OCR Interpretation


The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1856-1888, November 18, 1884, WEEKLY EDITION, Image 9

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015418/1884-11-18/ed-1/seq-9/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 9

THE PACIFIC COMMEEOIAL ADVERTISES, NOVEMBER 18, ,1884.
Quiet Observations.
"Some say that' this torchlight
business, whooping, hurrahing and howl
ing around is all tomfoolery, or worse, but
I don't think so,' said a prominent law
yer, as he watched the parade passing on
Tuesday night. 'lf there were not some
thing of this kind to absorb or carry off
the accumulated nervo-mental force, or
whatever you please to call it, we would
go to killing each other or become a nation
of lunatics."
"This is patriotic enthusiasm, or party
enthusiasm.17
"Patriotic fiddlesticks! It is nothing
more nor less than working off this sur
plus force. Some people call it bile, but
that isn't it. Bile is different. Men
usually exhibit it at home. This is some
thing that ha3 always been common to
tho human family, and more r less so to
the entire animal kingdom. It is called
devilishness when it pleads to waste er
wantonness, crankiness when manifested
iu a small way, and hysterics when de
veloped in nervous women. Were it not
for these quadriennial opportunities to
work it 'off legitimately there would be
many more murders, and more diabolism
throughout the country than there is.
I have noticed that crime is at its lowest
ebb just after a Presidential election, and
at its height at the opening of the cam
paign. Just make a note of it and see
for yourself.
There are so many strange phenomena
connected with the human nervous sys
tem that it is hardly safe to denounce
anything as nonsense that comes under
that head. When a man may believe he
is somebody else, or that ho is an animal,
or that he sees things that no one else
sees, and all is just as real to him as life
itself, what might not be?
It is not unusual to hear nervous per
sons say they feel as if ih?y wanted to
yell with all their might, or wanted to
break something, or do something that
would require extraordinary effort. Mrs.
Martin Van Buren, as was testified to in
court within the last year, used to ask
her coachman, when driving along the
streets of Buffalo, to drive to some place
where she could t'scream and yell," as she
felt she would certainly explode if she
didn't. Next to screaming and yelling
she found most relief in crying.
Mrs. Martha Wathington, according to
very good authority, permitted no person
to enter her room for 18 months before
she died. The only living creature al
lowed to pass the door was a cat, and for
its better accommodation a piece was cut
out from the bottom of tho door and a
swinging gate put on, which the cat soon
learned to operate. . Mrs. Washington's
spells, as the servants called them, fre
quently lasted for a day or two, during
which sho would moan and sob piteonsly.
Almost every delicate woman, and in
fact nearly every woman, will say, if
placed on the rack, that she often feels
like hurting or destroying something.
There may be a few husbands who might
give some valuable information on this
point. Some tak spells of singing,
pounding the piano, .scrubbing, lifting or
moving furniture, or going among the
dry goods and jewelry stores to assist in
keeping the clerks busy. Sick headache
is another popular" way of getting rid of
this accumulated force; nervous headache
is another, and making things lively for
the children and the old man another.
Women, however, are not so much
worse than men in this way, only they
are generally more sensitive and show it
more. (This is not to placate "Bessie
Bramble.") Men have better opportuni
ties to utilize or dispose of this surplus.
They can stand on the corner and talk
politics as loud as they want to, scuffle,
lift weights or get drunk.
The periodical drunk is a favorite way
of working it off. v A man feels all nettles,
he is restless, snappy and out of sorts.
Things are too slow, and nobody seems to
be doing right. The climax comes and
the sufferer ih soon as happy as a lord.
It may bo months before he touches
liquor again. A dog fight, horse race or
boxing match answers the purpese with
eome, and there are a few who can only
be satisfied with a good body beating.
One of the singular things about this
condition is the desire to do that which
the persons knows to be wrong. It was
stated of a physician, in an article on
nervousness recently, that ' a Bishop of
tho Methodist Chureh came to him in a
great state of mind over the fact that
when he took one of his 'spells' he
couldn'P help swearing. So far he had
been able to keep the profanity from
the ears of others, but it troubled him
wonderfully. .
