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Morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven [Conn.]) 1848-1894, July 28, 1884, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015483/1884-07-28/ed-1/seq-3/

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July 28, 1884.
mm$ mtml mi &mmx.
VOL. LII.
OVA
Jfrcciat Notices.
' (TVUbtnv
Will during till week make
very low prices on all kinds of
Sammer Good.
Reductions In every part of the
tore. Nothing will be reserved.
A lot of French Jerseys that sold
early in ticason easily at S8.50 ;
will close them out for 5.50. .
The prices we have made on
Paruxolft during last week have
reduced the stock much, but we
have a large stock still.
764 ,xcl 768 Oliapel St.
Mexi o,r
HAMMOCKS.
tixe: most
Also a Large Stock of Chinese Pans, Lanterns, Etc.
AT
G. J. MOFFATT'S Paper Warehouse,
49B. 497, 499 and SOX State Street.
1865 oJ 1884 I
nfH ''TTr--''-" i"i
PIANOS TO RENT !
A full set of
SECOND-HMD BAND INSTRUMENTS
lor sale very clieap. A Large Stoek of Drums for the Campaign al
ways on band.
O. :., IjOOMIS.
goaitl mid -blooms.
BOAKI) AND ROOIHS.
je A FEW arentlemen can be accommodated
EHiTTTT rrith fli-ct-jilnca hnril OTl Tlen.Rnt rnOTTlR With
Jbkraouern improvements.
Locality second to
limit in the pitv Terms moderate. ADDlV at
jea lm y WOOSTEK PLACE.
GREAT
MIDSUMMER
Closing-Out Sale
OF
CORSETS, HOOP SKIRTS
AND-
BUSTLES
IN OUR
CORSET DEPARTMENT,
Bolton & Neely,
SUCCESSORS
E. MAIjIjEIl & CO.
jyi4
University of Buffalo,
T i n AD I 'nCUTCTDT I VlDVCB TVI A IN 1VII
, Corner Main and !
1N1A STREETS, f
, N. Y., May 26, 18S3.J
V IRQ1NIA
BUFFALO:
Messrs. A. Heller & Bro.:
Gentlemen I have carefully analyzed the sam
ples of Hungarian "Wines submitted to me by you,
and find them to be perfectly pure, unwc:oU, "i
fortified, unadulterated in every sense. They are,
moreover, most pleasing to the palate, and possess
qualities which render them very valuable as mild
stimulants.
I am, gentlemen,
Yours most respectfully,
R. A. WITTHAUS, A. M., M. D.
Prof, of Physiological Chemistry, University of
New York.
Prof, of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of
Buffalo.
Prof, of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of
Vermont.
I am Sole Agent in the cw Eng
land Stales
FOR THE IMPORTING HOUSE OF
A. HELLER & BRO.,
BUDA PEST AND NEW YORK.
I keep in stock all grades of
IIUfJGARIMI VINES,
Including the celebrated TOKAY WINES.
H. J. REYNOLDS,
Nos. 152 & 154 Crown St.
Xcw Haven, Conn.
jyJB
A single dose of SANFORD'S RADICAL CURE in
stantly relieves the most violent sneezing or Head
Cold, clears the Head as by Magic, stops watery
discharges from the Nose and Eyes, prevent Ring
ing Noises in the Head, cares Nervous Headache,
and subdues Chills and Fever. In Chronic Ca
tarrh it cleanses the nasal passages of foul mucus,
restores the sense of smell, taste and hearing when
affected, frees the head, throat and bronchial tubes
of offensive matter, sweetens and purifies the
breath, stops the Cough and arrests the progress of
Catarrh towards Consumption.
One bottle Radical Cure, one box Catarrhal Sol
vent and Sanf ord's Inhaler, all in one package, form
ing a complete threatment, of all druggists for $1.
Ask for SANFORD'S RADICAL CURE.
POTTER DRUG AND CHEMICAL CO., BOSTON.
-mi I I k r ft For the relief and prevention the
lt lfYA' rVKTATiT TT IS APPr.TFn.nf rhi-
v y VOLTAIC matism,Neuralgia,Sciatica, Coughs
KVwUy Colds, Weak Back, Stomach and
yWHp Bowels. Shooting pains, numbness,
-y.,JV Dyspepsia, Liver Complaint, Bil
vxSAV ious Fever, Malaria and Epidem
?3C ics, use COLLINS' PLASTERS, an
Ai r'fTRl cVvELECTRIC BATTERY combined
E 7 ewith a POROUS PLASTER, and
"ij$E.I laugh at paint 2Tx; everywhere.
ml5mathaw
Ptaroftalo Homori hm
been cared, are being cored daily
by the uso of Vegetine. We can
show testimonials or refer you to
the parties In proof of till.
lyyspepsla and all the mrploa.
meic ot jjuugetuuu mv m. wju
relieved by the use of Vegetine.
Salt llaeum and all diseases
of tho 8k iu disappear when Vege-
uoe itu ini any useu.
For Liver and Kidney
Complaint you will And Vege
Uue a inoct valuable remedy.
Oh bow tired I am " to
o often heard. An impure con
dition of the blood will always pro
duce tlite feeling and it Is sure to be
relieved by the use of Vegetine.
Ia Ie who have used Vegetine,
an4 the cumber of Rich la large, are
fuiitft in its praise as a remedy for
tacosoi peculiar to their sex.
Vervem Sufferer yoq can
cse nothing so sre to turuldh roa
frep and reM 06 VegeUner
Vegetine is sold by all Druggists.
Hiprii wines
- -
gpccitil Notices.
Ask for Remnants. Many de
irable lengths may be had at
half price.
White Made-up Dresses at low
er prices than cost of simple mak
ing. White and Ecru Robes at great
ly reduecd prices. Look at them.
Linen Lawns, Satines, Cham
brays, Ginghams, Cambrics and
Prints, closing out at a reduced
prices.
HAMMOCKS
ORGANS TO RENT !
LADIES' RIDING CLUB!
RINK 38 1 TEMPLE ST.
OFFICE HOURS: 10:30 to 11:30 a. m, 3 to 5 p.m.
jelTm
PICNICS,
Excursions and Fishing Parties.
Tlie Sleriner Ivcriiia
HAVING recently been painted and improved will
be let fur picnics, excursions and fishing parties.
Sunday schools or family parties carried with com
fort and safety, and landed at different points along
the shore. Can be chartered for moonlight excur
sions on the Sound. For information address
J. E. BISHOP & CO.,
I 293 North Front Street,
Fair Haven, Conn.
