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Morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven [Conn.]) 1848-1894, August 14, 1880, Image 1

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015483/1880-08-14/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE LARGEST DAILY NEWSPAPER IN THE CITY.
OFFICE 400 STATE STREET.
Publislied,by CAJRRENGTON & CO.
JOL. XLVIU.
NEW HAJjNa CONtf. SATURDAY, MORNING, AUGUST 14, 1880.
Price Four Cents.
.v; -
vA
; 'tl. -
tMani
Xsreed ty J. IT.' AS AS & CO.
We have opened a line of Ginghams In
very attractive styles work which is far
ahead of anything that has yet been done in
this country.
J. N. ADAM A CO.
We have opened a line of Hamburg
Edgings and Insertings. The styles
are good, the quality good, and the prices
are low.
J. N. ADAM & CO.
We are selling a great many Navy Blue
Flannels, and have them in single and
doable width, both plain and twilled. Peo
ple come to ns always first and last. First,
to get oar prices, and last, to say that they
found none others so cheap.
J. N. ADAM CO.
I
Our stock of Cotton Cloth comprises
all the best and leading makes, excepting, at
S resent, yard wide ' Fruit of the Loom.' This
as been advertised lately ajt Tc, and as ;we,
cannot buy it for that, we prefer to be with
out it. We have a nice make of Twilled
Sheeting, which is coming much into favor.
J. N. ADAM fc CO.
In the Housekeeping Goods Depart
ment onr stock is complete. A special lot of
the very finest quality of Marseilles Quilts
imported offered at half price. ..Linen Sheet
ing in various widths and grades, bought pre
vious to the recent advance. Table Linen,
Napkins, Towels, Diapers, &c, in full and
regular assortment at low prices. Fine Blan
kets specially cheap. Those coming for our
Winter trade will be higher than those we
now offer. I
J. N. ADAM CO.
Having almost closed out our extensive
stock of Summer Prints, we have put in a
new line. The styles are very choice, the
colors fast, and the quality of cloth the very
best. We shall maintain our high standard
of excellence and our low rates of profit. A
few Lawns and Cambrics loft we are closing
out cheap.
J. N. ADAM A CO.
J. N. ADAM & CO.
u9
Bathing Shoes.
Patent Leather Opera
Slippers.
Josephine, Empress and Opera
Kid SUppers.
Gentlemen'sLow Shoes ingreat
variety of styles.
N. B. During hot weather, we
close at 6:30 P. M, Monday and
Saturday nights excepted. .
WALLACE B
FRUIT JAES !
ALL, SIZES.
H. N. Whittelsey. Jr.,
WEDDING PRESENTS !
STERLING SILVER
AND;
Silver Plated Ware,
InJNew Design.
MARBLE CLOCKS!
With the Cathedral Strike.
MONSON,
JEWELEB, ,
KO. 24CIIAIEt.STIlEET.
myia
C A URI AGES!
New and Second-Hand,
CONSTANTLY on band and for sale at bottom pri
j oea. I now have the following :
One aeoond-hand one-borse Business Wagon.
One second hand Phton.
One aeoond-hand aide-bar Carriage.
Three new side-spring piano-box no-top Buggies,
Two new aide-bar piano-box Carriages.
One new side-bar Corning-box Carriage.
One new turn-out seat end-spring Carriage.
And can furnish any style or quality of Carriages at
Short notice.
AlSO FOR SALE,
One very fine and stylish six year chestnut Horse,
warranted perfectly sound and safe for a family
jyi D. W. MORRILL.
1S5S
HOUSE
1880
SIGN PAINTING!
Pasarlu, Graining, Glnatng. Plnln uA
OnamUl Paper Hanging.,
Paint., OU", Varnish..
Window 6 lama,
Jirn.hM,
All work exeonted In th beat pomible manner by
sompatsnt workmen. JOrtlera promptyflattended to.
KAXSOM IIII.I-S,
NO. 492 STATE 3STKEET,
maStf TODD'S BLOCK.
FANCY
COLLARS AND CUFFS
SIX SETS4
THE NEW HAVEN
SHIRT COMPANY,
Chapel Street.
Hothouse Grapes'
OF DIFFEKKMT Tarlet;ca, aneqnality. prlo. mod
arata. In haakat. Iron 8 to 4 noiuida eaeL
363 and 363 Chapel Street
We seldom advertise Cashmeres ; ours
advertise themselves ; but the present is a
good time to bay these goods if they are like
ly to be needed. "Our Paris advices indicate
a higher market, and the make we sell being
much in demand on account of its excellence
will be the first to advance.
J. N. ADAM A CO.
The August Closing Out still keeps
going. We are constantly marking down
what we do not want to carry over. The pri
ces on what Parasols we have now will
iUa Vumaat - invpr Slnir.M &rfi fVT-
travagantly reduced. Gloves axe almost
given away. -
J. N. ADAMJr-CO. 5
We offer a very elegant variety of ' Silk
Handkerchiefs for Neckwear, and we
mention the fact that what we sell are really
worth wWuing.-q'hcre'ua beeu a great d3ei
of trash in the market, which has hurt the
trade somewhat, but such a quality as we ofj
fer will prove satisfactory every time.
J. N. ADAM & CO.
Black Silks are
our specialty."
J. N. ADAM & CO.
Gents' Furnishing Goods are al
ways under careful supervision.
, J.2S. ADAM & CO.
Our preparations for Fall trade have been
begun. We open the campaign with vigor,
and are determined to distance our competit
ors. We shall stick to our business, and
know our business, as hitherto, will stick to
us. The past season has been a highly satis
factory one, and returning thanks for the
kindly support accorded us, we are,
Respectfully,
891 AND J93 CHAPEL STREET.
DR. G. F. PETERSON,
DENTIST,
26 Elm Street. Corner of Orange.
n30 New Haren. Conn
The Highland and.Wlntlirop
PORTABLE RANGES.
THE largest, moat PERFECT and SIMPLEST on
the market. Thay are the moat even baker,
ever made. Sold by
W. T. CANNON & CO.,
.1 3AO State Street, near Chapel.
IF YOU WANT
A NICE GLASS OF SODA WATER,
Mineral Water or Boot Beer,
Go to Apotbacariea' Hall, 301 Chap. Street. -aH3
E. A. OEH8NER a CO.
WM. D. BRYAN,
CUSTOM' TAILOR,
No. 127 Churcn Street,
tenultac
DKESS JND BUSINESS SUITS
At lower prloea than ever before. wM
WINDOW SHADES AND FIXTURES.
BE1 CANOFIESyr
WIRE WINDOW SCREENS.
SPUING BEDS.
CARPET SWEEPERS1
Wholesale and Retail.
Ul'R PKICKS ARB THE LOWEST.
New Haven Window Shads Co.,
430 State Street.
my3
BUCKLEY & KELLY,
Practical Plumbers and Gas Fitters,
40 CROWN STREET,
Under Water Co. 's Office,
HKW HAVEN, CONN.
Jobbing promptly attended to.
. H. BUCKLEY.
