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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1856-1888, January 31, 1874, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1874-01-31/ed-1/seq-2/

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COIVIMEIICIAL.
mi i) ay. jam jar .. ni
- Ui U4k to Da- th Ul of !!!. -T llh IW' '
juri! or il- i'fiar'.
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(an rrm .
Tie . hrtr.n'r . M. W irJ t r:i rs I r t.V s : .n i'.
anl. T!. liik II-U ti V . Ax-y . ui- tt I J ! I I iii vl '
M n-Uj f. f J:i- jr.
Th bar l. I'. Murray n i.t 21 1 lyi ! ,-:.
Tlx- (f UBh;, M.ivl . f IV V A A. I I.-- i
bnut th aoiiJi on V r'l ,y.
pOitT or IIOIIOLULU, II. I.
.IKKIVAM.
Jo hr K jU R ,t, AJm. frra Kx,U.i
2t frhr l.naa. Kui, rr,m kooa.
a ichr Kwj Ad. J DaJoit. from KooUu
;f-hr Juitnita. f DoJcit, from Waiaiaa.
jd ?-hr M.i Morr:. Limi. from Ln b .r., Maui
j-,l.v.p I.lr Yat.W, Clark, from ilar.a, Uui.
..WS. hr Warwick. Ktltwt.1, from Pukoo. l ,1 i.
? -hr Piuahi. Norm, from liilo, Hawaii.
. tir .Vji k'.ki. fatey. Iron) Rahuuii. Mau..
:: f-hr Mary i'.i.m. Jou, froca Kahulm. Mu.
V hr K .ti Rot. Aiimi, from Koolau
?, t-hr A'lie, Puaahiwa, fr'.m H.lo. Hwv.
31 f. hr Atiruc, Koio!.n, Irom II. la, llm.i
31 tnr Kilau-A, Tajr lor, from ar..l M iui
l KIM KTC'K K.
J 4ii 21 hr M 4 K-.i.i. Pal-T, ( r Kal.uJui, Mui.
M mn.r KiUara, T?i"T, for Mui r.d IliWi;..
CrJ.r K.r.i Ada, J I)a.l .il, f.r K'ilaa.
yi H-hr R .' Hoy, A limi, for K".Lu.
ZT rhr J aatiUa. C I fcloit, for ViIu.
H hr it." Mrnl. ttiw, for l.atiaina. Mini
-.7 rrhr JliI Morr U, I ima, for M .!oki.
27 frrbr "I I IVIiow, .Nik.t, for ili. Kami.
v" frht Jronjr, l;oi-tr. for Koa, Kau li.
-.' rhr I uk, Kuj. t.r H.!o, Hawaii.
!' hr Muairk, Kuwait, f- r KiL-lU.l.l, Mli
::i Cl.j..r. l. Yank', Urk. f.r lUt.a. Maai.
Ht hr I'aoAia, Ilo.a, f.r ll.lo, Ilanit.i.
VKSSKUS I.V I'OIIT.
II B nam r-rr-H-t Ttir.M, Til 1. Ki .
wiiAtka.
Bi.l mh l.k Farawijr, '-.rl..n.
Uril w! bk A4rniarrr, ll'.-rrntleen, ri.air.f.
li t 4 br Koub, I'a. k'l, Kn -g.
Haw tr.f lnir I.
II aw bri Wm II A:i- n, H l,wi,l. r.
Aairhi - M W ar t, fi W Hirkman.
A at l.k llka W A liny, l r.--Tn!u, l-..lii.f.
A m bk t rtii. t, P I' Ml h"nJ,
K.IMIKT!S.
Fob niio lun-r. r C. M. WarJ, Jan. SOih:
Brra.1, r 11 I'alal, l
Hff, It.... 3,0i l'u(.tt, L.i i'
I'nIUO LU4 k,tM-il I R';, C..iU 3
Molwo, 30u '
Value Dom. at ic I on ijn ........ .00 7 4 .
Fob FakJiriuro Pr r. mn, Jan. SOih:
Rauanaa, tu hi. ....... 1,500 Rire, tm... CO
Brandy, ra.. 1 Kugar, .kg
Mala f. Ik( 1W lo..l, bi C
Value Uotiumtic. JlS.lJi 41; l'or. i(o. ...... . 175.
IMMKMiKKK.
Fob VijDwaao PoB-ra Prr Kilauca, Jan. '.'.th Mai-.i
; RiiU'rf. rd, W I. UaTia, lhaa Williama, A P Junra, J P 'in cu.
I J l BlaadtU, U W illuuca, an.1 about 74 deck.
I fti F4cico Per Cuml. Jan. 30il J H-inii.;,
!Gro llmpairail, W A I'ookc, Ja Morton, Mrfarkell.
'j Fob fiijo Ili Prr C. M. VVar.l, Jan. COih W II
. I rrrUr, A J klarwy, C M HiiliweU, L Mccail.
Facia Wiidwd PoT Per Kilauea, Jan. Zlt lion C
: IIarrta,T l!uVa. 1VC Parke. Jamea IJcril, Mr Keoynn.
-Mia Ei Hot p NahaJclua, V U Neetiham ana aoo. Mr Along,
'VIM Lacy Pealmajy, Mr Kenwty awl daughter, Mrs l.u. k-
wnc Bnl chiUI, F MvUaif, Bod 6J ueck.
I the PAcinc
CDmmfrcialbbcriiscr.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 31.
Iouv.m I'a lace, Saturday, 4 a.m.
! January 31st, 1874.
Sinee our laht Uulletin waa iieucl, on Wcdncs-
J.iv. the Kincr has lx;cn ecttlns weaker every day.
Vestcrdaj lie wan not able to take much nourish-
jient. He is riuiet. free from rmin, but hi Ftatc
a alarming.