Also telephonic communication. Fish lines and
bait furnished to parties wishing them. jy!2 12t
STARIN'S GLEN ISLAND.
America's Day Summer Resort !
TWO GRAND CONCERTS DAILY.
DILLER'S MILITARY BAM.
SUPERIOR DINNERS A LA CARTE.
Klein D eutschland !
THE STEAMER
JOHN H. STARIN,
CAPT. MCALLISTER,
Will make the first trip TUESDAY. JULY 8th, and
from this date till the close of the season will make
TWO TRIPS WEEKLY
To Glen Island and Return.
Every Tuesday and Thursday,
From StarhVs Pier, foot of Brewery street (live
minutes' walk from Railroad Depot) at 8:30 a. m.
sharp. Returning leave GLEN ISLAND at 3:30 p.
m., arriving in New Haven in time to connect with
8 o'clock train.
Excursion tickets (New Haven to Glen Island and
return) - .... 75c.
New Haven to New York and return via Glen
Island and Pier 18, North river ... $1.50.
single tickets to Glen Island - 50c.
Fare from Glen Island to New Haven - 50c.
THOMAS WILL FURNISH THE MUSIC ON THE
BOAT EVERY TRIP.
No intoxicating drinks obtainable on this steamer.
Glen Island is officered by efficient uniformed police.
Ladies and Children unattended will find nothing to
mar their pleasure.
positively no iree 11st. u. M. COJNB.UJN,
je30tf Agent, Starin's Pier.
Acknowledged the finest excursion steamer eve
run from New Haven.
THE SUPERB STEAMER
PIIILADELPIIIA,
(Capacity 600 Passengers)
FOR
BRADFORD POIXT
AND
TIII3IBLE ISLANDS.
DAILY.
I,ea,ve Belle Dock at 9:45 a. m. and 2:45 p. m.
Leave Islands at 12:15 and 5:15 p. m.
Leave Branford Point at 1:05 and 6:05 o. m.
FARE EACH WAY - 25 CENTS.
Special low rates for excursions. For moonlierht
sails this steamer is unexcelled. Address
jyl F. W. HINMAN, City.
FRUIT BUYERS ATTENTION!
THURSDAY, JULY 24th.
The first lot of fine Watermelons, large size, at
35e each. Warranted to cut ripe.
a lew ilea currants 10 arrive uus (.xnursaay;
morning at 7c lb Ubs (or 25c.
a iew large ripe pines at 3c eacn.
LEMONS. NOTICE. LEMONS.
Another lot of fine juicy lemons, only 13c dozen.
Lemons were never so cheap in July before.
Red Astracan Apples for eating at 35c peck.
Pie Squash makes the finest pies, only 4c lb.
NOTICE ! NOTICE!
Please bear in mind that the price quoted for fruit
and vegetables is subject to change, as we have to
buy every day and shall sell as low as possible.
VEGETABLES, VEGETABLES.
New Sweet Corn to-day at 30c dozen.
New Potatoes $1.50 per bushel, 40e peck.
Long Island Cabbage, the largest you ever saw, 8
to 10c each.
Native Beets, the handsomest in market, only 4c
bunch.
Butter Beans and String Beans only 35c peck.
Long Island Cucumbers 1 and 2c each.
Squash very low.
Java Rice, the finest cooking Rice in market,
cooks as white as snow, only 8c lb.
Molasses at 35c and 45c gal, the best Ponce at 50c
gal.
BUTTER. BUTTER.
We never get tired of telling you about our
Creamery Butter. The quality is growing better
every week and trade constantly increasing, which
speaks for itself. Butter is higher, but we sell it
at 25c lb, 4 lbs for $1. 53 tubs to arrive to-day.
We receiveived 40 tubs last Thursday. How is that
for Butter? And still another! Our Momaja Cof
fee at 25c lb. Try it: and don't forget
D. M. WELCH & SON,
Nos. 2S and 30 Congress Avenue.
E3FWest Haven Monday and Thursday, Westville
flioiiuay ana l-uesaay. jy
TRANSFER PROCESS
FOR
TING
o o
Useful for printing Circulars, Postal Cards, Price
Lists, Bills of Fare, Envelopes, Examination Pa
pers, Music, Designs, Diagrams, Portraits, Spec
ifications, etc.
This process affords a highly instructive amuse
ment lor young peopie in copying portraits, iana
scapes, etc. Send for price list ana specimens.
AGENTS WANTED.
COGSWELL & GAFFEY,
STENOGRAPHERS,
811 Chapel Street, New Haven, Conn,
THE" PEOPLE LIKE IT !
What more refreshing and satisfying than a cup of
COFFEE OR TEA
when the goods come from
DawKon's Popular Store,
344 STuSLTSU ST.,
Yale Rank: Building.
Ther sell at low nriraa
AT DAWSON'S,
And Clve A Good Article.
COFFEES ROASTED DAILY.
Jy26
Cheapest place in the city to buy wood by the cord,
half cord, quarter cord or barrel. Orders by mail
or leiepnone wiu receive prompt au-eiiuuu,
NEW HAVEN WOOD YARD.
noHtfl . EAST ST.. OPP, MYRTLE.
ml Estate.
FOR SALE,
THE Stock and Fixture of a flnrt-claa! fruit
tore on the best thoroughfare in the city, do
in? a good business. Will be sold cheap to a
caul Duyer. other business toe cause oi selling.
Address J. B., Lock Box 180,
Jy220t Mew Haven Postofflce.
LOTS FOR SALE.
M SIX valuable Building lots on Nash street,
between Eagle and Willow streets. Lots each
AOxlKS. Terms easy. One-half or more can
remain.
Also a lot on Eagle street, 100 feet front, and
a large triangular piece of land In the rear. Forpar-
uuuuuivwm AAnniii DneoijiauiHiunice,
jy 759 Chapel Street.
FOR RENT.
THE Brick House 106 Martin street; has 8
rooms; large yard; very convenient; $22 per
month. HENRY TROWBRIDOk.
jyga agawtr
FOR SALE,
A SMALL BUSINESS PROPERTY on Mead-
.street. Will make terms easy.
T. O. Sloan & Son,
Room 3, Benedict Bnlldlna;.
tOPEN EVENINGS.
Jyg4
FOR RENT.
