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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1856-1888, August 26, 1884, WEEKLY EDITION, Image 10

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THE PACIFIC COMMERCIAL ADVERTISER, AUGUST 26, 1884
the sand beach appeared under the
trees. A little nearer and the snowy
surf could be seen, ai.d then we ap
proach, to within a couple of miles
and all the details of the island are
plainly visible.
From aloft (and it in worth while
to go aloft for the view) the island,
as Dana in his Coral and Coral
Islands says, speaking of this identi
cal one "Mariki, lies like a garland
thrown upon the waters. The un
practiced eye scarcely perceives the
variation from a circular form, how
ever great it may be."
All along on the windward side the
surf breaks on the barrier reef, ever,
beating against the wonderful wall of
coral and limestone rock, and at high
tide sweeping over the flat surface,
sending loosened fragments and finer
material up on to the bank of dry
sandy saline soil, upon which a few
simple varieties of vegetation thrive,
and form a narrow belt of verdure.
At the north and south ends of the
Island long lines of reef run out, on
yhich the surf beats continually. As
we neared the north end of the island
wo could see the people running
along the beach, and when we ran
close into the line of breakers on the
west side, quite a crowd was gathered
to meet us, and soon a number of
canoes put ofF and .were clustered
about the vessel.
There came alongside of the Julia,
before the people were ready to go
ashore, one canoe, on the frail plat
form of which sat, paddle in hand, a
man, whom, from his dress, was at
first mistaken for one of the elderly
natives, but who turned out to be a
local trader, calling himself "Byron.'7
He was short and stout in stature,
grizzled if not grey as to beard, which
covered half his face; violent and pro
fane in his language, and bleared and
beery in expression. He had lived
seventeen years on Mariki, and had
arrived at the proud distinction ot
having acquired a native wife, and
children, and a homestead, a com
plete knowledge of the language, and
a taste for gin when he could get it,
and "toddy" when the gin was gone.
Besides the aforesaid beard, he was
dressed in a calico shirt and a short
petticoat. He told us that he hailed
from Providence, B. I., and that he
thought of selling out and going back
there "to see the boys." While I
was picturing to myself his appear
ance, like a second Bip Van Winkle,
in the streets of his native town, he
fell into conversation with Tasmania,
and finally took him ashore on his
caoue.
About this time a curious scene
was presented to view on the Julia
by the appearance on deck from the
hold of a number of our Mariki pas
sengers, who had dressed to go to
their homes. The deck was swarm
ing with them, in white shirts and
collars, black cloth suits, polished
boots, and stove-pipe hats! Their
wives were arrayed in loose gowns of
brilliant colors, and straw hats and
bonnets. The children were decked
out in all sorts of youthful civilized
finery, and clumped awkwardly about
in new boots with blood red tops.
Such a change as was effected by
their donning these clothes was never
witnessed before, perhaps. It was
impossible to identify them by any
likeness they bore to the half naked
crowd of the day before, and so the
Captain was compelled to muster
them by their numbers as they were
passed into the boats. And just here
it may be remarked that the amount
of luggage these people had was sur
prising. Each one had worked out a
three years' contract on the Hawaiian
Islands, for which they had been
paid, besides- their board and lodging,
the men an aggregate of $2i!0 for the
three years; the women had been
paid for the same length of time
31S0. A man and wife together would
thus have received $400 at the expira
tion of their contracts, and, though
they had been paid in cash the sums
due them at the end of each moiUh,
and had had abundant opportunities
and inducements offered them to
waste their wages foolishly as they j
earned them, yet they an nau urougui j
back with them at least one, some
times two or three large boxes tilled
with useful and ornamental articles
and, besides this, many of the men
had expensive breech-loading rifles
and fixed ammunition, and not a few
silver dollars. When 1 saw this, and
bow magnificently these returned
laborers outshone iheir stay-at-home
friends, and the airs they put on,
realized that civilization was indeed
a boon to this people.
I
The Great Vulture of the Andes.