A model Christain lady of this city
said to her physician not long since, that
she was really afraid that she was becom
irg 'possessed,' ' Tor whenever she be
came nervous and a certain desperate sort
of feeling came over her, she was sure to
say a bad word, and like the Captain of
the Pinafore, she said it with a "Big, big
D.'' After ripping out one or two of that
kind and kicking the wall a few times she
would feel better.
Examples might be multiplied indefi
nitely to show that surplus nerve force is
developed and stored up in the system,
and that it becomes negative, producing
results directly opposite to those desired.
It is more than probable that what is gen
erallv termed mental abberation of mind
and temporary insanity are nothing more
than the action of this surplus negative
force on the mind. For the time being,
or until it is expended, this force controls
the action of the mind, and prompts
wicked andjviolent actions, such as mur
der, suicide, arson, brutal assault or ma
licious mischief. "
A healthy brain probably does not gen
erate more nervous energy than the occa
sion demand, yet it is possible that at
times even the healthiest brain may get a
little too much of either' the positive or
negative force, so that even the best men
may find themselves nervous, and liable
to commit an excess or indiscretion of
some kind.
The Nervii, the cruelist and most
bloody-minded people the world ever saw,
were noted for their large and active
brains. Caesar certainly is deserving of
credit for exterminating them. ,
The excitement of battle is productive
of a great deal of the explosive nerve force.
Men yell from the word go until they are
shot, or something happens. While ap
proaching a battle there is not the least
inclination to rush or yell ; but when the
lihgting point is reached the nervousness
changes almost instantly from the tremb
ling, shrinking stage to the yelling, dash
ing, killing stage.
One man cannot get up much enthu
siasm when, all by himself ; but when he
is charged full of this, nervous force, as a
soda-fountain with gas, he can soon get a
crowd to fizzing. Some men get so
charged with it at political meetings that
they feel as if they would burst if not
allowed to yell. The same with success
ful and popular actors. They are full of
it, the audience becomes charged, and
when the climax comes there is an explo
sion. Actors, preachers, and lecturers
call it tnagnetism. No matter what they
call it, it is a bad thing to get into people
on all occasions.
In olden times not very old neither
doctors advised their patrons to take an
occasional course of blue mass, sassafras,
sarsaparilla tea to cleanse the system of
bad humors that might collect. It was a
good idea, . if the . means were proper.
The "negroes of the South, tud many of
the whites, always clean themselves out in
the spring of the year, in order to avoid
disease.
Is it not possible that a thorough quad
rennial cleaning out of the negative, mor
bid, or super-abundant nervous force is
conducive of healthier nervous action,
consequently less negative phenomena ?
It is certainly within the range of possi
bility that the lawyer was right in his state
ment that crime, or negative phenomena,
increases from the closing of the political
escape-pipe until its re-opening. If he is
right, would it not be the proper thing to
encourage hurrahs and social gatherings,
where people may sing and yell to their
heart's content ? Take the screeching,
screaming, street gamin as an instance.
His equilibrium is always perfect. Ex
change. Tlie Ilible Revision.
The revision of the Bible, begun 14
years ago, is completed, and the publica
tion of the Old Testament is anxiously
awaited, not only in this country and
England, where the work of revision has
been carried on, but wherever the Eng
lish tongue is spoken. Christians in
every land are dreading the new work,
however much it may excel in accuracy
the one around which so many sacred
associations cluster. ' Clergymen are
wondering how nian- sermons will not
bear repetition in the light of the new
readings of familiar texts; scholars expect
many changes and are conjecturing
whether this or that reading, which they
recognize as the true one, has been
adopted by the eminent revisers.
The English and American Committee
were each divided into . two companies,
one for the revision of each Testament.
When the New Testament was published
iu 1881 its companies were dismissed.
