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Morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven [Conn.]) 1848-1894, July 19, 1884, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015483/1884-07-19/ed-1/seq-4/

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mmKml ' ' - - CVV . CM!?'
VOL. LII.
July 19, 1884.
1)A
KIP
OT
Absolutely Pure.
Thin powde r never varies. A marvel or purity, strength
ajirt wliolesomeness. More economical than the orfll
flary kinds, and cannot be sold In competition with the
unifHtii'le of low test, Rhort weight, alum or phosphate
owi!er. Snld nnltj in can. .-,,.,. nv
Royal Bakiko Powder Co., 106 Wall tt, N. Y.
the BEST THING KNOWN
WASHTN"GAOTBLEACHM6
IN HARD OR SOFT, HOT OR COLO WATER.
BATES LABOR, TIME and SOAP AMAZ
INGLY, and gives universal satisfaction.
No family, rich or poor Bhould bo -without it.
Sold by all Grooers. BEVAB1 of imitations
troll designed to mislead. PBABUHB is the
NXY SAFE labor-saving compound, and
Vwnys bean the above symbol, and name of
JrlM I .S rYLlS, HEW IUK&.
WHAT THERE IS
IN A BOTTLE
Clf ADTIMP Sufficient to stop in five min
dlvlAn I I E1U utee the smarting, sting pain of
luu Durns or scaias. it win
stop the pain as soon as ap
plied.
Afl II PU IMP Abundance to cure ascore of
vUUUniHU colds and the coughing that
often leads the way to Con
sumption. IT WILL POSI
TIVELY ease a Cough in fif
teen minutes.
More than enough to save a
dozen children Choking with
CROUP. One minute after the
CHOKING
first dose the hardest attack
of GROUP will be relieved.
Vtf If FIT T I &f ft Plenty to relieve the oppres
VWnEE&lMU sion and wheezing of the most
severe case of Asthma. The
direct cures of Asthma by this
medicine is proof that Dr.
Thomas'1 Electric Oil has no
equal as an Asthma cure.
hi the above cases Dr. Thomas'1 Electric Oil can
be relied upon. It has given relief to thousands.
Keep it in your house. There is hardly a week of
the year it will not be useful. jy!4dawlw
Admiration
OF THB
WORLD.
Mrs.S.A.AHens
TTsn 7? t rv
HairRest&rer
IS PERFECTION t 5
Public Benefactress. Mrs. S.
A. Allen has justly earned this title,
and thousands are this day rejoicing
over a fine head of hair produced by
her un equaled preparation for res tor
Hair. Her World's Hair Restorer
quickly cleanses the scalp, removing
Dandruff, and arrests the fall ; the
hair, if gray, is changed to its natural
color, giving it the same vitality and
luxurious quantity as in youth.
COMPLTMEXTAEY. "My
hair is now restored to its
youthful color ; I have not
a gray hair left. I am sat
isfied that the preparation
is not a dye, but acts on
the secretions. My hair
ceases to fall, which is cer
tainly an advantage to me,
wh6 was in danger of be
coming bald." This is
the testimony of all who
use Mrs. S. A. ALLEN'S
World's Hair Restorer.
One Bottle did it." That is the
expression of many who have had
their gray hair restored to its natural
cxrior, and their bald spot covered
with hair, after nsing one bottle, of
Mrs. S. A. Allen's World's Hjur
Kzstorbk. It is net a dye.
ANDREW GOOMM,
OliD NO. 88 CROWN ST.,
NEW JfOS. 160, 162 CROWN
EGGS EGGS ! ! EGGS ! ! !
- 28c per. doz, 5doz. $1
3 lb cans Tomates 7c, 4 for 25.
Winalow Jones1 Succotash, 13c can, 2 for 25c.
Columbia River Salmon 15c per can.
Quart bottles new Maple Syrup, pure, 35c.
13 lbs Granulated Sugar, standard, $1.
15 lbs X C Sugar, standard, Si
Fine Old Government Java Coffee, per lb, 25c.
Fine Oolong and Japan Tea, per lb, 40c.
Extra largo Queen Olives, 45c per bottle.
1 bag best Flour $1.
I bag nice Family Flour, 85c.
Early Rose Potatoes, per bushel, 45c.
New Bermuda Onions 8c per quart.
Sweet Oranges 25c per doz.
Fine Butter 25c per lb, 4 1-2 lbs $1.
New Orleans Molasses 60c per gallon.
S lb can Cherries 10c, 3 for 25c.
Good many more bargains. Call and see us.
Goods dalivered to any part of the city.
FINE WINES, SHERRIES AND BRANDIES.
ANDREW GOODMAN,
New JVos. 160 and 163 Crown St.
GOODMAN'S BUILDING, FOUR DOORS FROM
all CHURCH STREET.
Whatsoever a Man Soweth that
also shall he Reap.
Selfishness, Dishonesty and Low
Grade of Groceries and Meats
Cannot be found at
J. A. WRIGHT'S,
748 State Street, Werwln'a Rloclt.
Artesian Wells
And water supply for manufacturing and domestic
purposes. I am prepared to contract for these
wells, to any depth in any formation of earth or rock.
je34 lm CHARLES L. GRANT, Rockville, Ct.
MUS. M. E. COWLES, M. !.,
CHRONIC DISEASES A SPECIALTY.
93 Olive Street.
Office hours 10 to 12 and 11 to 4. ml5 3m
THE EDDY REFRIGERATOR
FOR FAMILY USE.
The place to find the best Refrigerator is to know
where the Eddy is sold. That is just perfect in
every respect. Sold by
SIL.AS CrA.PItf,
m5 360 State Street.
EUDORSED BY EMIHEKT PHYSICIMS
FOR
VTtlTB, INVALIDS.
AND THE AGED.
Royal Dietamia
on
CZDICINAL NUTRITIVE FOOD
l HAM NO XIQTJAZi.
R has bean received with decided favor by prominent
members of the medical profession of the United States.
It contains all the elements necessary to supply the waste
and sustain the strength of the human body. It Is
not only strengthening and nutritions bat alse perfectly
lalatable.
THE BABIES ALL LIKE IT.
Royal Dietamia Is pore In Its Ingredients, nonrlshliif
In fevers, promotes sleep and sustains the strength of
tbe patient. It ts wonderful for children ss a substitute
for mothers' milk.
TOR STSFBMIA
fl may be used ss a grael and It would be difficult to con
oslva of anything more delicious as a Perfect Cure
for this distressing- malady. Ask for Beyal Dietamia
and lake no other. Consult your physician regarding
iron axa bt at.t. drtgkhsts.
SI. A WKITTIiIII
Wkol-akAfmt. B1V BJ.TMX, COJfX
1
3ue pnictmX mxd Gtoxucicic.
DmvKBES bt Carreers in the City, 12
cbctn a Wax, 42 Cents a Mouth, $5.00 a
Tkab. The Sams Terms Bt Mail,.
Saturday, July 19, 1884.
Mr. Blaine's Letter of Acceptance.
fcoMTmump ntOM first page.!
free from possible entanglements in the
quarreiB ui any. xixo uiuwu owtob mw v
m I nn .-I iu i t ir nrtcAcTA in ennfliet with
Ll.JVJ nuu v ' p 7
any power on earth and we may rest in assur
ed, connaence luhl no power ueoixtm iaj atuK
J 1 TT!1.J t A i
1 1 If DUIWD.
TH'i V. fha noHnna rt 4Tl WAaTAVTt riATTIl-
sphere we should cultivate closer relations
and tor our common prosperity ami auvauue
..Tii ti,n,ilfl fnvita f.riAm all tn inin with
us in an agreement that, for the future, all
international troubles in North or South
America shall be adjusted Dy impartial arm
tration and not bv arms. The pro
ject was part of the fixed policy
of President Garfield's administration,
ands it should in my judgment be re-
T annfMnnliahTnnnf im tVl 5 COT1 t.l -
UCWCU. i.rtjvmiiiBiiMBj.
nent wonld favorably affect the nations be-
,1 r 1 1 x
yond tne sea, ana tnus jjowenxmy cuuuiuuro
of the philanthropic and Christian princi-
-i a,:- ;v nQ &fFat. Tin nf rtii7-
gesting it for the Spanish American States
vc W.TI iY.z-.af rionnv Anrl haA increased the
"W MS-fKV
onfidence of those people in onr friendly
position, iz reii to my iui as owicmij u uaw
m Jnne, 1001, xo quiec upprciiciiaix a
Tn-n.nuiy TUTck-vinr Vv onviTiEr the ftssur anc e
in an official dispatch that "there is not the
- . , , -. A1- TT ; J. J C!4.J--
raintest aesire in iue umicu i
a :i td annfh nf th Rio Grande.
IU1U.1 rAlcimivu it i
The boundaries of the two republics have
.... . - r i : . 1. xi 1
been establisnea in coniormii,y wim mo
jurisdictional interests of both. The line of
j ;a .nnvATitiAriRl Tt. is more.
ueuuuv.iwu f " v... .
It separates a Spanish-American people from
the Saxon-American people. It divides one
great nation from another with distinct and
natural finality." .