Ity the attending physicians,
(5. Tbocsseai',
.. - R. Oliver. -
Lv th PBt!t.CEof nn impending public emer
gency, it becomes necessary not only to cogitate
rithin ourselTee as to the proper plana to pursue
i the near future, but it is tho part of wisdom
p Lake such preliminary eteps in advance as may
idicate the course marked out. Public exi
gencies by their gravity- override what might
f nder other circumstances be rightly deemed con
iderationa of delicacy or nice perceptions of
.ropricty..
j We deem the situation of the country to-Uay
b4 one of such emergency that, in the absence
f any regularly appointed and proclaimed 6uc
pmor to the Throne, the well understood will of
rio people ia this important regard, should be
! early and emphatically made known through
public pre. ilhe first choice of the Ilawai
n for lo for a successor to His present Majesty
tvhom Cxl preserve) is unejucetionabiy the High
hief David Ivalakaca. His claims arc in every
'pect porauiount to those of any other pereon
;e that can be named. Any attempt to thwart
e well-known will of the people in this matter,
j to be profoundly deprecated, for the Fake of
peace and future prosperity of the country.'
Wutki i.i docbt on any question of public im
rtance, there is nothing so reassuring to the
'rploxcdfitaUv-'Uian as a sound opinion, clearly
'preeetl through the press. Thus in the Gazrttt
I Weilnesday List, we Lave "an opinion as is an
inion" on the question "as to when the func
'Vis of a rci-resentative holding a scat in the
'ghdature endj." c are thus eentcntious-Iy
-i that "a rcprcseniative's term of office com-J-nces
from tho date of Lis taking the oath of
... i. n .i r il". l.i i t. .
S
x , u mat iioui uic uai wueu tie geis ma
tlGcate of election " he becomes the reprcsent-
af
e elect, anj. that " these newly chosen rcp
entatives aro t!ie only lawful ones for any er-
In
e that may bo required of them, even should a
it
cial iiession of the Legislature be called im-
iiatcly
aftcr the election." This acrobatic
le of ratiocination reminds us of a story we
e read concerning an experiment in gunnery
Jcrtaken by svmc tlcorUts, where a loaded
tla
vitzer was lashed to the back of a mule. After
"iia-J been duly r rimed and r-ointcd and the
tch ignited, the perverse mule suddenly slewed
tin
nit and brought the muzzle to bear upon the
o untied savants. Vc leave the application
it.
of
h our readers.
am
nvr Has bexv the custom Lcre to give the next
w"tf r r. i,rt i,va.i
wh
. CC OI liouur aiivi me kvnitiu vo mv m..v. vi
Judiciary Department, and from this fact ap-
.ently some have entertained the opinion
' . offtovv Loa riirfr TivvmrilircT tliat (
that
that of an
lual
crican Vice President, to take the head of j
ele(
irs in the Kingdom during an interregnum
ena
be j opinion which, eo far as we can sec, Las the
gjnonty oi ncimer coimniuiiouui jtovibiou uur
fiencQ'0r7 enactment for its foundation. Notwith
cf jding appearances, it was not so during the
that interregnum. Ihc " Cnanceiior ot tDo iung
of t" was doubtless much consulted, mainly as j
reprZ 'S0 official, and moreover because he was
altb. political adviser; but more particularly be- j
we kj bla yery ofSce he- could not exercise cxe- j
ihatT WeT3 waa JW"J na or u0P !
0f Change. I'nder these circumstances, he could j
jnppoeed to advise only for the honor and safety '
ria IvIntrrlAm. mi He uninfluenced bv considera- '
reser o- -i -
and Is P01"3.? oul r0'0 machinations or
jle irl. But it was really the Cabinet of His
r .iMajesty who acted for and as the Government
l'rjclcd Drpnrlurra.
Fob Htt l" 1 iriv Firk Con. ft. uili l).i ilay.
I ui ii-io ltM :l.r C l War.1. aiU to-U ijr.
to KtNi Lti hr M i h'lki', n.i.: thi r m.
Fob kroner 1 r k IJ'P-n V Aim. tL (ji Motia.
Fob WiiowkUD I'ot Mlmr K.l.iira, u.l cu Mowiay
jf ftr uiiteri,n' l be conrencu me igisuiure, ana
i ail executive autaoriijr, iui mc utuiuu ui
r. r l : . - M..Mn,tA
ptW aoyeTeigu reruireu no wncuun.
t':- n-itii' .f th- ( l.anall 'r aj-
ir.iry -.-f t'.e rvjt'.-.ritjr of t!-c vi-
cnt 1 i r
nr di-tir.- 1
the uT nit
I lip j i !-. :.-
;u. 1 f a
r .Atr f t! Kin
f ti..- C.ii.-tituti n
t ) ti.-- u f
r J :u. Articl.-
1 rovi l-ti. it the r in it exvrei-r j- divided
).etwe ii ti.-.- Lx'-rii'.iv-. I-. i-I.itiv.- ar. l JuiiCial,
whiiii -!. -.'.! ..i-.vay- b j re-cmd distinct; a i x-r-viri
-n fun lii.-fiitiil tj a ' '.on-titnti jn.il i--vern-jii
r.t il. it i-. t a verni.. i.t of rather
of ii.'ii. V.; t.ik- this j r .vi.-i oil t r' q'iire
a r. al an 1 sub-tantial ger aratin f thete three
functioiiR f a (overr.ruent. Not that thfro is no
: i.iutiiil ilejen.J.-ncc .r un.:.,n uiu -r;,r them, fr
measurably thti.- i- and umt b- Thu- the
King, wf.. r'j r'-r.-rjtf! th? executive jwr, i a
, constituent of tb.- I.-i-.-itire ; the executive and
the Legislative dej ittnentd may require the--j-in-
i n of the ju Jici.iry ; t!.e j'i Jieiary works tLrough
' the ei.-eutive. Hut we understand the .rovi-ion
. under review t i frbid a transfer of the whole
i
j j-ower A any one of the three enumerated branches
to another, surh as would be accomplished if the
head of the judiciary department wen- to be
vested with the j-owcr oi the .Supreme executive
the Rjyal I'ower though fior a brief time and
under some restriction-. S jX does it change the
complexion of the care to fay that, in that event,
this officer would be acting, n ot in his judicial ca
pacity but in an executive which would be to
quibble away a great and vital constitutional
jrinciple. l!y the same quibble, the King could
sit as Chief Justice, then acting judicially and
In f-hort, what was im-ant for a good deal
Would come to mean nothing at all.