M TO a good tenant, first floor of house 675
State street, at a low price. Also two tene
ments on Orchard street. Inquire at 146
Crown street. GLOSLN HALL.
jyatf
THOMAS O'BRIEN & CO
Real Estate and Loan Agents,
800 CHAPEEL STREET.
$50,000 to loan at 5 and C per cent, in sums to suit.
For sale, double house and lot, 60x150 on Chapel
street, for $7,500. Small house and large lot on Ver
non street for $3,500. Large two family house on
Orchard street, opposite Charles street, for $2,250
a bargain. A small honse and large lot on Congress
avenue; will be sold for much less than it is worth,
as the owner is leaving the city. Two houses on
Wallace street, near Grand, for sale very cheap.
tjOfflce open every evening. j2
FOR SALE,
tA FINE residence in West Haven on First
avenue, containing 11 rooms, also barn, hen
nery, bath house and all necessary outbuild
ings, in good repair; well stocked with fruit trees
and grapevines. Lot, 340 feet front with a depth of
50 feet, the rear facing the harbor. Also a house
and lot on Water street. Lot 95 feet front, running
back to the channel 320 feet deep; a good location
for a business enterprise desiring a wharf privilege.
For price, &c, call on or address
a 1. 1 r.tt a. -! a i ,
j23 West Haven Conn.
FOR RENT.
MONE front room, 73x38, on fourth floor of
Quinnipiac Building, No. (598 Chapel street.
Very desirable for a light manufacturing bus
iness, oremises beine suDDlied with steady oower.
steam heat and elevator for freight. Lighted on
tnree sides, isiay oe leasea ror a term or years.
HENRY F. ENGLISH.
m29 2m - 92 Orange Street.
FOR RENT,
M. FIVE rooms Fo. 553 State street, water clos
efc' gas water; and five rooms corner
lU!L South and Park streets. Inquire at No. 792
Chapel street. Room 2. JACOB HELLER.
myz
BUILDING LOTS FOR SALE !
f. MONEY furnished to assist men in buiiding
ULhouses.
R. E. BALDWIN'S
REAL ESTATE AGENCY, 818 CHAPEL STREET.
j27daw
FOR SALE.
tNo. 250 James street, just north of Grand
street, on a lot 35x100, a nearly new seven
room house that can he occunied hv two Rmall
families. The enftre premises have been well cared
for and are in first-class order. Price $2,000.
FOR REM.
The Grand Street Liverv Stables (old number 182
formerly occupied by Allen Seaman. The premises
are modern and desirable in all respects and in per
fect order. Tnere are accommodations tor tnirty
six horses and ample storage.f or the carriage outfit.
A low price for the rental will be made to a respon
sible tenant.
FOR RET.
Thirteen houses and thirtv-one tenements in vari
ous parts of the city.
trupea evenings.
HORACE P. HOADLE1',
jlp HOADLEY BUILDING.
N VIEW of the opening of the new railroad to
West Haven there will be some call for
Building Lots.
IJiave a tract of land, finely situated, close bv
West Haven Green, on Church street, 400 feet front
and 200 feet deep, which I will sell at $5 per front
foot, or will take less for the whole of it. There is
nothing1 else so favorably located that can be bought
nearly as low. EDWARD A. RAY.
aziti ;
REALTY EXCHAME!
Houses, Lots, Rents, Loans.
For rent, houses, tenements and stores in crood lo
calities.
For sale or exchange Property for business pur
poses within four minutes1 walk of postofflce. Fifty
choice lots on Kelsey and Ridge avenues, West
Haven. Call at once.
F. M. ElVTISOV.
Room 4, Glebe Building;, corner Church and Chapel
streets.
ml 9 OFFICE OPEN EVENINGS.
FOR SALE,
ffiffjk. A NUMBER of good iota in different parts
mi of the city; price low.
i&yJL A fine house with all the improvements, lo
cated in the center of the city; can be seen at any
time.
FOR KET,
A number of good Houses aud Tenements.
Money to loan in amounts to accommodate. Call
at
NO. 70 CHURCH STREET, ROOM 2.
Ks?"70ffice open evenings from 7 to 8.
L. F. C OM STOCK.
je28
FOR SALE,
$- TWO family house on Sylvan avenue, $800
mVi cash required. Two family house on Jackson
jliiiilLstreet, $350 cash required.
niHtf GEO. A. ROOT, 808 Chapel St.
A. M. HOLMES,
HOUSE MOVER,
HAS for rent the 2d floor of house No. 83
Houston St., $10 per month. Half of house
No. 4. Lewis St. 190 Clinton Ave., 1st floor.
10 oer month. Half of House 177 Meadow St.. $15
per month. 2d floor No. 12NewhallSt.. $8 per month.
and two rents on Ivy St., for $8 per month each.
Also for sale houses 78 Woolsev St.. 190 Clinton Ave..
29 Auburn St., and Atwater St., on easy terms.
i& w antea i nircy more nouses to rent.
mat WFLUEGU UJHL U KUJti HIKJiJST.
HINMAN'S REAL ESTATE
AND LOAN AGENCY.
Money to loan at 5 per cent.
Property in all parts of the city for sale. Seashore
residences and lots at Savin Rock Shore and West
Haven. The beautiful Savin Rock, mcluding sev
eral acres of natural grove. This is the finest loca
tion for a hotel or residence in the State and will be
sold at a bargain. L. B. HINMAN
mya unurcn st.
FOR RENT.
Several nice House .
Tenements For Rent.
A lot of first-class Tenements, $10 to $30 per month.
Fire insurance policies given in the best companies
and none others.
Those who are changing their residences this
spring would do well to call. We will insure your
r ui uiLure wr Jewelling cwu uie LunAOi ruooiOLiti
RATES.
Property placed in our hands will be properly
taken care of.
Repairs made at lowest rates by competent work
men.
Rents Collected
II. C. LONG'S AGENCY,
63 CHURCH STREET.
Open Evanings. Opposite Postofflce. a25tf
R. TL HOOKER.
19 Exchange Building.
HAS FOR RENT
First floor on Cedar street. -Second
floor on Saltonstall Avenue.
First floor on Sylvan ji venue.
First floor on Poplar street.
First floor on Goffe street.
First floor on Stanley street.
Second floor on Whalley avenue.
Farm in Farir Haven.
Also a large house on High street, 14 rooms, finely
iuiuiaucu,iui luijiiuYBiucuu), LJL 1 CUt J.OI lillV OGtMOUU.
at price ot uof urnished.
