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Morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven [Conn.]) 1848-1894, January 27, 1880, Image 1

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015483/1880-01-27/ed-1/seq-1/

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Published by OABBINGTOH .ft CO.
THE EtAJKGEST. DAILT JSTEWSVJLJPJ ISITOE XJTJTS.
OFFICE 400 state: STREET.
VOL. XL VIII
NEW HAVEN, CONN., TUESDAY MORNING, JANUARY 27, 1880.
Price Four Cents.
financial
VEBULIE k GO.
Banlicsrs,
Nos. 16 and 18 Nassau Street,
NEW TOBK,
Boy and Mil ON COMMISSION, for cash or on mar
gin, all sseurltls. dealt in at th Hew row stock Jcx-change.
All issue, of Government Bond bought and sold at
market rates, free of commission, and on hand for im
mediate delivery.
SPECIAL ATTENTION GITEH TO
EXCHANGES OF BONDS IN WA8H-
INOXON FOB ACCOUNT OF BANKS.
JeSO
iU F.
Bur well,
DENTIST,
oor. Cherch and
Chapel bib., late
of Fair Haven,
formerly ntnut,
E. Strong. ap9
Circulating Library.
A NtCrEOhrlstiisaa or Sow Year's Present will be
a subscription to Bartholomew', library for one
year, or six, or tnree uumuu. ah we new vuu.
ded.
jj. B. The best help furnished as usual.
No. 75 Orange Street.
Veterinary Notice.
DR8. O'SUIXIVAN ROSE, Veterinary
,2itfJSurgeone, graduates of the London and Amer
ican veterinary uoneges. iu wuy ijiuuuww
nery surgeons In New Haven.)
Office and Hospital, 816 CHAPEL 8TKEET.
Honrs of attendance, 8 a. m. to 8-p. m.
Telegrams and messages by post promptly attended
o. dl7 ly
MCHES!
The largest line of Watches
In this city, which are of
fered at prices that defy com
- etltion.
Eionoon,
JEWULElt,
NO. 374 CAAEa. 8fBEil.
dM
Christmas.
FGARDINe
SHOE!!
RARE T
EASONIN6 XV
Pause until yon catch these sound ideas.
Are You S New Shoes?
If so, dont fall to look at our splendid stock.
Oavc U" Boys 2 Shoe ?
If so, don't fail to examine the
B
EST STOCK I
KST QUALITY
EST VAH1ETY)
OF BOYS
SHOKS IN
MEW HAVEN.
Is it a. Question of Style?
Is it a Question of Price ?
Whatever the question MAY BE regarding Boots
and Shoes, BfcKliAM'8 is the best place to buy. .
C1IKI64T51AS SIiIPPSRS X
Oh ! What Beauties ! Look at them at
293 Grand Street.
dlS ROBERT A. BENHAM.
B. H. JOHi
Real Estate and Loan Agent,
Office, 487 State Street.
FOB SAXJS,
4sl A NICE House and large Lot on Eld Itreet at
f)!l a bargain.
" Oood Cottage House on Sw.'ght street at much
less than it is worth.
A fine place in Fair Haven and ssveral other places
for sale very low.
Some good Shore Property in East Haven and Bran
ford. For Sale or Bent- Farms,
A very desirable Farm of 70 acres In Southington
will be sold low to close an estate.
A list of good Farms In otheT desirable locations.
Oood rents in St. John and Greene streets, Fair Ha
ven, and other parts of the city.
Wanted, f2,0U0 to $4,000 on good first mortgage se
curity. m30
TIIJK SJOX.1DA1.1U5I.
THE ONLY ORIGINAL
Russian and Turkish Vapor Baths
In the New England States will be opened on
Wednesday, Jan. 7th.
fTTHB Bath open for Gentlemen from 13 m, to 9 p.
I m . Sundays from 9 a. m. to la m.
For Ladies from 9 a. m. to 13 m., exoept Sen days.
Reduced Prices Single Tickets for Russian
Bath, 60 cents ; 13 Tickets for $".00.
Turkish Baths, single tickets, $1.90 IS for $10.00.
Nicholas Weiler,
PROPRIETOR,
IO. 278 GKAKD STBEET.
JalSly
5,000 Barrels Flour,
Bought before ay advance
in price, which we offer to the
trade at prices below to
day's valne.
E. G. STODDARD & CO.,
Ho. S06 to 310 State Street.
1. g. Glenney Son,
No. 160 State Street, New Haven,
Importers and Wholes. Is Dealers in every deserts
HQL1HH, FBgfiUH AND AMIBIOAH COACH, WIB
DOW AND PIOTUBB GLASS, VABHI6B,
OILS, PAINS AND DTD STUFFS.
aT
H llk t Il'rt SOOD8.
a FCLL assortment of Huckin's Celebrated Soaps,
A also a lot of Old Cheese, extra nne. ior saie oy
OILBERT A THOMPSON.
Tontine Livery Stables.
WE are prepared at short notice to furnish
"the best Carriages, either close or open, for
Utoririfnir. anf fib ridtTll niTK.
rt 1. nnr intention to have ffood Carriages at the ue
Mil Mid mi boat landings when needed.
Grateful for the liberal patronage in the past we
hone by strict attention to the wants of onr patrons to
marn . nnniiimi wo - i .
BABKEB & BANSOM, Proprietors.
W. 8. Langdon. Foreman. n7
TO KENT,
GA PLEASANT and Convenient House on Ullve
street, first-class in every respeot, with all the
modern improvements, arranged with suites
of rooms, marble mantels, frescoed
wall, not and cold waller, and other modern
conveniences, 15 rooms, wetter closets on
two floors, Ac, Ac Possession given May 1st,
1879. Also the Hons. 373 Grand street.
Possession given immediately.
CHARLES IVES,
maao tf US Ohuroh Street.
BSrs. tee, M.
No. 408 Chapel Street, near Tork.
Special treatment of
au tf . Diseases of Women.
WM, D. BRYAN,
diatom Tailor.
SO. 127 CECUSIII STBEBTs
IS BELLING
Dm - and -Bnsiness Suits,
... .. . aArt
A. urwer prices inn em ociara.
Cuilford Clains,
SCOLiLOPS,
Lobsters, Lobsters,
Smelt, Salmon,
Oysters, Oysters, Oysters,
Th, Largest Varitty in the city at
A. JFoote & Co.'s,
853 State Street.
3&I 5sia&
O
FOR 8ALE.
ISO FEET of Land on Shelton avenue will be
sold for toe. than one-third what it was sold for
S years ago. Also a cheap Hones on West street
Motion!
fiw .J.lOfl mm mnlA fn. KflO it ... - m arm
KKBWIN'S BEAL ESTATE OFFICE,
n33. 387 Chapel Street.
For Sale or Exchange,
d27
ONJC of the fluest Farms la New Havvn Ooun-
ty ; oan be bongtat ftt ft bargain for part caah. or
win cxooange zor proaacuye 0117 propeny.
GEO. A. ISBEIile,
Boom and Power to Bent.
APPLY TO
. HEW HAVEN SPUING CO.,
d9 tf 70 Franklin Street.
JOSEPH 8ONSBNBEBO,
It call Estate and Exchange Broker,
338 OllAPlU, BilUU'I,
8naniahDonbloonawantea. uni
ted Bute, e ser cent. Bonds and
is. bonffht and aold and dividends paid
n United State, currency. Also Gold and Silver ex-
hanged at the office of JOSEPH SONNENBSBG,
m ylS tx see unape bubo.