High up among the towering snow
peaks of the Andes you will find the con
dor the huge carrion-vulture of South
America. As you see him wheeling in
circles three or four miles above you, he
looks a mere speck; you would never
imagine him a bird stuuding three or four
feet high, often measuring as much as
twelve feet between the tips of his wings,
and six foet or more from beak to tail,
with wings strong enough to break one of
your limbs, and with beak and talons
that might well be a terror to the young
lambs and goat.- of the mountain re
gions. On his- feet he is a white
necked, browu-winged, awkward creature
that, like a ea-bird, has to run a long
distance before he can fly; but when once
he is in the air, there is nothing more
beautiful and graceful than his flight.
His wings seem to be perfectly motionless,
and hour after hour he can be seen, with
apparently only the head and neck in
action, ascending and descending in spiral
curves, and floating in mid-air like a paper
kite. Little escapes the far-reaching eye
and keen smell of the condor. As they
soar so majestically aloft, they seem to be
casting a gredy look upon the wayfarers
and the cattle feeding or wandering
among the mountains. They are terribly
voracious birds, and are pretty sure,
within a very short time to pounce
upon those that fall down through
fatigue, exposure or mishap of any kind.
Pictures on the old Peruvian vases rep
resent children struggling in the grasp of
condors, and so one might suppose that
these gluttonous creatures would even at
tack man, but we know of no case to
prove this or the stories th.it tell of them
seizing upon young animals and bearing
them upon their backs to their rocky
haunts twelve or thirteen hundred feet
above the level of the sea. They do attack
lambs and goats, first picking out the
eyes and then tearing out the entrails with
their dagger-like beaks; and it is as much
as the shepherd dogs can do to protect
their charge. The mere sight of living
man, however, is enough to keep them at
a distance. They will follow in sweeping
circles high above you, as you and your
donkey struggle along the valleys, heights
and snow-blocked paths; but you will
have to use all manner of precautions to
bring them even within gunshot. If you
should fall over and pretend to be dead,
they would sweep down on you in an in
stant. Thousands of these birds frequent
the precipitous cliffs of the TJspallata
Pass, which is the great highway over the
Andes for travelers and cattle from the
Argentine Republic into Chili. Here
during the "Winter months storms rage,
and many a one is lost in the snows or
sinks down from exhaustion. Here and
there the roadside is strewed with
the clean-picked bones of horses, mules
oxen, and occasionally the remains of a
human skeleton tell of aonie poor fellow
over whose fata the ravenous condors
have rejoiced. Some of the battle-fields
of the late war where Chilians and Peru
vians fell in such numbers, bear evidence
of the quick and thorough work of these
great birds ; and in the copper regions of
Chili the sides of the paths down which
the mules bring their pack-loads of ore are
covered with the bones of the poor animals
that have fallen down exhausted under
their burdens. In certain parts of South
America the conjdor feeds almost entirely
on the carcass of the guauaco a kind of
wild llama that lives in constant dread of
its murderous enemy, the puma. The
latter animal, after eating his fill, covers
its victim over with bushes and then
watches it. In the wild retreats of the
Andine valleys when you see great flocks
of condors wheeling round a spot and
suddenly gliding up and down, you may
be pretty sure that they are disputing
with tho puma overt he guanaco that he
has just killed.
The Chilian Government has deter
mined to treat tho condor as an enemy to
the Republic. A price varying from five
to twenty-five francs has been put upon
its head, so that condor-hunting now
combines profit and sport. There are two
or three ways of catching the condors.