D. F. KELLY,
myOTtf
SALAD OIL.
VirrK HAVK bow In More m. thirty obm
YY Oil, aame brand aa add by na for ynn put.
Our m-wm iniportatloo. In quarts, pint, and half
plnta. Quality the vary 1lnt Prior. Baoderate.
myld K R BALL a HON
Y7m. L YJriclit,
ATT0ENET AT LAW,
ROOHIS NOS. TO o, .
No. 153 Church St. cor. of Court.
FEU
&CU
her
Fine Goods in
RATTAN
The Novelty
A. C. CHAMBERLIN & SONS,
au9
Rubber Goods of every description at Wholesale and Retail.
Rubber Jewelry we are selling less than cost at
13 Cliurcli Street, cor. Center, opp.'P. O.
03 Orange Street, Palladium Building.
A PURE DIETETIC FOR INFANTS, INVALIDS AND THE AGED.
Thla nutritious and nalatafale mrevamtion for In.
fantsand Invalids is highly recommended by the
most Eminent Physicians, bailiff far superior to any
known Medicinal Food.
Rotai. Dtxtaxia must not be confounded wiSi tha
numerous articles of floor prepared in any manner
by heat, which, while they may contain s oertain
degree of nutriment, are utterly devoid of those
medicinal qualities which alone characterise Royax.
DXXXJJOJu
YUUK UKUlitilST HAS IT,
Will be sent by mail (poet paid) if not
C.N. CRITTENTON, I 15 Fulton St., New York,
Cen'l Agent for U. S.9 and Canadas.
TRUNKS AND BAGS
MADE TO ORDER.
AH kinds of Repairs made
at short notice.
Old Trunks taken in ex
change. No charge Tor cartage.
CROFUT'S TRUNK DEPOT
NO. 97 ORANGE STREET,
Palladium Building.
myl7 - ''
"HEAVY FORGING.
WE have the the best facilities fordoing all kinds
of Heavy Steel and Iron Forging, Drop Work,
Machine Jobbing, Planing, Lathe Work, etc Prices
and estimates given on application
Mansfield Elastic Frog Co. j
Congress Avenue and Daggett Streets,
snU tf 1 HAVEN,CONy. J
THE 1SKST OF I
JELLY SOI- msOAP,
- BY THE
Barrel or Gallon,
AT
Brown's Soap Works,
No. 14 Union Street,
jell
R. F. Burwell,
DENTIST,
Olebe Building, Cor. Church and Chap
el Streets.
9 Appointments made by Western Un
ion Telephone.
myl7
Key West Cigars.
l MAKOAKITAS at $4.U0 per box of 100.
UUjUVv AIM 5,000 Bona Concha Kegalia just re
ceived.
jyi5
E. E. HALL h SON.
ARCHITECT, 7
tmy3
334 Chapel Street, New Haven, Ct
Sailboat for Sale.
EIGHTEEN feet long, eight feet beam, cat-rigged,
newly painted, all in sailing order ; price (65.
nquire at 28 CONGKE8S AVE.
lei tf
EYES TO SEE WITH.
Those in want of a good pair of
SPECTACLE S
for a little money should call at
No. 38 Church Street.
I am still selling Genaine.Scotch Pebbles at
t2.R0 regular price $4.00.
Watches, Cioclts and Jewelry at bottom
prices.
JOIIX II. O. DURANT,
Practical Watchmaker,
No. 38 Church Street.
tTAU repairing done in the best manner at rea
sonable prices. a3
Oyer One Million Now in Use
OF THE
"Eighmie Patent Sliirt."
The best in the world.
PRICE ON i: 130L.L.AR.
Only to be had in this city of
T. P. Merwin,
SOI.K AGEIVT FOR NEW HAVEJT,
Office (at residence) No. 8 College Street
Orders per mail for showing or delivery will receive
prompt attention. a2
rrcHTo.R line;
UNITED STATES MAIL STKAHEBS
Sail every Saturday. i
NEW YOKK TO GLASOOTT.
CABINS, $00 to $SO. STEERAGE, 2S.
These Steamers do not carry cattle, sheep or piffS.fc
And every Saturday, ?
TTEW YORK TO XOND02T DIRECT.
CABINS, 955 to 965. Excursion at Reduced Rates,
passenger accommodations are unsurpassed.
All Staterooms on Maln.Deck:.
Passengers boo teed at lowest rates to or from any
Railroad Station in Europe or America.
Drafts issued at lowest rates, payable (free of charge),
throughout England, Scotland and Ireland.
For books of information, plans, Ac. apply to
HBrsrozxaox Bbothxb. 7 Bowuarct Gkjuut, K. Y.
or E. Dowbm 3Q9 Chapel St., New Haven.
DR. S- W. FISKE,
The Celebrated Clairvoyant Physi
cian and Magnetic Healer,
Business and Test Medinm,
la permanently located in New Haven, Conn.
Office No. 370 Chapel Street,
WHERE he can be consulted regularly every
month from the morning of the 10th until the
34th at noon.
Office hours from 9 a. m. to 9 p, m.
Dr. Fiske has had twenty-nine years' experience In
the practice of medicines and has made thousands of
the most astonishing cures of all chronic and long
standing diseases of whatever name or nature. Those
who are afflicted with any disease or pain should con
sult Dr. Flake at once, no matter how long yon havo
been out of health or what diseases yon are suffering
from, or how many doctors yon have employed in
vain, or how much, medicine yon have taken, or how
little faith yon have. He will tell yon at once the na,
ture of the disease and where It affects yon the most
and the progress it has made upon the system, and
describe the symptoms thereof ; and will furnish
medicines prepared from the best of selected roots, to
those who wish, for their speedy and permanent cure
at a reasonable price, either by the week or month.
The doctor also gives valuable advice on business
matters, and all the affairs of life, both social and
financial, including Journeys, lawsuits, gain, losses,
absent friends, and great success in selecting lucky
numbers. Sittings for bosiness affairs er examina
tion of the sick, SI. Communications by letter upon
business or health must contain t age, sex, a lock of
hair and stamp. Address Lock Box 1,253, Norwich,
Conn.
The Doctor will make his last Tisit at the Sterling
House, Bridgeport. Tuesday evening, Aug. 24th, and
Veonesday, the 25th, until 3 p. an.
He will also make his last visit at the Ansonla Ho
tel, Ansonia, Conn., Saturday afternoon, Aug. 28th,
Sunday, 29th and Monday, the 80th, until 9 p.m.
Use Dr. Flake Valuable Liniment, for safe by all
druggists. a5 dawtf
Yale Bureau of Patents.
ANDREW O'NEILL,
A TJTHOR of the new trade-mark and label law for
the State of Connecticut recently passed by the
Legislature. Applanations received and infonxiation
given. Address
ANDREW O'NEILL, Benedict Building. 82 Church
Street, Box 602, Nsw Haven, Coan.2 sn2tf
Suites !
Walnut and Ash.
ROCKERS.
388, 390 and 392 State Street.