2
FOB BENT.
PAST f Store 144 State street.
Inonire at
THE STOKE.
PUK 8AJLK.
THE very desirable Residence on the eouth-
Tweet oorner of Temple and Trumbull streets.
Asm JTor lurUier psrucmars inquire 01
b3 3m E. X. FOOTIS, 9 jcxenange unnaing.
For Sale Cheap,
MMv BOUSE No. S3 D wight street, all the modern
I jy Improvements. Hons, and Barn in the western
imd part of city. Some fine Lota on State street,
Cedar Hill : Lota on Chanel street. Grapevine Point,
from $3S to $S0 per foot.
To Bent, second floor, 39 Auburn street, $7 per
month : 41 Greenwood street, whole House, six rooma.
$8 per month ; whole house on Water street, near
Meadow, S16 pec month; two nice rents on Henry
street, with furnace, ramje, gas and hot water, set
tnos ; in nice oraer. a large lot Desweeu aeaoov ana
State streets to rent for stone yard or storage ; will be
rented cheap. Apply to A. M. HOLMES,
ov unurcu street, room o.
Office hours, 13 to i, and T to 9 evenings. o35
FOB BENT.
-wS HOTJS on Blake street, Westvllle. House
II contains rooms, in good order. To the right
laJLtenant the rent will be low. For particulars.
eall aWUER WIN'S Real Estate OfHoe, 337 Chapel at..
o7
M. BHTJMWAT, Westvllle.
FOB BENT.
-sa ONE STORE and five Rooms MS State street;
I W five Rooms, five minutes from the City Market ;
aaaaLhas modern improvements: five Rooma corner
Park and Booth streets. Inquire of
JACOB HKLLEB,
olS No. 1 Yale Bank Building.
Houses and Ijots For Sale.
HOUSES AND LOTS situated In different
parts of the city. Also several large Lota, bav
ins railroad and water front : very desirable
for manufacturing purposes. All for sale cheap and
on easy terms. Apply to
,19 tf 398 Chapel Street, Room 8.
For Bent.-Brass and Iron Castings.
Repairing Lawn Mowers. -Wood
ana tjoax.
FOR RENT. One floor, with or without pow-
irposes. aaepaurans;
A,awn m
er, for manufacturing pnrposes.
and SbarDeninar l.awi
the same called for and delivered. Brass and Iron
Castinars at the lowest prices, and made at abort
notice. Wood avnd Coal at the lowest prices. Or
ders received at the offloe, 308 Grand Street.
jelo tl 'J. J1J& unnijn air vt. w.
For Sale at a Bargain,
aFirst-Class House, with modern
Improvements, good lot with barn, situat
ed on fine avenue, fronting on two streets, oan
be seen at any tune. For particulars call at
Koom no 9, newuey nniieiasi w
Chnrch Street.
deastf sj. r tuo ivi K rspsj iv.
DR. li. I PBTKHSON,
36 Elm Street, Cor. of Orauiaje,
90 New Haven, conn.
Board of Belief Notice.
THE Board of Relief for the Town of New Haven
hereby give notioe that they will meet at their
office. No. 8 City Hall, MONDAY, the 5th day of Janu
ary, 1880, and by adjournment on every week day
until Jan. 24th inolnsive, at 9 o'clock a. m., on each
of said days, and at 7 o'clock p. m. on the 30th and 33d
of said month, for the purpose of hearing any appeals
that may be made to them from the doings of the
Board of Assessors and for hearing appeals on account
of indebtedness; and on the 24th day of said January
for the purpose of hearing appeals for the abatement
of the polls of indigent sick and Infirm persons.
WlXl4lA&x W. 11U XJin-lD0, i
THOMAS O'BRIEN, I Board
FRANK CHANDLER, !
iCHARLES 8. SCOTT, I of Belief.
jslSlOt JOHN RUFF, J
For Bale,
One second-hand coal Stove In good order,
SJefghs and Carriages
cheap.
For sale at Wholesale Manufacturers' Prices.
nS D. W. MORRILL.
&J. .Bar
Furniture Dealers
i
AND-
BffiM
57, 59 & 61 Orange St.,
NEW HAVEN, CONN.
Grand Closing Out Sale.
FANCY GOODS MD GAMES,
Begardless of Cost.
Full Line of Diaries for 1880.
NEW YEAR'S CARDS,
If ew Desiarns, at
PECK SPERRY'S,
163 Chapel Street,
Under Elliott House,
Opposite Opera House.
GEORGE E. WHITJUOBE,
THE
ORIGINAL INVENTOR
AND
1SANCFACTUREB OP TRICltXES,
d9 SS CBN TEB STREET, New Haven, Conn.
Toilet Sets, Cut Glass Ware
Perfumes, &c.
E. A. GESSNER,
APOTHECARY,
151 CHAPEL STREET,
dl9' ' Oorner of Olive.
Vaults and Cesspools.
If you ltave a Vctnlt or Cesspool tbat
nee as attentiou,
SEND FOB
Farnham's Odorless Apparatus.
Orders may be left with
R. B. BRADLEY CO., 408 State street.
BOBT. VEITOH St feON, 438 Chapel stM
P. O. BOX 37S. JaSly
Diamonds, Fine Gold and Silver Watches, Necklaces, Vest Uhains, Kings
of every description, inns, .Ear lungs, Bracelets, AiOCKeis, oeais, unarms,
Fine Plated and Solid Silver Ware, Plain and Ornamental Clocks,
Studs, Sleeve Buttons, Spectacles, Eye Glasses, Emblems,
And Everything found in a Wle Jewelry Store, sold at the LOWEST price in New Haven
Repairing; Fine Watches, clocks, Jewelry, ace, a specialty.
Next door to the Ct&dGL t'W'S "W fTcP
FIRST NATIONAL BANK. -""O'
CALL AND EXAMINE OUR GOODS BEFORE PURCHASING.
CROFUT'S
NEW; FDR'
97 Orange Street.
Se&Isk-in Cloakab For Lined Circnlars
ana Dolmans. Psurs Kellned. Altered
mad Repaired. Work nrst-Clasai. Iri-
ces Low. ... -. js . - '
We trust tmat none of our friends will
force UstU we fears removed to 97 OB.
AIBB STREET, and sue still in the
FUR TRADE.
Remember the Number,
; NO. 97 ORANGE STREET,
Palladium Building
BlO
$45,000 WORTHljOF v r
lew aod J)esirable Dry aiidlPancfioods
To Be Sold To The Highest Bidder,
Commencing Tucaday, Jan.
AT IO A. M.
SAL.ES day and evening.
Tills will be the greatest opportunity ever offered to the pnbUc to
hay Roods at your own prices, as the foods mnst he sold. Do not fall
to attend the greatest Auction sale ever Held la this city, consisting'
of Silks, Satins, Cashmeres, Velvets, NoveltiesAlpacas, BrUllanttnes,
Shoodah Cloths, Flannels, Blankets, Cottons, Cheviots, Ticks, Den
ims, Prints, Ginghams, Comfortablec, JOinens, Towels, Notions, Host
ery. Glores. Underwear., Woolens, . Cloaks, Cloakingrs,- Broche and
Blanket Shawls, Wrappers, Sc, Ac Terms cash.
Yours respectfully, .
la. W. COOK, 7
NOS. 239 AND 241 CHAFEIi STREET.