Last July the English Old Testament
Company finished its work and held its
final meeting in the Jerusalem Chamber
of Westminster. Dr. Scbaff, President
of the American Committee, who has
conducted all the work correspondence
relative to the work, was present at the
meeting, and on his return home last
-week a meeting of the American Old Tes
tament Company was held in the Bible
House, the object being to determine the
precise nature and extent of the appendix
which is to be bound with the books sold
in Jthis country, showing the words on
which there was a difference of. opinion
between the two companies.
"It is not probable," said Dr. Schaff,
"that the new work will be published be
fore spring. The English company has
finished its labors, and our company will
only need to meet once or twice more to
complete the appendix, but it will take
several months for the presses to furnish
a supply at all ample to meet the demand.
As in the case of the New Testament, the
only authorized editions will be published
by the University presses of Cambridge
and Oxford, but in the absence of an in
ternational copyright, I presume this
country will have many editions of the
Old Testament soon after the first copy is
put on sale. It is astonishing to watch
the interest displayed as the book nears
its publication. All over Europe where I
traveled this summer, scholars are wait
ing patiently 'for it. An enterprising
man tried to obtain my copy of ' the New
Testament a few weeks before the market
was supplied with the stock from Europe.
He sent a letter from a prominent hotel
by a messenger, stating that he was the
agent of the London publishing house,
whom I knew very well, and asked me to
loan my copy for a few hours until his
luggage had come from the steamer.''
" Nothing specific can be said of the
character of the revision of the Old Testa
ment. The work has all been done at
secret session, and correspondence has
been conducted under the seal of secrecy.
The Universities of Cambridge and Oxford
have been at great expense in defraying
the cost of the revision, and it is not right
to anticipate their publications.''
" By no means as many changes have
been made in the Old Testament as were
made in the New, for ho new Hebrew
manuscripts have been discovered since
the authorized, or King James' . version
was published, while many new and im
portant Greek manuscripts were used in
the New Testament revisions."
"The book will be printed in many
editions of various prices. There will be
one edition which will not be placed in
the market. It will cons.ist of four large
volumes, printed on heavy paper, corres
ponding to the. presentation copies of the
New, Testament, a copy being sent to
every person contributing $25 or more
toward the expense of publication." New
York Tribune.
"The British Indian Government
is making strenuous efforts to en
courage the cultivation of tobacco in
the Bombay Presidency, and has
been directing attention to its proper
growth and curing that it may be
come an article of export as well as
of local consumption, and neither
pains nor expense will be spared to
bring the Indian production up to
the proper standard quality of the
English and other European mar
kets." The above item, taken from the
Grocer and Country Merchant, sug
gests the thought, why should not
tobacco be grown on these Islands as
an article of export as well as of local
consumption? The soil and climate
are here, and there is every reason
for believing that all that is needed
to enable the Hawaiian Islands to
become one of the great tobacco
growing countries f the world is
good seed, careful cultivation of the
plant, and proper treatment in the
curing of the leaf.
From information furnished by
Mr. George Wood, of Hingley Sc Co.,
it seems that the native tobacco now
grown here is too highly charged
with saltpetre to be of a satisfactory
quality, but that this can be lemedied
by curing it over a charcoal fire, as
is done in Central America and Cuba.
And, also, that tobacco grown here
from good Havana seed would prob
ably be of a much better quality than
the native variety.
The experiment is going to be made
as soon as such seed arrives, and it is
to be "hoped that "Hawaiian Leaf"
may become a standard article foon
throughout the world.
gustos iSnxte.
H. W. SEVEEANOE
Hawaiian Consul and CommiMiou
Merchant, 31G California Mtreet, Kan Franc is
co, California. Xo. 4. . lfio-w tf
F. A. SCHAEFER & CO., .
Importers &Commission Merchants
HONOLULU, H. I.
161-w tf
C. GERTZ,
IMPORTER AN J) DEALER IN
oots $t Shoes,
AESO
French J ressing.