W. C. WARREN, Manager of renting and collect
ing department. m27.
DECORATIVE PAPER HANGINGS.
PAINTS, OILS, GLASS, ETC.
rJLATT & THOMPSON,
66 Orange st, and 5 Center St.
CASH DOES IT:
My trade has more than doubled since I bet-an to
sell for cash. But then, J pell so miloh cheaper.
Look at the prices this week. wtr.
FLiOURI ' FLOUR! FLOUR!
L - "i"ur uueap as mis store. The Terr
rba$ P6r a8S7 P51" bbl and good flour for 80c
TEA ! TEA ! ! TEA ' ! !
r.42L"foJ'-mce JaP; try Jt' 1 'wars kept good
Oofelt is now better and cheaper than ever
? V.TTFB ' BUTTER ! ! - BUTTER I ! 1
Oood Butter. Best at 28c lb. Call nd see me, (
97 WHALLET ATENIIE.
tGooda delivered anywhere. Telephone..
E. S. STEVENS,
jy5
CREAMERY BUTTERED FLOUR
Hakes delicious biscuits. Try a package S2c
Litchfield County Butter. pautage-assc
Simsbury Creamery Butter.
Selected Smoked Halibut, just received.
D. S. COOPER,
l?85 3 T8 STATE STREET.
Local Weather Record.
roa July 87, 1884. .
T:16 11:18 S:1C 7:19 11:18
A. M. A.U. p. a. F.M. P.M.
Barometer 29.99 29.97 80.90 89.81 89.80.
Therrnometer...6-l . 7S 64 80 fig
Humidity. 00 08 84 98 98
Wind, in direction
and velocity in
miles per hour. . E 5 SE 18 E IS NE 11 N 15
Weather Ha'y Cl'dy Rain Rain Rain
Mean bar., 89.90; mean temp., 88.; mean humid
ity, 89.
Max. temp., 74.; mm. temp., SB.; rainfall .87
inches.
Max. velocity of wind, 17 miles.
FOR JULY 87, 1883.
Mean bar., 80.18; mean temp.,71 .; mean humid-
iky. ID. I
Max temp., TT.; min. temp., 81.
J. H. SHERMAN, Sergt 8. C. U. 8. A.
A minus sign prefixed to thermometer read
ings indicates temperature below zero.
I A dash 1 prefixed to rainfall figures indicates
precipitation too smau to
MINIATURE ALMANAC.
JULY 86.
Sun Rises,
Bun Sets,
4:471
7:16
Moon Sets.
10: 5
Hioh Wathr,
3:18
BIRTHS.
KELSEY In this city, July 86th, a son to John A.
ana ,mma j. &.eisey.
MARRIAGES.
HASTINGS WORTH In Providence, July 86th,
by Rev. J. Joy, Manning D. Hastings of Middle-
town, to jxiiss sn. r. vft worm ot Jrrovidence.
DEATHS.
CHIPMAN In this city, July 27th, Freddie C, eld
est son of Dwight and Ella Chipnian, aged 11
veara.
Funeral services will be held at No. 49 Pine street
to-day (Monday) at 4 o clock. Relatives and
friends are respectfully invited to attend without
iuroner notice.
HAYDEN In Brooklyn, N. Y., July 25th, John C.
Harden, acred 77 vears.
Burial at the Evergreen cemetery at 3 o'clock Mon
day, juiy sasin, on wie arrival ot tne 1 p. m, train
SNIDER In this city, July 25th, Ida N. WUber,
wife of E. Frank Snider, aged 26 years.
Funeral from her late residence, 230 Oak street, to
day (Monday) at 2 d. m.
ALLING In Hamden, July 25th, Charlotte E-, wife
v nicvwre xj. jumig, agea xo years ana iu
STANFORD In this city, July 25th, Matthew Stan-
f.-A ;n ..e l. : . .
J11UULUX.
Veteran Firemen. Attention '
A MEETING of your association will be held at
your hall. MONDAY EVENINO. 28th Inst t
8 o'clock, to consider the question of having an Ex
cursion, or the Reunion. A prompt attendance is
requested.
rer oraer, HIRAM CAMP, President.
Albert R. Goqdxow, Sec'y. jysi8 It
SHORTHAND !
EVERY person should be able to write short
hand. It is becoming indispensable in business
in our courts and in newspaper offices, besides being
a valuable aeconiDlishment in evrv dnv !ifv Tt. ia
the best capital a young man can have. For young
ladies it opens a field both pleasant and profitable.
We will teach you by mail at reduced rates. Send
for our "Compendium of Self -Instruction" and learn
this art at home. Hundreds have done it. You can
doit. $1.00 post paid. Circulars free.
COGSWELL'S
SCHOOL OF PHONOGRAPHY,
NEW HAVEN, COBW.
jy28
Lowell, Mass., February 21, '84-.
For a long time, and from some
unknown cause. I have been troub
led with a lame back, also a tired
feeling-on arising in the morning.
I bought a bottle of Burdock Blood
Bitters and before it was used my
back was much better, as well as
my whole system. I think it a fine
medicine.
F. H. Ciiirr.
Providence, R. I., April 4, '84-.
1 have been troubled with Dyspep
sia for four years and could not
eet relief; finally tried' Burdock
Blood Bitters and received im
mediate relief. It is a splendid
medicine for Dyspepsia.
Chas. R. Sweet,
No. 65 William street.
Parkersburg,W.Va., March 4-, '84.
I have been using Burdock Blood
Bitters for boils and sores on my
face, and by using the Burdock
have removed all eruptions so that
my face is clear; this was done in
a remarkably short time, little
over one week.
Cbas. Anderson.
Lancaster, Pa., March 3, '84.
For many years I have been
troubled with Bilious Disorder to
the extent that I was scarcely ever
without a severe headache at night.
I was restless and seldom enjoyed
a comfortable night's sleep. A
short time ago I commenced the
use of Burdock Blood Bitters: my
headache disappeared and I have
no more sleepless nights.
Mrs,. Daniel H. Hkrr.
jy28d&wlw
THE BEST EVER PRODUCED,
IS THE "
"EIGHMIE PATENT SHIRT,"
And can only be had of
T. I. MERWIX,
SOLE AGENT FOR NEW HAVEN.
Office at Residence. No. 28 College street. Postal
orders promptly filled. jy36
OIL PAINTINGS.
Just received, another consignment of those fine
Oil Paintings for $2.87
AT
NORTHROP'S,
697 CHAPEL STREET.
jy2C Just below the Bridge.