One is to lie in wait at night near
a recently-killed animal. As soon as
the remarkable scent of these birds
brings them to the carcass,
the
hunters
are ready to fire upon them. Others
again will climb the trees where the con
dors are known to roost, and throw their
lassos over them while they are in a heavy
sleep. But perhaps the most common
method is the following: During the
night, and with the least noise possible, a
circular wall of earth or sticks, about two
feet high, is made to inclose a little space
into which is thrown a dead animal. The
hunters hide a short distance off in wait
ing. Soon the condors come down and
voraciously attack the carcass till they
have gorged themselves to stupidity and
heaviness. Then with lassos and clubs,
and uttering the most confusing cries, the
hunters rush in among them. There is a
regular scrimmage. The Scanty space
will not allow the condors to give their
bodies the necessary momentum to rise
from the ground; and so one after the
other they fall below the fatal blows of
the hunters. The American.
3ttflius5 Carte.
B. C. ALLEN.
M. P. KOBLSSOJ.'.
ALLEN & ROBINSON,
AT KOBIXSOXVN WHARF, DEALERS
IN LUMUEIUnd all kinds of BUILDING
MATERIALS, Paints, Oiis, Nails, etc., etc.
AGENT FOR SCHOONERS
KULAMASU.
KEKAULTJOAI,
MARY ELLEN,
PAUAUI,
FAIRY QNEEN
U I LAMA
LEA III.
Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands. oct 1 83-dfcw
JOHS W. KALUA,
ttorney and Counsellor at Law.
Agent to tike acknowledgments to instruments
for the Island of Maui. Also, Agent to take ac
knowledgments for labor Contracts for the District
f Wailuku. Jan 1 81-w
M. MoINEENY,
Importer and Dealer in Clothing-,
Boots, Shoes, lints, Caps, Jewelry, Perfumery,
Pocket Cutlery, and every description of Gent's
Superior Furnishing Goods. Benkert's Fine
Calf Dress Roots, always on hand.
N. E. Corn icr Fort a Merchant Stw. janl81-w
WILLIAM ROBSON,
MERCHANT TAILOR,
90 Fort Street, Honolulu, II? I.
feb'-'J-w3m
f EMPIRE HOUSE,
Choice Ales. Wines & Liquors,
Corner Nuuann A Hotel Sts.
octl-w JAMES OLDS, Proprietor.
THOMAS SORENSON.
Snip Carpenter, Spar Maker & Caulk
er, No. 9 Queen Street, below
1 Honolulu Iron Works.
Spars, Oak Plank of all aizes, Ship Knees, Oakum,
Felt, Copper Bolts, and Sheathing
Metal constantly on hand.
FLAGPOLES
Made to order arid placed in position.
Jan 1 84-w
WILLIAMS. DIMOND & CO..
iSliippiiagr
AND
Commission ''.Merchants,
Uniou Block, SOS 9Iarket Street,
jun 30 83-w SAN FBANCISCO.
W. H. 0R0SSMAN BRO.,
Shipping-
AND
Commission Merchants,
11S Chambers St., XEW YORK.
Reference Castle fc Cooke and J. T. Waterhouse.
Jan 1 83 ly-w
H. E. McINTYEE & BROTHER,
GROCERY A FEED STORE,
Corner of Fort and Kins Streets,
au-18 8ldmy8 Honolulu, II. I.
HOLLISTER & CO.,
DRUGGISTS SND TOBACCONISTS !
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL..
53 Nuunnu Street. & cor Fort fc Merchant Streets
mrl 82-w
F. T. Lenehan & Co.,
IMPORTERS AND CJEXERAl. Com
mission Merchants. Wholesale Dealers in
WINKS, ALES and SPIRITS.
Honolulu. If. I. Jan 1 81 ly-w
M. GROSSMAN,
DENTIST, BEliS LEAVE TO INFORM
his many friends and the public in general
that he has opened his
Office at N. IOO Hotel St.,
NEXT TO Y. M. C. A. BUILDING
Where he would be pleased to have you give him
a call, hoping to gain the confidence of the public
by good wopt and reasonable charges.
S. BOTH,
MERCHANT TATLOR,
S3 Fort St., llonolnlii, II. I.
oct 1 83-w
WING W0 CHAN & CO.,
Importers and General Dealers in
Knglish. American and Chinese I'rovisions,
Plantation Tea and General supplies. Also, First
Class White and Colored Contract Matting all
qualities and prices.