Store open evenings. . ; ' - - " - ' J38
Teeth. Teeth. Teeth. Teeth.
255 Chapel St., North Side, between State and Orange.
Full Set of Teeth for Five Dollars and Upwards.
Teeth filled for Fifty Cents and upwards. - '
Teeth Extracted for Twenty-Five Cents. '
Teetnextracted without pain tr the nse of Nitrous
Oxide or Laughing- Gas.
Perfect satisfaction or no charge made.
jaS S. H. 6IDHET,
s. silverte.au a sow,
THE WELL
J JJ W
KNOWN
BI
AND RELIABLE
Dyeing and 1 Cleaning.
Ladies' Dresses, Shawls, Cloaks, Waterproofs, SUks, Blbbons, Trim
mings, Velvets, Kid Gloves, Feathers, Juace Curtains, snaaes ana
Blankets, &c
Shirts, Collars, Cuffs, Underwear, &c. First-class Pressing. Gen
tlemen's Garments Cleaned or Dyed.
ELM CITY DTE WORKS AMD STEAM IxAUJVOlSY,
360 and 178 Chapel Street.
825 THOMAS FOBSYTH.
L Slager Sewiog ISSaehine will Make the Best Possible
Holiday Cilft I
7Q COf mora SINGER SEWING MACHINES sold In 1878 than in any pre-
IIVHW VWS
1S70 we soid 12r,S33
Sewing machines.
In
1S78 we sold 350,43a
Sewinn; machines.
ha t ars. i
We now sell Three-0.uartera
of ail the Sewing; Rlachines
sold in the World.
Our sales have Increased enor.
ntously every year througn
the whole period of
"hard times."
These Facts Speak Iiouderf than any Words!
Send for Our Handsomely Illustrated Price-I,ist.
Prices Greatly Reduced I Waste no money on Cheap Counterfeits I
THE 8INGSK MA2TUFA CTUB1SG C O JJ1 Jt- A JM X
dS3tf Of lice 5a Orange Street. Sew Haven. Conn.
THE SALVATOR FOR INVALIDS AND THE
SUPERIOR NUTRITION THE LIFE.
Ml
I
AC ED.
AN INCOMPARABLE ALIMENT FOR THE
CROWTH AND PROTECTION OF
INFANTS AND CHILDREN.
J0NE5KW
A SUPERIOR NUTRITIVE IN CONTINUED
FEVERS. AND A RELIABLE REMEDIAL
ACENT IN ALL DISEASES OF THE
STOMACH AND INTESTINES.
HIS justly celebrated Dietetic Preparation Is, In composition, principally the CLUTEN
derived from the WHITE WINTER FLINT WHEAT tintsL,. a soiia eroam, "
mention of an eminent Chemist. It has not only Been nigniy recommenaea dux
certified to by a targe number of Chemists and Physiciansrepresenting a very high degree
of medical scienceas the Safest, Most Acceptable and Reliable Food for the Crowth and
Protection of INFANTS and CHILDREN, and for MOTHERS la.-Kina oumcienv noun.n
merrt for their offspring.
Unlike those preparation, made from animal or vinous matter, which are liable to
stimulate the brain and Irritate the dlatestlve organs, It embraces In Its elementary compo
sitionThat which makes strong Bone and Muscle. That which makes good Flesh and
Blood. That which Is easy of Digestion never consriparing. mm wnicn is mna ana
prevenxtve or xnose inresrinaii uiduiuoio
GOLD BY
friendly to the Brain, and that which acta as a
Incidental to Childhood.
And, while It would be difficult to con
ceive of anything In Food or Dessert mora
Creamy and Delicious, or more Nourishing
and Strengthening as an aliment in Fevers,
Pulmonary Complaints, Dyspepsia and Gen
eral Debility, Its Rare Medicinal Excellence In
all Intestinal Diseases, especially In Dysentery,
Chronic Diarrhea and Cholera Infantum has
been Inoontestably proven.
MACISTS
' v the: PRIHC1PAI CITIES
united stmeLJz
John Cap: $QBSJSmmfc
93 Orange Street.
Rubber Goods of Every Description.
Coats, laggings, jBlanhets, Gossamer Garments, Overs,
Arctics. The only plaee In this city where yon can bny a
Bobber Boot that will not crack is at the Orange Street
Bnbber Store.
Bicycle School, open from ga.ni.teln.nl.. to 6 anal T to 10 P. m.. at 98 Crown
Street, in the Grand Opera House Buildinr.
We still continue to meet the ever grow
ing Interest in Bicycle Biding, and we hope soon to
be able to open one of the largest Bicycle Schools
in America. We wish to state also that The Bi
cycle World," a beautiful little journal ot sixteen
pages, issued twice a month, devoted to Bicycling,
Archery. &c. can be obtained by calling: for it at
THOMPSON'S BUBBKB STOKE,
jaT 93 Orange Street, Palladium Building.
Spring Valley Hydraulic
Gold Co.'m Stock,
And Other Desirable mining Stocks for
sale by
Bunnell & Scranton,
jaao Bankers and Broker..
Patent Spring- Bockeis,
Wilton Ladies Bookers.
Gentlemen's Easy Folding Chairs,
" Cretonne Bockers,
Wheel Chairs tor Invalids,
toadies Sewf nir Chairs.
A full line of Faney Clisirm, all oor own make.
jalS IVew Haven Folding Chair Co.
Veakneae, Sperma-
onhcea, In. potent
CHAT'S SPECIFIC JHEDICIE. y,
TRADEMARK The Great TRADEMARK
cnfuia nen.
dy, An BOfailisg
core ior senunsi
ton lues.
oy. and .11 diseases
that follow, s. . se
qnenceof feell-
Abuse : aa Loss of
Memory. Uoiversal
tEFHRE TAUIB.de, Pain lnAFTEt T All IB.
the Back. Dimness
of Vision, Prematnre Old Age, and many other IMS us
es that kd to Insanity or Consumption, and a fjuit
tnreOrave. tv Foil parUcolars la onr pamphlet, which ws de.
aire to sen! free by mail to every cue. - tW The Bpe
oiSo M eiliclne is sold by all draggiata st SI per pack
age, or six packagea for $5, or mill be scut free by mail
on receipt of the money by addressing
THE CKAI MEDICINE CO.,
No. 10 Mechanics Block, Detroit, Mich.
I" Sold in New Haven by all Druggists.
Ja7 BI0HABD8ON 0O Wholesale Agents.
( C Ca week In your own town. Terms and SS outfit
) Q0 free. Address H. BiUtn k Co PorUand, Me.
The Marvelous
ohm iim: !
.. - ' J i J IR J Hi J! X!" 1PJJ! P.-1JII ! J.!1. 1. ' U " v
im 'in r Missttmniili-iiiTrT
Oar X.atest Departure X
A Bsed instrrimeBt vHich omblM any one, -whether
ntid?rBtvn(liDg mnaio or not, to pla; any desired mel
ody or harmony, nored or McUaW. from the most
plaint! re dirge t)0 the ilveilet dance imiaio, with faolt
Mfls expreeaton, sarrjasslng the execution at the most
higby educated and finished pertormera. It Is excel
lent in tone, possessing meonaniem of marreJovs
simplicity, requiring bat the intelligence of a child to
manipnlate, yet capable of reproducing the moaical
compositions of the pest, present and fniiire.
