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The Hawaiian star. [volume] (Honolulu [Oahu]) 1893-1912, August 13, 1904, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1904-08-13/ed-1/seq-4/

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THE HAWAIIAN STAR, SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 1004.
j 7 i."
2
'JTli2 Jrld-woiioxi. Star,
DAILY AND SEMI-WEEKLY.
Kabllthcd every afternoon (except Sunday) by the hfnwailan Star News
paper Association, Limited.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES.
Cecal, per annum $ 8.oo
ftrcign, " 13.00
Payable In Advance.
Frank L. Hoogs,
SATURDAY AUGUST 13, 1904
2.
That the World's Fair Is still Incredible to the country at large is not sur
prising, for there Is no way of using words to make It credible; to enable
the country to realize what it Is. If the buildings were empty, if their doors
were closed, If they with their sculptural decorations and the statuary that
surrounds them were the only attraction the only object lesson it would
be enough, of itself, to command and hold attention, not only for this year
but for as many years as such a spectacle could last. It was said by a prom
inent artist that the sculpture which decorates the buildings and the statuary
which adorns the grounds are better worth seeing, as they stand In plaster,
than any other collection of sculpture In the world. If all this be true, and
there is abundant testimony that such is the case, how essential it is to edu
cation and advancement to secure a permanent record of this great event;
such a one as is afforded in our magnificent series of World's Fair Art Port
folios, which are offered to our readers .on merely nominal terms.
Britain And
Japan Allies
importance, in references to the hap
penings in the Far East, frequently call the Japanese "our allies." The term
is spread all through the war news in the London Times. A sample of the
feeling on the other side, is the following from the largest paper in Japan,
the Jiji, published under the heading "Our Ally's Protest Against Russia:" ;
"Alliances generally collapse owing to the tendency on the part of the
strongest party to them to make unfair use of them to its own benefit,
without reciprocating the wishes of its allies, it was Germany's domineer
ing conduct that first cooled down the Italian enthusiasm and reduced the
Triple Alliance to a moribund institution. So is it with the Franco-Russian
alliance, which the French nation now regards as a vexatious burden, and it
-was Russia's indifference with regard to the Fashoda affair that sowed the
seed of this estrangement. Not so with Japan and England, though we stand
toward our ally in the relation of a junior toward a senior Power. True, the
alliance had its opponents in England at -the beginning, but they have since
become reconciled to it, persuaded the benefits arising are reciprocal and
equal to both sides. Not only that, but since the commencement of hostili
ties British sympathy with us has been real and even more than that which
can be expected from an ally. Whatever be the actual words in which the
protest is couched, the strong public opinion, which, after all, forms the real
part of such a protest in a country like England, is enormously in our favor.
Especially significant is the report that the British Government has caused
the Ottoman Porte to be informed of the nature of the Anglo-Japanese alli
ance, besides pointing out that Turkey's permit to Russia's naval ships to
pass out of the Dardanelles was an infringement of an international agree
ment in which England was directly interested. All this would go to show
that there is no desire whatever on the part of England to shirk the respon
sibilities she owes to her ally. In these circumstances, the Jiji feels assured
of the early return of a better state o'f things in the Far East to the perma
nent benefit of the allied powers, together with the United States and tho
other peaceful nations of the world."
t
2
I
T
v
Russia's Plan
Not Allowable
It is not at all certain that the Knight
Commander incident will not be repeated. America and Great Britain may
find an enlarged Vladivostok squadron preying upon their commerce with
the Far East and sinking neutral vessels, in the language of a St. Petersburg
dispatch, "at the discretion of the officer" in command of the Russian vessels.
Though the issue has not been so directly raised with America as with
Britain, there is already a protest in strong terms in the American press. "If
the Russian Government is so foolish as to attempt any such high-handed
piracy on the high seas she will discover that Uncle Sam has a fleet of fight
ing ships in the Pacific," says the San Francisco Argonaut. In London, the
press worked itself into a fury over the summary sinking of the Knight
Commander and war talk filled the air, with the result that the Russian
Government gave intimations of intention to make reparation and the crisis
passed. The promise seems to have been truly Russian, to tide over a diffi
culty, for the trouble remains unsettled, and at last accounts Russia has
given no definite assurances that the incident will not be repeated. Russia
insists that she has the right to destroy neutral vessels carrying contraband
"in case of emergency."