We seek the conquests of peace. We desire
to extend our commerce, and in an especial
degree with our friends and neighbors on
this continent. We have not improved our
relations with Spanish-America as wisely and
as persistently as we might have done. For
more than a generation the sympathy of
those countries has been allowed to drift
away from us. We should now make every
effort to gain their friendship. Our trade
with them is already large. During the last
year our exchanges in the western hemi
sphere amounted to three hundred and fifty
millions of dollars nearly one-fourth of our
entire foreign commerce. To those who may
be disposed to underrate the value of our
trade with the countries of North and South
America, it may be well to state that their
population is nearly or quite fifty millions
and that, in proportion to aggregate num
bers, we import nearly double as much from
them as we do from Europe. But the result
of the whole American trade is in a high de
gree unsatisfactory. The imports during the
past year exceeded two hundred and twenty
five millions, while the exports were less than
one hundred and twenty-five, millions show
ing a balance against us of more than one
hundred millions of dollars. But the money
does not go to Europe in coin or its equiva
lent to pay European manufacturers for the
goods which they send to Spanish-America.
We are but paymasters for this enormous
amount annually to European factors an
amount which is a serious draft, in every
financial depression, upon our resources of
specie.
Cannot this condition of trade in great part
be changed? Cannot the market for our pro
ducts be greatly enlarged? We have made a
beginning in our effort to improve our trade
relations with Mexico and we should not be
content until similar and mutually advantage
ous arrangements have been successfully
made with every nation of North and South
America. While the great powers of Eu
rope are steadily enlarging their colonial
domination in Asia and Africa it is the es
pecial province of this country to improve
and expand its trade with the nations of
America. No field promises so much. No
field has been cultivated so little. Our for
eign policy should be an American policy in
its broadest and most comprehensive sense
a policy of peace, of friendship, of commer
cial enlargement.
The name of American which belongs to
us in our national capacity must always ex
alt the just pride of patriotism. Citizenship
of the republic must be the panoply and
safeguard of him who wears it. The Ameri
can citizen, rich or poor, native or naturalist,
white or colored, must everywhere, walk se
cure in his personal and civil rights. The re
public should never accept a lesser duty, it
can never assume a nobler one, than the pro
tection of the humblest man who owes it loy
alty protection at home, and protection
cr land he may go upon a lawful errand.
THE SOUTHERN STATES.
I recognize, not without regret, the neces
sity for speaking of two sections of our com
mon country.. But the regret diminishes
when I see that the elements which separated
them are fast disappearing. Prejudices have
yielded and are yielding, while a growing
cordiality warms the southern and northern
heart alike. Can anyone doubt that between
the sections confidence and esteem are to-day
more marked than at any period in the sixty
years preceding tne election or resident Lin
coln f inis is tne result m pan or time ana
in part of Republican principles applied un
der the favorable conditions of uniformity.
It would be a great calamity to change these
influences under which southern common
wealths are learning to vindicate civil rights,
and adapting themselves to the conditions of
political tranquillity and industrial progress.
If there be occasional and violent outbreaks
in the South against this peaceful progress,
the public opinion of the country regards
them as exceptional and hopefully trusts that
each will prove the last.
The South needs capital and occupation,
not controversy. As much as any part of
the North, tne tsoutn needs tne run protec
tion of the revenue laws which the Kepubli
can party offers. Some of the southern States
have already entered upon a career of indus
trial development and prosperity. These, at
least, should not lend their electoral votes to
destroy their own future.
Any effort to unite the southern States upon
issues that grow out of the memories of the
war will summon the northern States to com
bine in the assertion of that nationality
which was their inspiration in the civil strug
gle. And thus great energies which should
be united in a common industrial develop
ment will be wasted in hurtful strife. The
Democratic party shows itself a foe to south
ern prosperity by always invoking and urging
southern political consolidation. Such a
policy quenches the rising instinct of patriot
ism in the heart of the southern youth; it
revives and stimulates prejudice; it substi
tutes the spirit ofbarbaric vengeance for the
love of peace, progress and harmony.
THE CIVIL SERVICE.
The general character of the civil service
of the United States under all administra
tions has been honorable. In the supreme
test the collection and disbursement of rev
enue the record of fidelity has never been
surpassed in any nation. With the almost
fabulous sums which were received and paid
during the late war, scrupulous integrity was
the prevailing rule. Indeed, throughout that
trying period, it can be said, to the honor of
. 1 . A 1. i 1" i".-T 1
tne American name, biiab uiiLaiLiixuiiices ami
dishonesty among civil officers were as rare
as misconduct and cowardice on the field of
battle.
The growth of the country has continually
ana necessarily emargeu liiu civix service,
until now it includes a vast body of officers.
Rules and methods of appointment which
prevailed when the number was smaller have
been found insufficient and impracticable,
and earnest efforts have been made to sepa
rate the great mass of ministerial officers
from partisan influence and personal control.
Impartiality in the mode of appointment to
be based on qualification, and security of
tenure to be based on faithful discharge of
duty, are the two ends to be accomplished.
The public business will be aided by sepa
rating the legislative branch of the govern
ment from all control of appointments, and
the executive department will be relieved by
subjecting appointments to fixed rules and
thus removing them from the caprice of fa
voritism. But there should be rigid observ
ance of the law which gives in all cases of
equal competency the preference to the sol
diers who risked their lives in def etise of the
Union.
I entered Congress in 1863, and in a some
what prolonged service I never found it ex
pedient to request or recommend the removal
of a civil officer except in four instances, and
then for non-political reasons which were
instantly conclusive with the appointing
power. The officers in the district, appoint
ed by Mr. Lincoln in 1861 upon the recom
mendation of my predecessor,served,as a rule,
until death or resignation. I adopted at the
beginning of my service the test of competi
tive examinations for appointments to West
Point and maintained it so long as I had the
right by law to nominate a cadet. In the
case of many officers I found that the present
law which arbitraily limits the term of the
commission offered a constant temptation to
changes for mere political reasons. I have
publicly expressed the "belief that the essen
tial modification of that law would be in
many respects advantageous.
My observation in the Department of State
confirmed the conclusions of my legislative
experience, and impressed me with the con
viction that the rule of impartial appoint
ment might with advantage be carried be
yond any existing provision of the civil ser
vice law. It should be applied to appoint
ments in the consular service. Consuls
should be commercial sentinels encircling
the globe with watchfulness for their coun
try's interests. Their intelligence and com
petency become, therefore, matters of great
rrablio concern. No man should be appoint-
1 . . - 1 . 1. WA11
ed to an American uuiibuuiw wuu d w .
his
m nonntrv. and in the reauirements
and
to
be
of
wtnen ne IK sent, lue same ruie tuiuuiu
armLied even more rigidly to Secretaries
The
people linvt? wiu ligun w m
agents in the discharge of public business
and the appointing power should regard this
as 111(5 prior ami uiwjnux- iiurai.u.
THE MORMON QUESTION.
Religious liberty is the right of every citi
zen of the republic. Congress is forbidden
by the Constitution to make any law "re
specting the establishment of religion, or
prohibiting the free exercise thereof." For a
century under this guarantee, Protestant and
Catholic, Jew and Gentile, have worshipped
God according to the dictates of conscience.
But religions liberty must not be perverted to
the iustification of offences against the law.
A Telicrious sect, strongly intrenched in one
r,f fho tATritories of the Union, and spreading
nniillv in frnir other territories, claims the
right to destroy the great safeguard and mu
. .t anil;.l anil rst -nrntir.A afl f
nun Ul ijmi im , i' -
religious privilege that which is a crime pun-
lHlieU ffHU B3VOID IJUUIU.J J
llie U111UI1. r?( i i:vi in. 'no mm uuu,
family must be preserved as the foundation
C nll 1 ..-..n.tiivMiii aa Ha aitni.f'A of ni-
Ji nil liivu r lunula, ua vuv " "
derly administration, as the surest guarantee
Ol moral puiity.
Tho flaAm nf the Mormons that thev
divinely authorized to practice polygamy
should no more be admitted than the claim
l.wlian fiTiAa if t.Viav ahnnlrl Am
AJll liv " - r
among us, to continue the rite of human sac
rifice. The law does not interfere with what
a man believes; it takes cognizance only
Wnat ne aoes. AS clfclZieilB me mwimuiio mo
ontitlAH in t,hA same civil rights as others, and
to these they must be confined. Polygamy
can never receive national sanction or tolera
ivn Viv HlTnitrinrr the eommunitv that UD-
holds it as a State in the Union. Like others
the Mormons must learn that the liberty of
the individual ceases where the rights of so
ciety begin.
OCR CURRENCY.
The people of the United States, though
often urged, and tempted, have never serious
ly contemplated the recognition of any other
money than gold and silver and currency di
rectly convertible into them. They have not
done so, they will not do so, under any ne
cessity less pressing than that of desperate
war. Tne one special requisite tor tne com
pletion of our monetary system is the fixing
ol the relative values or silver ana goia.