F. C. TUTTLE.
Pare In its ingredients, it nourishes In fever, pro
motes Bleep, sustains the strength of the patient and
in numerous instances has proved to be the only ac
ceptable sustenance
In cases of PuuuMuxr CbHTunrrs, Gkjchrai, Db
mutt, FCVXBS and Dysphpbta, it will be found ef
ficacious, and aa s TSxiaaoiAX. NoTBrrrva Food, a
tdntrla trial will afford 'nifllciexis. evidnea nf tin
Jf -worth.
OK WILL GET IT FOR TOV.l
easily procured. Prlee 7ft Cent.
PATENTS.
R. H. EDDY,
fVo. 70 State St., Opposite Killy, Boston,
SECURES Patents In the United States; also in
Great Britain, France and other foreign countries.
Copies of the claims of any Patent furnished by re
mitting one dollar. Assignments recorded at Wash
ington. No Agency in the United States possesses su
perior facilities for obtaining Patents or ascertaining
the patentability of inventions. B. H. EDDY,
Solicitor of Patents.
TESTIMONIALS.
"I regard Mr. Eddy as one of the host cajbls
and succKssFUL practitioners with whom I have had
official intercourse, CHARLES MASON,
Commissioner of Patents."
"Inventors cannot employ a person more truetwor
thy or more capable of securing for them an early and
favorable consideration at the Patent Office.
; EDMUND BURKE; late Commissioner of Patente."
Boston, October 10, 1870. "
R. H. EraY, Esq. Dear Sir You procured for me,
in 1840, my first patent. Bines then you have acted
for me and advised me in hundreds of cases, and pro
cured many patente, reissues and extentione. I have
occasionally employed the best agencies in New York
Philadelphia and Washington, bat I still give yon al
moet the whole of my business, in your line, and ad
viae others to employ you.
Yours truly, - GEORGEJDRAPER.
Boston, January 1, 1880. jal eodly
MASON'S
Mason's JPorcelain-Iiined Jar.
Rubber for all Jars.
COHANCY FRUIT JAR,
' The Best and Cheapest in the World.
Window Screens,
The only reliable Adjustable Screen in the World.
Fit any window and cheaper than a plain frame.
American China.
A new invoice of those handsome American China
Dinner and Sea Sets. 123 pieces, only $15.00.
Another load of Lunch and Picnic Baskets just
damped off and most be sold.
Crockery, Glassware, Tinware, Woodeu
ware, Lamp Chandeliers, and House
Furnishing Goods in General, at
O. Xl. V Jli.XVXi.JCj- UU. O,
No. 90 Church Street,
4y29eod NEAB CHAPE1V
MANHOOD RESTORED.
A victim of early imprudence, causing nervons de
bility, premature decay, etc.,having tried in vain ove
ry known remedy, hoe discovered a simple means of
aelf-cure, which he will send tree to hi. fellow-sufferers.
Address J..H. BEEVES, '3 Chatham street,
N. y. el2 eod3m
Are sold by all Hardware and Harness Dealers. There
la no one owning a horse or male bat what will find m
ibis line of goods, something of great value, and es
peciallr adapted to their wants. COVERT KTG C(X.
iBbstTroy.N. Sole Maaufacturera.
3777
A YEAR and expenses to agents.
Outfit free. Address P. O. VICK-
ERY, Augusta, Maine.
Newspaper Advertising Barea.,11) Spruce
Street, New Yorlt.
SALMON
CHEAP. CHEAP.
i Hardiand Soft Crabs I.
Spanish Mackerel ! Bass !
&c, &c, &c,
AT
A. FOOTE & CO.'S,
353 STATE STREET.
JeM
A NEW SCHOOL SONG BOOK!
JUST OUT.
SO NG BELLS I
A New, Complete and matt attractlre
Collection of Scliool Songs.
By Ii. O. Emerson.
Send SO Cents for Specimen Copy.
Books for Schools,Singing Schools,
Choirs, and Gospel Temper
' ance Meetings.
'Weloome Cborna $1.00. For High School,
gong Bella 50 oenta . For Common Sohoola
White Robes. 30 centa. For Sunday Schoola.
Temple. $1.00. For Choir, and Singing School..
Vole, of Worship. $1.00. Choir, and 8inging Schoola.
Johnson's Method for Singing C Usees. 60 eenta For
Singing Schoola
Temperance Jewela. 36 omta. Gospel Temperance
Work.
Temperance Light, tt centa, . .
0L1TER DITS0N & CO.,
JyMWSaw
IHPOKTASiT TO AGENTS.
THE LIFE OF
GEN. JAS. A. GARFIELD,
By his personal friend. MAJOR BUNDY, Editor N. Y.
Mail, to the.nAy edition to which Gen. Garfield
haa giren personal attention or facta Beautifully il
lustrated, printed and bound. Full length steel por
trait by Hall, from a picture taken expressly for this
work. Active Agent. Wanted.. Liberal term.
Send 81 OO at once for complete outfit.
A. a BARNES A CO.,
y96 dSwlin . 1U and 118 William St., New York.
aRAVEST PATT
A. C CHAMBERLIN SONS.
my!4 2aw3m New Haven, Conn.
JOSEPH MOEKS,
ARTIST LN" FBESCO AND OIL,
FORMERLY E. Srharfschwerdt a Co., reeel.es or
der, at JOHN MAYES'S, !1SI Chapel street, or
JjrUtai - KftBOXan l
1
IMPROVED FRUIT JAR.
,jt,r j, arr j i :v j -mm
1 1 " 1 1
Kir fit - I
CAIlIAbil
WE take pleasure in informing the people of this
city and the country at large that no better as
sortment of fine carriages can be found in this State
than can be found at the Bepositary of
WM. H. BRADLEY & CO.,
61 Chapel Street,
(Cor. of Hamilton,)
andt price, that shall be satisfactory to purchasers.
We Have a Few
SECOND -HAND CARRIAGES
in awmd order and at low prices : also, a few of those
nice $60 No-Top Plat no-Box Buggies. Please
call and select one if in want, as they will cost
more soon
Repairing of all Kinds
Eone in the best manner at reasonable price, by
WM. H. BRADLEY & CO.
ieal Estate.
First-Class Residence for Sale.
OWING to a contemplated change in business
Eftlil location the ensuing fall, I offer my residence,
fcjtiij) corner of East Grand and Ferry streets, for
sale. This is by far the finest place in Fair Haven,
Lot 131x230 feet, well stocked with every variety of
fruit in bearing condition. House built of founda
tion stone, contains ten rooms, all heated by steam ;
also gas ana water, stationary range ana wasn raos.
Large barn and carriage house ; accommodations for
live horses ; gas and water : room for man. Large
hennery and garden. Parties meaning business can
apply on the premises.
my31 tf FREDERICK W. BXBCOCK.
FOB SAME,
A NEW AND COMMODIOUS HOUSE on
Sherms-i avenue, handsomely fitted with mod
ern conveniences, and most pleasantly located.
Will be sold at a great bargain. Inquire at
myI2 dtf ' THIS OFFICE.
TO RENT.
A DESIRABLE Furniahed Room will be
rented to one or two gentlemen. Call at
26 ELM STREET,
mylStf
Corner Orange.