It is inconceivable that either America or Great Britain will allow any
such doctrine as this to be carried out. In the first place neutral vessels
are not supposed to be subject to destruction at all, and in the second the
destruction of such a vessel at sea leaves it to the Russian officer concerned
to decide, on the spot, whether she is carrying contraband or not. It is the
principal of "hanging a man and trying him afterwards." With the vessel
and her cargo at the bottom of the sea, how is it to be proved that she had
any contraband, or how can her owners attempt to prove that she had not?
It is for the purpose of settling such questions that prize courts are estab
lished by international law or custom. Russia's plan makes her command
ers of war vessels act as officer, court and executioner all in one. It is no
wonder that the cable states that Great Britain is "greatly dissatisfied"
with the Russian position.
Russia probably has a bigger fleet at large In the Far East now than she
has had since the war began. Some of the Port Arthur squadron must have
reached Vladivostok. The preying on commerce may therefore increase.
But if it is to be carried on under the Russian Idea of sinking vessels carry
ing the American or British flag "at the discretion" of any officer of the Rus
tian navy who may happen to make a capture, it is likely to come to a sud
den stop. There are enough British and American war vessels in the waters
of the Far East to very quickly drive the Russians from the seas.
I " -..in.,,!, . . "I b 1 .1 111. I W looi.lM M
I cj. c'j t statement showing their side of the
t strikers Side controversy with the packers. The
1 Tie Case "statement contains a long history of
I a system under which pressure was
-t- exerted on the men until the cattle
killing business became a daily race
of gangs, and idle, or ill-paid apprentices stood by taking the places of men
who broke down from the strain at the age of forty or even less. The state
ment says:
"To check this system the union was organized. It was chartered in Syra
cuse, N. Y., in 1897, but for two years it made no progress in the big cen
ters. The packers bitterly fought each first attempt to organize. When,
in Chicago In 1898, a local union of thirty-five men was formed, every mem
ber of it was discharged within three weeks. We then turned our whole
energy on the small towns. We succeeded there, and, so strengthened, we
tried the big centers with better success.
"Then at last, in 1900, Michael Donnelly came to organize the greatest
center of them all Chicago. His first attempts were fought bitterly. One
of His leaders was offered a life Job If he would desert the new union. Scores
Manager.
The tone of the London and Japan
ese press indicates a very close feel
ing of alliance between Great Britain
and Japan. Such papers as the Lon
don Times, whose utterances are
often regarded as of international
When till VlmlivnctnLr crilfnilrnn
" " "
starts on another raid, if it does start
on one, there is likely to be a good
chance for the Eagle to do some of
its shrillest screaming and the Lion
to growl its most terrifying growls.
A non-intoxicant, sparkling and
highly concentrated liquid
Extract of
Malt and Hops
Strengthening, invigorating and
sedative.
Recommended by the Medical Pro
fession.
THE WARM WEATHER TONIC
FOHT STREET
of active union men were discharged.
reached 15,000 member? In Chicago
Still the union grew. In one year it
reached 15,000 members In Chicago
a'one.
"What has the union done for this
community? Briefly, It has forced the
packers to give more regular hours, to
employ more men, and hence to spread
the work among us all Instead of keep
ing half of us at the daors to underbid
the men who are working. The union
has forced a uniform wage scale for all
skilled workers, to replace the old sys
tem, and has raised wages to meet the
Increased cost of living.
"This change has vastly Improved the
community. This condition the pack
ers are now attempting to undo. They
are attempting to reduce the wages of
the common laborers 0 per cent of our
60,000 members from lS'3 cents an hour
to the old rate of 10 cents, or even less.
As the average week's work is but thirty-live
hours, 1$'. cents per hour means
$J.50 a week.