The large use of silver as the money of ac
count among Asiatic nations, taKen m con
nection with the increasing commerce of the
world, gives the weightiest reasons for an
international agreement in the premises. Our
government should not cease to urge this
measnre until a common standard of value
shall be reached and established a standard
that shall enable the United States to use the
silver from its mines as an aux
iliary to gold in settling the balances
of commercial exenange.
THE PUBLIC LANDS.
The strength of the republic is increased
by the multiplication of land-holders. Our
laws should look to the judicious encourage
ment ot actual settlera on tne public domain,
which should henceforth be held as a sacred
trust for the benefit of those seeking homes.
The tendency to consolidate large tracts of
land m the ownership of individuals or cor
porations should, with proper regard to vest
ed rights, be discouraged. One hundred
thousand acres of land in the hands of one
man is far less profitable to the nation in
every way than when its ownership is divided
among one thousand men. The evil of per
mitting large tracts of the national domain
to be consolidated and controlled by the few
against the many is enhanced when the per
sons controlling it are aliens. It is but fair
that the public land should be disposed of
only to actual settlers and to those who are
citizens of the republic, or willing to become
so.
OUR SHIPPING INTERESTS.
Among our national interests one languish
es the foreign carrying-trade. It was very
seriously crippled in our civil war, ana
another blow was given to it in the general
substitution ol steam tor sail in ocean tramc.
With a frontage on the two great oceans,
with a freightage larger than that of any
other nation, wo have every inducement to
restore our navigation. Yet the government
has hitherto refused its help. A small share
of the encouragement given by the govern
ment to railways and to manufactures, and a
small Bhare of the capital and the zeal given
by our citizens to those enterprises would
have carried our ships to every sea and to
every port. A law just enacted removes
some of the burdens upon our navigation and
inspires hope that this great interest may at
last receive its due share of attention. All
efforts in this direction should receive en-
Anni-acairiAnl
SACREDNESS OF THE BALLOT.
This survey of our condition as a nation
reminds us that material prosperity is but a
mockery if it does not tend to preserve the
liberty of the people. A free ballot is the
safeguard of Bepublican institutions, without
which no national welfare is assured. A pop
ular election, honestly conducted, embodies
the very majesty of true government. Ten
millions of voters desire to take part in the
pending contest. Tne safety or tne repub
lic rests upon the integrity of tbe ballot,
upon the security ot suttrage to the citi
zen. To deposit a fraudulent vote is no
worse a crime against constitutional liberty
than to obstruct tne deposit or an honest
vote. He who corrupts suffrage strikes at
the very root of free government. He is the
arch-enemy of the republic. He forgets that
in trampling upon the rights of others he
fatally imperils his own rights. "It is
good land which the Lord our God doth give
us," but we can maintain our heritage only
by guarding with vigilance the source of pop
nlar power.
I am with great respect,
Your obedient servant,
James G. Blaine.
DERBY DRIVING ASSOCIATION.
Races at Hamilton Park Harry R.and
Cedar Jack the Winners Andrate
Horseman Uses Insulting Language
to tne Judges and Afterward Begs
Their Pardon.
The annual summer meeting of the Derby
Driving association was held at Hamilton
Park yesterday afternoon. The attendance
was large, fully 700 people being on the
grounds. Large numbers drove from towns
in the Naugatuck valley and a goodly sprink
ling of New Haveners were seen about the
grounds. The day was perfect for racing.
warm enough and with no wind to interfere
'with the time. The track was in fine condi
tion, and the trees that have grown up under
the grand stand protruded their leafy branches
through the seats, affording delightful
shade for those who dared risk their lives on
the dilapidated structure.Many ladies and sev
eral prominent men of this city witnessed
the sport that our neighbors in Derby pre
pared for our delectation. The pool stand,
presided over by Charles Downs, was the
center of attraction to many, and Dorman's
pies and Mann's , lager did not
lack customers. The races were suffi
ciently exciting to : give satisfaction. The
Derby Driving association gave free races on
the ice on the Housatonic, which afforded
much pleasure to a large number, and they
naturally wished to reap substantial returns
from yesterday's meeting, as they did, the
attendance being large enough to give the
treasury a good lift.
The races were called about 2:30. The judg
es were: John Hard of Stratford, Henry Ben
nett of Bridgeport, and Dr. J. Lyon of this
city. Mr. Hard was starter and Sheriff Rob
ert O. Gates and Mr. Hard timers.
The 2:50 class were called up first. The
entries were as follows:
George Adams, Derby, enters b. m. Lady Dag-
gera.
George H. Washburn, Seymour, enters b. g. Bos
ton jonn.
C. E. Swan, New York, enters a g. Cedar Jack.
1 1 t' T V. A nonnin .... TI ... t ...
George W. Simmonds, Bridgeport, enters g. m.
Seniwana.
John Judd, New Haven, enters br. m. Hazel
Kirke.
T. S. Holt, New Haven, enters br. g. Sherbrooke.
Hamlet was drawn. Boston John had the
pole, with Lady Daggett for a neighbor. The
other horses were in the following order:Seni-
wana, Hazel Kirke, Cedar Jack, Sherbrooke.
Jack was the pool favorite. After many at
tempts to Bcore the horses got away with
Jack in the lead and Sherbrooke second, John
third and Daggett last. The leading horse
pulled away from the others and showed his
speed. The heat was his from the start. The
only struggle was for fourth place, Seniwana
and Hazel Kirke coming under the wire
neck and neck. The other horses kept the
starting positions. In the second heat Jack
also won easily, and Seniwana got second
place by some good work. Sherbrooke was
third, although he broke badly. Daggett
came in behind and was withdrawn. In the
third heat Seniwana gave Jack a hard push
in the first quarter, but fell behind and Jack
won easily, getting the heat and race. Seni
wana got second money, Sherbrooke third.
The 2:35 class was quite exciting. The
entry list was:
J. H. Xewis, Stratford, enters bL g. Harry B.
C. E. Swan, New York, enters ar m.&.J.B
erbury: ' "
J?" n fSr8' Haen, enters H. m. Edith May.
C. B. Adams, New Haven, enters ch. m. Celeste
Belle of Waterbury and Edith tf
drawn. Harry B. was a strong pool favorite.
Bessie B. drew the pole,. Celeste second and
Harry is. outside. . The nrst start was a good
one, the -three horses trotting finely. The
speed was fast. Bessie B. led at the start, but
she broke1 and Harry B. passed at the quar
ter. Celerte did not seem able to keep up
with the pffce. Harry B. got a good lead on
the half ana won tne neat, narry a. was
behind on the start in the second heat. But
Bessie B. broke and Harry B. forged ahead at
a tremendous pace, the driver, Lewis of
Stratford, pulling him back on the finish.
The third heat was won by Harry B. Bessie
B. broke badly and let Celeste in for second
place.
The summaxias are as follows:
2:50 class.
Pvn-se $75 $40 to first, $25 to second, $10 to third.
Harry B.... J 1 1
Bessie B 2 2 3
Celeste -3 3 2
TIKE.
Quarter.
Half.
First heat 89 1:17 2:40U
Second heat. 4pi 1:19 2:40)3
Third heat 1:17J4 2:39
2:35 class.
Puree $125 $65 to first, $35 to second, $15 to
third, $10 to fourth.
Lady Daggett 6 6 dr
Boston John 3 4 3
Cedar Jack 1 1 1
Seniwana 4 2 2
Hazel Kirke 5 5 4
Sherbrooke 2 3 5
TIME.
Quarter. Half. Mile.
First heat 1:1
2:34L.
Second heat. . 89 1:15J 2:34)4
Third heat 38 l:14jj 2:36
After the announcement of the time of the
first heat of the 2:35 class a man approached
the judges' stand and began to address those
dignitaries in very uncomplimentary lan
guage. He spoke his mind freely and then
went oa in the crowd, ne proved to oe j.
E. Swan, the owner of Bessie B. Hia griev
ance was that the judges had announced the
time made by Harry is. the wi3aner,as :a4J4,
when it should have been two : seconds faster.
The judges, when they learned who the man
was, called him up and asKed Aim wnat ne
meant by such language. Mr. Swan said he
in a moment of anger did use rstronger lan
guage than he should, but hie asked the
judges' pardon. They were appeased and
Mr. Swan was saved the fine of $25 which
could have been imposed. f3wan belongs
in Stamford. He claims that Harry
B. should have been credited with a record oj
2:32 instead of 2:34M . The judges maintain
ed that thev were right, and their decision
created no further trouble.
A scrub race between Mary Pond and Vick
Ton Vick was arranged after the regular
races. The latter horse won two out of three
heats trotted. The match race arranged be
tween Kim, entered by D. L. Beardsley, of
New Haven, and Doctor, by James Cream, of
Branford, was forfeited by the latter horse
County Commissioners.
The county commissioners were in session
yesterday. They granted a license to Alex
ander Cummings of 383 East street, and af
terward heard an objection to the transfer
of Mrs. Hageman's license to Constant Moel-
ler. Mr. Moeller showed a bill of sale exeeu
ted by Mrs. Hageman conveying to him her
entire interest in the former saloon which
she conducted, including the license. There
was also a stipulation that Mr. Moeller should
have the privilege of running the saloon in
her name during the period covered by the
license if he so desired. After executing
this document Mrs. Hageman changed her
mind to some extent and entered a protest
with the commissioners against the transfer
of the license to Mr. Moeller or anyone else.
