OCR Interpretation


The Hawaiian star. [volume] (Honolulu [Oahu]) 1893-1912, May 12, 1903, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1903-05-12/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

1 J, 1
I
I
I
ft.
fa
If yon want to
day's Notts, toiIny
Tou can And it In
THE STAK
I
THE HAWAIIAN STAR.
CLASSIFIED ADS, THREE LINES, THREE T1V1E?S TWENTY-FIVE CENTS. QUICK RESULTS
Tim llurrnlliinStar,
Is llio imjicr tlint
ITni'S Into tho brut
homos of Honolulu
Vol. XI.
HONOLULU, H. T., TUESDAY. MAY 12, 1903.
Rev. Father Libert, Pro Vicar of this missionary province, is the
new Catholic Bishop of the Territory of Hawaii in succession to the
Bishop of Panopolis.
A cablegram was received at the. Catholic Mission at 9 o'clock this
morning, making the announcement. The cablegram was in French,
from the Mother House of the Order of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and
Mary, which order has charge of the missionary work in Hawaii, and
vas as follows: "Libert preconise Evcque." The word "preconise" is
a technical term, the cablegram meaning that Father Libert has been
appointed Bishop.
Immediately upon the receipt of the cablegram, the bells of the
cathedral was set ringing, by direction of Father Valentine, in joyful
announcement that the vacant See had been filled. It was not long be
fore inquiries began coming-in to the mission asking why the cathedral
bells were ringing, and when the reason was given there was very gen
eral expression of gratification the selection.
Letters of Father Libert's appointment will follow later and then it
will be known what title has been selected for him. All that is known
now, is, that he has been selected as bishop for the Territory of Hawaii
and that his selection has been approved bv the Pope, and that his con
secration as bishop will follow in order. This is not a diocese, so that
the title of the bishop cannot follow the name of the diocese, as is the
case with diocesan bishops. In all probability his title will be taken
from that of some historic, but now extinct See, and the announcement
of the title will come with the official letters of appointment. It is prob;
able that Father Libert will go to San Francisco for consecration, that
being the nearest place where the necessary number of bishops could
conveniently gather for this sacred ceremonial.
Reverend Father Libert Boeynaems, Bishop-elect for this mission,
was born in 1857 in Antwerp, Belgium. After receiving a splendid
scholastic education he was ordained a priest at Lottvain in 188 1, and
the same year lie came 'to Honolulu to take up the work of this mission.
His first mission was in Kauai where he remained till 1895, when he
was transferred to Wailuku, Maui, where he remained until the death
of Bishop Gulstan, made his residence in Honolulu necessary, he being
Pro Vicar of the province, and hence administrator of the affairs of the
mission until the appointment of a bishop.
Last year he became an American citizen. He was very popular in
Kauai and Maui where he labored so long, and since coming to Hono
lulu his intellectual attainments, and his kindly manners, have approved
him not only to the members of his own communion, but to the com
munity at large, and the satisfaction which has been expressed this
morning by the members of the Catholic church on Father Libe; i's ele
vation to the episcopate, will be shared by all who know him.
Until the official letters of his appointment are received there is
nothing that can be done. When these are received, arrangements will
be made for his consecration cither at San Francisco or whatever other
place is designated.
:o:
COMMISSIONER
OF
EXTRADITION
Judge
Estee This Morning Makes an Appointment New to Th.s
Territory.
United States Judge Estee this morning made an order appointing
E. A. Douthitt, Commissioner of Extradition. The office has not here
tofore been filled here and the order is under a federal statute which
provides for the issuance of extradition papers by a special federal com
missioner, instead of by the Governor.
Under the law the federal commissioner takes charge of all extradi
tion matters brought up by consuls of foreign nations, as well as issu
ance of papers for extradition of parties who may be wanted by the au
thorities here.