Call ftad tee for riinelf
J. HAYNES & CO., SOLE AGENTS,
Office ana Salesrooms,
400J Chapel Street, Cor. Temple,
Open day and evening. Boom 6.
disam
FOB BAXitH
At A BARGAIN. 97 feet on No. SO Garden street,
with a great rear lot, suitable for any large man
nfsotnrlng bnsiness; likewbwone of the best places in
he otty for a Floweret. It la very rJoh and early and
will be sold vary cheap. Apply on
anTtf .TBZ FBKsnB8.
: 8. ARTHUR : MARSDEN,
Attorney and Counsellor at law
i IS LAV CHAMBERS, VaTW HAVER, OOHH.,
-OMMISaiOMBBOF DK3EIS for Hew Tork. MEas-
! y aacntisetta, miomgan, rtumijivMin, iiiinms,
Oeontia, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, Cal
ifornia, Kansas, Bhode Island, Iowa, New Jersey,Mui'
- nesot Ohio. Ijonsiatta. &c &c
OoUectiona made In ail parts of the United States, at
IX) west Kates, tnrongp reuaoie corregponoents. ig
E. P. ABVINE,
Booms 9 and 11, 60 Church St.
au!9
Ghas. S. HaaniltonT-
Attorney and Ckmnselor at law.
- S YAX.B SAXIOSAI.:UAKK BntLDIIS,
Oomerof Chaml and State sis. .
osuyTsba.
apStt
R. G. RUSSEEiLi,
ABOHITKOT
8S4 Uhapel Btreet, Hew Haves, ot
myao
INFORMATION FORTHEAFFLfCTED
BUNI0l.
I CLUB&mGrXWlHGNruThw
RAfiD AND SOFT COBSS.
THESE painful difficulties are s mystery to medi
cal science. They come from wearing tight boots
and shoes, also from loose one ; they come where they
d lease and when they rteaae. and stay as leas: as they
please, and nothing will remove them without canning
pain so effectually as the treatment demonstrated by
DR. WELCH,
SO. 270 CHAPEL STREET.
BUNIONS.
'Where the skin has become hard, crusty, and so
overcome the natural Bkin as to give rise to roots that
branch out in all direct tons, pinhead oorna often ap
pear, indicatiug several piths attached to the bone.
These painful difficulties are easily remedied without
causing pain by
Dr, Welch, 270 Chapel St.
Ulcerated Joints
Are a most trying disease of the feet, occasioned by
long continuance of hardened excrescences growing
over the bone, under which forms fungus vims and
suppuration often breaks and becomes a running
sore from the bone, with great suffering. In meet ca
ses the patient rt quires constant attention, and such
are remarkably treated by .
Dr. Welch; No. 270 Chapel Street.
Enlarged, Inflamed. Diseased and
xenaer j oinis.
Hundreds of ladies and gentlemen suffer untold
miserv. and it 1b brought on Invariably by a compress
ion of the joints, causing inflammation in and around
the socket, causing the joint to enlarge, with constant
pain, inese complaints require experience ana some
times long treatment in their cures, but are easily con
trolled by
DR. WELCH, 270 CHAPEL ST.
Ingrowing Kails.
This most nainf nl disease, by lontr standintz. be
comes obstinate and requires study and practice in its
successful cure.
Ulcerated Nails.
Where has for oaed funaus and proud flesh, with
great pain, walking increases suffering until positive
rest is entirely dispensed with. The patient shouli
consult persons who by virtue of years of experience
are prepared to pass correct judgment and apply the
right treatment in every case. The most critical case
of this kind successfully treated by
Dr. Welch, 270 Chapel St.
CLUB NAILS
The Elands of ten become ulcerated and the nerve
swollen oansiog great suffering.
This is a branch of feet diseases which are suc
cessfully treated by
DR. WELCH, 270 CHAPEL STBEHT.
DR. WELCH
RAnonves Coras under the nails. Warts or Moles on
the head, face or hands, Birth Marks, Blotches, Black
Headed Slug Worms, Frond Ilesb, Freckles, Tan,
Meth Patches, Dry, Bough Skin, Old and Lingering
Sores compelled to heal, Chilblains and Frosted Feet
and every case
SUCCESSFULLY TBEATKD.
CONSULTATION FBEE.
Office Hours from 8 a. m. to 8 p. m. Sundaja from
10 a. m. to p. m.
USE
tt- Welches Chilblain Lotion, a sure our. for Chil
blains, Excessive Perspiration, &o.
Dr. weun's xi union uintueut.
Br. Welch's Corn snd Bunion Plaster.
Dr. Welch's Inarowing Mall Bemedy. Sore Core if
directions are etnc ly observed.
Persons desiring treatment at a distance should en
close $1 and stamp for remedies and full information.
AGEST8
WANTED
30 to
In every City in New England.
.7a per ibduiu;
Call or address with stamp
DR. WELCH,
CHIROPODIST,
270 CHAPEL STREET,
jlS Mew Haven, Conn.
to cosvaieBs of
SIS II, D90RS AP BLINDS.
WITH improved machinery and facilities we sre
now ready to compete for the above . commodi
ties afrainst imported work for CASH. If consumers
want that kind, they can have ONK DOOB, WISSOW
OB BLIND, OK A HUNCHED, AT
A.S low a price as dealerslpay for
the same by the car load.
Custom Hade Work at Very
faOTF Prices.
Lewis & Beecher Company,
lOO
Kast Water Street.
New Haven, Conn.
Andrew Goodman,
83 Crown Street.
A FINE assortment of Fancy and Staple Groce
ries, comprising a stock of
Imported Sardines,
jsonejess rjaromes,
Tanney Fish,
French Mushrooms,
French Peas,
Edam Cheese, Bnssian Caviar,
AeUTcnavei uneese, vapraa,
alun.ter Cheese, . Spanish Olives,
Sapsago, Queen Olives,
Italian Parmassaen,
Fromage De Brie,
Imported and Domestic 8 wins Cheese.
CANNED GOODS.
Peaches, String Beans,
noeappie, . x.un. ro.ua,
Bartlett Pears, Sugar Corn,
Apricots, Tomatoes,
Plume. Asparagus.
Dried Peaches, Dnad Raspberries,
AJrlCO Apples, arneu ifiianiNMmM,
Dried Blackberries, Dried Cherries.'
A nntnnlMe aMOrtment of the finest branda of Cham
pagnes, Port, Sherry, Oatawbs Madeira and Blackber
ry Wines, also a fine stock of Bottled Good, of every
description.
jnneet Dranos oi mporwi .uu wmkoho uigars.
Gall and be convinced that we handle nothing bat
first quality goods.
$ Andrew Goodman
BTO. 88 CBOWK STJBEKT,
KearMnsic Hall, 4 doors from Church St.,
jais coednufs Bnlldlnc
CRAVES" PATENT
. WST MOVED
aii ai f.
T.M- . ar - . a.
SALE BY O1-- '
A. C Chamherlln & Sons .
jaaatavUw Now Haven.
REMEDIES
Have speedily and permanently cored Hnmors of the
Bkin and Scalp of Children and Infants afflicted ainoe
bfth.
The rxeatmect prescribed. in such oasts is mild dosea
of fhB Oaticura ReaolveiuV-a perfeUy-aafe yet power
ful blood purifier, and the external nse of Cuticnra,
the greet akin core. The Onticnra Soap ahonld be the
only soap applied to the diseased-akin for clesns'ng
purpoEBB. . -. - -.-i
HUMOR ON A CHILD
Since Blrta Cured after Faithful ITIerli
cal Treatment hud failed.