The board dismissed the objection and de
cided to make the transter as applied tor.
Andrew Redding, aged twenty-nine, died
at the hospital of consumption on Thursday
night.
STATE COBESPONDENCE.
Shelton.
A meeting of the Blaine and Logan club
was held last evening at the Town Hall. It
was decided to repaint the banner of for years
ago and prepare it for raising. A torchlight
company was started and a number enrolled
their names. Meeting adjourned until next
week JJTiday evening. July lis.
Birmingham.
The banner raising of the Blaine and Logan
club will occur haturday evening. Hon.
John A. Tibbetts, of New London, will ad
dress the audience. Echo band, twenty-two
pieces, will furnish music, also the'Glee club
of sixteen voices will be present. A rousing
meeting is anticipated. July la.
North Haven.
Mrs. Maria Bishop, who died in this town
on Monday, was a sister of George Lewis and
has lived with him about two years. Her
death occurred at his residence.
who has been living at the boarding house at
Jtrns nishop s Dnckyard, hired a horse and
wagon of Francis Beaumont to go to New
Haven, taking an oil can to get filled for Mr.
B. In the afternoon the horse came home
alone without any wagon. Upon investiga
tion it was found that Demarest had used the
team to convey his worldly possessions to the
depot and had left town, leaving Mr. Beau
mont mmus his oil can and his horse hire.
Mrs. L. P. Tuttle and Miss Ina Tuttle leave
to-morrow for a visit of some length at East
Berlin. They will visit a great aunt, also a
great, great aunt ot the little girl.
Zerah Tuttle, whom it was thought could
not live many days, is so much better as to
walk outdoors, although still suffering from
the disease. July lo.
Walllngford.
Dr. C. S. Bray, who formerly practiced
here, and went from here to Mill ord, has re
moved from that town.
Mrs. Cordelia Hills, mother of Mrs. Sack
ett, was buried here Thursday afternoon.
the funeral taking place from the Episcopal
church. She died in Durham, and was 45
years of age.
The work of laying water mains on Whit
tlesey avenue has commenced. MeCormack
6t Uasnen do the worK ana will push it rapid
ly forward.
Stanley Botsford has been spending his
vacation in jNewtown.
The estate of O. E. Larkins was distribut
ed on Thursday. There were three heirs.
Timothy O'Brien, who worked in this town
at one time, was run over by -the cars this
morning near Menden and was killed instant
ly.
Professor Russell, of Waterbury, will give
an entertainment m Town Hall on the even
ing of July 31. The entertainment will con
sist of readings, recitations, etc., and the
proceeds will go for the benefit of missionary
worK in uregon.
G. W. Woodhouse has taken the contract of
filling between the stones of the Episcopal
ennren wnere the mortar has worked out. It
is quite a job and his men commenced on it
this morning.
btanley;Botsford s new block presents a
very handsome appearance now that the brick
worK is completed and the staging down. C.
H. Barnes has the contract for the joiner
worK ana it wm oe pushed lorward at
once.
Water Commissioner Hall reports the res-
- - 1 1 j 1 :i . . . .
ervoir iiuier iuui 11 was uune 1st ana tne
water running over the wastewav.
William M. Hall, who has been at Stonv
Creek for several weeks, is failing slowly
and it is doubtful if he survives many
montns. July lo.
. STATE NEWS.
Captain Russell, of Middle Haddam, came
to Hartford Monday and positively identified
George Leary as the man who took $240 out
of his pocket at Middletowa last Monday.
Leary was taken to Middletown Thursday
evening for trial. He is sure to get a Weth-
ersneia sentence.
Robert 0. Tyler post and its friends, of
Hartford, made an excursion yesterday to
osprey .Beach.
The commission appointed by the Gov
ernor to examine prisoners considered insane
at the Wethersfield prison have reported on
three cases. One prisoner, John Dines, is
adjudged insane. Governor Waller will soon
issue an order for Dines' transfer to the Mid
dletown insane asylum.
Thursday morning a covered bridge at
xuuiiviiit) wuimi conneciea tne Home woolen
shop and George W. Eaton's shor, was burn
ed. It was about 100 feet long and the fire
spread from it to a small building and a
quantity or uaiea nay ana machinery. The
building was destroyed, but most of the hay
was saved and all the machinery.
Those extremely popular gentlemen, the
members of the Connecticut Commercial
Travelers' association, will hold their annrn)
clambake at the Branford Point House. Bran-
ford, Conn., Friday, July 25th. Special rail
road rates have been obtained and the clams
are emigrating to Stony Creek.
AH the Knights of Honor lodges in the
State are invited to a clambake to be given
by Victor lodge of Bridgeport at Seaside
Park, August th.
The Hubbard Hose, company of Middle-
town have accepted an invitation from Black
stone Hose company of Norwich to take part
in the fall parade of the firemen.
The Rev. Charles A. Piddock, of Middle-
town, will sail for Europe next week Satur
day. - Advlee to mothers.
Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup for chil
dren teething is the prescription of one of
the best female nurses and physicians in the
United States, and has been used for forty
years with never failing success by millions
of mothers for their children. During the
process of teething its value is incalculable.
It relieves the child from pain, cures dysen
tery and diarrhoea, griping in the bowels and
wind colic. By giving health to the child it
rests the mother. Price 25c a bottle.
aSmws&wly .
A ' Light market Dullness The main
Feature And Business Very Small
An Advance In Prices At The Close.
New York, July 18.
Extreme dullness was about the only feature of
the stoc'i market this morning. Up to noon not
more titan sixteen thousand shares changed hands.
The (hictuations were fractional except in a few in
stances and mainly the result of the tactics of ma
nipulating cliques. The bears did but little, while
their opponents contented themselves in bidding
prices up fractionally. Missouri Pacific was about
the strongest stock and led the advance. The stock
was bid up by the Gould brokers and at one time
showed an advance of over 2 per cent. Lake Shore
was the next strongest, advancing 1-. The ad
vance in the rest of the list was only fractional. The
market continued dull during the afternoon until
the last hour of business, when there was a decided
change in the temper of the market. There was a
brisk buying of all the leading stocks and the full
lisfydosed firm at the best figures of the day. The
advance as compared with the closing prices of yes
terday ranged from to 4 per cent, and was well
distributed. The sales amounted to 238,000 shares.
The specialties were dull and featureless.
Money closed at 12 per cent.
Exchange closed dull. Posted rates 484 486; ac
tual rates 4834884 for sixty days, and 485485J4
for demand.
Governments closed firm.
Closing prices reported over the private wires of
BUNNELL & SCKANTON, Bankers and Brokers.1
Bid Ashed
American Bell Tel 153 154
Alton and Terre Haute 24 25
Alton and Terre Haute pfd 71 75
American District Telegraph
Boston & N. Y. Air Lane pfd 82U 85
Burlington and Quincy 11494 115
C. C. C.and I. 35 38
Canada Southern. 30fc 31H
Canadian Pacific 44 44M
Central Pacific .36 36 J
Chicago and Alton .
Col., Chic. & Ind. Central I 2
Chesapeake and Ohio 8 8)
Chesapeake and Ohio, 1st pfd 14 14
Chesapeake and Ohio, 2d pfd 9H 10
Del. Lack, and Western 1093J . ioi5
Del. and Hudson Canal 92 94
Denver and Rio Grande 9 9
Erie 13J4 13 j
Erie,pfd
Erie Seconds 54)4 54)4
Erie and Western 9 19
East Tenn., Va. & Ga 3 4)4
" " " pfd 6)4 7
Express Adams 128 131
American 90 93
United States 52 55
Wells Fargo 102 103
Houston and Texas 20 21
Ind., Bloom. nd West 13 13W
Illinois Central 124 124M
Kansas and Texas. 15V4 15)4
Lake Shore 75W 75V
Louisville and Nashville 28?? 28g
Manhattan Elevated 53 55
Mil., Lake Shore and W
" " pfd
Mutual Union Tel 11 13
Memphis and Charleston 24
Michigan Central 58 61)4
M. and St. Louis
M. and St. Louis pfd
Mobile and Ohio 8)4 10
Missouri Pacific i 97 97)4
Morris and Essex 122 134
Nashville and Chattanooga 37W 39
New Jersey Central 57
New York Central 103)4 10334
New York and New England 9 10)4
New York Elevated 105 130
N. Y., Chic, and St. Louis 5)4 6
" ' " " pfd 11
New Central Coal 5 9
Northern Pacific 18)4 184
Northern Pacific pfd 45-lS 45(8
Northwest ftiW 924
Northwest pfd 128 I2814
Norfolk and West pfd 24)4 24)4
Ohio Central 154 ij
Ohio and Mississippi 20M 21
Omaha 28M 27
Omaha pfd 8614 S7l
Ontario and Western 1054 11
Oregon Transcontinental
Pacific Mail 46)4 46)4
ireona, u. UJiu x.vousvuie 1194
Reading 25
Richmond and Danville 32
Richmond and West Point 13)4
Rock Island 109)4
Rochester and Pitts 3)4
St. Paul 72
St. Paul pfd 106)4
St. Paul and Duluth
St. Paul and Duluth pfd
St. Paul, M. andM 86)4
Texas Pacific 9-K
Union Pacific 34)4
Wabash 5W
Wabash pfd 12)2
Western Union Tel 5
United Pipe Line Ctfs 696
Pullman , 103)4
West Shore 39
Government bonds closed as follows:
6s 81, continued
5s continued
4)4s, '91, reg no
41s. '91. COUD 110
4s, 1907, reg 117teill77,
i, imi, wup lioaiina
... ir.9iaimiJ4
Currency 6s, 'OS
.123 Did
Currency 6s, '96 125
Currency 6s, '97 127
Currency Cs, '98 129
Currency 6s, '99 131
Pacific railroad bonds closed as follows:
Firsts 11354all4)i
Funds 116)?all7
Grants 107)al08t4
Centrals 112 all'4i
Chicago and Provision Market
Closing quotations Reported over Private Wires
to Edwin Rove 4c Co., Commission Mer
chants, 403 New York Produce Exchange, New
VorW - - . - -
The following shows the quotations at 2:30 p. m.