"This wage the packers now propose to
reduce to $3 a week. And 011 what
grounds? Is It because they cannot af-
tord to pay tho difference? This Is u
question for the public to examine, ns it
I'xamlned the coal trust's financial con
dition in 1803.
'We submit here but one point on
which the public appears to be unin
formed. Our secretary has for one year
received weekly reports from every cat
tle killing room in the country.
"These reports show that the average
cost In labor for killing and dressing a
bullock, from tho yard to the cooling'
room, is U cents. The average bullook
weighs 700 pounds. The labor cost is
but 6-100 of a cent per pound. The aver
age price of beef at wholesale Is 10 cents
per pound. The Jabor cost Is therefore
6-1000 of the selling price. Labor is not
to blame for the Increase In meat prices
In the past four years.
"Can the packer afford to pay 18
cents per pound? If they can, shall they
bi allowed to reduce the wages?
"The packing Industry has not suffer
ed from tho depressjon as some others
have suffered. Hundreds of thousands
of men" are out of work, and will soon
be willing to work at any wagei Shall
the packers be allowed to use this over
supply as a club with which to reduce
the wages of their njen? In other words,
are we to be treated as more expense
Items or as tho workers who have help
ed to build up this Industry?
"There. Is a deeper issue. If the pack
ers refuse to agree to any minimum
wnge for the unskilled, how long will
It be before they attempt to reduce the
wages for skilled men?
"For In this Industry the unskilled
men may soon become the skilled men.
GO
Classified Ads in Star.
Ads under "Situation S anted." Inj-itcd
Iree until further notice.
Nolico Of Itomovnl
Dr. Camp Olllce No. 1240 Emma Street
Hours: 9-12 a. m., 7-S p. m. Ilesidence
Telephone Bluo 20?1.
A few good chickens In excellent con
dltlon. Address H. F. Benrdmorc, Kn
mehameha Avenue, College Hills.
A magnificent building site on the
Punchbowl Blope near Thurston are
nue. Particulars at Star oflice.
Building lot corner King and Kame-
hamaha road. Palama terminus of
Rapid Transit road. Apply at Star
office.
Furnished I! ooins To Let
A nicely furnished front room. Mos
quito proof and electrlct light. 494 Bere-
tanla near Punchbowl.
I
f4
Our work Is perfect and watches re
paired by us
KBKH 'X" I AXIS
h CO, LTD,
EARNS
41.), Interest
And Can Be Withdrawn on
Demaiid
Amounts Received from
U.O0 to $5,000.00.
Phoenix Savings, Building
And Loan Association
. GUARANTEE CAPITAL.
$200,000.00.
PAID-UP CAPITAL,
$1,250,000
H. E. POCOCK
- CASHIER
Let them, while unskilled, be forced to
grow accustomed to the wretched liV'
ing possible on $3 or $6 a week, let them
grow used to living like the most re
cent Immigrants, and when 'they rise to
the skilled positions, the low standards
to which they have become accustomed
will still be adhered to. '
"This is the problem which confronts
us. Shall the standard of the most poor
ly paid workers of Europe be establish
ed by the packers as the standard of
life for American citizens?
"Shall labor be treated ns a mere ex
pense Item, or shall It be treated as a
sharer In the profits of Industry?
"Shall this Industry be developed
solely for tho profit of the packers, or
shall It be developed to the good of the
community as well?
"This Is the real issue in the contest
In which the butcher workmen are en
gaged. Wc leave the public to judge
whether right is not on our side.
''Executive Board Amalgamated Meat
Cutters and Butchers "Workmen of
North America. By
"HOMER L. CALL, Secretary."
. With tho return ft Governor Carter
to hls,post, Secretary A. L. C. Atkinson
resumes his own position nnd is "Act
ing Governor" no more. He hns filled
a most difficult post for "the last few
months with exceptional ability. An
"acting" position Is at no tlmo an on
vinblo one for It carries with It all of
the responsibility with little, of the re
ward. Acting Governor Atkinson how
ever was singularly fortunate In his
brief administration.
A LEAF OF PAPER.