Mesars. Weeks & Potter ; Oentlemen. My little
twe year of ae, has had a humor on one side of his
face since he was born, which daring the last -four
months has spread over the entire sine of the face, the
chin, ear, and aide of the head. It must hays Itched
and Irritated him a great deal, ts he scratched the sur
f a all the time, no matter what was applied. I used
many remedies by cdvioe of friends and my physician
without benefit until I found Oaticura, which imme
diately al'ayed the itching and inflammation, and en
tirely cored him.
liespectfutly, JOHN la. SUBBY.
With Walworth Manufacturing Co.
B stoD, April 15, 1878.
Sotk. - Once cured, the ekin may be rendered soft
and iair by uing the Outicura Uoap exaluslyelj for
tout or nrcbery parposea.
CHILDRENlND INFANTS.
ACore Cures of ftkin and Scalp Affections
by tlae Cuticnra Remedies
Fred. Bohrer. Eaa.. Cashier Stock Growers Nation
al Bank, Pueblo, Oqiorado, writes : I am so well
pleased with its effects on my baby that I cannot af
ford to be without it in my house. It Is a wotaderf ul
cure, and is bound to become very popular as soon as
us virtues are Known to tne masses."
J. 8. Weeks, Ken., Town Treasurer. St. Albans, Vt.
says in a letter dated May 33 : It works to a charm
on my bab$ 'b face and head. Cured the head entirely,
and has nearly cleaned the face of sores. I have rec
ommended it to ceveral, and Dr. Plant has ordered 4t
xor tnemi"
M. M. Chick. Esq.. 41 Franklin Street. Boaton.ays
My little daughter, eighteen months old, has what
the doctors call Eczema. We have triad 'most every
thing, and at last hive need Cnticura, and she is al
most a new child, and we feel very happy."
pricklTheat.
. incidental to the Texan Climate
Messrs. Weeks h Potter : Gentlemen, Enclosed
please find one dollar for a large box of Outicura. The
small one that I received some time sge has bean very
efficacious, especially In Prickly Heat or Bash, as some
peopie can is. i am noising it a do us.
Yours truly, XHOMAS W. BUCKLEY.
Mason, Texas, eept. 31, 1878.
It
Outicura is a meet valuable external application,
heals all cuts, bruises, aod abrasions of the skin.
stores the hair when destroyed by scalp diseases, re
moves dandruff and keeps the scalp clean and the hair
sott ana piiaDie. it is as agreeable as it w effective,
and is ably assisted in every case by the Outicura Soap
which is particularly recommended to mothers for
desning the skin and scalp of infants and children.
It is Toilet as well as Medicinal, and is the most fra
grant and refreshing Soap for the nursery and bath of
any yet prepared.
Parents have our assurance that these remedies con
t-in nothing injurious to the youDgest infant, evidence
of which may be found in the certificates of Dr. Hayes
and Prof. Merrick accompanying each remedy.
The Outicura Remedies are oreuared br Weeks &
Potter, O Demist and Druggists, 860 Washington
Street, Boston, Mass., and for sale by all Druggists
and Dealers. Price of Outicura, nuail boxes 60 cents;
large boxes, containing two and one half times the
quantity of small. SI. Resolvent, tl per bottle. Outi
cura Soap, 35 cents per cake ; by mail, 80 eents ; 8
cakes, 76 cents. - . -
COLLINS.
They destroy all tendency to
ii; 13 Animation by drawing from
au. tau FSSsV p. MTorathe system morbid or nnwnoie-
SJULIflnj SuSUIanm. matter." thna snraatlii.
J3u . AvsrCS caring Bhsumatirm, Kenral
aUlSl t.w els. snd Sciatica. Worn over
the nit of th Stomach, they prevent Ague and Liver
Fains, Inflammation of the Iaver and Kidneys, Bilious
Collo, Dyspepsia, Indigestion, Cramps, and Pains.
jaae Mower r2w -
TIieSlFiopiipliicliiiprtPcfl
A Pencil that writes 20,-
000 words with common
writing1 ink without refill
ing. It wUl last a lifetime,
is simple in construction,
inever clogs, does away with
1 nked linerers. blots and blot-
Iters, and is a perfect fen for
the IESii or POCKET. As
a KUiiiau fen il is une
qualed. This Pen is eener-
-J ally and favorably known
(nrougnoui cue couni.ry.anu
hundreds can testify to its
merits. Critical iuspection
is solicited. .Every Pen war
ranted to give satisfaction or
money refunded. The Styl
ographic Pen Improved was
awarded First Premium at
ttie Connecticut State Pair.
October, 1879. .Beware of
imitations, many attempts
a have been made to produce
a fountain pen, but tne im
proved Stylographic is the
only Successful, Self-feeding
Pen invented.
JUDD,
THE BOOKSELLER,
AGENT,
24LO Chapel Street.
, d20tf
illliiiiesota Venison.
Prime Stock Just Received
Direct From St. Paul.
Also a Fresh !ot of
rouse, Western Quail,
Onto Docks, Turkeys and
Chickens.
Frlsbie k, Hart,
350 and 352 State Street.
alS
; Jmmtal and (Siraii. .
EDITED AND PUBLISHED BY
OABRCfGTOS & CO.,
If o. 40O State Street, Conrter Bnlldlnff.
5 70HT S, CABBrsOTOK.
KOWAmD T. CAKBIKOTON. IOBS B. CABBISOTOK, IB.
Tuesday Sonuntf, Jan. 27. 1880.
TQE SELECTIO.t OF JUDGES,
There has been for several years consider
able dissatisfaction with the mode of select
ing Judges which prevails in' this State. The
agitation of the subject resulted in two pro-;
posed amendments to the constitution which
were passed by the House last year, and last
week were referred to the Committee on Con
stitutional Amendments. The first of these
amendments provides that "Judges of the
Supreme Court of Errors and of the Superior
Court shall upon nomination of the Governor
be appointed by the General Assembly in such
manner as shall by law be prescribed." The
second makes the same provisions as to Courts
of Common Fleas and District Courts. These
amendments are supported by the State . Bar
Association and a committee of that associa
tion will appear before the committee of the
General Assembly and present its views.
It is argued that it would be a great gain
to deprive irresponsible party cauouses of the
power to nominate judges and place that
power in the hands of the Governor, who
would be responsible. There is some force
in this on first thought. Under the caucus
system the candidates are frequently, perhaps
generally, unknown to the majority of those
asked to nominate them, and their qualifioa-
Ltions must be passed upon without sufficient
opportunity for investigation, and without
full and free criticism. And there is anoth
er serious objection to the nomination of
judges by caucuses, and that is that the nom
inations are often, not to say always, the re
sult of trading. The candidate Who can pull
the most wires and pull them the most ef
fectively gets the nomination, and aotual
merit is substantially lost sight of. That this
is true none familiar with .caucuses will deny.
Moreover, it is pointed out tbat in ten
States judges are ohosen by Governor and
Council or Governor and . Senate. These
States are Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mas
sachusetts, Mississippi, New Hampshire, New
Jersey, Michigan, Delaware and Maine. In most
of these States the courts have a high char
acter, and everybody knows how well the Su
preme Court of Maine has recently done its
diffioult duty.
But if it is clear that there ought to be a
change, it is not so clear that that change ought
to give the nominating power to the Governor.