Articl s C4 to Ci proviJc that tho Chief Justice
shall j rcide over the Judiciary Department;
shall be Chancellor of the Kind-.m, and rive him
power as such to preside over the House of No
bles when it sits judicially in impeachment cases;
and to excrcie"; such other jurisdiction in equity
and other cases as the- law may Confer upon him.
And there is an entire absence throughout the
whole of this instrument of words conveying any
such supposed authority as we have mentioned.
Neither can it c derived from the high title of
Chancellor, for there arc surely no great powers
latent in a name alone without some express gift.
The name of Cltanccllur is at plied to officers of
very different functions in diffi rent states of
Kuroj-c and in different states of the United
.States. That officer is just w hat he is expressly
constituted, whether a political Chancellor as in
rrusn'a ; an officer of legation as w ith the French ;
the judge of a Court of Chancery, otherwise
called Lquity, as in some of the United .States;
or as here, the head of the Judiciary Department,
and a judge with fruity jurisdiction though
sharing the latter power with both his associates.
On the other hand, th Constitution docs pro
vide otherwise for the temporary and limited ex
ercise of the JJoyil Tower, in several emergen
cies that may arise. In the event of the Throne
falling to a minor heir, and no Regency provided
by the will of the deceased Sovereign, his Cabinet
call the legislature to elect suoh Urgency, and
meantime themselves act as a Regency exercising
the I'oyal Powers in the name of the young Sov
ereign. In the same way when there is no suc
cessor, the Cabinet call the Legislature who elect
a King, and if that King were a minor would also
elect his Regent or Council of Regency. There
is here no more intimation of tho executive power
being wielded by the Chancellor of the Kingdom
than by the Marshal of the Kingdom. The only
act of Royal Power and rrcrogativc mentioned
the convening of the legislature is expressly
assigned to the Cabinet, of which the Chancellor
is not a member. It can never be supposed that
the Cabinet, having done this, will then look to
the Chief Justice for further authority, and con
duct the Government ad interim as his Ministers.
The act of convening the -Legislature is of high
authority and great responsibility, when and
where it shall meet; whether in four weeks, as
lately, or whether the interregnum 6hall be longer
or shorter. Further, the Cabinet might have the
responsibility of deciding who arc the Represent
atives to 1h) called a subject w hich we discussed
last week and that resjonsibility is one that
cannot be shifted to other shoulders. The
Cabinet being responsible for the acts of a
Sovereign, none of which have any f jrce or effect
without being countersigned by a Minister, it
must bo held that they cannot shift the responsi
bility of interregnum acts aud administration
upon cither the Chancellor or the Court. There
is, however, a provision for asking the opinion of
the Justices.
Rut perhaps all this is too obvious, notwith
standing the opinion referred to in the outset as
entertained by some. And in fact, we supposo
that tho distinguished official whose executive
jurisdiction we have been considering would be
the last to pretend to any such extraordinary,
inconsistent and conflicting powers.
The Internationals.
Perhaps no sooial diaturbancc of modern days ever
occasioned so much alarm at the time among the gov
ernments and crowned heads of Europe, as that which
was aroused by the uprising of the Internationals,
some three years since. lr a few months it was the
theme of newspaper discourse in all parts of the
world, and the prognostications as to the aim and ul
timatum of the mysterious society were in many
cases as amusing as they were absurd the sensa
tional class cf newspapers being especially great with
the cares of nations in this matter. Gradually
however, this species tf Communism has died out. I
The members assembled in general Congress could
noi agree upon tiiui puiuia vi pvticj, uua iuc jiousc
thus divided against itself gradually tumble! to
pieces, and now the end has come.
At their sixth Congress, held on the 1st September,
only one of the original leaders was present, Jaques
Guillaume, the remainder being deal, changed iu
their opinions, or become too prosperous to care
about Internationalism. " Like the St. Simonians," caa as wcl1 done here, and iu all respects as
says a contemporary, "the Internationalists seem to j feaply and advantageously to all concerned, i, do
J . . , - ... .. . . IDS a direct injury to our own industries. Is this
have a faculty for getting on in the world ; and when
they do, they acquire new ideas as to the value of :
property, or think, like Albert Richard, that an Em
peror could do no more than a committee, just the
conviction cf the Roman plcbsT after their long strug
gle with the patricians, and of the l'anish proletariat
after their contest with the Utiles." Karl Marx is
still trying to organize a central despotism over labor,
but decs not succeed, and the new leaders at Geneva,
so far from approving the Commune, are not willing
to organize a general strike, fvr which it is said the
working-classes on the Continent have a hankering,
but for which th?y have not the means. The Spanish
representative revealed the curious fact that there are
still only 50,000 Internationalists throughout Spain,
and the entire orgariiation had to congratulate itself j
on only a few local strikes. Germany was notrepre-
sented; Mr. Hales, from Kngland, reported no pro
gress, and M. Costa, from Italy, denounced Gari
baldians and Mazziuists as people who knew nothing,
and understood nothing except fighting. The Amer
icans sent no delegate, but wrote that the Council
should have no powers, but all duties; and the Dutch
men point to the rising wages of their tobacconists.
Altogether, wc should say this bug-bear cf mankind,
which three years ago nearly launched the Govern -
ments of the worll into a crusade, is to-day a respect-
able council of persons inclined to chat in French
t. i . c - . Ti,.r. x
upon the best way of raimg wages There is no
particular harm or good in that. Ihc Lnglish opera-
tives have effected that fvx themselves, without talk-
ing about the matter at all. Hodmen, we are told, j
now receive mason's wages, and nobody has even ;
heard of a Hodmen's League, while their only decla- i
ration of principles has been lhat they won't take J
leS3.