No 80, Fort Stree t, Honolulu. 162-w tf
E. S. OUNHA,
JJetall Wine Dealer, Union Saloon, .
In the rear of the Hawaiian Gazette Building,
No. 23 Merchant Street. 00-wtf
M. McINERNY,
Importer ami Dealer in Clothing:,
lioote, Shoes, lints. Caps, Jewelry, Perfumery,
Pocket Cutlery, and every description of Gent's
Superior Furnishing Goods. Btgr" lienkert's Fine
Calf Dress Boots, always on hand.
N. E. Cokkkb Fort a Merchaxt 8ts. ICO-wtf
JONATHAN AUSTIN,
Attorney and Conusellor-at-Law,
And Agent to take Acknowledgments.
No. 12 Uaabnmaiiu St. Honolulu,
302 f tf
CLACS SPBECKELS
f Mi O. IHW1N
WM. G. IRWIN & Co.,
SUGAll FACTORS ami Commission
AGE NTS. Honolulu, 31. 1. 101-tfw tf
THOS. J. HAYSELDEN,
A netioneor. Ifnhnln.. Ilnwiiil. ii.
Jjl. of Ileal Estate, kkh1 and Property of v-i.
uescnpuou uiienuea to. commissions moderate.
102tf-wtf
JOHN BUSSED,
ttorney at JLnvi.
No. 42 MERCHANT STItEET, J EA K i-.Vi
1 t:
M. PHILLIPS & "Go.7.
Importers and Wholesale Iealer in'
Clothing, Boots, Shoes, Hats, Men's Furnish
ing and Fancy Goods. No. 11 Kaahumanu Ktreet,
Honolulu, II. I. 104tf-vtf
S. J. LEVEY&00
Grocer and Provision Dealer.
Family Grocery and Feed Wtore.
Orders entrusted to us from the other Island will
be promptly attended to. 52 Fort St., Honolulu
I05tf-wtf
J. LTONS.
Is. .1. UEVF.T.
-A.Tctioiie or s
-AND-
General Commission Merchants
Reaver Block, Queen St., Honolulu
lies of Furniture. Stock, Heal Instate
and General Merchandise properly attended to.
Solo Agents lor:
American & European Merchandise.
110-tfWtf
FRAPSK GERTZ,
f (Importer anil Manufacturer
Of all Descriptions of
BOOTS & St-IOES
IOOrdersfrom the other Islands solicited.
Xo. Ill Fort St., Honolulu.
111-tfwtf
St. Matthew's Hall,
SAN MATEO,
CALIFORNIA
A SCHOOL roil ROYS
UNDER MILITARY DISCIPLINE.
Located iu the beautiful village of San Mateo,
on the Southern Pacific IS. R., 21 miles from San
Francisco. Established in 186.. Fourteen In
structors of reputation and ability. The buildings
are extensive, are heated by steam, and are In
every way arranged for the health and comfort of
the cadets. Trinity Session began July 21, and the
Easter Session will commence January S, 1SS5.
For further information and catalogue, ju.st out,
address
JlKV. ALFRED LEE BREWER, 3L A.,
IOC ja2! 'S5-wja27 '85
Principal.
Bone Meal! Bone Meal!
IONi: MEAL (WARRANTED PURE), FROM
the ilanufaciory of BUCK & ASLILAND
San Francisco. Orders for this
Celebrated Fertilizer
will now be received by the undersigned. Planters
are requested to send their orders In early, so that
here will be no delay In having them tilled in
irne for the planting season. Also,
Super- Phosphates,
A Fine Fertilizer for Cane.
Orders received in quantities to suit.
165-wtf WM. C. IIUVIN & CO., Agens
Dusturss (Cards.
H. E. McINTYRE MOTHER.
G
ROCEBY fc Fi:i:i NTOKK.