What security is there that a Governor will
make better nominations than a caucus ? To
be sure,if a Governor makes a nomination that
is really bad, the responsibility for it can be
brought home to him. But he would have to
make a very bad (or some would say a very
good) one to be in much danger of getting re
buked. The faots in this State show, we be
lieve, that the nominations of Governors have
certainly not averaged any better than those
made by the General Assembly. Friendship
and prejudice have their influence even upon
Governors, and if a Governor is looking out
for a renomination or for some coveted office
he is as apt to trade as are the members of a
caucus, and to bestow appointments where
they will do him the most good rather than
npon those most fit for them.
Many States, inoluding New York, eleo
judges by popular vote. There is considera
ble to be said in favor of this method. Per
haps there is no more probability that an un
fit nomination will be made by a popular
caucus than by a Legislative caucus, and the
merits and demerits of candidates for the
votes of the people are apt to be pretty thor
oughly discussed by thepress. Then, too, a
judge whose oontinuanoe in office depended
directly upon the people's votes would natur
ally try to make a good reoord. If the people
can be trusted to eleot their Governors, why
not their judges ? Would they elect poorer
judges than those who get on the bench under
the present system ?
The matter is a very important one and
should be fully discussed before any action is
taken. If all the future Governors of Con
necticut are to be wise, good and independent
it may be advisable to give them more ap
pointing power, as they would use it for the
good of the people. But considering the case
as it is actually likely to be, it does not seem
that there is anything to be gained by the
proposed change.
A Happy and Prosperous New Year
TO OITE MD AXX.I
Is the sincere wish of your Tailor,
L. H. Freedman,
92 Church Street.
Thanking you kindly for past favors, and hoping to
njoy a liberal patronage in the future, as our aim la
o serve onr customers with the latest style of goods In
tthe most approved manner and at Popular s?ri-
Cw5M
N. B. For the next 30 days we will sell oor good at
ost, as our stock is large.
Freedman,
. 92 Chnrch Street.
j. K.
' JaS tf
No.
The Johnson Revolving Book-Case.
Hade entirely (of iron. A most appropriate Holi
day diftfor
Im w y ers, - Clergy men, : Editors,
- Pbjsictans, Merchants, Teach
ers, Students.
roa SALS by .
r . . F. I. JT AK.TIATT, .
Art Manufacturer. Agent.
The Highland and Wintlirop
; ; Portable itanges.
r fiHS largast,most;perfect snd simplest on. th.
J. market. They; are the most even bakers ever
made. Sold by - " (
r f Vt. T. Cannon & Co, u
' si . . , i - . -L- S0 Bte Street, nearOsspel. ;
latest Styles How ISeady at
j 3Ire. S.rl. Stanley
restntd Cloak ilavfelnjc Ejasperl
! urn, lOO tart-Street.-: : ;
4. tal r . -- - van and Infant.' Wardrobe a apiaaaity,
".. Ohilareus UimI nr-r on band or mad.
t .r.-fcv
V I.- ..I fi;iilr liKwt .MX Km
,Hxl e
- i tfloaser Mackerel. - -
NK Btoatrr Has. Mackerel, extra large end3fat
best we nave seut for several years.
tU (UIjBebt at XH0MFBOS
EDITORIAL NOTES.
- Mr. Hayden is now out on bail, end if his
friends sre jodioious they will not complain
because he is not entirely free.
It is cheering to learn that long-haiied men
do not attend the woman suffrage gatherings
in Washington in such numbers as they form
erly did. The sooner the women get entirely
rid of them the better for their "cause."
It is expected that the case of Fitz John
Porter will be acted on in the Senate commit
tee to-day. General Garfield has prepared a
speech with special reference to vindicating
the court which sentenced Porter, and some
thing interesting is promised.
The prosperity of the country and other
causes are having their effect in England in a
revival of business and an advance in prices.
The improvement was first noticeable in the
iron trade, whioh was affected by the large
orders received from the United States. Wool
has gone up 30 to 40 per cent, and the finer
grades 15 to 20 per cent. Freights from In
dia have doubled in the last quarter, and Aus
tralian freights have increased one-half.
While the larger railroad lines show on the
whole a decrease in their net earnings for the
year 1879, there are signs on the London
Stock Exchange that a great speculative move
ment in railroad and other securities is to fol
low the advance in the market quotations of
the great staples.
The suits arising from the destruction of
property in the riots at Pittsburg have been a
souroe of controversy throughout the State of
Pennsylvania for some months past. The
main trouble was against the Pennsylvania
Bailroad Company, in whose burned depots
an immense amount of merchandise was de
stroyed. A test suit was made to ascertain
the responsibility, and Judge MoKenman, of
the United States Court, has just delivered an
opinion in the case that the railroad company
was not guilty of any negligence impairing the
efficiency of the exception printed on its bills
of lading, and that the plaintiff is not entitled
to recover. The exoeption referred to ex
cepted the liability of the railroad company
for freight lost by fire. This decision and
opinion is of interest not only in Pennsylvania,
but throughout the country, as establishing a
precedent for circumstances which, happily,
are very rare.
According to Le Pelerin, an Ultramontane
periodical, enjoying a large circulation in or
thodox French circles, and lay ing claim to derive
its information npon religious subjects from al
together exolusive souroes,Pius IX., upon enter
ing Paradise shortly after his demise, was there
received with somewhat exoeptionaThonora.
The account of his reception purports to be the
faithful reproduction of a communication "re
ceived from the highest authority.'' ' It is as
folio wb : "When Flo Nono entered Paradise
he al onoe obtained a crown from the hand of
the Immaculate Virgin, as a reward for the
crown whioh he had bestowed upon her during
his sojourn upon earth.. St. Joseph, whom he
had made patron and protector of the Church,
shook him heartily by the hand and thanked
him. Then St. Peter gave out the key in
whioh the hymn of Welcome was to be sung,
and the celestial choir chanted it, while Fran
cis de Sales and Alphonso . Liguori, whom he
had formerly proclaimed teachers of . the
Church, alternately recited in laudatory terms
the deeds and achievements of his Pontificate
Fifty-two saints and twenty-six of the blessed,
all of whom owe their present position to Pius
IX., greeted him with harmonious choruses.
A writer in Fraser's Magazine discusses the
cost and results of strikes in an interesting
manner. He estimates that the engineers'
strike, which began in February last and con
tinued about thirty-three weeks, caused a loss
of $70,000 to the strikers. The average num.
ber of men out of employment during this
time was 500. If no strike had taken place,
their wages would have amounted to $144,000.
But they received from society funds about
$74,000, reducing their personal loss to $70,
000. Of notable strikes that have taken place
within the last two years, that of the London
masons, whioh lasted thirty-three weeks and
threw 1,700 men out of employment, oost the
strikers about $130,000. The carpenters'
strike In Manchester involved about the same
number of men, and cost nearly as much.
