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The Hawaiian star. [volume] (Honolulu [Oahu]) 1893-1912, December 23, 1908, SECOND EDITION, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015415/1908-12-23/ed-1/seq-4/

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The JBLo-waLiio-JO 8tar
DAILY AND SEMI-WEEKLY.
Published every afternoon (except Sunday) by the Hawaiian Star
Newspaper Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES.
Local, per annum $8.00
Foreign, per annum 12.00
Payable in Advance.
Entered at Pott Office at Honolulu, Hawaii, at aecond class mall matter.
Subscribers who do not act their papers regularly will confer a favor
by notifying the 8tar Office; Telephone 365.
The 8upreme Court of The Territory of Hawaii has declared both THE
HAWAIIAN STAR (dally) and THE 8EMI-WEEKLY STAR newspapers
t general circulation throughout the Territory of Hawaii, "suitable for ad
vtrtlslng proceedings, orders, Judgments and decrees entered or rendered
In the Courts of he Territory of Hawaii."
Letters to THE HAWAIIAN 8TAR should not be addressed to any Indlvl
dual connected with the office, but simply to THE HAWAIIAN STAR, or to
the Editorial or Business Departments, according to tenor or purpose.
GEORGE F. HENSHALL MANAGER
WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 23, 1908
NEWSPAPERS AND NEWSPAPER VOTING CONTESTS.
During the past year The Star lias received numerous offers of
newspaper voting contest schemes. We have them in circulars before
us, worked out to the small details, explaining just how to start, run
and complete these "popularity" contests and practically demonstrating
a guarantee of large financial returns, for, of course, in all these sub
scription contests the votes arc simply paid for, there is no issue of
popularity, !ut lone simply of paying up, and "working" one's friends
to make them pay up. The Star has not taken up any ot these sclicmes.
Journalistic sclf-rcsncct has seemed a bar. The scheme is usual'y on
the following lines: A number of prizes arc offered for the "most
popular" young women; to start the contest. those managing it usually
select a list of candidates who seem likely to hustle, and give these
candidates a few votes. As in the case of Admiral Bcck'cy a few years
ago, vanity and flattery soon begin to work, the "candidates' bite quick
ly, and the contest develops into a tussle between a few leaders who
begin spending all they can and working their friends to the 'ast limit
to'buy votes. That is how the schemes are run. No one need know
that you gave them the votes at the start," as the circulars of instruc
tions put it. "It is up to you to make people run, and run they must.
All they need is a start."
Is this sort of thing journalism? Is it exactly the right thing, to
start a lot of young ladies out canvassing subscriptions and trying hard
to work all their friends like political job-hustlers? We think not,
The Star, we repeat, has received all sorts of offers and pledges of
profits if it would take up one of these popularity voting contest
schemes. The matter was given the amount of consideration it was
worth some months ago when the organization of the Alaska-Yukon
exposition led various parties to suggest to The Star trips to that ex
position as prizes for yoilng women. The offers have been declined,
and will always be. We don't want peop'e to subscribe to The Star
without wanting it in order to encourage some young lady who knows
no better in the silly notion that getting votes in a contest of this sort
proves her popularity. Nor is it at all beneficial to the young ladles
themselves that they should engage in such a contest.
This much in answer to those who have proposed that The Star in
'dulge in a voting contest. The Star will not, not for more subscrip
tions than there are men, women and children in the Territory of Ha
waii. As far as subscriptions are concerned, people who take The Star
lake it because they want it, and read it, and for no other reason.
MAY BE AN UGLY SCANDAL.
There are signs that the Panama canal controversy is likely to bring
forth an ug!y looking scandal. The charges in brief are that Charles
P. Taft. brother of the president-elect and Mr. Robinson, brother-in-law
of Roosevelt, were heavily interested in an American syndicate
which was paid $40,000,000 for Panama land concessions which the
syndicate had acquired for only $12,000,000. As far as the records
are known and as far as President Roosevelt seems to be aware, the
$40,000,000 was paid to the French Government, and there was 110
American syndicate at all. But a Paris newspaper owner, commenting
on the President's denial, says that while Roosevelt is sincere, he is evi
dently not informed:
"I am willing to repeat and can prove if necessary that the
United States bought the canal fr0m a group of its own citi
zens who. through clever maneuvering acquired either the
canal outright or the privilege of selling it at any figure not
below a certain sum. There arc at least a score of persons In
"r Paris who know this.- Moerover, Mr. Roosevelt shows his
lack of acquaintance with the subject in the language he uses.
He speaks of a 'distribution by the French government' to cer
tain 'individuals.'