FOB BENT,
BRICK BUILDING, with eneine in cood or
der, with or without barn; possession any time.
ANDREW MARTIN,
f23tf 19 Pearl Streev? r
FOB SALE.
M BUILDING LOTS on Nicholl, Eagle, and both
aideB of Nash street ; 400 feet in one place ;
price low ; terms easy.
ANDREW MARTIN,
f23tf 19 Pearl Street
W. P. NILES,
(Notary Bublic,)
Keal Estate, Fire Insurance, Loan
and Collection Agency.
FOR SA I,K.
A beautiful place on Town Bend arenue, over
jj looking Long Island Sound, with 10 acres of
j choice land, good dwelling house and barn.
WANTED
To exchange, a finely located business property in
this city, well rented, for a dwelling hou, cen
trally located. Call for particulars.
Will pay cash for a good residence, centrally
located, with modern improvement.. Not
over 15,000 can be given.
Money to loan.
Office, 370 Chapel Street,
. Jylo Room No. 1.
JOSEPH SONNENBEKG,
Real Estate and Exchange Broker,
238 CHAPEL STREET.
. f Tk g Spanish Doubloons wanted. United
XvF.VFVrVf States per cent. Bond, and For
eign securities bought and sold and dividends paid
in United States currency. Tenement for rent corner
of George and Day streets, 6 rooms, $9 per month.
Also Gold and Silver exchanged at the office of
JOSEPH SONNENBEKO,
ap26 tf 238 Chapel Street.
BOOMS TO BENT.
KIVK ROOMS with gas and water and water
closet on same floor; lve minute, wallc from
.City Market, Also half house, 8 Lewis street.
: air Haven. Auuit iir:i.i-r.it, .
my4 Room No. 1 Yale National Bank Building.
B. H. JOHNSON,
Real Estate and Loan Agent
Office, 487 State Street.
FOR SALE.
A Nice House and Large Lot on Eld street at
a bargain.
uooa uottage Mouse on lswxgn. street at mucn
less than it is worth.
A fine place in Fair Haven and several other places
for sale very low.
Some good Shore Property in East Haven and Bran
ford. For Sale or Rent -Farms.
A very desirable Farm of 70 acres in South ington
will be sold low to close an estate.
A list of good Farms in other desirable locations.
Good rents in St. John and Greene streets. Fair Ha
ven, and other parts of the city.
Wanted, $2,000 to $4,000 on good first mortgage se
curity ma30
For Sale at a Bargain,
J" First-class House, witlx modern
improvements, good lot with barn, srtuated
jjll on fine avenue, fronting on two streets, can be
seen at any time. For particulars, call at Room No. fi,
Hoadley Building, 49 Church street.
d'25 tf L. F. COMSTOCK.
HINMAN'S
REAL ESTATE AGENCY,
63 Church Street,
OPPOSIITE POSTOFFICE.
- Money Loaned on Eeal Estate.
Houses and Lota in all parts of, the city for sale and
Rent. Rents and Interest money collected.
CHOICE WATER FRONTS.
Savin Rock Shore Property, 1,000 Front
Feet on Beach Street.
The most desirable on the shore, a beautiful grove
upon a portion of it. Fine water will be supplied
from the Artesian well to all purchasers, making this
particular location very desirable.
Seashore Cottages For Rent.
Fire Insurance Policies written in all first-class com
panies. ap'iO LONG fc HINMAy, Agfa.
TO RFNT,
J", . THE STORE No. No. 61 Church street, oppo
Hfl site the postofflce ; two small rants on Whalley
! j avenue ; second floor No. 51 Asylum street ;
whole house on Henry street, all modern Improve
ments; whole house No. 241 Crown street; whole
house No. 54 Whalley avenue, all modern improve
ments, $400 ; whole house on Clinton avenue ; second
floor No. 29 Auburn street ; whole house on Water
street ; whole house corner Union and Fair streets,
$21 per month ; whole house Cedar Hill avenue ; three
small rents Cedar Hill. Apply to
A. M. HOLMES,
apl7 69 Church Street, Room -8.
Hall's Bitters.
XT Is now twenty-nine years since we commenced
the preparation of this article. Their truly val
uable medicinal properties, in eases connected with
the stomach and nervous system, their exquisite taste
as a cordial, and agreeable effect as a tonic are readily
acknowledged by all who have used them. In fact,
Halls Bitters stand unrivaled, and their pre-eminence
over all newly started and much advertised Bitten
will be striking to any one, after a fair trial and com
parison. We should be pleased to show them.
p24 E. E. HALL, 250 Chapel Street.
LAWN CHAIRS.
WE have a fine line of Camp Chairs, suitable fo
out-door use, painted red, with carpet, canva
and cane seats.
New Haven Folding Chair Co.,
558 State Street.
Native Tomatoes
- Native Green Corn,
Early Harvest Apples,
Potatoes, Beets,
Beans, Onions,
Whortleberries, Blackberries.
All of Connecticut growth and in prim, order. They
were never better than this no,
Fine Groceries. ,
MEATS at all kind, and store free from fiiea.
IX9UIS S. MASO, v v
748 State Street, near Bradley.
PRIME BEEF, H1UTT0N,
Lamb and Veal.
SPRING Chickens and Fowls dresMd to order.
Halibut, Mackerel, Spanish Mackerel, Sea Ban,
Blacknsh, Flatfish, Bluefish, Codfish. Haddock, . Eels,
Lobsters, Oysters, Round and Long Clama.
oat JUCjrasej, no- pwwr .ins.raa,
. n ii, t ITmm flluwlJk. Tli,, i
aat Bacon, Smoked and Dried Beef, Tutton Market
Bmoked and Pickled Beef Tongues.
- Vegetables and Fruit. .
New Sweet Potatoes, Watermelons, Green Citron
Melons, very fine Peaches, Banana., Pears, Apples,
Green Corn, Lima Beams, fce. .
At very low prices for cash.
JTJTDSOIf BEOS. ,
Packing and Provision Co
an7 605 andSOT Stat. Street.
The Voltaic Belt Company, Mar
shall, Mich.,
WTT.T, send their oelebrad Eieetro-VolUie Belt,
to the afflicted npon 4, day. trial. Speedy
core, guaranteed. They mean Vhat they say. Writ,
to tbem without delay. d!9dawly
FREE
IfRWratt flrttstlBe nr tbrKcr
viiSaac Medleiae, trvm whatever
DebtBty.
m. Hails
cMflxtrital sift mxm.
EDITED AND PUBLISHED BY
CABKINGTON & CO.,
la 00 State Street, Courier Building.
jotnr B. CABUHQIOX,
nWAXn T. CABBZVOTOir. JOHH B. CASHIHGTON, JB
Saturday Mornin?, August 14, 1SS0.J
NATIONAL REPUBLICAN TICKET.
FOB PRESIDENT,
JAMES A. GARFIELD, of Ohio.
FOR VICE PRESIDENT,
CHESTER A. ARTHUR, of N. York.
STATE REPUBLICAN TICKET.