The strike and lock-out of the boiler-makers
and iron ship builders on the Clyde oost the
society upward of $65,000, the estimated loss
es being $1,500,000. The losses of the miners
in the Durham strike are estimated at $1,200,
000. In the above strikes, excepting that of
the engineers first mentioned, the strikers suf
fared disastrous defeats. While strikes are
exceedingly expensive luxuries to the men,
even when successful, the writer above cited
maintains that the number of strikes from
which the employes reap no advantage are ex
tremely few, as compared with those from
which they derive some benefit, proximate or
remote. In illustration of what is sometimes
gained by the strikers, he oites the builder'
strike and look-out in London in 1859. About
21,000 men quit work, but many of these ob
tained employment elsewhere. ' The number
engaged in the struggle was from 6,000 to
10,000. The whole number interested in the
result of the contest was between 40,000 and
50,000. After spending upward of $250,000,
besides the loss in wages, the men were com
pelled to yield. But they gained the Saturday
half holiday, which is now enjoyed by not
fewer than 100,000 building operatives. This
is computed to be a gain to the men of about
$2,800,000 a year, "if not in money, at least
in-money's worth." The writer claims that
the employes get over their losses much more
speedily than their employers. With the form
er, he says, it is a matter of temporary in
convenience, or, at most, of present suffering
only ; with the latter it means, not merely a
derangement of business for the time being,
but in many oases future embarrassment, if
not failure.
PEACE OFFERINGS.
IHB FATTGB OF THAT SHINGLE.
When the angry passion gathering in my mother's
face I see,
And she leads me in the bedroom gently lays me on
her knee:
Then I know that I will catch it, and my flesh in fancy
itches,
As I listen for the pitter of the shing'e on my
breeches.
Every tingle of the 'shingle has an echo and a sting,
And a thousand burning fancies into a?Uve bing
spring,
And a thousand bees and hornets 'nesth my c Jt tail
seem to swarm
As I listen to the patter of the sbiogle oh ! so warm !
In a splntter comes my father, wham I supposed had
gone,
To survey the situation and tell her to lay it on ;
To see her bending o'er me as I listen to the strain
Plsyed bv her and by the shingle ia a wild aud weird
refrain.
In-a sadden interm'ssion, which appears my only
chance,
I say : "Strike gently, mother, or youll split my Sun
day pants."
She Btop a moment, draws her breath, the shingle
holds aloft,
And says : "I had not thought of that my son, lust
take them off."
Holy Moses ! and the ange's, otst thy pityiag g'aace?
down !
Aud thou, oh family doctor, put a g jod B'jf t ponltice
on !
And may I with fools an I dances everlastingly co n
roingle If I ever say another word when my mother holds the
ehlDgle. Robert J. Bukdette.
There is something saddening about a pair
of scissors alas I they only meet to sever.
Cleveland Voice.
No one would suppose from Mary Ander
son's looks that she is part Indian.and it any
one did, he'd make a thundering big mistake.
Boston Post.
A witness in court was asked if a party to
the suit was a truthful man. "No," he an
swered, "he'd rather lie at sixty days than tell
the truth for cash." Kingston Freeman.
They sat upon the sandy beach
And gazed upon tue sea
" When are the waves oslled aogry waves' ?"
Oonnndrumly asked she.
"Galled 'angry wave'?" her beau replied
'Twixt wonderment and doubt ;
"I giv. it up I" "Way, then," she cried,
"It's when the watexs-pout 1"
Kansas City Times.
Indignant Wife "If I had known you were
ooming home in this condition, I should have
gone home to my father's." Inebriated Hos
bsnd "Hio would yn ? I'm awf sorry didn't
shend yu word hio." Pack.
Says the New Haven Register : "A woman
with a red petticoat was mistaken for a danger
signal by the engineer of a railroad train, but
hold, perhaps he wasn't mistaken after all "
No, it might have been bis wife. Oil City
Derrick.
"My darling G. is the most perfect Apollo
of a man I have ever seen," remarked Matilda
Anne, wending her way home from a leap -year
visit to the young gentleman Bhe is now
paying her addresses to. "Yes; a perfect
Apollo-G. !" spitefully retorted her sister Mal
vina Jane, a rejected rival, bent on desperate
revenge. Biohmond State.
SmtSHINK A2TX SHADOW.
They do not sit in toe garden chair.
And they do not swing on the gate ;
Bot they go in the cosy pirlor, whore
They sit till a quarter of eight.
The old man weeps, bat his burning tears
Oannot appease the fates ;
It will cost him more for coal, he fears,
Than it did last June for gates.
Hawkeye.
COMMUNICATIONS.
Woman Suffrage.
To the Editor of the Joubnal and Coijkikk :
Please allow us to say a few words on a po
litical topic, one that concerns the larger and
better half of oar citizens, and therefore ap
propriate to the columns of your paper. To
the friends of woman suffrage the political
events in Maine for the last few weeks afford
a sufficient answer to a very popular objection
to woman suffrage. It is said, "Woman can
not fight, therefore she ought not to vote."
The objeotion is made to assume the follow
ing shape by Francis Parkman in the North
American Be view for January, that is, "If a
law was passed by a majority chiefly women,
the minority being men, they would resist it,
being phvsioalty the strongest." An almost
impossible case, the interest of men and wo
men being so identical. Now in Maine a mi
nority perpetrated an outrageous fraud. The
majority were conscious of their superior
strength in the State, and the adjacent States,
and . that the whole military power of
the Union was in the hands of a
Bepublican President. And yet the loaders
of both these great parties warn and caution
against any resort to physical force. They
fear the moral sense of the people. Mr.
Parkman's argument is this, "Tbat this Gov
ernment is sustained by physical foroe, and
that men in the aggregate only have this,
and therefore they only, and not women, have
the right to vote." In reply, we would say
that that Government is the strongest which
relies the least npon its physical element,
whose strength comes not from these brute
foroe arguments, drawn from the basilar re
gions of the brain, but from lessons taught
from the pulpit, press and rostrum.
Another objeotion of Mr. Parkman is this :
That as women do not write npon political
economy, silver bill, finanoe, etc, they ought
not to vote. Are there not subjects rpon
which women only oan write well that need
legislation quite as much as dollars and cents.
It is said that women do not want to vote.
Why not ? Because hitherto the "keen shafts
of wit have dug the grave of every feminine
mind thai has dared to express" a wish to
vote. There are a good many men who do
not want to vote. It is stated on good au
thority that in Philadelphia there were over
thirty-four thousand men whose taxes (only
fifty cents each) were paid by the Bepublican
and Democratic executive committees so that
they could vote. We believe tbat as in
the past, so in the future, work and agita
tion will be necessary to arouse the pat
riotism of both men and women each to
vote on those questions that specially interest
them, and herein lies the educational power
of the ballot. Women are certain for tem
perance, and will also pass judgment on the
moral fitness of candidates for every office.
On the subject of temperance we may add
that Miss Fraooea Willard, who was reoently
elected president of the Woman's National
Temperance Union in the place of Miss Annie
Wittenmyer, is a strong advocate of woman's
voting, while Mrs. Wittenmyer has Bteadily
opposed it. This indicates in a decided man
ner the growth of the suffrage sentiment in
that organization. There are other fallacies
of Mr. Parkman that we might notice, but the
above objections to woman suffrage that we
have briefly touched are the most prominent
and popular ones. ' B.
Tbe Went worth Fletcher Disengage.
; mettU
f om the Parisian.
Our Boman correspondent has already men
tioned that an engagement of marriage be
tween an English lord and an American girl
had been suddenly broken, and that there is
strong indignation against the man who has
thus wantonly destroyed the happiness and
future of a young girl whose brave and cour
ageous career has commanded tbe admiration
of strangers.
The gentleman is Lord Wentworth, a grand
son of Lord Byron, and the young lady Mies
Fletcher, author of "Kismet," and well known
by her nom de plume of "Gaorga Fleming."