"All this is wrong. There was no distribution. There was
a certain sum turned over to the directorate of the Panama
company. There were no 'individuals' as such concerned in
the matter. The official Hquidator received $40,000,000, but
immediately transferred a substantial part of this sum to the
American syndicate, whose energy and perseverance had made
the transaction possible. The books of the Panama company
would easily prove this and if congress really investigates the
story it can get plenty of evidence of all kinds- right here to
the effect that the president is not well informed on the sub
ject of this historic deal."
It won't look right to the American people if this story turns out
to be true and if Robinson and Taft were really heavily interested fn
the syndicate. Both men were naturally in a position to know in ad
vance of the administration's intention to choose the canal route that
was chosen. If they made millions out of tlieir own government by
reason of their knowledge of such a secret, it was simply a bad kind of
graft on a very large scale. atyH
THE MATTER OF SIGNS.
It is not always wise to be too abrupt and sweeping in the abolition
of practices of long standing which may have become objectionable,
especially when nothing particu'arly hurtful to public interests or pri
vate morals is concerned. An instance in this connection, where
thoughtfulness and discrimination arc advisable, is that of the sudden
campaign against projecting street signs. There are such signs and
too many of them having elements of nuisance and danger which
should have been altered or abolished years ago. In the objectionable
category aie signs with loose and frail wire hanging, which creak and
mutter and are liable to come down and break heads in a wind storm.
Signs there arc a many which are neat in design and artistic in in
scription, with secure and shapely fastenings, against which no objec
tion other than the esthetic one of obscuring the perspective over side
walks can be urged. There would seem to be no immediate call for
compelling owners of these not radically offensive signs to sacrifice
the expense at which they were erected and their existent advertising
value. If the town would look' better without any projecting- signs,
let the movement for their abolition begin ns ui educative one."' Prob
niiy by.and by many of them would disappear by voluntary action of
owners as a result and tlfc putting out of new 'one's' stop altogether.
Compulsion might be adopted indeed at the outset, that is providing
public discussion proves that the community wants projecting signs
eliminated, only to the extent of preventing an extension of the prac
tice. , , .
Probably the anti-projectionists might have the belter of the argu
ment in a discussion of the subject. They might edntend that signs
high enough not to menace the hcadwear of tall persons and irritat
ingly catch, umbrella tips arc very apt to be undcrlookcd by pedestrians
and thus fail to attract the eye. Certainly it can be ttrgucd with force
that projecting signs running close together, as in many places may be
sseii, mutually obscure each other so as largely to nullify their intend
ed value and effect. The inartistic ensemble of a, congeries of signs of
varying sizes and inscriptive treatment is a strong rnrgitmcnt against
them, and to overcome it would require a schcrtjc of; symmetry which
to carry out would be as much confiscatory as abolition. Not the least
of the reasons for doing awav with ptojecting signs will be found in
comparing them, both by esthetic and advertising standards, with the
best types ot wall and window sign?. Shoppers do1 not have the star
gazing eyes that the overhanging sign will be the first to fix. Rather
have they the metropolitan faculty of seeing out of file corner of the
eye without icemingly looking, and the artistically gilded trade symbol
111 window and enameled legend on polished brass upon window base
D
ELAY IS .....
ISAPPOINTING
or portal will compel their attention.
PURE FOOD ACT ON THE DEFENSIVE
Both the fruit and the liour interests arc reported to be up in arms
against Dr. Wiley and the Pure Food Act. They arc claiming that
certain of their preserving, coloring and bleaching processes, condemn
ed bv the service, are not deleterious to the human constitution. Dr.
Wiley contends to the contrary and with specifications So far as pre
servatives' are concerned a great economic issue is involved which
should be decided against the producers only on atcicntific showing
that the methods arc prejudicial to the public health. If the tests go
adversely to their claims they should gracefully -submit and seek meth
ods that are safe. With regard to the bleaching an'd 'coloring of food
staples, sensible people wi'l not be disposed to' Wdr'ry! over the griev
ances of the producers. These processes are only'' a catering to silly
fads of consumers and, in some cases, are said to, be; deteriorative of
the nutritive value of foods. One instance where "such a practice has
been condemned is that of the polishing of rice, whereby the "bloom"
containing a subtle gastronomic property of relish is taken off the ker
nels. It is to be hoped, at all events, that Congress, will not impair the
effectiveness of the Pure Food Act in the interest filter of profits to
producers and packers or of the fads of consumers Where the law
may run to unnecessary, extremes it should of course be amended, but,
taking it on the whole, the Pure Food. Act U one of llic greatest boons
the people have conferred on themselves. ' '
President Castro is revealed as a precious scoundrel. The people
of Venezuela mav nerlians tlmnU- tlm T
doctrine, for giving him so long-lived an opportunity to plunder them.
uul 1U1 ll,lL "ucirme, it is proname that luironean nations would have
settled with him long ago. But he shrewdly nestled under its protec
tion, feeling safe to. ignore treaties whenever it was profitable so to do,
as lone- as the United Stntre w.ic ,0n,1rm,1 t e U. i
. r. - - ivj iiwi in, puwer iiuiue
a serious attack upon him. There are a lot of reasons whv the Monroe
doctrine is out of date, unwise and even dangerous to American peace.