(Chicago time) for the past three days:
July 16. July 17. July 18.
( July 82
Wheat-; August 82J6
( September . . 8324
83 84
84 85
85 86)4
53 54
54 55)4
54 5596
July
August
( September
(July
August
( September
51-4
523s
52
2914
26U
2554
Corn
31 U 30)
27 26!
26 26
23.50 23.50
23.50 23.50
22.25 22.75
7.15 7.12)
7.20 7.17)
7.35 7.30
Oats
(July 23.50
Pork August 23.40
( September.. 22.59
(July 7.05
-(August 7.07J
Lard
( September . . 7.20
RECEIPTS.
Wheat, 36 cars; corn, 199 cars; oats, 110 cars; hogs,
iv,uw neau.
Michigan Central R. R. Co.,
First Mortgage Main Line 5 per
cent, jtsonas.
Due May 1T 1902. Interest payable May 1st and No
vember 1st.
These bonds are part of the 7 per cent, first con
solidated mortgage, reserved to retire prior liens,
and are now issued with the rate of interest reduftftd.
We offer a limited amount for sale and recom
mend them as a nrst class investment.
VERMILYE & CO.,
os. 16 and 18 Nassau St.
NEW YORK CITY.
Stocks For Sale.
10 shares Mechanics' Bank.
20 shares Yale National Bank.
20 shares New Haven County Bank.
10 shares N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. Co.'s Stock.
BUNNELL & SCRANT0N,
BANKERS AND BROKERS,
jyl5 732 and 734 CHAPEL STREET.
IF YOU WISH TO BUY OR SELL
STOCK PRIVILEGES
Write to SEirraouR k CO.,
51 New Street, New York City.
my31 2m
STOCKS AND BONDS FOR SALE
fclO.OOO New York. New Haven and Hartford d'a
$2,000 New Haven and Northampton First Mort
B2000 New Haven and Northampton First Mort-
SpUOOO New Haven and Northampton cou's 6's.
100 shares New Haven County National Bank.
60 Shares Branford Lock Works.
Small lots of Yale and Merchants' National banks,
N. H. and Northampton B. B.. N.-Y. and N. .1. Tele-
pnone.
W. T. HATCH & SONS,
BANKERS.
B.U.M.
57, 59 & 61 OEAMEST.,
FURNITURE DEALERS
AND
UNDERTAKERS,
Have the finest Painted Bedroom Suits in the citv.
New Parlor Suits, Walnut Bedroom Suits.
xne oest spring aea tor me money.
Snlint. Rattan. Cane and Bush Seat Chairs in
great variety, as low as can be bought.
UNDERTAKING
promptly attended to. night or day, with care.
Bodies preserved without ice in the best manner.
Also Sole Agents for Washburn's Deodoring and
Disinfecting fluid.
A new lot of Fol diner Chairs and Stools to rent for
parties or funeral. "jyS
1. ;
A FRIEND IN NEED.
DR. SWEETS
INFALLIBLE LINIMENT.
Pmnarnri frnm the racine of Dr. Stephen Sweet.
of Connecticut, the great natural Bone-Setter. Has
been used for more man fifty years and is the best
known remedy for Rheumatism, Neuralgia, Sprains,
Bruises. Burns. Cuts. Wounds, and all external in
juries.
DODD'S NERVINE AND INYIGOBATOB.
Standard and reliable, and never fails to comfort
the aged and help everybody who uses it.
SOLD BY at.t. DRUGGISTS TRY IT.
nl3eod&wtf "
For Sale and To Rent.
FOB RENT Block House No. 239 Orange
street. Perfect order. Possession at once.
Bent low to a good tenant for a term of years.
FOB SALE House No. 57 Pierpont street.
Lots on Howard avenue, riauocK ave
nue and in "The Annex."
Monev to loan in sums of X500 on first Mortgage
at 6 per cent. Inquire of
WILLIAM C. ROBINSON, I No. 14 White's Build'g,
PHILIP ROBINSON, f opposite P. O.
Blair
Hours 1
10 to 12 a. m., 8 to 3 p. m. ocawitBti
Robust Health
Is not always enjoyed by those who seem
to possess it. The taint of corrupted
blood may be secretly undermining the
constitution. In time, the poison will cer
tainly show its effects, and with all the more
virulence the longer it has been allowed
to permeate the system. Each pimple, sty,
boil, skin disorder and sense of unnatural
lassitude, or languor, is one of Nature's
warnings of the consequences of neglect.
Ayers Sarsaparilla
Is the only remedy that can be relied upon,
in all cases, to eradicate the taint of hered
itary disease and the special corruptions
of the blood. It is the only alterative
that is sufficiently powerful to thoroughly
cleanse the system of Scrofulous and
Mercurial impurities and the pollution
of Contagious Diseases. It also neu
tralizes the poisons left by Diphtkeria
and Scarlet Fever, and enables rapid
recuperation from the enfeeblement and
debility caused by these diseases.
Myriads of Cures
Achieved by Ayer's Sarsaparilla, in
the past forty years, are attested, and there
is no blood disease, at all possible of cure,
that will not yield to it. Whatever the
ailments of this class, and wherever found,
from the scurvy of the Arctic circle to the
"veldtrsores" of South Africa, this rem
edy has afforded health to the sufferers
by whom it was employed. Druggists
everywhere can cite numerous cases, with
in their personal knowledge, of remark
able cures wrought by it, where all other
treatment had been unavailing. People
will do well to "
Trust Nothing Else
than ayer's Sarsaparilla. Numerous
crude mixtures are offered to the public
as "blood purifiers," which only allure
the patient with the pretense of many
cheap doses, and with which it is folly to
experiment while disease is steadily be
coming more deep-seated and difficult of
cure. Some of these mixtures do much
lasting harm. Bear in mind that the only
medicine that can radically purify the
vitiated blood is
Ayer's Sarsaparilla,
PREPARED BY
Dr. J. C. Ayer & Co., Lowell, Mass.
Sold bv all druggists ; price $ 1,
"six bottles for $5.
AYER'S
Ague Cure
IS WARRANTED to euro all cases of ma
larial disease, such as Fever and Ague, Inter
mittent or Chill Fever, Remittent Fever,
Dumb Ague, Bilious Fever, and Liver Com
plaint. In case of failure, after due trial,
dealers are authorized, by our circular of
July 1st, 1882, to refund the money.
Dr.J. C.Ayer&Co., Lowell, Mass.
Sold by all Druggists.
TURNIP
SEED.
Buc k wheat
AND
&0LDEU MILLET,
Timothy, Red Top
AND
CLOVER.
FRANK S. PLATT
374 and 376 State Street,
jyl4
CONGRESS SPRING.
The Standard Mineral Water
Catliartlc, Alterative. A specific for
disorders of tbe Stomach, Liver and
ataneys, eczema, Malaria and all Im
purities or tlie Blood.
SO enviable a name has this famous mineral water
mat me managers or lnierior mineral springs, de
sirous of imitating the natural purity of the bottled
water of Congress Spring, inject a powerful acid in
their bottled water to preserve the crude ingredients
ww-uv.vw, CTV ucoyhj ItXUtril YY1LI1
Lime and Iron Deposit.
WITH such contrivannAs. hnime tuctimAnioia
doctored analysis cards they seek to rival the pure
'- THE reemlar season visitors tr Kamic fniir in.
derstand these crude, harsh waters, many of them
after painful experiences. In proof of this fact we
can produce a reat many responsible names. But
the Saratoga visitors without experience, and many
who use the bottled waters (often labled as cura
tives for disorders which they positively aggra
vate), should remember that crude, harsh mineral
waters produce headache, a sense of burning and
internal irritations, and do irreparable injury to the
Congress Water,
Pure, Natural, Reliable.
None Oennlne Sold on Draught.
For sale by Drnsglsts, Grocers, Wine
. . . . . .. .a nuw .v in.