Two Will Arrive From Ulsco Two
Coast.
to
MAIL BOATS THIS WEEK. from the same place, with five days
later mall news files that that -which
will be brought by the Nebraskan to
day. 1
Tomorrow morning the S. S. Alameda
sails for San Francisco with mall. The
Coptic is due the afternoon of Friday
from the Orient. She will sail for San
Francisco probably Saturday morning.
There will be double boats to and
from San Francisco 'this week. The S.
S. Nebraskan Is due this afternoon
from San Francisco with three days
later mall and news files. The S. S.
Doric Is due on Thursday afternoon
r
s
u
m
m
If you are going away and
wish your property taken care
of,
If you wish assistance in hand
ling your property,
If you wish a Burglar or Fire
proof Box to keep your valuables
In,
Call on the
NEVADAN ON HER RETURN TRIP.
The S. S. Nevadan Is to sail from San
Francisco for Honolulu May 22.
Diarrhoea Is more to be dreaded than
dlptheria. 'It attacks all ages and is
equally fatal to young and old. The
great mortality resulting from diarr
hoea Is due to the lack of proper treat
ment at the first stages of tho disease.
Chamberlain's Colic, Cholera and
Diarrhoea Remedy Is a reliable and ef
fective medicine, and If given in time
will prevent serious consequences. This
remedy never falls and Is pleasant to
take. Every household should have a
bottle at hand. Get It today. It may
save a life. For sale fey till dealers.
Benson Smith & Co., general agents.
WUWHRTflUlD
H '
H
923 FORT STREET,
TELEPHONE MAIN 184.
(HHMMHMU
For Tents, Awnings, Storm Curtains,
Hammocks and all kinds of canvas
goods. Telephone lis and we will be
pleased to submit samples a.nd quote
estimates.
Pearson & PotUr Go,, Lid
HOTEL AND 'UNION STREET3.
'Phone Main 317.
IS THERE
NO LIMIT?
THE QUESTION OF HOW LQNG THE LEGISLATURE CAN
REMAIN IN SESSION IlXs BEEN RAISED BY THE
SLOW WORK IN THE HOUSE SOME SAY SIXTY
DAYS SOME TWO YEARS.
The question of how long the Legislature has a right to remain in
session is being discussed in view of the slow work in the House. The
session threatens to drag beyond sixty days and the question has been
raised as to whether the session is limited to that period. Some of the
members think that the legislature lias to adjourn at) the end of sixty
days whether it has made appropriations or not, and that if it has not
the Governor may consider the last legislature's appropriation bill rc
cnacted for another two years.
Ihe Organic Act has two sections bearing on the subject, section
43, stating that each session may be for sjxly days and section 54, which
are as follows:
Section 43. That each session of the legislature shall continue not
longer than sixty days, excluding Sundays and holidays: Provided,
However, 1 hat the governor may extend such session for not more than
thirty days.
The governor may convene the legislature, or the senate alone, in
special session, and, in case the seat of government shall be unsafe from
an enemy, not, or insurrection, or any dangerous disease, direct thai
any regular or special session shall be held at ome other than the regu-
lad meeting place. 1
bection 54. That in case of failure of the Jcgislature to passappro-
priation bills providing for payments, of the necessary current expenses
of carrying on the government and meeting its legal obligations as the
same are provided tor oy the then existing laws, the governor shall, up
on the adjournment of the legislature, call it in extra session for the
consideration of appropriation bills, and until the legislature shall have
acted the treasurer may, with the advice of the governor, make such
payments, for which purpose the sums appropriated in the last appro
priation bills shall be deemed to have been reappropnated. And all leg
islative and other appropriations made prior to the date when this Act
shall take effect, shall be available to the government of the Territory
of Hawaii.
It is claimed that under this section the legislature may continue to
oit for two years, or until the terms of the members expire, if the mem
bers so desire.
fflfflii f ie ram web
THE REPRESENTATIVE FROM THE FOURTH DISTRICT
TELLS OP HIS EXPERIENCE IN CHICAGO AS INDI'
CATING THE NEED OF ADVERTISING HAWAII ON
THE MAINLAND WHAT THE HOTEL KEEPER SAID.