FINE SHIRTS
TO ORDER
E. MERWIN'S SON
383 STATE STREET,
Established 1857.
BROADWAY CASH STORE,
10O BBLS. BEST NEW PROCESS FLOUR, only
$7 a barrel, or 90c a bag. This flour gives the best
satisfaction of any in market. Warranted to suit
everyone, or money returned. ' Fresh country Eggs
21c a dozen. Best New York State Elgin Creamery
Butter 28c lb, 4 lbs for $1. Fancy New Orleans Mo
lasses 60c a gallon. Very nice Porto Rico Molasses
45c a gallon. New Potatoes, large Long Island, 5c a
quart will be lower in a few days. Extra large
Beets 4c a bunch. Native Beans 85c a peck, 5c a
quart. Large Native Cabbage 5-7c each. Messina
Lemons 15c dozen. 8 lbs best Carolina Rice for 25c.
3 quarts best State Beans for 25c. 3 lbs Tapioca
for 25c. Macaroni in 1-lb packages 15c. Rising Sun
Stove Polish 6c each. Try 1 lb of our best JAVA
COFFEE, only 25c a lb. Also our TEAS cannot be
beat. Only 50e and 60c lb for the very best in mar
ket. AAso
IT! eat Sold at Wholesale Prices.
Come in: Come all! Come early!
PAUL .IKVTK & BROS.,
lOl AND 10T BROADWAY.
Jy28
SPRING CHICKENS!
PRICE REDUCED.
Prime Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Fresh Pork.
FRESH SALMON,
Halibut, Sword fish, Bluensh, Sea Bass, Blackflsh,
Fresh Mackerel, Codfish, Haddock, Lobster, Round
and Long Clams.
Stony Creek and Lighthouse Oysters opened to
order.
Sugar Cured Pork Hams, Breakfast Bacon, Smoked
and Dried Beef, Fulton Market Smoked and
Pickled Beef Tongues.
Native Squash, String Beans. Tomatoes, Cauliflow
ers, Cabbages, Beets, Cucumbers.
AIL AT LOW PRICES.
SOS and. 507 STATE STREET,
JUDSON BROTHERS,
PACKING AND PROVISION CO.
jy9 : -
SECURITIES FOR SALE.
25 shares New Haven Gas Stock.
25 shares National Tradesmen's Bank Stock.
1.500 New Haven & Derby R. R. 1st Mortgage Ta.
25 shares Southern N. E. Telephone Stock.
, 15 shares Merchants' Bank Stock.
-BY
1VCAI.ISTER 4c WARREN,
jy25 3t 8 T Orange Street.
ENDORSED BY EMLHEST PHYSIGIAKS
FOR
INFANTS, INVALIDS,
AND THE AGED.
Royal Dietamia
-o
MEDICINAL NUTRITIVE FOOD
cra,n 3VO 9V7.
It has bean received with decided favor by prominent
members of the medical prof easlon of tha United States.
It contains all the elements necessary to supply the waste
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puatable.
THE BABIES ALL LIKE IT.
Royal Dietamia is pure In its Ingredients, nourishing
in fevers, promotes sleep and sustains the strength of
the patient. It Is wonderful for children ass snbatltnte
for mothers' milk.
It may be used as a gruel audit would be difficult to eon
celvs of anything mors delicious as a Perfect Core
for this distressing malady. Ask for Royal Dietamia
and take no other. Consult your physician regarding
ttsmerlta.
SOB BALI ST T.T. DHtJCKJISTTS.
.
Wholesale Agent.
JfBW HATJSX. CONH.
Established 1858.
BUY THE BEST .
AEVIPDEN
PAINT COLOR CO'S
READY 1 AD E PAINTS
SPRINGFIELD, MASS
Sample Cards rarnished bum stpplicmtlo"
News by Telegraph
FROM ALL QUARTERS.
THE CHOLERA RAVAGES.
A Large Number of
Deaths Yesterday.
DANGER, OF ITS SPREAD.
Plans To Keep It Con
fined To France.
A MAMMOTH LAND STEAL.
The Plots Unearthed By a
Detective.
THE CHOLERA.
Precautions Agates Its Outbreak In
Tne English Army.
London, July 27. The Duke of Cam
bridge, commander-in-chief of the forces, has
issued an order to all commanders of mili
tary depots that in view of the possible ap
proach of cholera they instantly select sites
upon which to encamp their troops and be
ready to vacate the barracks at a moment's
notice. They are also required to filter all
water used for drinking or cooking purposes,
to empty dust bins daily and to inspect sew
ers every week. Any failure to observe
these instructions will result in the offender
being court martialed.
Yesterdays Returns From The Deaths.
Pams, July 27. There were thirtv-six
deaths from cholera to-day at Marseilles and
twelve at Aries.
The Record at Toulon.
Paris, July 27. There were twelve deaths
from cholera to-day at Tonlon. The disease
has attacked the troops at Marseilles. The
military hospitals are full of patients and
several deaths have occurred therein.
No Railway Travel With Germany.
Berlin, July 27. Through travel on the
railways between France and Germany has
been suspended until further notice as a pre
caution against cholera.
A HORRIBLE DISEASE.
Singular Complaint Supposed to Have
Been Caused ly Diseased meat.
Chicago, HI., July 27. The surgeons at
the County hospital have under treatment
Mrs. Murphy, twenty-seven years of age, who
is suffering from a horrible disease which
afflicts cattle and is known as "lumpy jaw."
It is in the form of an abscess on her jaw,
and was at first supposed to be an ordinary
abscess, but microscopical examination proves
the contrary. The abscess was found to con
tain vegetable parasites identical with those
found in abscesses oh cattle. It is supposed
to have been caused by eating the meat of
cattle having the disease. An operation will
be performed on Tuesday next. The case
excites some interest, as it is the first one
reported in the United States, though simi
lar cases have already been recorded in Ger
many.
A BATTLE WITH A MADJIA1V.
The Strange Frenzy or a Farm Hand
Who Was Disappointed in Love.
New York, July 27. William Johnson,
of College Point, L. I. , became violently in
sane about four weeks ago because his sweet
heart had refused to have anything further
to do with him. It was only after a des
perate struggle that Johnson was secured and
placed in a padded cell of the Town Hall.