FOB GOVERNOR,
HOBART B. B1GELOW, of New Haven.
FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR,
WILLIAM II. IlILKELEY, of Hartford.
" FOB SECBETABY OF STATE, .
CHARLES E. 8EABLS, ot Thompson.
FOR TREASURER,
DAVID 1?. HICHOL8, of Duabnry.
FOB CONTROLLER.
W. T. BACHELDES, at -Winchester. --
FOB ELECTOBS-AT-LARGE, ' -HE5TH.Y
M. SORTOV, of Norwich,
ABU AH CATLIX, of Harwiatoa.
PAUPERISM AND ITS REMEDY. 1
The philosophers who are talking together
at Concord on Thursday had something to
say concerning one of the most important
and difficult problems with which civilized
governments have to deal, namely, that of
pauperism. They did not solve this problem,
bat much that was said about it is, neverthe
less, very interesting. A notable feature of
the talk was the remarks of Mr. Alcott, who
thought that the fact of pauperism implied a
great want in our institutions. Society, said
he, has not done its duty toward the poor.
Others who participated in the conversation
seemed to be of the same opinion.
This opinion, which we believe to be a just
one, is held by many outside the ranks of the
philosophers, and various propositions have
been lately made designed partially to remedy
society's neglect of its duty toward the poor.
Thus, in England a bill was recently introduc
ed in the House of Lords by the Earl of Car
narvon, whose object is to secure to the worn
out workingmaa means of subsistence in his
old age other than that which the poorhouse
offers. In order to effoct this, it proposes
that each man working for wages shall be
obliged by law to pay the government fifty
dollars before reaching the age of twenty-one,
and as a convenient way of collecting the
money, the bill directs that employers shall
be required to deduct a weekly sum from the
wages paid until the required amount is
made np. On the other hand, the govern
ment, in consideration of the amount paid,
undertakes to maintain the laborer in
sickness and old age by paying him
a small annuity, to which the stig
ma inseparable from public char
itable relief is not attached. A measure iden
tical in its ends and very similar in its propo
sals has also been brought before the French
Chamber of Deputies. M. Nadaud, its pro
jector, suggests that five per cent, be deduct
ed from the gross wages of each working
man, and that to this sum an equal amount
be added by the employer and the- govern
ment conjointly, in equal proportions. The
grand result of this arrangement is to be
that at the age of fifty-five the, employe will
receive from the government an annuity of
four hundred francs. -
Neither of these plans will commend itself
to American readers as adequate or even prac
ticable solutions of the problem to which
they are directed. They are, however, based
upon sound principles. As the Philadelphia
North American says : "It may be taken
for granted that the average man earns
enough to admit of his making a provision
for old age if he could only be brought to ex
ercise the necessary self-denial. This, how
ever, he will seldom do except upon compul
sion, and the great point is to bring this com
pulsion to bear in a manner that shall be at
once efficient and acceptable. This is done
already to a considerable extent by building
and mutual benefit societies, and by insur
ance companies, for when a man takes out a
policy, or joins a society, he feels bound to
keep up his payments, and is much more
likely to do so than he would be to save a
like amount independently of such constraint.
As yet the field of co-operation and insurance
is only partially developed. The principle
of insurance is capable of a much wider ap
plication than has yet been realized, and it is
in the working out of this principle that the
most efficacious means of restricting pauper
ism is to be found."
In this country, with its vast territory still
open to settlement, the problem of pauper
ism is not yet so pressing as in Europe, but
it is sufficiently troublesome, and bids fair to
become more so. If our philosophers, philan
thropists and legislators, profiting by trans
atlantic experience, can invent some plan
that will decrease instead of increasing it
they will do a much needed work for their
country and the world. As human society is
at present constituted, it would be impossible
to blot out pauperism, but it is not impossible
to lessen it.
EDITORIAL NOTES.
The race may not be always to the swift,
but it would be unsafe to bet against Maud
S. or St. Julien.
Ex-Senator Bamum is pleased with the
ticket nominated by the Republicans of this
State. We thought he would be.
Business men, who know the value of sta
bility, do not take so kindly tqpthe idea of a
change as the Democrats would like to have
them. We were recently told of a Water
bury manufacturer, and a Democrat, too,
who remarked that he had been three years
getting his business where it would' pay, and
as he did not want to run the risk of a change
he should do what he could to prevent it by
voting for Garfield and Arthur.
The New Albany (Indiana) Ledger-Standard,
a Democratic newspaper which refuses
to support Landers for Governor, says :
The Ledger-Standard, long before the deci
sion of the Supreme Court on the State con
stitutional amendments, predicted that they
would be decided unconstitutional. We now
predict that a new hearing will be had and
the matter reversed. That will postpone the
State election to November and be the only
thing that will save Landers' bacon, and that
will hardly do it."
President Fairchild, of the Berea (Ky.)
College, who is in position to know what he
is talking about, urges Chairman Jewell to
look, after the South during the present
campaign. He says that it took thirty years
of earnest, persistent discussion to prepare
the North for the struggle for equal rights,
and he wants one hundred of the wisest and
most eloquent men of the North sent to ad
dress conventions and hold debates in the
prominent cities and towns of the South,
with National and State rights, universal edu
cation1, honest government and our glorious
common country for themes. He sensibly
remarks that the southern people " are not all
hardened, hopeless reprobates. "Arguments
and eloquence are no more wasted on them
than on other people. Many in the Demo
cratic party seem to s northern man, morally,
religiously and socially, out of their normal
sphere. Seen at the North they would at
once be taken for Republicans. There is
where they belong, and thither with proper
effort they may be led. But if the policy is
to abandon the solid South to the Democratic
party, our prospects as a nation are gloomy."
Those of our readers who are eagerly wait
ing for a month with "R" in it will be
glad to know why they prefer raw oysters to
cooked ones, if they do. Dr. William Rob
erts of London tells why, as follows : "The
fawn-colored mass which constitutes the
dainty of the oyster is its liver, and this is
little less than a heap of glycogen. Associa
ted with the glycogen, but withheld from
actual contact with it during life, is its ap
propriate digestive ferment the hepatic
diastase. The mere crushing of the dainty
between the teeth brings these two bodies to
gether, and the glycogen is at dnce digested,
without other help, by its own dias
tase. The oyster in the uncooked
state, or merely warmed, is, in fact,
self-digestive. But the advantage of this
provision is wholly lost by cooking ; for the
heat employed immediately destroys the as
sociated ferment, and a cooked oyster has to
be digested, like any other food, by the eat
er's own digestive powers." We are pleased
to be able to add to this the fact that glycogen
is isomeric with starch.