"Pii -oyn" i4 tie term i.r.v in grrrral u
to 'J -ir..-itc t!...- iTtu3l tl.irt I t .i.-uuLu.t
vrl,i-:!i .itV.. i?." ..iii.tin! Jn;i.k.irl. Ti c vrtfrJ
is Co,njj .lin 'cl ro:a tl.c 'o.ck, an-i f ign.lles a
craj tl.:r-t . "trj j r jrly, as wc think, vlip--xaiu.i
i-i t; ,vr rcgarJ.-i as a di-caso, an t n".t a
criai. In t!ic early ! ijJ uf L'a i wnwarJ c-ur-rc,
tLc wL ir. jjlciic-d csct'T.-ivtly in drink is
utk-ijuSt'NiJy cri:uir.al, nut when tl.at nag.i i-
To.;s:d :kt.-l t'.c ja.-.-i jQ f.-r drink Las bco -ni- a
ditcajj.., wo fail to .-.-c the justice of jun'shin
hiru a-? vc w.juIJ a thief. I'Dier uur statute, any
! convicti jn fjt drunkenneef after the rst, renders
! the j-ern liable to imprisonment at hard labor
j f jt a t-rni nt t j exeeei three months. In our
1 priori, the inmates are uot classified, 5 j that the
' jitiible ictiiu of dij jaaDiu, who as a last re-
j sort i- imf-ri-jne-d ti jrevetit his committing
j suicide, is sent to work on the roaii (ii Lis health
j will all jw of it) in company with criminals of the
lowest stamp- We think it will be conceded, in
tins age of enlightenment, that such a mode of
treatment of this class of cases is radically wrong.
We have our hospitals for those suffering from
any disease, no matter what or how caused, with
the exception of the mania fjr drink. If a man
is mad upon any other point than that of insatia
ble thirst, our laws make provision lor his eafe
custody.
In tht.- United States, in Kngland and in the
colonies of Australia, habitual drunkenness is
trcat.-d as a disease; asylums and " Homes of the
Inebriate" have been established with remarka
ble success. In Melbourne, as we learn from re
cent papers, an asylum lor the reception and cure
of dipsomaniacs has been established fur some
time, and has been found to answer admirably
the purpose it was intended to subserve. It has
not only redeemed the drunkard, who but for such
a valuable institution would have met a horrible
death from delirium or suicide, but it has caused
many a man to be returned to his family at least
temporarily reformed, If not permanently so ; and
there is the institution to receive back the erring
mortal should he find the craving for drink com
ing on him which may cause a relapse to his
former terrible vice. Many of these institutions
have been nearly self-supporting, because, as it
unfortunately happens, there are many members
of the well-off and comfortably situated classes
who require the restraining powers conferred on
these asylums, and whose friends or relatives are
both able and willing to pay for their admission
and retention.
In making these statements, we are not about
to urge the propriety of building an asylum for
dipsomaniacs in this country; but we desire to
exhibit the view taken of the subject in other
countries as a contrast and a reproof to our own
mode of dealing with the disease, with the hope
that some action may be taken towards amending
the law in this particular.
Is looking over our exchanges we came across au
account of a new process for cleaning wool, recently
discovered and patented in England, which, as it will
be of interest to those of our readers interested in
sheep-farming, we here insert. Whether it be on the
sheep's back, or after the clip, the way in which wool
is cleaned is of vital importance to all any way con
cerned with this great staple of textile industry.
Any improved method whereby wool, however clogged
with dirt or grease, can be purified cheaply, thor
oughly, and quickly without trouble, and so as not
to injure in any way the fibre of the wool, is neces
sarily welcome as an economic discovery, and claims
the closest attention of all industrially or commercially
interested in wool. Such a discovery seems to have
been made by the Bank Wool Cleansing Company,
the patentees (one of the gentlemen connected with
it being himself a retired squatter) and exclusive
manufacturers of a neutral soap, which, as a deter
gent, possesses several remarkable and valuable
properties. Guaranteed to be destitute of alkali or
acid, the chemical effects of which on wool are well
known to be so destructive, the soap in question does
not in any case damage the wool, which it actually
whitens. The patentees also claim for it an Improv
ing and preserving quality. The wool has simply to
be soaked previously in hot or cold water in order to
remove loose dirt ; after this the neutral soap to be
added iu the proportion of one gallon to thirty to
cither hot or cold water ready to wash the wool or
the sheep before shearing, the usual manipulation,
results in the wool being rendered perfectly pure, of
a dazzling whiteness, and that with an unknown
fibre. Cold water will answer, but hot eflicts an
economy in material, time, and labor. In the wash
ing of sheep the value of this new and powerful de
tergent is enhanced very greatly by the fact that
should the animal happen to swallow the liquid no
harm will result; another great advantage is that it
is free from taste or smell. Totent as the prepara
tion is fur removing dirt and extracting grease, it ac
tually softens the skin of the hand of those using it,
or even the sensitive lip, without injury to the skin.
Those who have seen the efficacy cf the neutral soap
tested on Eome very dirty and greasy wool, report
that the action was virtually instantcous, on the wool
on being taken from the liquid and dried becoming
at once clear, white, and quite-clean, while the fibre
was decidedly perfect. The neutral soap acts with
equal efficacy on cotton waste, which is, as some of
our readers know, intensely foul at times, and no
doubt the scope cf this new, innocent, and most eco
nomic detergent can be widely extended. For wool
producers and consumers, however, the invention
promises to be of the greatest moment and value.
Mr. EniTOB : I am informed that a large propor
tion of the printing required for the Supreme and
other Courts blank rroces.oes. &c. is executed in
Saa FrancIiCOf anJ comcs Jown Lerc na tLe sajing
- b th cart-load." This strikes me as very
) questionable economy, and is certainly au unjust
! and illiberal policy towards our own people. In the
j Aovebtier printing office, as daily observation
, shows, there arc some fourteen or sixteen native
: printers employed, and in the Gazelle say half as
I many. Many of these have families to support,
i The sending out of the country of any work that
Court work sent away from Hawaiians by the order
of Judge Ilartwtll, the head of the bench, or is the
chief clerk, Mr. Seal, the responsible party ?