It was intended to send him to an insane
asylum, but after he had been confined in
the cell few days three physicians decided
that he had recovered his reason and that
there would be no fear of danger if he was
allowed to go at large. Johnson was, there
fore, discharged from custody, and leaving
College Point went to work for Charles Cor
nell on the Haviland farm in Little Neck.
He seemed to be all right until 3 o'clock Sat
urday morning, when Mr Cornell's family was
aroused by Johnson, who rushed through the
house brandishing a revolver and an axe. Mr.
Cornell and his family were driven from the
house in their nightclothes and several shots
were fired at them by the madman. He de
molished some of the furniture in the house
and went into the parlor and began to pray
to a large oil painting of a young lady. Every
once in a while he would shout, "Annie, my
darling, how I love you!" In the meantime
the neighbors, who heard the noise, went to
Mr. Cornell's assistance and tried to break
into the house and secure the maniac; but he
kept them all at a distance with theCBvolver.
Constable George Eoe and Officer Herrick
were notified; and they resorted to
strategy to capture Johnson. They
climbed through one of the back windows
of the house and were slowly creeping
on the maniac when he discovered them. He
fired three shots, none of which took effect,
and just as Officer Herrick was about to
pounce on him Johnson dealt him a terrible
blow on the shoulder, inflicting a severe
wound. Before the man could strike a sec
ond blow Roe felled him to the floor with a
heavy wooden chair. The blow stunned
him, and the officers quickly placed him in
irons. He was placed in a room and a care
ful watch kept over him for several hours
until, by order of Judge Van Nostrand, he
was taken, heavily ironed, to the Queens
county court house, Long Island City.
WHOLESALE ARRESTS.
Fifty DIen In Custody For Assaulting
miss Bradley Her Jewelry Recovered.
Pittsburg, Pa., July 27. A wholesale
arrest of the parties supposed to be implicat
ed in the Lizzie Bradley outrage has been
caused by Chief of Police Brown. Over fifty
arrests have been made. A gang of thirty
two laborers employed on the Baltimore and
Ohio railroad were arrested before daylight
this morning. This afternoon detectives ar
rested George Helton (colored), of "West Eliz
abeth, and Robert Grimes, of the same place,
for participation in the outrage, and received
a pair of diamond eardrops from Helton.
Other arrests will be made this afternoon.
The diamond necklace was also recovered,
and now all the jewelry is found. All the
parties arrested were committed to jail for a
hearing next Friday. The woman is better
toiy.
BOTH VESSELS SUNK.
A Schooner and Brig Go Down.
Boston, Mass., July 27. Details have ar
rived of a disaster in the harbor of Port An
tonio, July 19, which resulted in the sinking
of the brig Etta of Kingston,and the schooner
Bertha Watts of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Both
vessels had been chartered to raise the steam
er Calvert, sunk by collision with the steamer
Alpin, a year ago while lying at quarantine.
The brig and schooner were scuttled at the
waters' edge and chains secured to the sunk
en steamer. With the aid of powerful steam
pumps on both vessels the contractors ex
pected to raise the wreck before either vessel
was half pumped out. A short time after
the pumps had been started the spars to
which the hoisting chains were attached gave
away and the brig keeled over towards the
schooner and sunk. In going down her
Bpars caught the masts of the schooner, cap
sizing and sinking her. The 'steamer
and brig now lie in about six fathoms of
water with the schooner on top of them.
"BUG PARDON, SIR."
The Clever Trie It Flayed By Burglars.
Bostow, Mass., July 27. Professional bur
glars last evening relieved the dry goods store
of Alex Patillo at Gloucester of $800 worth
of silks. While they were operating two po
licemen rapped at the door. The burglars
opened the door and told the officers that
they had a busy day and were arranging
stock, whereupon the magnates of the law
left them with a "Beg pardon, sir." After
the discovery of the robbery, Boston officers
were wired and one of the gang giving the
name of Henry G. Edwards, of New York,
was arrested on the 4:20 train for New York
just at it was about to start from the Boston
and Albany station this afternoon. The
goods were found in his possession. . He
steadfastly refused to give his companions
away. The gang is probably the same which
has operated extensively in Boston recently
and which burglarized a jewelry store at
Lynns Friday night.
RAILROAD RCMORI.
Items of Interest to Railroad men.
Boston, July 27. It is generally reported
along the line of the Massachusetts Central
railroad that the Fitchbnrg road will lease
the Central and complete it to Holyoke and
Springfield, also that the New York, New
Haven and Hartford has sent an engineer
over the line for purposes of inspection.
Coventor Robinson Will he There.
Bostok, July 27. At the meetings of the
Massachusetts, Essex, Middlesex and Nor
folk clnb yesterday arrangements were made
to give a complimentary dinner to Blaine and
Logan at an early day at which Governor
xtoDinson will preside.
JUDGE LYNCH GRINDS SLOWLY.
The Row Raised by Boughs.
Minneapolis, July 27. The murder yes
terday of Policeman Robert . Laughlin by
Tony Cautiony, Mart Gonnam and James
Parker, roughs, created intense excitement.
Crowds were gathered all day about the jail
where the prisoners were confined and
threats of lynching were openly made. An
extra guard was put on. By nightfall crowds
began to gather about the jail. It was evi
dent that there would be trouble and the
Mayor ordered the police to be armed with
rifles and sabers and the military to rest un
der arms and to be ready for action at a mo
ment's notice. At midnightjthe mob around
the jail had increased to a thousand and a
systematic assault on the entrance was begun.
A huge beam was brought from a near lum
ber yard and the outside door was
battered in in a few minutes. The inner
door was stronger and refused to yield. The
shouts and cries of the mob could be heard
all over the city. Inside the cage where the
calls are situated a strong armed force of po
lice was stationed. The excitement outside
was intense. By one o'clock the mob, failing
to effect an entrance, began to weaken and a
gradual retirement began. Chief of Police
West was hit on the head with a stone
and knocked down, but not badly hurt. He
addressed the crowd later, asking them to
observe the law and help him preserve the
peace. In this good advice the majority ac
quiesced and went away. At 1:30 the outer
room of the jail had been cleared and no
further trouble was apprehended. The wife
of Sheriff Stoddard was very much prostra
ted by the excitement and is seriously ill,
but no dangerous result is looked for.
Frost In New Hampshire.
Dover, N. H., July 27. There was a
heavy frost in Latham last night, seriously
injuring the crops.
Peterborough, N. H.,' July 27. There
was considerable frost on the low lands this
morning, and the beans and other vegetables
are injured.
A Joke and a Swindle.