Representative Aylett made some telling points in favor of advertis
ing the islands this morning in the course of a speech in which he told
of his Experiences in Chicago at the Exposition. So densely ignorant
was the hotel manager who accommodated the Hawaiians at Qiicago
regarding the people- of the islands that he told Aylett at night, that
pants must be put on before a morning walk was taken in public.
"When you get up in the morning," said the cautious host to the amaz
ed Hawaiians, "put on your pants. Don't go out with nothing on."
"Now Mr. Chairman," said Aylett, "I am not talking "hearsay be
cause I was there myself, and was told that we were from the Cannibal
Islands. When we got to Chicago we could not get into any hotel be
cause we wece supposed to be from a heathen land. We were in the
depot from 9 o'clock in the morning to 6 o'clock in the evening and we
finally got accommodations from a place seven miles outside the city.
After the first day I asked why people were so afraid of us and was told
it was because we were from Cannibal islands."
Aylett said the only way to correct such impressions on the main
land was by proper advertising, to show the people of the states the true
conditions in the islands. "I have become an American citizen," huf
added, "and I expect to step on the mainland. I don't want to be again
told that there are no accommodations for me because I am from a sav
age land. I can never forget that statement made to me, 'You come
from a savage country and we have 110 accommodations for you.' It
was a result of the false advertising of the past."
Aylett's speech was in answer to a motion by Kunialac to reject
the appropriation. Fernandez seconded it, intimating that it was a
printing 'scheme and saying he would not vote for anything to help
printing houses, except to establish a Territorial printing office. Chil
lingworth spoke in favor of the appropriation and Vida suggested pro
Vision for a tourist commissioner.
Pali opposed the appropriation. He appeared to be in favor of a
law to prevent Hawaiian hulas on the mainland, also pf lower steam
ship rates and cheaper living in Honolulu.
Gandall supported the appropriation, He spoke of his own trip
abroad and said that people had been surprised when they found him a
Hawaiian to see him dress and act as they did. He had been taken for
a Mexican and a Dutchman, said Gandall, but was never ashamed to
say that he was a Hawaiian. Advertising ws necessary tp reach the mil
lions of people in the great cities. Incidentally Gandall remarked that
he found on the mainland the same hospitality to a stranger as was
practiced on Hawaii and spoke of the natives' loss of lands. "If the na
tives had followed the advice of the missionary fathers," he said, "theji
would still hold the lands. The fathers advised them to beware of other
foreigners who would come later and would be land-grabbers, but in
stead of following this advice Hawaiians went to the offices of foreigners
borrowed money, and never paid it and lost their lands."
In hotels all over the mainland, Gandall said, he found material di
recting him how to go anywhere but to Hawaii, and telling ail about
other places but nothing about the Hawaiian Islands.
Lewis spoke in favor of advertising and Kaniho against it. H -; had
r.ot heard any statement of how much returns were to enu from the
islands, and as for the heathenism the mere fact of annexation was suffi
cient to show that the islands were all right. The missionaries had ad
vertised the hula and they ought now to advertise the opposite.
ThU debate was the longest of the session on any one subject niul
at noon the ayes and noes were called. The appropriation was defeat
ed by the following votes against it: Damiana, Fernandez, Haia, Kaili;
Kaniho, Kealawaa, Kou, Kunialac, NakaL'ka, Oili, Pali, Pulaa, Purely,
13. Andrade, Greenwell.Jaeger and Kupihea were absent, or the re
sult would probably have beeTf different.
MANCHURIA
IS OPENED
FORMAL NOTICE SENT BY RUSSIA TO CHINA AND THE
POWERS ANNOUNCING THAT SHE HAS CONSENTED
TO OPEN THE PROVINCE OF MANCHURIA TO FOR
EIGN TRAVEL REGARDED AS CONCESSION.
Associated Press Cable to the Star. !
PEKING, (May 12. Russia gives notice to China and the other
rowers that Manchuria lias been thrown open to foreign travel.