A. 15.
Mn. Li'iTOit : Amongst the work which is to Le
done by the coming Legislature, I think an amend
ment to the bankrupt law ought to have a place
such an amendment as is now before the United
States Congrcss introduced by the Hon. Mr. Tiemaine
cf 2SCW York, one of the first lawyers in the United
States. Section 1st repeals the present law with all
its amendments and the second provides that where
there arc bankruptcy proceedings pending, a majority
in value of the creditors whose claims had been
rroven. may determine in what manner and on what
tcrnis anJ Ctinditions the estate of the bankrupts
be administered, and such administration shall
be immediately confirmed by the Court.
This sccm3 to me to be eminently just, and no cred
itor for a email amount ought to have it in his power
to force a bankruptcy to the injury of the great body
of creditors or the majority in interest.
Ia the great failure here in 1SCG, the liabilities
were SG00,XO, and the business of winding up was
in process, under a committee chosen by the creditors
with a prospect of paying fifty per cent, or more,
when a creditor for SI, "200, one five hundredth
part of the liabilities, puts the house into bankruptcy,
and only twenty to twenty-five per cent, of the debts
were ultimately paid. 1 hope that some of themem-
bers will try to secure such an amendment as will be
tQ aU nJ prevcnt guch losscg t0Q oftea hj tJje
capriCe or ill will of some minor creditor. I can
think cf nothing more essentially just than the
amendment offered by the great New York lawyer
Tremaine.
Yestebday p. m. a three-niasted schooner passed
tho port steering west probably a China-hound
Jumber teasel.
t M. Emtob: I; is a matter .f general belief
that f. r a peeph; to le Lipry thty shcuM be well
goTtrne-1, but thay cinnct be well govertel uctes?
the laws are wise, atj arc justly and impartially
' alailniitcre 1. When the laws press heavily ta f-tne
nacmters cf the c-wiuraua'.? leaving others to act as
they like. irresp-'Ssille t any legally constituted
' p- wtr, thfy arc ucicalted'y bal, anl shouM be
rcpealc-l a: the earliest eppcrtaaity. It is f.r this
; very purp-isc that Parliaments anl Legislatures have
j their stated periodical times of Electing; they alter
cr repeil the tld laws if fjunl insufficient to ensure
tie well being of the peoples, or make new ones to
j suit the exigencies of the times.
Bat. no matter how good, how wise, how whole-
I some the laws may be, the country is cot well gOT-
i erned if they are c;t impartially administered. If
1 cne man is bell to strict account, and made to
! uaJergo the infliction cf the most severe penalties f
! provided Lr the commission of an offense, while
; another, guilty of the same, or perhaps cf a more j
; condition of the community in which such poerver
; sion cf justice is knowingly and deliberately perpe
trated is deplorable indeed, anl those rulers, who
j act the part of the " unjust ju Je," cannot too soon I
be replaced by others at once more upright and more j
! un discriminating in their pursuit of offenders against j
gool morals. j
Article 13:h cf the Constitution reads as follows : I
'The King conducts his Government for the com
mon good: and not fur the profit, honor, or private
! interest of any one man, family, cr class of men,
; among his subjects."
We may fairly reason from this article that no one
. man, family, or class of men may violate the laws
with impunity, all others being held strictly account
; able and severely punished fur ar.y violation of the
; same laws.
We find it recorded in the Hawaiian ClaztUt of
.Lecembcr 21th last, that one man forfeited his bail
Vf SI 00 f.r selling awa without a license'; in the
' same paper of Iecember 3d, another man wis fined
S'oOO with So costs, for vending intoxicating liquor;
: on January loth, still another fined 300 and costs
for the same offense; with numerous fines of from
, two to fifty dollars, even for fast riding, drunken
ness, fornication, and the like. These results to the
commission of unlawful acts prove the determination
of the Miuistry to be the conservators of the public
morals, with one class of offenders at least, while the
detection of the wrong doers equally proves the
, devotion and energy of the police force; but how is
it, that while punishment for these offenses, the com
mission of which except for the intervention of the
i Government through its agents might not have been
' known to one out of a hundred of the community,
has been so heavily visited upon the unfortunate
delinquents, how is it, that the agent of the Govern
ment, its own exponent, the subsidired publisher of
i the Mission Board, has Leen openly accused in the
columns of another paper of this city of unres trained
traffic in the vilest obscenities and no official notice
taken of the alleged offence? Nor himself Lad the
grace, or the good taste, to come forward and apolo
gize for his wrong doing or deny or attempt to ex
plain it away? What is the unlawful selling of a
bunch of awa or of a glass of spirits compared to the
I systematic and continued poisoning of the minds of
: the young, and the pandering to the vices of the
i mature? Why should the small offender be so hear-
ily stricken and the great one be suffered to go
! scathless? The subject is too unpleasant to be further
pursued, but this one case could not be suffered to
J pass unnoticed, of inequality in the execution of the
! aws by the toleration of an obstruction and antago
j iiist of civilization and good morals. Hawaii.
I For the I'aciflc Commercial Advertiser.
To Write egibly a Moral Duty.
Books with fair, clear type, are always praised,
! and a beautiful hand-writing always gains admira
tion. But printers and others are often at their
wit's end to decipher the hieroglyphics of their cor
respondents; and besides the waste of time, there is
I often much irritation and bad feeling.
" Time is money," says the old proverb. " Time
j is the most precious of all things," writes the old
philosopher Seneca. The printer is paid according to
the niraiber of ma bo sate- up. If tboix b loses an
hour ia a day in consequence of illegible copy, is not
I the writer guilty of robbing him of one-tenth of his
! wages for the day ? But the writer excuses himself
j by saying that he cannot spend time to write a fair
i hand. He should think that the time of the printer,
I or of his correspondent is worth as much as his own.
! I have known individuals to spend a quarter of an
j hour in finding out the meaning of a single sentence;
I and that loss of time must be laid to the account of
i the writer. Others think that it does not pay to
! spend time in this way, and they pass over such
sentences. If one loves his neighbor as himself, and
places a just estimate upon his own time, he will not
occasion a loss of his neighbor's time by his illegible
writing. Tress of business does not excuse him for
scribbling off what causes wearisome effort to do
cipher; for Eome of the most rapid writers are, at the
same time, the most legible. It is carelessness, a
lack of taste, that covers the sheet with pot-hooks.