Boston, Mass., July 27. William Haynes,
doing business at No. 363 Washington street,
this city, was arrested and held in $1,000 for
inserting advertisements offering to give
away samples of silk in various lengths to be
used in making dresses. A lady at Bing
hamton received twenty-four spools of ma
chine twist and complained to the postal au
thorities, who charged Haynes with intent to
defraud.
A GIGANTIC LAND FRAUD.
The Schemes Worked By a Special
Agent.
Huron, Dak., July 27. One of the most
gigantic land frauds in Dakota has just been
made public by the arrest of Captain J. B.
Week in this city yesterday. The case was
worked by T. M. James, special agent of the
Interior department, A year since it is al
leged Weeks arranged with L. T. Cummings,
of Chicago, to procure for him soldiers'
declaratory statements to enter government
land, each statement to cover 160 acres and
paying Cummings $16 for each declaratory
statement. Both men were old soldiers,
members of the G. A. R., and had considera
ble influence in the order. It is said Cum
mings told the Chicago people he was en
gaged in getting possession of large tracts of
Dakota land. If the soldiers would give him
their declaratory statements and sign relin
quishment in blank, he would attend to the
fillings and in six months they would get
from $200 to $400 for each tract entered.
At the end of six months the soldiers be
gan writing to the United States land of
fice here, inquiring about their fillings.
The inquiries were so frequent that the
matter was thought worth investigation.
Cummings said Weeks had the papers. He
was an attorney at Huron and all was right.
The matter was referred by the officers of the
land offices here to Special Agent James. It
was found that as Weeks secured customers
for these lands he filled out the blank relin
quishment, acting as attorney for the soldier
and accompanying each tilling with his
own affadavit to the effect that he had
no personal interest in the trans
fer of the land. Because of these
facts and the affidavits Assistant District
Attorney Murphy swore out a warrant and
Weeks was arrested and taken before United
States Commissioner Taylor in this city last
evening, who held Weeks in bonds of $2,000
to appear for trial on Tuesday. Weeks had
operated quite extensively, having acted as
attorney and filled two declarations in the
name at Hermann Taffant, one at the Mitch
ell office in January last, and the other at
the Huron office last August and did the
same for Patrick Kingsley. The land office
record is being searched to learn the magni
tude of the swindle which so far promises to
be the greatest known in the territory. This
receipt is in the hands of United States of
ficials: "Received of J. B. Weeks $600 for soldiers' declara
tories, and $300 for blanks." So anxious were the
Chicago soldiers to realize the promised $300 or
$400 from their declaratories that they paid Cum
mings from $10 to $30 to hurry their cases. Tri
homas, partner of Weeks, was also arrested, but
was released on his own recognizance, it being be
lieved that he had no hand in the matter. The case
has caused much excitement here.
A Chinaman Hacked Almost to Pieces.
Portland, Oregon, July 27. Friday the
mutilated body'of Fee Gung, a well known
Chinese merchant of Olympia, W. T., was
found in the timber near that place. He had
evidently been murdered as the body was
hacked almost to pieces with knives. The
murder had been committed some days, the
remains being much decomposed. Fee Gung
mysteriously disappeared two weeks ago.
Foul play was suspected and a search made,
resulting in finding the body. The night on
which the murder was committed the victim
had in his possession $500. No money was
found on the body. The crime was evidently
committed to obtain that sum. When last
seen alive he was in the company of Sam
Wing and Mong Fong, two of his country
men. Investigation shows that these men
are the guilty parties. Both have fled to
British Columbia, whither officers have gone
in pursuit.
A PITCHER IN LUCK.
Sweeney Gets m Big Salary.
Boston, July 27. A dispatch from St.
Louis says that Sweeney, late pitoher of the
Providence club, has signed with the St.
Louis Unions at the biggest salary paid any
pitcher in the country.
Laboring men in Convention.
Chicago, HI., July 27. Preparations for
the national labor convention which meets
here on Wednesday are being rapidly pushed
forward. The gathering will be held in
Greenbaum's hall on Fifth avenue, and be
tween two hundred and fifty and three hun
dred delegates are expected. The New York
delegation under the leadership of M. A.
Carney is expected to arrive in the morning
and open headquarters at the Briggs House.
Among the labor organizations of this city
there is a disposition to hold aloof from the
convention until its purposes have become
more apparent. Several organizations have
instructed their officers to investigate the
movement and report at special meetings,
which have been called for Tuesday night.
It is understood that nearly every State in
the union will be represented and the con
vention will be at least two days in session.
The Steamers.
New York, July 27. Arrived
The
Alaska from Liverpool, the Norma ndie from
Havre.
A THRILLING ACCIDENT.
The Loss of a Little Girl by Drowning.
Chicago, July 27. Otto Mulhart and a
few friends went sailing to-day, A lurch of
the boat sent Mamie Davis, thirteen years
old, itno the lake. As she sank Mulhart
dived into the water to rescue her. The head
way of the boat and the impetus given it by
Mulhart's plunge carried it some distance
away. Efforts to bring the yacht around
were made in vain owing to the light wind.
Mulhart seized the girl and made an effort
to reach the boat; but his strength gave out
and he sank with the girl clinging to hurt
within a few yards pf the boat. Tne mother
of the little girl was crazed with grief and
endeavored fa jump into the lake, but was
prevented by main strength. This was one
of the saddest accidents that ever occurred
on the lake. -
A Worklngman Brutally murdered.
Kajtbas Cmr, Mo., July 27. Robert Lo
gan, an inoffensive mechanic, was shot dead
by Edward Sneed, a dissolute character, in a
saloon on Twenty-third street last night. The
crowd procured a rope and threatened lynch
ing but the officers hurried the murderer
away before the mob could execute their
design.
CLEVELAND'S ACCEPTANCE.
The Soreness Thought to be Healing.
Albaky, N. Y., July 27. Judging from
the utterances of prominent Democrats who
have visited the Governor during the past
two weeks, the soreness in the party is heal
ing. Tammany it is true, is in doubt, but it
is predicted that the organization - will fall
into line at the proper moment. Many who
met the Governor for the first time were de
lighted with his frank, open, manly bearing.
Those who conversed with him at length
were keely impressed with his brood, states
manlike knowledge of public affairs. Sena
tor Pendleton looks upon his administration
as the embodiment of true reform and ad
vancement. General Rosecrans says of
Cleveland: "Can take hold," and that this
campaign means a declaration of independ
ence of the producing classes from capitalis
tic domination and dictation. John E.