A clerk in the Worcester freight office
was much surprised to find a perfectly
preserved elm leaf on the page of his
"book the other day. Ifo tried to pick it
up and was more surprised to flnil
that it would not "plclt." Then he saw
thnt It was made Into the paper. The
only explanation Is that the leaf fell
Into the paper vat at the mill and tho
bad leaf was overlooked by the sorters,
Twenty-five cents pays for a Want
Want uds In Star cost but 25 coatk.
h '
H. F, WICHMAN
FOItT STREET.
Sill
Thousands
GARDEN
Anticipating the irrigating season
of the
VBRY BBJST
GARDEN HOSE OBTAINABLE. V
THB )LVOW PRICES
WE ARE ABLE TO MAKE ARE SIMPLY PARALYZING.
Lawn Sprinklers in Great Variety
A New Invoice of the Favorite
EDDY REFRIGERATORS
Made to Keep Things Cool and Economize ICE.
JVJteaJ-iairvt Street
AIJ.iIUHUO.LID..
LIMIT
Importers and
Commission
flerchants
8OLE AGENTS FOR
Smoking Tobacco
fie. and 10c. packages.
a MntH fnr
BRITISH AMERICAN ASSURANCE
COMPANY of Toronto. Ontario.
DELAWARE JNSURANCE CO. of
Philadelphia.
Careful people should consider it a
duty to use
Pacheco's
Dandruff Killer
a scalp nnMseptlc, that Insures cleanli
ness and freedom from dandruff mi
crobes. Sold 1)y all Druggists and at the
Union Barber Shop. Telephone Main
232.
.Richest Soil and
Black Sand in
Town, .For Sale
Cheap, tfee Us
At Once '
LORD & BELSER,
We
On
hesitatingly
The Emphatic Statement ,
McCall Patterns
tsuEtzr to t,,e pub,,c' and are cut 10 fit
a Zutat.0f the8C Pa"ernS 80'd dUrlng ",e year with """ or never
OUR MOTTO IS:
Strictly high grade Patterns at the lowest possible price.
10 AND isc, NONB HIGHER.
SOLE
E. W. Jordan & Co., Ltd
NO. .10 STORE,
of Feet of
HOSE
we have imported a large stock'
ill! I COOKE, IK
Commission Merchants,
Sugar Factors,.
AGENTS FOR
The Ewa Plantation Company.
The Walalua. Agricultural Co., Ltd
The Kohala Sugar Company.
The Waimea Sugfr Mill Company.
The Fulton Iron Works, St. Louis, M
The Standard Oil Company.
The Georgs F. Blake Strain Pump.
Weston's Centrifugals.
The New England Mutual Life Insur
ance Company of Boston.
The Aetka Fire Tn3uranc Company mi
Hartford, "Wnn.
Thn Alliance Assurance Company of
London.
I. G. IRWIN & CO.
AGENTS FOR
Western Sugar Refining Co., 8u
Francisco, CaT.
Baldwin Locomotive Works. Philadel
phia, Pa.
Newell Universal Mil: Co., Manufac
turers of National Cane Shredder,
New York, N. T.
Parafflne Paint Company, San Francl.
00 Cal.
Ohlandt & Co., San Francisco, Cat
Pacific Oil Transportation Co.. San
Francisco, Cal.
Fire Insurance!
NIK B. F. DILLINGHAM CO., LIMITED,'
General Agents for I iwall
Atlas Assurance Company of London.
Phoenix Assurauoo Company of Lon
don. New York Underwriters Agency.
Providence Washington insurance
Company.
Phenlx Insurance Company of Brook
lyn. Albert Raas, manager
Insurance Department office Fourtfc
Floor, Stangenwald Building.,
The Pacific Hotel,
1182 UNION STREET
OPPOSITE PACIFIC CLUB. -'
NEWLY FURNISHED ROOMS
The Best fteduaraht
In ih& :ty , ,
MRS. HANA, Proprietor.
AGENTS.
Coil, HI
Make
FORT STREET.
1. ;,vnm
.1 ft l.L

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