It is a thoughtless disregard of the rights of others
that inflicts upon a correspondent a loss of time, and
of patience.
He who wishes his thoughts to be read, will take
pains to give form and comeliness to h?s letters., The
Jate Mr. Wyllie was a voluminous writer; as his Sec-
j retary informed me, he left cords and cords of paper
covercu n uu uia e.imi?. uui tuvo jo . nwvi
them ? If he had written a fair hand, some doubtless
! would consult his writings with interest, for the sake
of the curious information contained in them. But
who ever thinks tf looking into them? They might
; almost as well have been written in Chinese, or
: Arabic.
And orthography should be united with calligraphy.
By the absence of either cf these blunders and losses
are frequently occasioned. A merchant in England
! sent an order to his agent at the West Indies for two
monkeys to amuse his children; but unfortunately he
was not skilled iu spelling, and he wrote for. too
monkeys. And as his hand-writing was not very
fair, his agent read it 100 monkeys. Accordingly,
he procured fifty monkeys, and sent them by the
first opportunity; and wrote that he would send the
remaining fifty very soon. That merchant received
a fitting penalty for his carelessness and ignorance.
Could illegible writers be made to do penance in some
such way, much vexation would be avoided, and
much time would be saved. ALiQrr-.
From tho Sydney M.rhbtj Jbr'thl we clip the
following :
The departure of the s-teamship Mf jrej'-r from
this port inaugurates a now mail service for New
South Wales. We Lave before had a service via
San Francisco, but if the most temporary char,
acter. and quite subsidiary to the griier;il colonial
service via dalle. Since then it lias been found
that the interests of thi- colony demanded a dis
tinct line cf it own, and as the route via S;in
Francisco promised more beneficial results iu a
commercial point cf view, as well as a more rapid
course of post than either via Torres Straits r
fJ:ille. it has been selected. There is a general
wish on the part of our fellow-Colonists that the
new line receive support commensurate to what
may be considered a national undertaking, and in
future our usual monthly summary will be pub
lished for transmi-sion by it. instead of by the I',
and O. steamers.
NOTICE.
rrT.j .MISS LOTTIE ALEXANDER IS
rfftn' Prepared to five lessons on the l'iano to a fesr
N.-holars. The bed f-f references given. jj31 tf
THEOD. C. HEUCK,
M PORTER AND COMMISSION MER-
X tUAsr
( ji.il ly) Honolulu, uaijU, n. i.
I
X GREEX CASES, 12 BOTTLES EACH.
la KcJ Cases. 13 UuttUfi eat-h.
In Basket'. 12 Jura each.
In Bandar Duly Paid.
nc9 For Sale by CUAS. LONG.
THE CAEG-O
O I"
FINE BARQUE LOUISE AND GEORGINE
rov XVarlv IDiu- ironi I.ivorpool is olKrel
Ior Sole. -oiiNiNtinr of:
A
ASST. DRY GOODS,
DENIMS, CLOTHING,
TROUSERING,
f
CHOICE
Xj argo "X7" olvot
BAGS, HEAVY BAGGING, LEATHER BELTING, SADDLES,
WINES AND SPIRITS !
Ind Coope & Co.'s Ale; Blood,
HOOP IRON, FENCING WIRE.
WHITE LEAD.
ia24 lm
NOTICE TO CREDITORS !
DIVIDENDS AT THE RATE OF TWKX-j
ty-cne por ront.. on account of claims aiiaiiil the rtate !
cf W. HUM J'HKKY, late cl Honolulu, d.-ceaicl, will be!
pah! to Creditor aftr this ilatc. at ihecfti.-e of j
S. 11. 1MILK, Executor.
Honolulu, Jan. 31. 1ST1. jaP.l 4t ;
NOTICE.
'V.IIE A X N I' A I- MEKTIXIi OK THE
HAIKU' hliiAK COMPANY ill be held at the
lug room of Mesr. Castle Jc CooWe, on
r-nniv a w 4 r- a a -a- , n x
Counti
SATl'RDA V Slat JAM'AIIV, AT IO A.M..
fir the purpose of clectinu Officers for the ensuing jear au.l
ether business. l'er Order :
It J. P. CO0KK, Secretary.
MANILA CICAJIS !
SMALL LOT OK THOSE Sl KERIOK
Xm quality CIGAKS. just reeeired. These Cinars, are liWe
tho we had aliout one year since, and pronounced to be the
best article offered in this market during the last twenty
years. S-pecially put up for us 2uO cigars 111 a box.
ja31 For fale by lHU.LKd & CO. i
NORTH C.ERMAN EIRE j
INSURANCE COMPANY OF HAMBURG ;
flMIE KXDERSIGNED HAVING HE EN" j
M. appoiuted Agent of the atiove Company for the ?in.l ioh
Islands, is now prepared TO IXtfl'ltK Ati A INST FI11K upou i
the most favorable terras, I
On ltrirli, Siour, nud Wvoilrn Siarra. j
And on Merchandise stored therein, Private Iiwellings, Furni- (
ture, yc. All Louses adjusted an J paid for here with prompt- j
itude. For particulars apply at the office or
ja31 ly TIIKOD. C. HrXCK, Agent.
N. MURPHY,
snip smith,
.MACHINE AND TOOL KO RUING!
Also, AGRICULTdlAL IMPLEMENTS made and Repaired
r.rtirular Atttntiou raid to llOUSK-SllOKlM; !
ja31 Shop at Jas. Robinson ti Co.'s Wharf. 3iu
SPRING VESSEL, 1874!
G. BREWER & Gl
OKFER FOR SALE
THE
OF
AMERICAN BK. EDWIN
K R O M HOST O N ,
Xno in n.11 7rni-oli !
JJCR.4XTOX STEAM COAL. IX LOTS TO
3 suit purchasers, for f.tmily me.
NEW II ED FORD KAMILV SO A I. I
5 OOO FT. SELECTED BOAT BOARDS,
2 CENTRE BOARD EXTRA TIMBER
ED AVHALE BOATS.