Dr. Cutting, the State geologist , of Ver
mont, has concluded his unique series of
tests of the fire-resisting qualities of build
ing stones, and he declares, in substance,
that no known natural stone deserves the
name fire-proof. Conglomerates and slates
have '-no capability" of standing heat ; gran
ite is injured beyond cheap or easy repair by
even so mild a heat as that which melts lead ;
sand-stones, including the variety commonly
called brown-stone are better, and lime
stones and marbles are perhaps the best
in this respect. But even they are injured
by continuous heat of 900, and at 1,200 are
changed into quicklime. Therefore it would
seem that no stone buildings are fire-proof,
and some of them, Dr. Cutting even says,
are as much damaged by fire as wooden struc
tures are. Brick, on the contrary, is usually
uninjured, and is often rather improved by
heat until it is melted. . But as most brick
buildings are trimmed with iron or stone,
the damage is often considerable, even when
the walls stand. To avoid this, Dr. Cutting
recommends soap-stone trimmings, which
are open only to the objection of-expense.
But although brick stands heat so well, it is
objectionable because its power to resist
pressure, without crumbling from dampness
or frost, is less than that of stone. Never
theless, as brick is in fact only a kind of ar
tificial stone, the search for an ideal building
material is not hopeless, but it must be pros
ecuted rather by the maker than by the quar
rier of stone.
Earl Stanhope has been asking the Canter
bury (England) Diocesan Conference whether
or not any steps can be taken to meet the
tendency in the laboring classes to fall away
from public worship. It would be well, he
said, to consider, first, whether it was due
to idleness or to an actual distaste
for the Church service that the working
classes to a great extent absented themselves
from church. He feared that both causes
were at work. Due allowance must be made
for the workingman's inclination to rest on
Sundaynd this inclination might be and
was greatly abused, until the whole day was
often passed in idleness. The working
classes, too, were subject to many varied in
fluences now. There were cheap newspapers,
popular orators and railway excursions. Re
ferring to the danger that, amid these many
exciting incidents of the workingman's life
in the present day, the old familiar words
and forms of the service might seem dull and
tame to him, the speaker suggested that this
should be mot, not by altering the services,
but by adapting them to a certain extent, by
shortening them if necessary, by oppointing
convenient hours for them, and particularly
by considering the special needs of holf
educated minds. In conclusion, he advised,
among other things, that at the afternoon or
evening service all seats should be free,
and that well-organized parish committees
should be formed to administer charities so
as to avoid any appearance of sectarian favor
itism. .
RECEJiT PUBLICATIONS.
A collection of "Little Comedies," by Ju
lian Sturgis, is published in the Appletons'
New Handy-Volume Series. These exceed
ingly graceful little comedies appeared in an
English magazine and at once attracted atten
tion to their author. There are six of them
"Apples," "Fire-Flies," "Picking up the
Pieces," "Half Way to Arcady," "Mabel's
Holy Day" and "Heather." Of course they
are very light, as they should be, but they
are very charming. For sale in this city by
Judd the bookseller.
Another addition to Appletons' New Handy
Volume Series is a collection of Maurice Mau
ris' sprightly sketches of "French Men of
Letters." Maurice Mauris is the pseudonym
of a Marquis Calenzano, a native of Nice a
Garibaldian, an abject admirer of Victor
Hugo, and a man well qualified by experience
and inclination to chat pleasantly of the lite
rary Bohemians who are by turns happy and
very wretched in Paris. The little sketches
should not be taken seriously. They offer
reminiscences, anecdotes and points picked up
here and there. The author's sketches are
Hugo, A. do Musset, Gautier, Murger,
Sainte-Beuve, Nerval, Dumas-fils, Angier,
Feuillet, Sardou, Daudet and Emifo Zola.
With many of these the gossipy writer has
had personal intercourse, and what he says
of Hugo, Daudet and Zola is specially inter
esting. For sale in this city by Judd the
bookseller.
Under the name of "Health," the Apple-
tons have published a series of lectures de
livered some time ago in the rooms of the
Society of Arts, in London, by W. H. Cor
field, M. A., M. D. (Oxon). These lectures
are a model .popular exposition of sanitary
science, clear, precise and comprehensive.
They first describe the anatomy and physiol
ogy of the body, accompanying the descrip
tion with a running commentary throwing
light upon the causes and conditions of
health and disease. In regard to hygiene the
lectures are full of practical 'information
in regard to good and bad ways of living
from the earliest infancy to old age ; the
sort and quantity of food best suited to dif
ferent states of health are pointed out, to
gether with the nature of common diseases
and the methods of preventing them or re
ducing their recurrence to a minimum. The
chapters on foods and drinks are important,
and it should be noted that while Dr. Corfield
is not an extremist in either way in regard to
the use of tobacco and alcohol, pie points out
that both substances are highly injurious to
children and young people ; that it is only in
idiosyncratic cases that their habitual use by
adults can possibly be beneficial. In regard
to public as well as private hygiene, Dr. Cor
field's work is well worth reading, and per
sons who are particularly interested in the
present controversy . over vaccination for
small-pox will here find a fair statement of it
from the point of view taken by the great
majority of prominent physicians. For sale
in this city by Judd the bookseller.
"Beauty's Daughters" is light and grace
ful novel from the pen of the author of
"Phyllis," "Molly Bawn," etc stories
which are popular among readers of fiction.
This novel deals with English society life.
The plot is a triple one, with three sets of
lovers, all of whom ay made happy in the
end. As there are no villains to be punished,
nor any very serious wrongs to be righted,
the reader is spared much that harrows the
feelings in novels generally. Still, there is
enough of misconception and unhappiness to
redeem the story from the imputation of
The characters are pleasantly
grouped, the situations natural, and there is
sufficient interest in the plot to Aider the
book attractive. Published by J. B. Lippin-
oott & Co., Philadelphia, and for sale in this
oity by Judd the bookseller.
8:113-4:.
OVEO TO AH ICS HAK $6.50.
I prithee. Iceman, why dost thou
80 coldly turn away from me ?
The hunk of ice thou leavest now '
Li not the hunk It ought to be. ..
Two months ago you oame my way
And handed in your little biU
"Five dollars fifteen pounds . day"
I paid it with a cheerful will.
Then all at ones that hnnk of ice.
For which you asked the amplest pay.
By some malign and weird device
Seemed to diminish day by day.
And when yon called a month ago
And handed in yonr little bill
"Six dollars fifteen pounds a day"
I groaned, yet groaning paid it still.
And though with heartache day by day
I've watched that wasting hunk of ice.
Ton have the cheek to come and say
You think you'll "have to raise the price."
Hast thou a cemetery lot
Art wearied of Ufa's varying phases
And wouldst thon occupy a spot
Beneath the pretty little daisies T
Kansas City Times.
"Tea," said Johnny, "lapsus may be the
Latin for 'slip," but when mother laps ns it
usually means a slipper."
The Philadelphia Chronicle-Herald thinks
the vounc man who has proposed and has
neither been accepted or rejected knowaiow
exciting it is to live in a doubtful State.
A cynical exchange charges that a Boston
high school girl remarked on seeing a fire en
gine at work, "Who would have believed
that such a diminutive looking apparatus
could hold s6 much water."
A Nebraska Indian contrived to swallow a
lot of dynamite, and now he can stand around
the corners and call a white man anything he
chooses without being kicked for his inso
lence. They're shy of jarring him, even.
A wit, speaking of an unpopular author,
said that he was color blind. "How so?