:o :
JAPAN DIET IS OPENED.
Associated Press Cable to the Star.
YOKOHAMA, May 12. The Emperor opens the Diet today.
-:o:-
THE PRESIDENT REACHES SAN FRANCISCO.
I
Associated Press Cable to the Star.
SAN FRANCISCO, May 12. President Roosevelt arrived hen
today.
:o:
DISTINGUISHED WRITER 'IS DEAD.
Associated Press Cable to the Star.
NEW YORK, May 12. Richard Henry Stoddard, the writer awl'
lectrurer, is dead.
KING EDWARD REACHES EDINBURGH. s
Associated Press Cable to the Star.
EDINBURGH, May 12. King Edward VII and Queen Alexan
cira arrived here today from London.
:o:
PROBABLY HAD NO PLAGUE.
Associated Press Cable to the Star.
CALLAO, May 12. The mysterious deaths which were reported:
yesterday as plague, were probably not due to that disease at all, but tai
some other cause.
FAMINE FALLS ON CHINESE PROVINCE.
Associated Press Cable to the Star.
WUCHOW, May 12. Terrible famine exists in the Kawang Sr
province. Hundreds of inhabitants have died already and unless relief
i speedily sent to the afflicted districts, the loss of life will be terrible.
: :o:
PROMINENT CALIFORNIA JURIST DEAD.
Associated Press Cable to the Star.
BUTTE, Mont., May 12. Judge W. F. Fitzgerald of California's
dead. Judge Fitzgerald was one of the superior judges oj Los Angeles
county. He was Attorney General of the State of California,' for one
term under Governor Markham.
:o:
IN TERROR FROM HOSTILE TRIBES.
Associated Press Cable to the Star.
TANGIER, May .12. Tetuan is terrorized by the attacks of hostile
tribes. There has been heavy firing between the .tribes and thegovern
nient soldiers. Many lives are believed to have been lost. The inhab
itants are flying for their lives. Many houses have been burned.
BROTHERS GETS REGISTER.
Young Brothers havo had the gaso
line launch "Brothers" registered with
the Collector of the Port. She Is of 5
tons register und her number Is 3943.
KOREA TO SAIL TOMORROW.
The S. S. Korea Is to sail from Hong
Kong on her homeward trip tomorrow
She Is due here June 1.
SPECIALS.
White dresa goods at Sachs' In latest
patterns 8 yards for $1; 0 yards for $1.
and 12 cents per yard. Turkish tow
els, $1.60 dozen. White cotton face
towels, $1.10 per dozen.
MONET SAVED IS MONEY EARNED
Yes, remarked one of Honolulu's old
residents I never havo saved a cent
out of my salary until I Joined the
Pioneer Building & Loan Association
and now this comfortable home you
pee Is the result of money earned by
Pioneer Building and Loan savings.
The Interest earned for 1902 was 11V4
per cent. Pioneer Building & Loan
Association, Judd Building, Merchant
Street. J. L. McLean, President: A.
V. Gear, Secretary.
Star Want ads pay at once.
THE OLD RELIABLE
la
CLAN MACFARLANE SAILED.
The Swedish ship Clan Ajucfarlane
got away today for Portland. She
went In ballnst.
HAWAIIAN SAILED YESTERDAY.
General Freight Agent Morse has re
ceived a wireless message' stating that
the S. S. Hawaiian sailed from Hllo
yesterday afternoon at 3 o'clock, for
DelawajTe BreUkwajtfcr. She had a
full loiul of sugar.
POWDER
Absolutely Pure
THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE
Those
Banister
Hen's
Shoes
They're elegant shoes for well
dressed men.
Dandies for all dandles or not.
Gentlemen's hand turned danc
ing pumps. The very latest $5
Gentlemen's hand welt Ideal
Oxfords $6.60
Gentlemen's mat. top balmorals
solid oak sole ;....... ..$6.C0
COMPANY, LIMITED
1057 FOR" STREET,
IE
it
Ml-

xml | txt