25 URLS, AMERICAN T.R.
25 URLS, SOUTHERN PITCH,
50 BULS. No. I ROSIN,
cases spirits ti'ri'enti ne,
a kink. assortment ok oa rs.
eale a plows,
25 KITTS No. 1 MACKEREL.
15 CASES CORN STARCH,
i
KiUIt. IMJLS. KAMILV POKK, j
5 UBLS. CENKINE CIDER. VINEGAR,
FOUR FIRE EXTINGUISHERS.
BALES OAK CM.
EASTERN PINE K Efi AND BARREL j
i
SHOOKS.
ALSO, ON HAND
EX RECENT ARRIVALS !
Which will be offered LOW
TO CLOSE CONSIGNMENTS. j
I
ANCHORS nud CHAINS. ASSTD. SIZES.
KARMER'S BOILERS. 20, 25. :iO AND
40 K ILLS.
PAINTED BCCKETS AND PAILS.
EASTERN HARD BRICKS.
PINE MOLASSES BARRELS. SET I P.
HORSE, I CLE AND HAND CARTS.
CA X I L BA RRO WS.
CUMBERLAND COALS !
E NT R I KI C A L LI N 1 X OS,
(JIXXV fIA:;S IX CASES OFaaO l'ir'a
I
OX YOKES, e. I. j AXD t.
OVSTERS. I'll ESI I AXD M'ICED.
VKLLO V I ET A Ls A X I X" A I Ls.
C. BREWER & CO.
j26 ja31
K I Xf STREET OPPOSITE THE B ETII EL, j
for saleor hire! i
Gaur,
Hoist- Lr-spu to Hai Qi-ss on reasonable terms. ,
K AN'OKLEIIL'A,
Late Coachman to the late Quen Dowager KaUma, and
jalO 2m J. C. Peuger, Esqr.
4
T II K
CHOICE PUTS. BLANKETS
BLUE & WHITE CHECKS,
WATER PROOF TWEEDS,
XX
Wolfe & Co.'s Ale; Bass' Ale!
H0LL0WWARE. SLATES,
ZINC, BOILED OIL.
THEO. H. DAVIES.
NOTICE.
'IVIIK I'l'III-M' AITK IIKKEIIV OTI-
lht JoSKI'll TUCHAIKY t. n. autli.irltr to
l "y Leather or ruaU-rial ma.l. at ttie KA1.U AU TAN -
NKIIV, nor to incur any eximtuliture on account of llie .nii-,
,'""' I Uiroufli the- un.lmigne.l .
J. I. 1'iiWSKTI'.
Honolulu, March 17, IST.t uili .'
j JEKKKl'S. TKXXKXT'Si, CIIAMI'AGX E, i
J Norwegian, Key llraml, tic, Ac.
i lioS For SAlf hv (-11 AS I ilr:
CIIAS. I.OMJ.
Strangers Visiting Honolulu
MIM. FINII AT
DICKSON'S ART GALLERY!
TIJO. Ill KORT STREET. A SPLENDID
Photographic Views of Hawaiian Scenery,
i. COIXKCTION Or
Port mil of Prominent Iln wniiitii,
IIIU III IN AMI MHKOVKMIY ( I IllOMTIKS !
COKAI.. .HEl.I-o, VOLCANIC HITCIM KNs. Jte.
j t 10 tr
HAWAIIAN MESS BEEF !
IJACKEI) HV C. 1IERTLEM ANN. K A I ' A I ,
and WAKRANTEO. For Pale by
oelS 3m A. W. PEIRCK A: CO.
TUGS. Gr. THRUM.
Stationer
AND
NEWS XIZ2VTTi:
BEGS LEAVE TO NOTIFV TIIEI'l lt
I.IC that a
Fine Line of Stationery !
II AS
Just been Received ex Late Arrivals
among which way be found :
Foolscap Taper, all kinds;
Legal Cap, Account Current Paper,
Letter Paper, all kinds;
Note Papers, a Fine Variety of American, English and French
in White and Blue, plain and ruled; Tinted, plain and
ruled, and White and Blue Bank Note, plain.
Initial Note with Envelope to match, check and linted, some
thing neat and desirable. Also, several plainer kind-4.
A Few Boxes only "De Soto" Papeterie,
the latest style out.
Note, Lett'-r and (lovernment Hiie Envelopes,
Pens (lold, Steel and Quill, a large assortment.
.Vi-iiolclVi "Wx'ltiiifif Xlnici
The Best Black Ink know.i,
DAVIDS' VIOLET INKS!
All sizes, the most lasting of any maker or this favorite shade.
Davids1 aud Underwood's Copying Ink,
Memorandum and Tass Books, Cypher Book.
Blank Books, Mucilage,
Large Rubber Holders with caps for protecting the Pen.
I'aber'i Postal Card Pocket Pencil, Willi protecting slide.
Stephen's Combination Eraser and Enve
lope Opener !
Thumb Tacks or Drawing Pins,
Faber's Rubber Bands, 1-4, 1-2 an l 3-4 in h.
Wax Crayons, Colored, In boxes;
Camel's Hair Bruihes, Gum Labels in vari.-ly.
Blotting Pads, 3 sizes ;
Blank Visiting Cards, 3 sizeg in boxes, 4 siz-s In parki H.
'
EX. LARGE AND HEAVY FLAT PAPERS!
j for special sizes of Blank Book Mai.uf o tuie.
I Toijftlifr r',th hif Itii other All'tele olirtit f-iviul in
! II Will Aq(iiidiil Stiltiimt r's.
-ALPO-
DIARIES FOR 1874!!
In the u?ual fine variety of tyl s and sizis.
'r (ii T. IS AO EXT FOR THE HAWAII-
j AS I.-I.AMS f. r It. AI-l'I.KlON tt '.-
SUBSCRIPTION BOOKS!
. Amo"e whirh ar"
Seward's Travels around the World,
Iiarton's Knryclopedia of Wit arid Iluin -r,
Business Anecdotes,
Fuiith's Dictionary of the Ilil.le,
American Kneycl-.edia,
Annual C -li.pedi i,
Lire of K'.hert E. Le.-, Ac.
All orders will l forwarded as fiat as practical, The s .-r,i, I
i.'iv .ii'.- i.f th- alrf.ve is evj.eet.-.! shortly.