What proof have you got of it?" asked a
friend. "He always thinks his literary pro
ductions are read, when everybody else
knows thy are not," was the reply.
A new song is called "Why does mother
stay so long!" Perhaps she went to the cir
cus and concluded to remain and witness the
"first-class concert" given in the ring at the
conclusion of the circus performance "Only
ten cents admission ! Procure your tickets
from the young gentlemen as they pass
tihrongh the audience." Norristown Herald.
"But you can't get home if the wind is dead
against us, can you ?" inquired the nearest
passeneer. "Uli, ves, " repiiea tne jn antucKet
skipper. "Oh, yes ; I had the boat made
with two sides on purpose, so that when she
couldn't soil on one tack she could on the
other. It is the only boat in these waters
that is built in tnat way." Ana tne pas
ger was reassured and the Clara got in on
time.
It was on a Sound boat, and the mate was
evidently annoyed about something. "Carry
it forward." he roared; "carry it forward,
you lunk-headed soc of a sculdin, or I hope
to be gee-whizzley gaul dusted to jude if I
don't maul the dad-slammed head off 'n y
with a capstan bar. you hog-backed mulli
grubber, ye !" And the deck-hand looked
up in profound admiration and said : "By
George, Cap, if l naa your cuicner, i wouia
not be running as a mate for no man in
these waters ; I'd be commandin' a boat of
my own." Burlington Hawkeye.
The other Sunday the superintendent of a
city Sunday school was questioning the pu
pils on the subject of the lesson. Among
the Questions asked was : "When God found
out that Adam and Eve had sinned in the
garden, what did he do f " A little fellow m
the rear of the room was just too anxious to
reply ; his glistening eye and excited frame
attracted the attention of the questioner, and
unfortunately he was greeted with a nod in
dicating that he might answer. With a
voice, the echoes of which could be heard
far off on the distant commons, ne snouted
"Gave 'em the g. b." To most of the school
this was perfectly intelligible ana satisiac
tory, but to a few it had to be explained that
it was street arabfor "grand bounce," that is,
removal from the garden. Iroy iimes.
CORRESPONDENCE.
The Pleasure, of Travel by Rail in a
Rainy Day Richfield Springs, New
York Its Gouty Frequenters What
the Water Smells and Tastes Like The
Hotels Not the Liveliest Place in Crea
tionHandsome Voung Ladies, Watch
ful Parents and Shy Young Men What
They Find to Do.
Richfield Springs, N. Y.,Aug. 10, 18S0.
To the Editor of the Joubxax. and Coubisb :
Although in some respects cheerless and
dismal, a rainy day is not altogether to be
despised for a long journey by rail. After
having secured a seat to your satisfaction
and carefully stowed away your umbrella
and other impedimenta where you can easily
lay your hand upon them in case of a colli.
sion, you settle back in a comfortable posi
tion, and with that delightful feeling of securi
ty often experienced when snugly tucked up
in bed and the wind and rain are beating on
the roof and rattling the windows, you
mentally ejaculate as the train moves out of
the depot, "Let her rain !" A duster is not
thought of, and you do not feel in five min
utes as though you must thrustyour head
out of the window for the sake of inhaling a
breath of fresh air, your nose and throat not
being so choked up with dust as to require
it. The ever-changing view presented as
you speed along through the country, al
though not sunlit, is fresh and brilliant from
its washing, and as the train halts for a mo
ment at some country station the gaze is di
rected through the "gilt-edged" frame of the
parlor car or the plain wooden one of the
ordinary car, according to your taste and the
state of your exchequer. The foliage spar
kles with the dripping moisture and every
thing springing from terra firnia is fresh and
erect. The pumpkin peeps out from be
tween the rows of waving corn with a smile,
and flower, leaf and shrub and the mantle of
the fields show forth their beautiful shades
to perfection, and seem proud at being able
to present such a fine appearance. To
many such a time would be one of the most
gloomy, but to a close observer of nature
it is one of the most pleasant. It
so happened that your correspondent had
such a day in which to make his journey to
this place. An additional diversion of the
trip was the meeting at Albany of the now
much talked of celebrities Garfield and Ar
thur, and the listening to good speeches
from each of them. They were standing on
the rear platform of the New York-bound ex
press, and in turn, amid tremendous hurrahs
from a tremendous crowd, assured the Al
banians of a coding Republican victory in
November. '
Richfield Springs" lies in a direct route
about twenty miles from TJtica, but owing to
its elevation the road winds through the
hills for a distance of thirty-six miles before
it arrives and terminates at the village. It is
called by some a second Saratoga, and in
some respects, such as its class of visitors,
its springs, its .amusements, etc., it does re
semble the above-named place. New York
ers and those who have been used to high
living are to be found here in large numbers ;
in fact there is hardly anybody else here.
Daily they may be seen sitting on the hotel
piazzas (when not at cards), and discussing
the probabilities of being able to get
rid of the gout this summer. The sulphur
water is resorted to freely for this
purpose, and with satisfactory results, accord
ing to the testimony of many of the afflicted.
A fair description of the water would be to
say that it is as clear as crystal and tastes and
smells like an egg left over from a last year's
picnic Many raise a glass of it to within an
inch of their nose and then set it down with
disgust. It is said, however, to have great
healing virtue, and to be certain to give a
new lease of life, with a new pair of legs, to
those in need, if they will only persistently
swallow and bathe in it. The baths are taken
daily, and some are so devoted to the water
as to swallow from six to ten glasses at a time.
A person who has been known to take twelve
glasses at one time is now, we believe, lying
under the sod. There are other than the sul
phur springs here, but none possessing such
renown.
A few years ago it used to be necessary to
take a stage-ride of sixteen miles before the
village could be reached, but the number of
yearly visitors increased so rapidly that the
branch road of the Delaware, Lackawanna ,
and Western was built. About I,fi00 -people
compose the native population,
and at present there are probably 8,000 visi
tors quartered at the hotels and cottages, the
largest numoer tnat tne place can boast of
for the lost twenty vears. Amour a half
dozen or more hotels, the Spring House takes
the lead, and although it is not a modern
structure, is one that has a pleasant air and
inviting look about it. It is very large and
roomy, with wide piazzas running the whole
length of the front and one side of it. Al
though it will accommodate between three
and four hundred, it is not large enough to
room an tnose wno apply for shelter this sea
son, and people have been turned away daily
or "roomed out" in cottages and neighboring
dwellings, of which there are many desira-
oie. xo me lerc, ana belonging to the hotel,
are very extensive grounds, with fine trees
spreading their branches and throwing
welcome shade over the
numerous and neatly kept gravel walks which
wiud through a beautiful lawn. Inviting
rustic seats and arbors are scattered about,
and judging from the fact that they are most
of the time occupied, are highly appreciated
by the guests and others. For the retailing
of some racy piece of gossip, (gossip being
no stranger here,) or for the telling of and
listening to 'tne oia, old story," no more ap
propriate places could be found. Although
many complaints are heard, the table is un
doubtedly superior to that found at the usual
summer place, but it is said by many that at
the American, Canadarago and other of the
nrst-eiass nouses, tne cuisine is better, and
that it does not require the expense of i
per day either.
