that Mr. Roosevelt is the ideal man for the
'bead of Harvard, regarded merely as an educational institution. On
I the other hand, it is certain -that his incumbency would draw many
students to the university, that he would keep it constantly in the pub
lic eye, that athletics would be likely to show a lusty development, and
that he would encourage a manly, hearty spirit among the students. He
would have a great and wholesome intiuence in many ways. But the
university as a seat of learning would gain things from another man
such as Mr. Roosevelt could not give. It is not a question of greater
or less,but of difference in kind, and both kinds are required for the
good of the place. Hartford Times.
Why should not Mr. Roosevelt become actual president of Harvard?
Why not, indeed? It is impossible to imagine any position whatever
in which the president could be placed to which the prefix "ex" would
not be absurdly inappropriate. , It is equally impossible to imagine any
position in which lie would not be very much "at large." He would at
once "get busy" at the head of that or any other institution, and he
would promote business in others. When the existing undergraduate
body thinks of his presidency, it must lament that itself was born too
early. Under the grinding tyranny of the faculty committee on athletics
its victims now groan helpless. How would they rejoice if they could
look forward to a Rooseveltian regime. The new president would put
that body in its place if he had to lick every member of it. And how
happy would those undergraduates be who feel themselves capable of
filling every item of the Cecil Rhodes bill except the disgusting first,
which the name "scholarship" implies, if they were sure that this frivo
lous and irrelevant objection would no longer be brought up against
them.
It would not be. Can anybody imagine President Roosevelt letting
a good left tackle go because he could not decline "musa, musae," or,
for that matter, because he could not spell "cat?" Assuredly not. Har
vard would be first in the field and on the river, whatever became of
the Homer examinations and the prize debates or its president would
know the reason why. His aspiration for his undergraduates would be
that of the poet around his "dusky brood":
Iron jointed, supple sinewed, they shall dive and thoy shall run;
Catch the wild goat by the hair alid hurl their lance in the sun;
Whistle back the parrot's call and leap the rainbows of the brooks.
Not with blinded eyesight poring over miserable books.
Theodore Roosevelt must have conduced considerably to the enliven
ment of Harvard when he was there as an undergraduate, even though
cramped by the trammels of an effete system of discipline and a false
standard of instruction. But installed there as president, with ample
power to his free and strenuous elbow, what a transformation he would
work! All over our broad land youths more distinguished for strenu
osity than for studiousness would be begging "the end man" to send
them to Harvard as the first arena ever opened for their peculiar gifts
in the guise of an institution of learning. The presidency, of Harvard
would be great while it lasted. There is no doubt about that. New
York Times.
It is a little early for speculation as to Mr. Roosevelt's employment
after he leaves the White House. Two years of his present term remain,
and a full term of four years may be added. But this much may be
said with safety: The presidency of Harvard university would fit him
like a glove. The duties of the office would appeal to him strongly;
and while they would take up a good deal of his time, they would not
take up all of it. There would still be time for writing, and Mr. Roose
velt could address himself to the preparation of those histories and bio
graphies relating to American subjects and statesmen which arc said to
be now on his memorandum book. At 50, and even at 60, years of age,
Mr. Roosevelt is likely to be a very strenuous laborer in whatever vine
yard may be found. Washington Star.
President Roosevelt's future after he leaves the White House is map
ped out for him in an editorial printed by The Springfield Republican,
which carries the inference that Mr. Roosevelt would not be averse to
accepting the presidency of Harvard university when President Eliot
retires. It is not known whether the editorial is ex-cathedra. Phila
delphia North American.
Tim
Associated Press, Morning Service.
DR. HALE "JOSHES" NEWSPAPERS
Although tho son of an editor, Dr.
Edward E. 'Hale has good, natural dis
paragement of tho Intiuence of news
papers. Referring to Edward Everett's
sensitiveness, he says: "He was hope
lessly sensitive to what the press
printed, not knowing what I, who was
bred In a newspaper office, know first,
that of whatever Is put In tho newspa
per half the people who see It do not
read It; second, that half of those do
not read It; second, that half of those
do not understand It! third, that of the
half who understand It, half do not be
lieve It fully half forget It; fifth, that
the half who remember It are probably
of no great account anyway,"
Bank ofJJawah
LIMITED.
Incorporated Under th- Laws of the
Territory of Hawaii.
PAID-UP CAPITAL, -SURPLUS
- . - - .
UNDIVIDED PROFITS
$600,000.00
300,000.00
48,000.00
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS.
Charles M. Cooke President
P. C. Jones Vice-President
F. W. Macfarlane..2nd Vice-President
C. II. Cooke Cashier
F. C. Atherton Assistant Cashier
H. Waterhouse, E. F. Bishop, E. D.
Tenney, J. A. McCandless and C. H.
Atherton.
COMMERCIAL AND SAVINGS DE
j PARTMENTS
Strict attention given to all brancnes
of Banking.