No. 20 Nuuanu Street, opposite Mr. C. Afong 3.
ct 1 83-w
cm
ItORTM DlilTISH ASD JHERCASTILE
Insurance Company.
Established 1809.
Resources of the Comrany as at 31st Dec., 1592
1 Authorized Capital 3, 000,000
2 Subscribed " - 2,000,000
3 Paid up 500,000
4 Fire Fund and Reserves as at
31st Dec, 1883 l,'i74,66l
5 Life and Annuity Funds 3,855,529
6 Revenue Fire Branch 1,107,124
7 Life and Annuity
Branches. 434,798
Ed. IIOFFSCIILAEGFR fc CO.,
mch31 Agents for the Hawaiian Islands
THE NEW YORK
LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY.
ORGANIZED 1845.
PURELY MUTUAL.
Assets $53,000,000
Surplus 10,000,000
TIIE NEW YORK TlFE INSURANCE CO.
has been doing business for thirty -eight years, and
was never so strong and prosperous as now. It
offers to those desiring life insurance
A COMBINATION OF ADVANTAGES
which only long experience, a large and well-established
business, and carefully perfected plans
and methods can afford. Among these advanta
ges are
-AJbsolute Security.
Insurance at Low Cost.
JC equitable Dealing.
XT' very desirable form of l'olicy issued
i some with advantages ottered by no other
Company. Apply to
C. O. BERGER,
jy29 ly General Agent for Hawaiian Islands
THE CITY OF LONDON
FIEE INSURANCE COMPANY
OF LONDOX.
Capital,
$5,000,080.
LIMITED.
Having established an Agency here,
the undersigned is authorized to accept risks
against Fire, ISuildinjs, Merchandise,
Furniture, etc., on the most favorable
terms. Losses promptly adjusted and payable
here.
C. O. BERGER,
apl ly dmyl Agent Hawaiian Islands
HAWAIIAN INVESTMENT & AGENCY CO.,
(Limited.)
Money Loaned on First Class Securi
ties, for long or short period. Apply to
W. Ij. GREEN, Manager pro tem.
Office: Queen St., over G. W. Macfarlane & Co.
au20
GREAT WESTERN
INSURANCE COMPANY.
HT1AP
oO WALL STREET, NEW VORlV
The above Company having estab
lished an Agency at Honolulu, for the Hawa
iian Islands, the undersigned is authorized to accept
and write
MARINE RI5SKS
ON
Merchandise, Freights. Treasure
Commissions, and Hulls.
At current Rates.
WM. C. IRWIN & CO.,
no5 dmyl Managers for Hawaiian Islands
TRAXS-ATXANTIC
FIRE IHSURAHCB COMPANY
OF IIAMR17RG.
Capital of the Company & Reserve
Reiehsmark 6,000,000
Capital of their Re-Insurance Compa
nies Reiehsmark 101,650,000
Total Reiehsmark 107,650,00
NORTH GFKMAX
FIRS INSURANCE COMPANY
OF IIA9IRURU.
Capital of the Company & Reserve
Reiehsmark 8, 830, Of
Capital of their Re-Insurance Compa
nies Reiehsmark .. 35,000,000
Total Rcichsmarks 45,830,000
The unilersigrued. General Agents,
of the above two companies for the Hawaiian
Islands are prepared to Insure Buildings, Furni
ture, Merchandise and Produce, Machinery, etc.,
also Sugar and Rice Mills, an 1 Vessels in the har
bor, against loss or damage 'iy fire, on the most
favorable terms.
y22 1y H. HACKFELD&CO.
OERJIAN LLOYD
Marine Insurance Co.. of Berlin.