This vear's linlid.iv unncrm ov-nf1r . .t.
of local business. Last year exceeded the year bdfbrc, and the two
Vnnrs ntrn wnc UnHt- f1n. , t, ' -,-, . .
J 1"""" " vcciis iiu, unci so on. Honolulu is
growing in a substantial way. Next year will show a greater advance
than any other recent year. f
No one in Honolulu will have a happier Christmas than, those who
are-responsible" for' the plan tirfill the Bishop street' park with hannv
children. ' ' "S'-' ' '
Talk -about h-Christmas- day' holiday. ThcAlaji'leda- Siheria ' nml
Mauna. Kca arc due to arrive here on Friday morning, 'and th
nrnffn rri .1 ,1n.. 1 i . i
i""v "uiay w wurK in signr m the post othce
ere s a
BAKERY BURGLED
EOR LUTTEE LOOT
, (Continued from Pago One.)
detective force and has later been put
on th& motorcycle where ho has no
opportunity- of 'doing any good.
In theX,eal connection, the follow
ing was1 'sent Toi'The Star and signed
by a business man: '
"1 note with regret that Detective
Leal will be dropped from the police
force after January 4. He is certainly
the best detective In the department,
thoroughly acquainted with his work,
speaking half a dozen languages, quick,
active and capable. In view of the
many robberies occurring here dally, I
wish to protest against the change. I
think it a case for the Merchants' As
sociation to look Into for the benefit
of the community."
uie urpneum last, night was a fine
success. It will be repeated Satur
day evening, Nobody who takes an
Interest in Hawaiian history nnd mu
sic should miss it.-
T.
GOODMAN
PARSES AWRY
GOODMAN In Berkeley, December 12,
" William GTbeloved husband of Alice
Goodman, and father of Harry Mi
nott, Robah A. and Inez Goodman, a
native of Falmouth, England. (Hono
lulu papers please copy.)
Friends and acquaintances are
respectfully Invited to uttend the fun
eral today (Monday), at 2 o'clock p.
in., from the Masonic Temple, Ber
keley. Interment, privute.
THE SPARK
GREETING
The above announcement appears
In the San Francisco papers of Decem
ber 14. Captain ilGoodmau wns very
well known here, having been a regu
lar callor for niajiy years as a sea
captain. Ho was very popular and his
death will bo greally regretted among
many old timers, ,
Tim Hawaiian
opora proseiilod at
On Christmas eve, tomorrow nlcht.
the long distance station at Kahuku
will scatter wjreless messages out
over tho ocean, for whatever there Is
on the shores beyond or on the wa
ters between, in the way of wireless,
to receive.
"A Merry Christmas! Merry Christ
mas! Aloha!" will be sparked for mere
good feeling's sake across the seas.
and ships near and afar, equipped with
wireless, and shore, stations wherever
they be, which can; catch the mes
sage, will hear Hawaii flash the sea
son's greetings."
It is a pretty idea and orlcinated
.with Manager Baron of the Wireless
Telegraph and Telephone Company
and will help;, draw,, the attention or
the world to the fact' that Hawaii is
as much interested in Christmas as is
any other spot on , the glooe.
A CHRISTMAS SONG.
"Hark! the apse, host In Heaven.'
Singing ot thelr.'.now born King:
Christ was born.fcpday in Bethlehem,
Let all on earth, raiolce and sing.
ChriBt tho child In lowly manger,
Born a King of Dayldjs line,
Sing and praiso Hia, glorious being,
"Peace on earthifcoall mankind."
Born a King of humble parents,
In an ill kept cattle stall:
Angelic hosts above proclaiming,
"Unto them a King wns born,"
Wlso men bowed In adoration,
Offering gifts so rich nnd raro:
And tho multitudes were singing,
Hymns of praiso that filled tho air.
"Glory to our King in Ileavon,"
Peace on earth, good vt towards men,
Blng and praiso wltlu humble rever
ence, Christ the Child of neinlohom,
J.'W, WijRRTMII.