Bottle C mark.
STRAW HATS
50cto $2.00
MACKINAWS,
MANILLAS,
ALL THE LATEST,
MEJV'S FIRMSIIIVCS.
TKUNKS. TRUNKS
KILBOURN & CO'S, 816 Chapel St
IMPORTANT INFORMATION.
To those in want
ot uiasses:
Durant has
u r-
one
of
Dr.
Brocklin's O t t h a
moscopic test lenses
ior resting tne eves.
J It is the best thing
cci luvtjuiKU. itui
and see it before go
ing to an occtmst.
You will save money
and be perfectly fit-
Lea.
J. H. G. DURANT, 38 & 40 Church St,
SMALLPOX
CAN BE REMOVED
jLmThojst 3 go.,
London, Perfumers to Her Majesty the Queen, have
Auveiiw! ana pacentea tne woria-renownea
OBLITERATOR,
Which removes Smallpox Marks of however long
a)UUMUUU IB BlUl(JiG CUIU 1ICU Illld5f,
ftfl.1VW tin infAtivomcnrUk anrt nnntaina nnrhinit inui.
rious. Send for particulars.
SUPERFLUOUS HAIR.
LEON & CO.'S "Depilotory"
Removes Superfluous Hair in a few minutes without
mcuii w unpleasant sensation never to grow again.
ouiipie ana narmiess. vxui directions sent oy man.
Price $1.
GEO. W. SHAW, Gen. Agt.,
219ATREMONT STREET, BOSTON, MASS.
m28eod&w
VAULTS AND CESSPOOLS.
Be sure y our Vaults and Cess
pools are in good condition be
fore not weather sets here. Send
your address to
A. N. FABXHAM,
P. O. BOX 275 fTTTV. OR MAY BE LEFT AT R.
Tl I3t A imrv o. s-u-v -t- jna -i.,.. eKuf UiU'P
"Hi. 1-11 j 1 ot. 11. 1 , " 1 1 1 i"n. oum.v, . "
VEITCH & SON'S, 974 Chapel street. ml5
GOLD MEDAL, PABIS, 187th
BAKER'S
Broffi Cocoa.
Warranted absolutely pure
C&coa, from which the excess of
Oil has been removed. It has three
time the strength ot Cocoa mixed
with Starch, Arrowroot or Sugar,
and Is therefore far more economi
cal. It is delicious, nourishing,
strengthening, easily digested, and
admirably adapted for invalids as
well as for persons in health. '
Sold by eroeero everywhers.
f. BAKES & CO., Dorchester, Mass. i
ttorncijs.
CHARLES S. HAMILTON,
Attorney and Counsellor at Law.
YALE BANK BUILDING,
CORNER CHAPEL AND STATE STS,
Notary Public New Haven, Conn.
ap6tf
E. P. ARVINE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Rooms 9 and 11, 69 Church St.
JOHNSTON'S
PREPARED KALSOMINE
In white and all other desirable
tints.
The Best and Cheapest in the
Market.
A Large Assortment of
WHITEWASH BRUSHES,
Varying in price from 5c up
wards. MASURyS CELEBRATED
RAILROAD COLORS
AND
AVERILL CHEMICAL PAINT.
D. S. G-IEOTT & SOU,
Nos. 270 and 272 State St.
L. C. PEAIT & SON,
Prime Meats, Vegetables, Etc,
7 and 9 Church Street.
X. B. Beginning June 1
we shall make daily trips
to the West Haven Shore
for the accommodation or
families residing there.
my23
Rubber Hose !
LARGEST STOCK,
LOWEST PRICES
IN THE CITY.
EOSKETT & BISHOP,
BRANCH STORE,
462 STATE STREET,
Opposite our Old Stand.
mylO 3m
CREAMERY BUTTERED
Martha Washington Brand.
Fifty Cases Just Received
The trade supplied at factory prices by
J. D. DEWELL & CO.,
Wholesale Grocers,
233 TO 239 STATE STREET.
J.V14
SHOES
L We have made a specialty of this
ft excellent SHOE :for BOYS'
WfiAK i or years, we mane
nothing' else, and produce per-
fectiOD of fit, comfort, od
' Mtyle and the bent wearing
boot that is made. Cost no more
than is generally charjred for or
dinary shoes, and will save &O
tiprvnt in wadt 'Nrt evrrnm. Tin
bimionB. Any dealer content with a fair profit will
confirm what we say. Give them a trial, and yon will
Ire a permanent friend of THE MOLAR TIP.
Beware of Imitations called by names so nearly
like (Solar Tin as to deceive. Trade-mark and "John
Mundkll & Co.." iu full, is on sole of each pair.
Hose. Hose.
COTTON, LINEN RUBBER,
We do not claim to have more Hose than all the
dealers combined, but we do keep a general assort
ment of goods that we can warrant to do as repre
sented, at very low figures. Give us a call before
purchasing and we will convince you.
J. F. GILBERT & CO.,
470 State Sitroot;:
je35
THE REASON WHY
THE '
kSEAL OF NORTH CAROLINA.1
PLUG CUT
Is the favorite Smokine- Tobacco of connoisseurs
Because it is the best. It is selected with the great
est care from the best Tobacco grown in Granville
County, North Carolina, and stored away two years
wciuiu it is iu.ii n i.ii-iKj;i.uit.i. p or svi. it? oy aii aeaiers.
makdukw, DKua., JNanuiacturers.
Safe Investments for Money
7 PER CENT. FIRST MORTGAGE LOANS
on improved farms in Ohio and Indiana, worth three
or more times me amount loanea; in a rich, agri
cultural region; in the midst of railroads, school
houses, turnpikes, permanent improvements all
calculated to make land good security. No losses
in twelve years' experience. No expense to the
leuuer. inie rest semi-annuaiiy. Mver rorxy years
riucm-c, rw iu.11 liiitji iiiaiiuu write iu us.
J. DICKINSON & CO., Richmond, Ind.
A fiPTC'TSi TO SELL POSITIVELY the best
iiUJJli M-kJ selling book in the market. GATE-
W A Tlr II ljY s universal educa-
?f X-XilS TOR, 1,200 pages. 500 illustra
tions. Has outsold everything else. 35,000 copies
sold last year. Exclusive territory and the most
noerai terms ever oxtered. Apply at once,
E. GATELY & CO.,
280 ASYLUM STREET,
jtiarrrora, conn.
TO ADVERTISERS Lowest rates for Advertising
in 970 good pnewspaers sent free. Address
lieo. -t. Kowen k uo., iu Mpruce St. jn. Y.
jiijeoaawim
I See that the children
maintain their vigor in
tne tjummer months.
; Ridge's Food will do it.
it your child has any
symptoms of dysentery,
or any trouble of the
bowels. commence
Ridee's Food as a diet
without delay. Unless
the trouble has become
chronic, reauinntr med
ical aid. it will cnriwt.
Ithe difficulty; and, as a
Jdietic in sicknfws. it. is
invaluable. A physician of large practice says: "It
nas never lauea me and 1 have never lost a child by
diarrhoea or cholera infantum." In cans, 35c and
upwarua. jya lm
W. A Strong,
DENTIST,
6 Hoadiey Building
COnn Pnstnffir
OFF1CEHUUBS-TaO n. m. t ft n.m. Sun-
WtJTB, ZT W M. M. . IDs
FISTULA
Cured without tne use of
tne Knife.
Wm. REED.(M. D.. Harvard. 18421
and ROBERT M. REED,)M. D., Har-
vara lo, b, isvani Home, 17a
Tremont St., Baston, treat
FISTULA.PllES and ALL
DISEASES OF THB BEC
Tllltt, without detention from
business. Reference given. Send
AND
PILES,
for namnhlAtH. Office hours 11 a.
" wt o cioc p. m- (.except fcimaay?. aaoeoaiy
Another Reduction.
THE New Haven Butter Store has acrain rednced
J to a great extent the Ttiittor to such a nrice that
cv oij' uuuj must oe sarasnea witn me price aua qutu
ltv. Our trade hra intrrAfuuvi l.rcrV We pan save
everybody S cents on the pound. Stores, hotels and
restaurants can be Bupplied by the" tub or greater
quantity. Fresh Eggs as low as the lowest in market
at wholesale and retail.
nt Jon greet Avenue.
A. K tt LIS K. jc.
G. H. tUdney,
Dentist
T8T t'hapel St.
Orange sts.
Teeth Extracted. 25 Cents.
" " Without Pain by tne
use of Ether or Gas. 50 Cents.
Teeth filled and Artificial Teeth made of the finest
materials and warranted. Prices the LOWEST
consistent with nrst-daas work. jylS
New Haven and Derby Railroad.
Train Arrangement commencing July 16, 1884.
LEAVE NEW HAVEN
At 7:00 and 9:50 a. m., 2:00, 8:45, 6:20 p. m. Satur-
aaysatn;w p. m.
LEAVE ANSONIA
At 6:35, 9:05 and 11:40 a. m., 8:25 and 7:31 p. m.
. vuii?;vijii "i i-- J---'- ...... , - -r.