FORTUXA
General Insurance Co., of Berlin,
milC ABOVE IHrSCKAKCE tOMPA-
B nies have established a General Agency here
and the undersigned. General Agents, are author
ized to take
Risks against the Dangers of the Sens at the
most Reasonable Rates, and on the
. Most Favorable Term?,
F A. SCIIAEFER A CO., General Agents,
apl ly
IIA3IRIRG-3IAUDEBURG
FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY
OF HAMBURG,
BUILDINGS, MERCHANDISE FCK
niture and Machinery Insured against Fire on
the most favorable terms.
JAJEA.GKER Agent for the Hawaiian
ian l-31w
Contractor and JBuilder,
Honolulu
Steam
o nino
a
MILLS
l.i"iit Ikii ; r -
Esplanade, Honolulu, H. I.
Manufactures all kind of
Jlonldlngs, Brackets, Window Frames, Doors,
Sashes, Blinds and all kinds of Wood
work finish
TURNING & SCROLL SAWING.
All kinds or
Planing and Sawing,
Mortijing- and Tenoning.
Plans, Specifications, Detailed Draw
ingrs and estimate furnished upon
Application.
Plantation Workof all ICinds, dither
in Brick, Wood, Iron or Stone Con
struction Door in Workmanlike
manner, and at reasonable price.
ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED
And Work Guaranteed.
Orders from the other Islands solicited,
oct 1 83-w
BEYOND COMPETITION!
R. More & Co.,
King: Street, (between Bethel and Fort.)
11
EPAIRIKO AND CONSTltUCrriOW
01 an Kin as 01 Machinery and Smith's work.
GUNS &
PISTOLS
For Sale and Repaired. Having
STJEAIWC POWER,
IMPROVED TOOL and SKILLED WORKMEN,
we can execute all kinds of work in our line.
NEATNESS te DISPATCH.
MORE & CO.f
73 Kiusr Street, Honolulu.
Oct 1 83-w
F. BUKGESS.
CARPENTER & BUILDER,
Shop No. 48, King Street, Opposite M. J. Rose'a.
ET'i? A?138 lE ir AM, KINDN
of Buildings, when required; Offices aad
Stores fitted up In the latest Eastern Styles.
REPAIRING OF EVERY DESCRIPTION
Done la the best possible manner, and at reason
able rates. GARDEN ORNAMENTS of all kinds
made to order. Saws filed and set.
N. B. Personal attention will be given to the
moving of all kinds of buildings. Having had ex
perience in the Eastern States, I feel conflden It
can give Hatisfactlon to he most fastidious.
IT Orders left at my shop or residence will
receive prompt attention. Best of references
Residence, 218 Fort Street, Honolulu.
Orders from the Other Inlands solicited.
tan l--;iw
C. C. COLERrlAN,
Blacksmith and Machinist.
Horse Shoeing,
CARRIAGE WORK, &c.
Shop on King Street, next to Castle & Cooke's
oct 1 83-w
9
STEAM CANDY
MANUFACTORY AKD BAKERY,
E HORN,
Practical Confectioner, Pastry Cook & Baker
lanl 8l-w
Bone Meal! Bone Meal!
B,?K ,cIEA (W ARRANTED PURE), FROM
the Manufactory of BUCK & AW LAND
.San Francisco. Orders for thU
Celebrated Fertilizer
will now be received by the undersigned. Planters
are requested to send thelrorders in early, fio thai
here will be no delay In having them tilled i
ime for the planting season. Also,
Super- Phosphates,
A Fine Fertilizer for Cane.
Orders received in quantities to suit
fel6-vtf VM. G. IRWIN fc CO.. Agon
1 to 4!
PER DAY I.STO BE MATiw
by persons f either sex. in
their own localltips.
for 11Q. lstzir V,... . ..
meet with wonderful success. Any one can dothe
work. Capital not required. We will start you
Outfit worth 1 mailed free. The employment is
particularly adapted to the region In which this
publication circulates. Boys and girls earn nearlv
as much as men. Full particulars and InstrucUont
mailed free. Now is the time-don't delay bat
rite to us at once. Address Stlnson A Co. Pora
nd, Maine, Up ited States. mh-w Jy
A
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