Itichneia springs is by no means the live
liest place in creation, the majority of the
visitors coming nere undoubtedly for rest
and health. The first they get without a
doubt, and the other probably, as the air is
very pure and the chniate, ludging from tho
present, delightful. It is very comfortable
through the day, with very cool evenings and
nights, so that an extra blanket has been
needed during the past week. Occasionally,
like the sputter of a candle, the spirit of
the young folks asserts itself, and there is
a frolic and a good time in consequence, but
the "properness" of things is generally
brought to such a fine point that a dumper is
put upon a great many projected plans for
amusement. For a young man who is
averse to matrimonial complications, this
may oe saia to be a dangerous
place. lhe hotels are full of pretty young
ladies, and words cannot fitly describe the
style and beauty of their costumes. About
10 a. m. there may be seen from fifty to sev
enty-five of them sitting o the piazzas, at
tired principally in white and light colored
dresses, set off with stylish bows and ribbons
such as only New York young ladies know
how to procure and how to wear. They are
all apparently interested with their fancy
work or novels, but in reality are scanning
the horizon in search of a young man, and
now and then one is captured. They are
very Bcarce, however, and wary of venturing
into sight unless possessed of unusual cour
age. it does not take the residents here long to
find out the extravagant tastes of the visitors,
and consequently their prices range accord
ingly. The horses are not what they ought
to be for pleasant driving, but a good horse
would surely become a second class one in
the hands of promiscuous drivers. The
drives afford very beautiful scenery, although
not more so than is common in almost any
part ofcthis State. Lake Canadarago, about
two miles from the village, is one of the
principal places of resort and affords the
usual pleasures of sailing and rowing. The
Lake House, as well as some other more dis
tant resorts, is noted for its fine dinners, and
game, in and out of season, is furnished
at Delmonico prices, that would
moke the most respectable pocket
book be ashamed of its leanness. It may be
added that a moderately good meal can bo
obtained at moderate a price. The equestrian
art is practiced a good deal, and evidences of
the training of the New York riding school
which, by tho way, would be a capital insti
tution for New Haven to imitate are brought
prominently forward. The young ladies, in
parties of six or eight, mount their horses
and go for a ride, and gentleman escorts are
permitted to attend them.
On tho whole, Richfield is a charming place
for those who can be satisfied with no special
attractions besides pure air and sulphur
water, and the crowd of visitors increas es
every year. C., Jn.
The Training of a Hindu Faplr.
From the New York Times.
The physiological training of the Hindu fa
kir for his profession is something worth
study. He begins by abstention from food
during the day and taking a very reduced
quantity at night. Certain articles are strict
ly prohibited ; among them are salt, fish and
meat, oil and wine, mustard, onions, garlic
and turnips. He must refrain from spices,
from all acids and acid preparations, and
from all pungent articles, except ginger. His
carbonaceous food ii limited to rice and
wheat, his nitrogenous to milk and melted
butter, (ghata,) and as to the carbon hydrates,
honey and sugar are alone admissible. There
are two or three articles familiar to Euro
peans only by their Bengal names, "which he is
permitted to use ; but they are composed of
the preceding ingredients in various propor
tions. Water is positively prohibited; but
some socts allow the devotee to drink spar
ingly of alcoholic beverages. Hs must next
learn how to live underground, and for this
purpose he digs a subterranean cavern, (the
gublia, ) in which he passes most of his time.
The temperature must be warm and perfectly
even, and the cavern is entered only by a hole
which can be closed with a stone. It is a
living sepulture. Indeed, the essentials of
the mode of life are the complete occlusion
of the free oxygen, impenetrable darkness,
and an unbroken silence. He lies upon a pal
let of cotton or wool something warm and
soft at the bottom of this subterranean cell,
and repeats from day to day the mystic word
"Om," the Hindu name of the great abstrac
tion of universal life a being more transcen
dental than that of Hegel. The devotee takes
occasional walks, but is very slow in his move
ments, so as to lessen the rapidity of thej.es
piration. He repeats his "Om," sometimes
10,000 times a day, and has othor syllables,
among which are "Ram," "Ham," "Lam,"
"Ram," "Soham," "Yam," of which he per
forms end'ess series of repetitions, arranging
them in every order of which they are sus
ceptible, and rigidly following a prescribed
order for a given number of repetitions. He
trains himself to sit squatted for hours to
gether in a certain peculiar attitude, (the sid
dhasana,) which consists in doubling the left
leg under the body, so as to rest upon the
heel of the left foot, while the right leg is ex
tended forward. In this position, with his
right arm extended, he holds the big toe of
the right foot in his right hand, and with the
left arm flexed under the body.grasps the big
toe or tne lert root, xnis brings tne lower
part of the face to rest upon the breastbone.
In this awkward and difficult attitude the fa
kir sits for hours together ; that is, when he
is not standing npon his head or training
himself to take a deep inspiration and expel
it slowly taking 12 seconds to breathe in and
24 to breathe out the cubio feet of atmos
phere that the lungs can contain. Besides
these exercises his tongue has to be cut 24
times, so as to sever all the ligatures one by
one, and enable him to flex it backward and
close the throat with its tip. This extraor
dinary discipline is steadily prosecuted for
years, and at length the fakir tries his first
experiment with feigning death, allowing
himself to be shut up in his subterranean
cell and sealed therein with every precaution,
generally for a week or two at first, then for
a month or two months,, lying or squatting
in a state of trance, with the tip of the tongue
closing the throat, without perceptlbe action
of the heart, and with the circulation of the
blood apparently suspended. He would
never recover hiutftelf from this con
dition of suspended animation; but
he can be recovered by proper manipulation,
which commences in pouring hot water over
the shriveled body, stiff and rigid as a corpse,
for some minutes. As the bathing In hot
water continues, the arms and legs gradually
relax from their rigor. A hot cake is next
placed upon (he crown of the head, and the
plugs (made of cotton soaked in wax) are re
moved from the nostrils and ears. The next
steps it being understood that assistants are
all this time engaged in rubbing the limbs
are to pry open the rigid jaws and restore
the tongue to its normal position ; then to
rub the eyelids with melted butter until they
can be unclosed, revealing the glazed and
motionless eyeball. Finally, the hot cake
on the top of the head is renewed. The heat
acting upon the nervous centers of respira
tion and circulation, the breast heaves with a
convulsive throe, and the heart starts with a
violent pulsation. So many cases have been
attested of this remarkable condition of simu
lated death that its acts are practically be
yond dispute. Now, something of this kind
would make a real impression ; it has pow
erful dramatic features, and its physiology
furnishes ample verge for novel and original
observations.
A heavy thunder shower with a strong
wind swept through Suffield Thursday morn
ing in the north part of the town, accompa
nied with hail which riddled Edward Austin's
Bix-acre piece of tobacco, which had been in
sured last week for $1,000. Among other
sufferers are H. M. k D. Bement, Horace
Ford and Mr. Hastings. The same storm did
much hurt to tobacco irT northern Enfield.

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