The correspondent of the Anglo-American says
Miss Fletcher is very ill. "It ia fortunate for
Lord Wentworth," he continues, "that Miss
Fletcher is not English or in England, or
there might be a'breach of promise' case tbat
would amuse the two worlds for some little
time. In the meantime the poor girl's health
has suffered intensely, and I hear tbat all her
beautiful hair is cut off 1 Miss Fletcher had
many enemies, and these were very envious
of her evident good fortune in having so great
a prize within her hands. They did not rest
until they had wrenched it from her.
But it is a general surprise that Lord Went
worth, as an Englishman and a man of mature
age, was not firm enough to resist all the ar
rows flung at him,
Very different from another English noble
man I oould name, who, when engaged to an
un&ristQoratio lady, was asked, "Do you
know that her first husband is not yet dead ?"
"If she had twenty husbands living," he an
swered, "I should be happy to be the twenty
first." And they were married, nor did he
ever repent of his firmness.
Governor Andrews' Appointments.
Hartford Correspondence Springfield Bepublican.
Governor Andrews seems to think that, if he
oan only prove that he "moves in a myste
rious way," the people of Connecticut will
supply the rest of the syllogism and worship
him. His surprise party that gave us Prof.
Walker for railroad commissioner did elevate
him a good deal. But when he puts Senator
Bill Hayward into Walker's shoes it is, though
no less mysterious, decidedly less to h s credit.
The intimation in this correspondence, a week
ago yesterday, that Hayward might be the
man was laughed at by the Governor's best
friends, who said it must be intended for
a joke. He seems to have made it a practical
one. The explanation offered now for the act
is that, office-seekers having- threatened
and bully-ragged the little Governor till he
really became afraid he wouldn't be renomi
nated, he settled it and them by giving the
plaoe to what he considered an influential
politician, and that Litchfield and Colohester
have locked arms across the Connecticut riv
er. Leaving out any consideration of Hay
ward's personal fitness for the plaoe, there
are other obstacles whioh should have pre
vented the nomination. For instanoe, he was
direotor and president of the Colohester rail
road, and direotor of the Air Line, and is so
in the new railroad report issued to-day.
The law forbids any railroad stockholder
from being a commissioner, but tbe Hart
ford Post says Hayward was not a stock
holder, and only held these directorships as
"honorary offioss." It is anew idea that a man
can be a direotor and not be a stockholder,
but I find nothing in the general railroad law
to prevent, so that really the resignation of
the directorship was superfluous. Connecti
cut sentiment as to the railroad board has al
ways been divided. Bailroad people contend
ed that it was a nuisance ; part of "the peo
ple" considered it a superfluity, and the other
part thought it better to abolish it than to
continue it as an asylum for political veter
ans, which used to be its purpose. Of late
years something has spurred Commissioner
George M. Woodruff up to giving us very
good reports, and a sentiment in favor of
continuing the board, with the hope that it
might prove good for something, has been
rapidly spreading. It looks to me now as if
this was the time to change it from three
members to one member. If it is to ravert to
its asylum functions, it might better disap
pear altogether.
iTIrs. Spragne's Dinner to 3Irs.Conktinar,
One of the Washington papers gives the
following piece of "society news : "One of
the handsomest entertainments imaginable,
being perfect in its minutest details, was the
little dinner given by Mrs. Kate Chase
Sprague on Wednesday evening last to hsr
friend, Mrs. Boscoe Conkling, who is visiting
there. The cosy home on Connecticut ave
nue whioh Mrs. Sprague has ocenpied since
leaving EJgewood is arranged with such ar
tistic skill and on this oocasion was so beauti
fied by flowers that upon entering the bril
liantly lighted saloon from the gloomy streets
outside it looked like fairy land, and the illu
sion was not dispelled as its presiding spirit,
radiant in white camels' hair and diamonds,
advanced to welcome the favored guest. The
table with its flowers and favors was a work of
art, everything being designed, from decora
tions to dessert, by the hostess. On the oentre
of the table lay au oval mirror in its tank of
flowers, looking like a miniature lake upon
whose bosom appeared to float a huge swan
with a back load of fragrant blossoms. At
each plate besides the customary bouquets
were exquisite trifles, such as for instance a
crimson satin slipper with gilded French heel
and chenielle bordered top, a bow of hand
some satin ribbon on the toe and long loops
and bow of the same to carry it on the arm
as a satchel, and the shoe filled with gorgeous
Marshal Niel rosebuds. Another was a choco
late cake wrapped in its silver paper, upon
which pranoed a silver goat drawing a minia
ture basket of fruits. Trailing vines sus
pended from the chandeliers and pyramids
of fruits and flowers completed tbe
adornments. Mrs. Conkling looked very lovely
in black velvet, with trimming of white laoe
and ornaments of pearls. Mrs. Hamilton
Smith wore a rich black velvet costume with
black lace garniture; ornaments, amethysts
and violets. Mrs. Conkling's trophy was a
shepherd's hat of satin filled with roses, whioh
were held in place by a silver dart. Mrs.
Smith's a long Turkish pipe of crimson satin,
the immense bowl being filled with buds.
There were but eight in the party including
the beautiful hostess."
Dlastangs InTezas Xhlrtv Years Ago,
From the Texas Mute Bangers.
The word mustang is a corruption of mes
ttno, the Mexican name for a wild horse.
Many years ago there were thousands, no
doubt millions, of those animals in Texas. In
1849, and for several years thereafter, they
were numerous in the region between the
Nueces river and the Bio Grande. They were
found further north, but not in such numbers..
Immense herds of wild horses could be seen
grazing on the prairies. When they saw any
one approaching the leader would often move
to the front and make a reconnoissanee. If
things did not suit him, he would give his
head a peculiar toss, wheel, and sound the
note of alarm. These demonstrations would
be followed by prompt movement on the part
of the herd, sometimes to the front, but more
usually to the rear. They would wheel into
line, ohange front, move in line or in column
with as much precision and order as cavalry.
It was wonderful to witness how well they
were drilled and disciplined. In the event a
retreat was ordered the leader would move in
the rear for a while. If any lagged or strag
gled tbey were very apt to feel his teeth, if
not his heels. On some occasions a move
ment to the front was ordered. It was a
charge in line or in column, proudly headed
by the leader. This was the case sometimes
when mounted men were in sioht. The
Texas Bangers operating in that oountry
were followed by pack-mules in oharge of a
guard. It was necessary at times to form a
hollow square, place the mules inside, and to
throw out skirmishers to fire into the animals.
If the leaders oould be struck, the charge
would be broken. The horses would retire at
once. -
The mustangs were hunted by Mexicans,
and the finest ones singled out and lassoed.
Whole herds were driven at a run into pens
having extended wings, whioh contracted as
they approached the gate. As many as five
hundred mustangs have been penned at one
"run." They were aold at almost nothing,
five dollars being a high priee for a choice
home. These mustangers were a wild set,
often no better than Indians; some of them
were honest, good men. They were guilty of
many murders and robberies. The Coman
ohes marie many visits to that region. They
would . pounce npon the mustan
gers,. set ' them afoot or kill
them, as oaprioa diotated. The Coman
ohes wanted the mustangs to ride and eat. '
Horseflesh is s great delicacy with them. The
choioa part is the fat immediately under the
mane.. The section in question was very not
in those days for Americana. A Texan was
considered an hereditary enemy by both mus
tangers and Indians. His only protection
was the rifle and the six shooter and a horse
ot strength and bottom.

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