LOOK OCT FOR
V 1 i : TV rr I TV 1 Si
Expected by the S. S. Macgregor.
AIIOrJrn.,11 l OIW iu th- or.Lr in wl.i. h tl.cy ar ro !
reiv.!, arl w.ll t.t- .lliv.-rcl arror.lir,( In aMr-u on j
J.21
ST. VALEXTIXE'S DAV.
Superior Clarets.
C1 II ATE I' LA ROSE. C II A T E A I
J fitt', St. Julian.
Medoc, Contry kc, kc.
noS KorcaleLy CUAH. I.OMO
I
r . Tr r- tvt ?
,m f
Columbia River Red Salmon
Of the Packing of 1873.
27 tf
luR SALE BY
II. II ACK FELD t C.
:.'0Tifc
y t:t ru Tiir v ita k n,.h ih au kt
Br 'M' CTrtrvvl , r4X9?, ,f , , w,t,a
tltt ir ttritt.'fi rr.Jr r . t 1
THE GRAND PACIFIC HOTEL!
CHICACO.
The Largest and Most Complete Xotcl in
the World!
rV K .Ki:i: iV i:i.I. K v i s t n
1 l-r..'t-i W IV MILKMAN Hot Mt ,r.
.W.I.-1 . l i Ui fc.ri.-rat. .-..ur.4Crat-4 U U,t.4r u a
.li. 1T1.) U .i( iu acn.Mju. L-n t r.it.muw ,
nr rutf r.r.w, arhich at Dow apra BiiJer It.nr ana.
Ifi nrn! fr lh rcvnitu.!fl n ai farata.
; .:: iiko. k hick.
l.l.Sj-Lh? ivH TWI'NTV )k. AH
I r.:caf Jur. I at, 1TJ.
. NOTICE TO CAPTAINS
Till t HIMJ AT Til:
SnncUvich Tishmds.
' f,K t Mt:uw:NKi win, I.IVK A
I.IVF! ANIMAT.S r.A lUIH'n uvvv
-,.r-
A Lion & Lioness or Cubs,
A Spotted Leopard.
A Tificr,
A Varioty of Deer.
A Zobra,
BK.inE!
Aiijthlns: Ih Harr or lllrarlivr!
AH't.Y To
JOHN THOMAS V A T K It II O ( N K.
' Juan IVruau.W V Ilia, Kuuanu Valley
HS TA HUSHED, 1851 !
FOR SALE
WHOLESALE OR RETAIL
-AT-
j QUGGII StXGCt WIlQl f StOTG,
EV ER V
VARIETY OF GOODS!
St' IT A RLE
For tho Island Trado.
Islands of tho Pacific, or
Northwestern Trado !
CONKISTINO OF
DRY GOODS. GROCERIES
HARDWARE,
SLOTS, CLOTHING,
HATS, CAPS!
Shirts of Every Kind and Quality.
Silks, 1'iinU, Ih'iiims, Hint. Cotton,
Orange Cotton, 1IoiioVh Long Cloth.
SADDLES AND SADDLERY !
Hits nud Spurn of every kind, Mexican .Saddle
and Saddle Tree, with an almost mhUch vuiielv
of (Joods, including Chalk, Whiiin, l.nmi lll.u k,
Plasler of Paris, and ieihiiis Kuiiielhing Die
reader of thi jiaju-r would not liotire Iml of -i v
great pervir-e when wanted.
Guns, Pistols, Powder, Shot. Caps,
CUTLERY, EVERY KIND!
And very mutable fur T lading iurioseH. l iihing
Twine, A c, Ac,
WHALEMEN'S INFITS AND OUTFITS!
Anoliorw, OliiliiH,
If '" lliiP, IiiKLhi!.' J'lhhtl, ll,ilhml'-l IttiileA
,l, T.iris.
GROCERIES OF ALL KINDS I
ItAKKLI.S AND 1 1 A I. K HAKHKI H HM; hiO
1873 Columbia River Salmon.
TilK
Wbolo Invoice of Manila Hope !
KEATING S PATENT,
i:x ii i: n voi ULI4JH, ji:st landkd.
DOWXEICS KEROSEXE OIL.
C 4 RD M K I CUES t
All the Card Matches to Arrive
per Syren.
PORTLAND CEMENT!
Tl.c iipw-t ami l-st I'orllanil (Ymciit in tl. Mark.-I, runr
. ai.t' f--I not nnly c-huii..- (.'.incut, l.ut g i.uiue I'l.rilnii l L'e
: nici.t, ll.e Kiii. ua!ily an liil Ly (K- Hrilii.li (luycrtionriil
: an-1 will, wlif-n u'l, r.-uiain firm at a rck ; wliil soma mIht
! lirula will, wh'-n most wanlr-.l, f-.un.l full of fl-,-,uiri. ai.-l
Hi tanks r-tui'ty, at a moat inroiivpiib-iit tiiu-.
j THKRK 18 AIXJ T1IK LATK.-T INVKNfl 0
jVUVKHU UAT-TIOil"!
KKTAU. PRICES li.HO EACH.
! Tt.ia trn lii.ftla aU tt. i.i.ffd a iwl iu fj ti.iiif. ram I.t an nl.l
f- ur-lc-ol rat ll.i- f.ile-r lia(.a cruilj not ralrli. Il 4 al a
Iji.li.-s' hruiiiiary ; an l tlire " ;'r-t j-.y oy.-r v-i,l
Tl.i- rat wai uu.l-r h) y-ara of a.
- enns -T T WATERHOUSE. il' . flll.l
J
H. WATERHOUSE
AttPnil to tli' liutiie'sa an.l will s-rv. all rualoiurra
j OX THE VERV REST iimJ
MOST LI li E R 1 ( T C U .MS
.7 if Country Orders Especially Invited.
JOHN THOS. WATERHOUSE.
oris 3m
Maraschino, Curacoa,
.BSIXTHE. CORDIALS. BITTERS OF
li inherent Brandi. In Bond or Dot f l'aid
noS For Sale by CIIAS LONO.
U

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