JUDD BUILDING. FORT STREET
Claus Spreckle3.
. "Wm. G. Irwin.
Clans Sprecfcels & Go.
HONOLULU,
H. I.
San Francisco Agents The Nevada
National Bank of San Francisco.
DRAW EXCHANGE ON
SAN FRANCISCO The Nevada Na
tional Bank of San Francisco.
LONDON Union of 'London & Smith's
Bank. Ltd.
NEW YORK American Exchange Na
tional Bank.
CHICAGO Corn Exchange National
Bank.
PARIS Credit Lyonnals.
BERLIN Dresdner Bank.
HONGKONG AND YOKOHAMA The
Hongkong and Shanghai Banking
Corporation.
NEW ZEALAND AND AUSTRALIA
Bank of New Zealand, and Bank of
Vu S t si SL
VICTORIA AND VANCOUVER Bank
of British North America.
TRANSACT A GENERAL BANKING
AND EXCHANGE BUSINESS.
Deposits Received. Loans Made on
Approved Security. Commercial and
Travellers' Credits Issued. Bills of Ex
change Bought and Sold.
COLLECTIONS PROMPTLY AC
COUNTED FOR.
ESTABLISHED IN 1S58.
BISHOP & CO,
BANKEES
BANKING DEPARTMENT.
Transact business In all departments
of Banking.
Collections carefully attended to.
Exchange bought and sold.
Commercial nnd Travelers' Letters
of Credit issued on The Hunk of Cali
fornia and N 31. Rothschild & Sous,
London.
Correspondents: The Hank of Cali
fornia, Commercial Ranking Co. of
Sydney, Ltd., Loudon.
Drafts and cable transfers on China
and Japan through the Hongkong &
Shanghai Banking Corporation and
Chartered Bank of India, Australia
and China.
'Interest allowed on term deposits at
the following rates per annum, viz.:
Seven days' notice, at 2 per cent.
Three months, at 3 per cent.
Six months at 3', per cent.
Twelve months, at 4 per cent.
TRUST DEPARTMENT.
Act as Trustees under mortgages.
Manage estates (real and personal).
Collect rents and dividends.
Valuable Papers, Wills, Bonds, Etc.,
received for safe-keeping.
ACCOUNTANT DEPARTMENT.
Auditors for Corporations and Pri
vate Firms.
Books examined and reported on.
Statements of Affairs prepared.
Trustees on Bankrupt or Insolvent
Estates.
Office, 921 Bethel Street.
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT.
Deposits received and Interest allow
ed at per cent per annum, In accord
ance with Rules and Regulations,
copies of which may be obtained on
application.
INSURANCE DEPARTMENT.
Agents for FIRE. MARINE, LIFE,
ACCIDENT AND EMPLOYERS' LIA
BILITY INSURANCE COMPANIES.
Insurance Office, 924 Bethel Street. '
THE FIRST
CO. OF HAWAII, LTD.
Capital, J230.000.00.
President Cecil Brown
Vice-President ...M. P. Robinson
Cashier W, G. Cooper
Principal Office: Corner Fort and
King streets.
SAVINGS DEPOSITS received and
Interest allowed for yearly deposits at
the rate of V3 per cent per annum.
Rules and regulations furnished up
on application.
S. SAIKI,
Bamboo Furniture
AND
PICTURE FRAMES
Neat and Handsome
Designs, mads to order.
HI, Beretanla Street, near Punchbowl.
'? I"?! '?i.t 'f v' 'o,,?ir ?!!
.
.
.
Iwakami & Co,
IMPORTERS AND
DEALERS IN
DRY AND FANCY GOODS
GENTS FURNISHING GOODS,
JAPANESE SILK AND
COTTON DRESS GOODS.
.
Leading Straw Hat Manufacturers
All kinds of Straw Hats made to
Order. Hats Washed and Pressed.
Largest Stock of Ladles' and Gents'
Hats In the City.
Wholesale Dealer In All
Kinds of Japanese
(Irocerles and Provisions
36 and 42 Hotel Street
V.r.v:.;..?7..v.'.i.
:.-.v-
ft
.
..'Vi
.r.v-
V
"
Electric Lamp Shades
ONLY
10
CENTS
To close out our stock we will sell a
fine asiortment at 10 cents each. Some
we have sold for $1.00, others at 75c,
60c., and 25c.
We have a dozen of a kind of some
varieties of others, only one. All col
ors Included In the lot. See window
display at our office.
Hawaiian Electric Co.,
LIMITED.
OFFICE KING STREET NEAR ALAKEA.
TEL. MAIN 330.
1
rVmiftlJICWl!
H.Hackfeld&eoJ?
DO IT NOW
'f-
III
Insert Your
Want Adv't
In the STAR
Note Heads, Bill Heads, Statements Want ada In the Star bring quick f
and Fine Commercial Printing; at the suits. Three lines three tlmea toa H
Star Office. cents. lw
3
unliM iiili

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