Corner of Fort kjk! KIuk
175-wtf llu'iol jlti, LC i
8. C. ALLXV,
M. P. JORCTSOl.
ALLEN & hOBINSON,
AT RORINSOX s WIIAISF. IXiAlXKi
IN I.U.MltKK and h1 kind of LCIUDINLZ
MATKlllAlJS, iJiniH, Oils. NmiI. etc.. etc
AO OCT FOll SCHIHI.VKUA
KULAMANU.
KEKAULUOAI,
MARY ELLEN.
I'AUAHI,
FAIRY UN KEN
U I LA MA
LEA III.
Honolulu. Hawaiian Island. 19L.WKT.
JORft W. KALUA,
tlorney atari Counsellor at Lawr.
Agent to take acknowledgment to iustrumen.T.
for the Island of M iul. Alo, Agent to take ac
knowledgments for labor Contracts for the lfcnriU
of Walluku. lSS-artC:
JNO. A. HASSINQER,
A Cent lo Inke Acknon letlsriufutM Ctw
Contract for lbor.
Intjiior Oflioe, Honolulu.
WING WO TAI !, CO.,
H
uve constantly on fmiit! unci 1'iaw
.Suh a full line of
JAI'AX AND CIJI.YA TiVH..
both Hiyh and Low Priced, according to quaiity.-s
Rest China Maltintrs, plaiu an J eolnrcd.. ALso, fiC3
assortment of 1'liut union upp!is( nil kind..
Always on bund a larjre slock ut Rice, they beL'.rt
Agents of tlm-e Piunta turns. l(i:5-w
RI0HA.KB FBI0KERT0N
llorueynsiiJ Counsellor m! lMUfm
J Money to Lend on Mortgage of Frvlivt.isi.
Office, No. 40 Merchant .street. Honolulu,. LL.tX.
l."7-wtf
MERCHANT TAIfcOEU
!M Vurt Strt , l, Honolulu, II. I.
house,
Uhoioe Ale.$. Wines Iiqucux,
iWner .Miiiuui'i V:'IIotl Ntttu.
Mi-wtf JAMES OLDS Propgletuo,
W. iv, ukOSSMAN & BECLj,
5liippingf
m AND
Commission Hercliait&
US Immber St.. NEW YORIL.
Ueference Castle fc Cooke aud J. VatfttlxMe-
172-wtf .
M. THOMPSON,.
ATTORNEY AT UlW .
And Solicitor In Chancery.,
O
FFICE AT THE COKNEIS MEnflTLX-sv
and Fort Streets, Honolulu, II. I.
173-wtf
WILLIAMS. DIMOIID & 00
AN I )
Commission Merchants.,
Union ll!ok, Marked Street.
174-wtf HAN ritANCIHCO,
HQLLISTER & CO.,
DRUGGISTS fliil) TOBACCONISTS
WHOLESALK AND flHTAIL.
59 Nuunnu Street. A cor Fort & Merchant Htre-
J7C-wtf
M. GROSSMAN,
DKXTIST, HECJS LKAVUTO iXTOItffW
his many friend and the public iu genenx
at h e has opened hLs
Office at H. iOO Hotel Gt
NEXT TO Y. M. C. A. BUILDING
Where he would be pleased to have you give hiiat
a call, hoping to gain the confidence of the publLcr
by good wopk and reaonabl charge.
177-WLf
S. R0THf
MERCHANT TAILOR,
S3 Fort St., Honolulu, II. I.
178-wtf
WING W0. CHAN & CO.,
Importers anil General Doalera irm
English, American and Ciiinene l'rovislon.,
Plantation Tea and General frSupplie. Aluj, Firsff
Class .White and Colored Contract Mattlnsr at?
all qualities and prices.
No. 20 Nuuanu. Street, opposite Mr. C. .Won',':.
17!) -.v
WILLIAM TURNER,
PRACTICAL WATCHMAKER,
LATIi OF SAA I'KAXCINt'O.
Has established himself at 82 Kin- Strew-1, opi.
site M. Iiose's Carriage Factory.
.FINK. WATCH WORE
sapeclidty. nnd satisfaction f?uannte-d. 130-wtl

xml | txt