. : . . . F 1 . . . V ii i . i.q 1 1 , 1 i i 1 i-i in 1 1 null u T K.w H.von
with the principal trains of other roads centering
! r V. S OIIINTARn Rim't
New tiaven, juiyin. i;yvi.
Philadelphia and Reading It. R.,
(BOUND BROOK ROUTE.)
FOB TRENTON AND PHILADELPHIA.
Station in New York, foot of Liberty Street, North
Kiver.
COMMENCING JUNE 22, 1884.
Trfave New York for Trenton and Philadelphia
4:00, 7:45, 9:30, 11:15 a. m., 1:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:30, 7:00
and laroo p. m. aunaays : a. m., ix:uu p. m.
For Sunoury, Lewisburg and AVilliamsport, 7:45 a
m. and 4 p. m. Drawing Room Cars on all day
trains andsleerjine Cars on nierht trains.
Leave Philadelphia, corner Ninth and Greene
streets, 7:30, e:iu, y:au, ii:uu a. m., 1:10, 3:10, o:w,
6:45, 12:00 p. m. Sundays 8:30 a. m., 5:30, 12:00 p. m.
Leave 3a ana uerKs su. o.iw, o:u, w:w, u:au a. m.,
1, 3:30, 5:20, (5:30 p. m. Sundays 8:15a. m., 4:30 p, m.
T-eAve Trenton, Warren and Tucker streets, 1:25,
6 20. 8 03, 9:00. 10:08, 11:35 a. m., 1:54, 4:22, 6:24, 7:28
' ! -1 .O- fl.iU n v. A.IKv. m
III. OllLIUrtVS J.i, p. til.
d "HANCOCK. H. P. BALDWIN.
G. P. & T. A., Philadelphia, Gen. East. Pas. Ajft,
J. E. WOTTEN, Gen. Manager.
aulStf
Housatonic Railroad.
COMMENCING JUNE, 16,. 1884.
Trains Leave New Haven via N. Y., N. H. & H.
R. R. at 9:30 a. in. and 4:07 p. m., connecting at
Bridgeport for Pittsfield and intermediate stations.
Albany via State Line and Saratoga. New lork
Limited Express leaves Bridgeport at 5:25 p. m.,
arrives at Pittsfield at 8:30 p. m., connecting for
.North Adams, arriving at y::au p. m.
i. u. av jckijuju. ijtenerai iickct Agent.
W. H. YEOMANS, Superintendent.
General Offices, Bridgeport, Conn.
IF YOU ARE GOING
WEST OR SOUTH
TRAVEL BY THE
PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD.
Tlic Rest Railroad in the World,
4 DAILY EY PRESS TRAINS TO THE WEST.
Amlv for tickets and full information to J. N.
States, ticket agent, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., New
riaven jay
Naugatuck Railroad.
COMMENCING NOVEMBER 19th, 1883, trains leave
New Haven via N. H. & D. R. R., connecting with
this road at
7:00 a. m. Connecting at Ansonia with passenger
train for Waterbury, Litchfield and Win-
steaa.
9:50 a. m. Through car f or Waterbury, Watertown.
Litchfield. Winsted.
2:00 p.m. Connecting at Ansonia with passenger
train ior wareroury.
5:40 p. m. Through car for Waterbury, Watertown.
Litchfield, Winsted.
6:20 p. m. Connecting at Ansonia for Waterbury.
FOR NEW HAVEN Trains leave Winsted: 7:10
a. m.. 1:28 p. m., with through car, and at 5:20 p. m.
TRAINS LEAVE WATERBURY At 5:30 a. m.,
8:20 a. m., through car, 10:50 a. m., 2:44 p.m.,
tnrougn car, o:o p. m.
GEORGE W. BEACH, Supt.
Bridgeport, Nov. 17, 1883.
HeHaYenioiaHortliamptoa'Rallioaa.
, Eastern Standard Time.
CoMiiENcisa June 30th, 1884.
Leave
New York,
New Haven,
Plalnville,
S.OOwm.T 2.00p.m. 4.90pJh.
7.15;to.10.S5 " 4.10 ' 6.25
8.15 " - 11.80
4.5S 7.18 "
5.47 " 8 08
5.54 " 8.25 "
6.50
6.25 " 8.59 "
7.24 ' 9.20 "
6.45 "
7.06 '
7.11 "
7.59 "
8.25 "
10.30 "
9.58 "
Arrive
N. Hartford. 9.03
"Westfleld, S.19
t 1.10 p.m.
.' 12.23 "
12.49 "
12.58 "
- 1JQ "
1.19 "
2.01 "
1.45 "
Holyoke, 10.18 "
Northampt'n, 9.55 "
Willlamsb'rc. 10.16 ":
So.Deerflelff, 10.16 "
Turner's F'l8, 10.45 "
Shel. Falls. 10.42 "
No. Adams, 11.80 '
Willlamatown, 11.45 '
Saratoga, S 20 p.m
Troy, 2.15
Leave
Troy,
Saratoga.
2 83
2.59
4.55 "
6.45 "
7.45 a.m. 1.28p.m.
9.45 " -
11.40 "' 8.45 "
12.25 p.m. 4.10 "
1.11 " 5.03 "
12.55 " 4.40 "
1.41 " 5.25 "
10.40 a.m. 5.20
Willi amstown,
No. Adams,
Khol FfLllH.
7.45 a.m.
8.35 '
Turner's F'ls, 8.35
So. Deerneld. 9.U0
TVIlllamsb rff, 6.15 a.m. .su
North ampt'D, 6.34
9.20 "
2.06 p.m. 5.49
6.45
8.56 "
935 "
9.15 "
10.59
11.52
2.20 p.m.
2.10
5.30
6.26
Westfleld,
N. Hartford,
Plalnville,
New Haven,
New York,
7.09
7.30
8.15
9.17
11.45 -
2.38
2.55
3.45
4.40
7.20
6.40
7.33
8.28
10.30
8. n. OPPYKE, Jr., Bnpt,
Sew York, New Haven & Hart'
ford IE. IE., June 15, 1SS4.
TRAINS LEAVE NEW HAVEN AS FOLLOWS
FOR NEW YORK 3,5S, 4:18, 4:28, 5:15, 6:30, 7:30
8:10, 8:3U, :a". iu:4, ia:iio noon, (l:uu p. m.
wav train to Stamford). 1:30. 2:30. 3:5O(4:0'
wav to Stamford, thence Ex. to New York),
5:07, 5:42, 7:10. 7:15 milk tram with pass, ac
commodation stops at all stations except Glen
brook, Sound Beach, Cos Cob, Harrison, Larch
mont and Pelhamville. 18:00 way to Bridgeport).
8:38, p m., 9:20 p. m., way train for Stam
ford, stops at all stations except West Haven.
Sundays, 3:58, 4:18, 8:00 a. m., 5:00, 7:15,
8:38 n. m.
WASHINGTON NIGHT EXPRESS VIA HARLEM
RIVER Leaves at 11:50 p. m. daily, stops at
Milford, Bridgeport, South Norwalkand Stam-
iora.
FOR BOSTON VIA SPRINGFIELD 1:02 night,
:52, :00, 11:05 a. m., 1:16, 8:18, 0:so p. m,
Siindavs. 1 :02 nie-ht. fi:26 n. m.
WHITE MOUNTAIN EXPRESS 11:05 a. m. through
cars for the White Mountains on this train.
FOR MONTREAL via Conn. River and C. V. R. R.
11:05. a. m., 6:26 p. m. daily except Sunday.
FOR BOSTON VIA NEW LONDON AND PROVI
DENCE 12:4o night, 10:25 a. m., fast express
(3:15 Newoort Express, goes no farther than
Providence), 4:10 p. m. Fast Express, Sundays
l:lo nignt.
FOR BOSTON VIA HARTFORD AND N. Y. & N.
E. R. R 2:30 a. m. dailv.
FOR HARTFORD. SPRINGFIELD AND MERIDEN,
ETC. 12:15 night. 1:0S night 2:30 a. m to
Hartford, 6:5a, 8:00, 10:25, "11:05 a. m., 12:10
noon, l:10, 3:12, 4:0(1 (5:5." to tiarttord), o:26,
8:12 p. m. Sundays 1:08 Bight, 6:26 p. m.
FOR NEW LONDON, ETC 12:45 night, 8:08,
10:25. 10:35 a. m. 3:15, 4:10, 5:00. 6:18 p. m.
(!:00 p. m. train to Guilford goes no farther.)
Sundavs 12:45 night.
VTAB. StN. Y. AIR LINE DIVISION for Middle
town, ' Willimantic, Etc. Leave New Haven for
an stations at 8:l;j a. m., 1:3., b:2u p. m, con
nect at Middletown with Conn. Valley R. R.
and at Willimantic with N. Y. & N. E. and N. L.
& N. R. R., at Turnerville with Colchester
Branch. Trams arrive in New Haven at 8:00 a.
m., 1:22, 8:29 p. m.
E. M. REED, Vice President.
Express trains.
tLocal Express.