Our STOCK is Larger This Year Than Ever and Our
Patronage Is Greater.
The Assortment of CHRISTMAS GIFT GOODS' is now
at Its Best.
Now is the Time to Order. Delay is sometimes Disappoint-
ing, as We may Run Out; of Your Choice. 0
All Goods Engraved Free of Charge by the Best Engraver
in the City.
MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
II. R. COUNTER
1142 FORT STREET
HOES
FOR WOMEN
1
The buildings of Women's shoo is a specialty of Its own. Itegals
for women are distinguished by their grace, style, and fetching fe
minine character, and are preferred everywhere by women ot refine
ment c
SHOE CERTIFICATES
One of the most sensible and acceptable Christmas gifts Is a
Christmas Certificate, good for a pair of Regal Shoes, to be selected by
the recipient. Try it
Our Regals for Men, and Women at J3.50 and ?4.00 are known all
over the world for their high quality quality of style, materials, work
manship, fit, and wear.
SLIPPERS
Cozy, comfortable slippers for1
the home. They make very
sensible and acceptable Chrtst
" mns fclfts.
For Men and Women.
Regal Shoe Store
McCandless Building, King and Bethel streets.
CHRISTMAS
BOOKS
BOOKS' FOR CHILDREN.
Pretty Picture Books, Story Books, Fairy Tales, Mfather
Goose, Etc., Etc.
STANDARD AND POPULAR FICTION.
In our Fine Assortment of all the Standard and Populaf
Authors, you will find Books that will please the taste of any.
Grown Up. Books always make most Acceptable Presents for
Christmas Remember That.
Hawaiian News Company, Ltd.
YOUNG BUILDING.
1
Exquisite
Petfume
Never haVe such flno perfumes
been shown in Honolulu; theso
have a delicate, yet persistent,
fragrance that stamps them as
highest In quality.
We offer them at reasonable
prices.
ENDOItA, SAFIUNOn,
' VIOLET LEAVES, VIVITIZ
Packed especially for Christ
mas trade in beautiful fancy
boxes, in sets or singly. Neat
half-pint bottles for those who
prefer them.
LIMITED.
FORT BTREET.
ft-
! .
"PURITAN" and "ROSE"
CREAMERY BUTTER
Largd, fresh shipment Just in.
HENRY MAY & CO., LTD.
Phone 22.
it
Don't Use
Glasses
Unless you need them and when too
do need them be sure they tit you W
will give you a thorough examination,
and if you don't need' glasses will tell
you; it you do will sell you the best
H. F.
k CO,, LTD
Optical Department
DR. F. SCHURMANN
Optician.
V
3
STEINWAY
STARR AND OTHER PIAN03
THAYER PIANO CO.
15G Hotel St., Opp. Young Hotel.
Phone 218. '.
TUNING GUARANTEED.
All kinds WRAPPING PAPERS Antfyf t 't
TWINES, PRINTING 'and WRIT(lNar
PAPERS. AMERICAN-HAWAIIAN PAPER A
SUPPLY CO., LTD. .
GEO. Q. GUILD, General Manager.
. Fort and Queen Street.
Honolulu. PHONE 410. -
FOR SALE.
Toilet Sets
51 . -
'
! HANDSOME, USEFUL GIFTS.
TOILET SETS, consisting of Mirror, Comb, and Brushes,
some with Natural Wood, others with Alligator Backs. All
Handsome Goods, and of the Very Best Quality.
, MANICURE SETS', PERFUMES,
MILITARY HAIR BRUSHES,
SHAVING GLASSES, ETC.
I Many Other Suitable Gifts for CHRISTMAS.
I Honolulu Drug Co.,
L,lmltecX
Odd Fellows' Building, Fort Street,
I HI ' HP Ml ! Ill IIIIIBIIBI I II
French Ganges Brick setting slzee 4
ft to 9 feet at right prices. Set-up.,
ready for a fire. Zinc lined Redwood.
Bath tubs complete. Wind mill force
pumps, all brass cylinders. Largt.
variety of special pipe and fittings.
Prompt attention to Job work 1m
plumbing .' !
EMMBLUTH & CO.. LTD.
Phone 211. -146 King Btroet
i if
Hawaiian Souvenir Purses.
50c Each.
IT
and ease can only bo had In our
Koa Furniture. Chairs, Dressers
and Desks of beautiful finish
made from the finest Koa log and
cut from tho best grain. Why
not outfit yourself for Xmas.
Wing ChongCo
Manufactures of Quality,
Corner King and Bethel
iiMjlMitfft
tittWPPPI
4 Hi i i i wyyilr fif ifWwir fimAn
4 '
I:,

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