Flows from the Maximum Mineral Fountain of Sara
toga Springs, and is in the opinion of the most emi-
stination. Dvsnensia. Tornid I-dVer. Inactive Condi
tions of the Kidneys, and a most salutary alterative
in scrofulous affections. With ladies, gentlemen
and bon vivants everywhere it has become the
standard ot dietary expedients, lortuymg tne aiges
tive functions ana enabling free livers to indulge
with impunity at the table. The world of wealth,
intelligence and refinement testifies to its sparkling,
naturallv pure and delightful qualities as the bev
erage incomparable, and accredit it with being the
surest and spediest source of their clear complex
ions, high and exuberant spirits. HATHORN
SPRING WATER is sold only in glass bottles; four
dozen pints are packed in a case. It may be ob
tained at all hotels, and of druggists, wine mer-
cnants ana grocers everywnere. myz
WE HAVE COMPLETED
Our arrangements for a
SUPERIOR STOCK
OF
FERTILIZERS !
Including brands from the. following well known
manufacturers.
Quinnipiac Fertilizer Co.,
II. J. Baker & Co.,
Mapes Formula and Peruvian
Guano Co.,
E. Frank Coe,
J. It. King & Co.,
Lester Bros.
Our aim this season will be to sell only goods that
we can guarantee, and to make our prices as low as
consistent with the quality.
Farmers and market gardeners intending pur
chases in this line should secure our lowest prices,
as we have made a marked reduction in Dry Fish
Guanos. Complete Manures.
Call on or address
R. B. Bradley & Co.,
No. 406 State Street.
jytO gawaw '
E (BEFORE.) 7jS-rKHLl
LECTRO-VOLTAIC BELT and other Klictwo
irrAJ35ft',cS?n,?:? sent "n 30 Day"' Trial TO
UJ?0"". NEBVors Debility, Lost Vitality,
Wastoo Weaknesses, and all those diseases of a
PEKSOKAi Natohe, resulting from abuses and
E5LDS.ES- - Speedy relief and complete
restoration to Health, Visok and Manhood
Guaranteed. Bend at ouce for Illustrated
Pamphlet free. Address
VOLTAIC BKI.T CO.. Marshall, Btleh.
I r For Men. Quick, mi, a.f.. Book ftwo,
W I Vt V OlTUl. AjUiej, lflO r HUB Sk, Nw ToiX.
Sawclcrs' (Snide.
NEW HAVEN STEAMBOAT CO
DAILY LINE FOR NEW YORK.
. Fare 1, .Including Berth.
TICKETS FOR THE ROUND TRIP $1.50.
The steamer C. H. NORTH 4-vr r't;,. it x
Peck, will leave New Haven nt. i Sun
days excepted. State rooms sold at office of' Peck
is. Bisnop, flK unspei street, and at Klock's Druir
Store,.corner of Chapel and Church streets.
Steamer CONTINENTAL, Captain Stevens, leaves
New Haven at 10:15, Sundays excepted.
from ptew ion met', n. rsuKmAM leaves Peck
Slip at 3 p. m., CONTINENTAL at 11 o'clock p. m.,
Sundays excepted Saturday night at 'i oxjlock
midnight.
Sunday Kiglit Boat for Now York
The Steamer NEW HAVEN. Captain Walter f!..
Post, leaves New Haven at 10;80 p. rn. State rooms
sold at the Elliot House. Free Stage from Insur
ance Building, Chapel street, commencinjr at 9 p. nt.
l levels sola ana tsagpage cnecJtea tnrougn to mil
fcdelphia. (both routes), Baltimore and Washington.
oxo ja:nta n. waku, Agent.
TO AND FROM NEW YORK
SrXDAY BOAT.
Commencing SumLay, July 13.
THE Steamer Elm City will leavV New Haven at
9 o'clock a. m.. retiiminc Imva .New York from
Peck slip, E. R., at 11 p. m., arriving . New Haven
at an early hour Monday morning. jy7tf
AffOHOB, LINE,
U. R. MAIL STEAMSHIPS
Sail from New York every Saturdav for4
GLASGOW via LONDON DERkVi'
Cabin rassaee ?fi0 to $80. Second Class $35. 8tet'r
age, Passge (to or from) $15.
Liverpool and
Queenstown Service
From Pier No. 41. N. R., New York
AUSTRAL sails July 26, Aue. 23. Sept 20
CITY OF ROME sails Alljr. 11, Sep. H, Oct. 4.
Superb accommodations for all classes of rjassen-
gers.
Cabin passage $60 to $100. according to accommo-
dations. Second Class $40, Steerage as above.
For passage, Cabin Plans, Book of Rates, etc., ap
ply to
HENDERSON BROTHERS, New York
jr luivAKu iwivmss, WW Chapel Street.
BUNNELL & SCRANTON, 216 Chapel St.
11
m9
-Vnlional I A tie of Kleniiniliin.
BETWEEN NEW YORK, LIVERPOOL, QUEENS
TOWN AND LONDON DIRECET.
Sailing weekly from Pier 39, North River, New
lork, are among the largest steamships crossing
the Atlantic. Cabin rates. SS0 to $100: Excursions
at special rates; outward steerage $17. and pre
paid steerage tickets $19. ' Being $2 lower than
most other lines." New steamship America's firs
trip to Ifew York, 6 days. 15 hours and 41 minutes
F "V .T Hl'RSiT Mnnm.
Agents at New Haven, BUNNELL ,t SCR ANTON
r. FTTZPATRTf'K" A IIIMTTCTI'D nL-nuni?
w.
M. DOWNES & SON, E. DOWNES.
all 73t
STARIN'S LINE.
Daily Except Saturday.
Leave New Haven from Starin's Dock at 10:15 p
m. The JOHN H. STARIN. Captain McAlister
every Sunday. Tuesday and Thursday. The ERAS
TUS CORNING, Captain Spoor, every Monday
Wednesday and Friday.
Returning leave New York from Pier 18. foot of
Cortlandt street, at 9 p. m. the STARIN every
Monday, Wednesday and Friday; the CORNING
every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. The only
bunday night boat from New York. "
Fare, with berth in cabin, $1; stateroom $1. Ex
cursion tickets $150.
Free Coach leaves the depot on arrival of Hart
ford train. Leaves corner of Church and Chapel
streets every half hour, commencing at H:30 p. m.
Tickets and State Rooms can be purchased at L.
E. Ryder's, No. 276 Chapel street, nt the Tontine
Hotel, or of the Downes News Co., 351 Chapel street,
and at the International Exchange. 31 Center street.
C. Ja. Cl KLIN, Agent,
. New Haven, Conn.
m20
PRATT'S
ASTRAL OIL!
Was the first sale and reli
able Illuminating Oil for
family use ever made. Af
ter fifteen years' trial, and
annual sales of many mil
lions of gallons, no injury
to person or property lias
ever resulted from its use.
In addition to its essential
quality of absolute safety it
ranks as the best Illuminating-
Oil in the world.
lie suretoinsistthat deal
ers furnish you with the
genuine artiele.
PRATT MANUFACTURING CO.,
NEW YORK CITY.
Sole Proprietors and Manufacturers.
FOR SALE BY
KIMBERLY, STODDARD & CO.,
WHOLESALE DEALERS,
New Haven, Conn.
The Astral is particularly adapted for use in Oil
Stoves, on account of its absolute safety and free
dom from odor. jeiilwasaeowwlp
JVEW HAVE"
WINDOW SHADE CO.,
MANUFACTURER OF
WINDOW SHADES,
And Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
Turcoman Curtains,
Madras Curtains,
Xiacc Curtains,
Cornices, Cornice Poles, Etc.
By making a specialty of these goods we are able
to show tho largest assortment, and offer all goods
In our line at VERY LOW PRICES.
In order to make way for our new Fall Patterns
we have laid out 500 pairs DADO SHADES, in odd
lots of one to five pairs, which we will close out
without regard to cost of manufacture.
MR. L. B. JUDD will have charge of our Drapery
and Shade work, and orders by postal or telephone
will receive prompt atention.
New Haven Window Shade Co.
694 CHAPEL STREET,
BELOW THE BRIDGE.
N. B. Store closed evenings, except Monday and
Saturday. jylO
REMOVAL.
We have removed to our new
Building-
Nos. 821-823 Grand Street,
Which is very spacious, well lighted, and four en
tire floors on which to display our new styles of "
Furniture of all Kinds.
We are now carry a very large stock and will be
able to meet the demands of our constantly increas
ing trade.
THE SAME LOW PRICES
And Liberal Terms as have here
tofore been the feature of
or this establishment.
P. J. KELLLY & CO.,
CTos. 8Q1 and 828
GRAND STREET.
Household Ammonia.
In the Toilet, Nursery, Laundry or House Cleaning
insures health, beauty and cleanliness.
For safe by
J. D. DEWELL & CO.,
m37eod3ms and all Grocers.
A Training Class for Kin tcrgart
ners. Will nnu, in T,"- n. f t- . i M
., ... i.n navcil, Willi.. OCUWlUWr .1. H OT
circulars address MISS ANGELINE BROOKS, 15
flume nww. new raaven, l OI1U.
ft iiiLim, IT r T 1 T-
si
.

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