Devlin pointed out that the much
talked of vetoes were misunderstood;
that instead of being aimed at the working
classes, they were really in their interest and
pressed harshly on the interests of the mo
nopolists. Men like Daniel Dougherty, the
noted orator of Philadelphia, John Boyle
0'Railly,the eminent Irish patriot and writer,
and Hon. P. A. Collins, of Boston, have de
clared that Cleveland will get and. deserves
to get the Irish vote. The attitude of Butler
gives the Cleveland men no concern. The
reports that the doughty general will run
have not yet been confirmed. "But," argues
the Governor's friends, "should Butler de
cide to enter the field, what votes he might
draw from Cleveland would be more
than offset by the votes St.
John will wring from Blaine. ' We
are easy in mind." It has been suggested
that Blaine made a serious omission so far as
the labor vote is concerned in not handling
the Chinese question in his letter of accept
ance. There is little doubt but that matter
will be carefully treated in Cleveland's letter.
General Rosecrans, who understands the
Chinese question thoroughly,may have given
the Governor some hints during their inter
view on Saturday. Gov. Cleveland went to
church with his sisters this morning and re
mained at the mansion during the rest of
the day.
A Well Known manufacturer Attempts
Suicide.
New York, July 27.: B. Estes, 'a manu
facturer of woodenware of South Oxford
street, Brooklyn, during a fit of despondency
caused by sickness, attempts to commit sui
cide in a room at the Grand Central Hotel by
shooting himself in the head. He was re
moved to the hospital and it is believed his
injuries are fatal. He is believed to be a
native of Maine.
A Sprint Race In Prospect.
Pittsburg, July 27. The challenge to
George A. Smith, the champion short dis
tance sprinter of the United States, by an
unknown has been accepted by Smith's back
ers. Five hundred dollars a side is the
amount settled upon and the race, 150 yards,
will take place in this city on August 2ll
There seems to be a mystery surrounding
this unknown. His backers gave Smith the
assurance that he is not a foreigner but a
native of the United States to show their
confidence in his fleetness offered to back
him for ten times the amount.
The Cotton Worm at Work.
Cairo, July 27. The cotton worm is doing
great damage to the crops in Egypt. One
estate of one hundred acres has been com
pletely ruined and many others will suffer
the same fate.
Germany's League with the Czar.
Vienna, July 28. The agreement on the
part of Germany to expel from her soil all
Russians who are objectionable to the Czar's
government has caused great dissatisfaction
in this city. The Neue Frie Press declares
that Germany has offended all sense of hu
manity and that it will be impossible for her
to retain the friendship of Austria if she
discriminates so unjustly against a race with
which a large part of the citizens of Austria
are allied.
"Nana" An Outrage on morality.
Vienna, July 27. The Austrian author
ities have prohibited, the circulation of a
translation of Zolas novel "Nana" which they
denounce as an outrage upon morality.
SHOT ill A FRIEND.
The Curions Statement of a Young man
Who Was Driven to a Hospital.
Brooklyn, July 27. A coach drove rapid
ly up to the Chambers Street hospital about
half -past five o'clock yesterday afternoon and
a young man slowly alighted. He moved as
if in great pain. The driver helped him up
the steps and into the office of the hospital,
and left him there. No one else was in the
coach, which was driven away as rapidly as
it came. The young man left in the office
said to the surprised attendant, "I am shot.
Hurry up and call a doctor." He then sank
half fainting to a chair, and was with difficul
ty aroused when the surgeon came down stairs.
The patient was carried to a ward and quickly
examined. His clothing was found saturated
with blood, which was flowing from a bullet
hole just below his heart, The wounded
man tried to evade answering any questions,
but finally said he was Austin Burrell, a
scenic painter, twenty years old, of No. 427
Fourth avenue. He refused to tell who shot
him, but Baid that the wound was inflicted
by a friend who was examining a
revolver. The surgeons do not
believe Burrell's story, as the
nature of the wound does not indicate
that it was inflicted accidentally. Neverthe
less, no word of the affair was sent to the
police, and at midnight the surgeons were
considering whether or not they should call
a coroner.
Burrell was at that hour very low, and
hardly any hope was entertained of his re
covery. He was asked to give the name of
some friends, and told the surgeons to send
for T. A. R, Widlake, of No. 4 Morton street,
if it should become necessary.
A manufacturing Firm's Bad Fix.
Berlin Mills, N. H., July 27. The Forist
Fibre company, formely a prosperous con
cern, is in a bad fix. Lately merchants have
refused to receive its orders and its employes
have not been paid for May and June, many
of them being reduced to want. The amount
due them is $1S,000. Yesterday 150 em
ployes struck and attached the company's
property.
FIRE IN RHODE ISLAND.
The Flames Eat Up Several Establish
ments.
Woonsocket, R. I., July 27. J. C. Fish
er's carriage establishment was burned last
night. William Rockwell's carpet sweeper
manufactory, Fred W. Jenckes' steam laun
dry and Nelson Praray's carpenter shop and
Sylvester Albe's turning shop were all in the
building. Loss $25,000. A Mr. Crane was
run over by a horse ridden by one of the as
sistant engineers and fatally injured.
SHOT BIT a MAN" I AC.
The Cruel Fate of a Toung Woman.
York, Pa., July 27. Saturday midnight
Mrs. Emma Miller, a young woman, was
shot through the body while asleep with her
husband in her father's house at Centerville,
four miles north of York. He brother-in-
law, Pins Miller, is suspected strongly of the
crime. He has for a long time been a mo
nomaniac who believed himself bewitched by
his brother and his wife. The woman was
shot in the back and the ball fractured two
ribs and Derf orated the left lung. Her phy
sicians have no hopes of her recovery. No
arrest has yet been made.
KILLED FOR A WOmAN.
A Toung man Commits murder for the
Woman He Loves.
Princess Anne, Md., July 27. The de
tails of the murder yesterday of Captain L.
T. Davis, a wealthy citizen of Worcester
county, have just reached here. Irving J.
Mills, a drummer in the employ of W. G.
Banesmer & Co. of Baltimore, has been for
some time paying attention to Mrs. Mary E.
Ross, a beautiful young widow, daughter of
Captain Davis, against the wishes of the
lady's father. During the captain's absence
yesterday, Mills called on Mrs. Ross and the
pair went out- driving. When returning in
the evening they were met by Captain Davis
in the Dublin district. The irate father or
dered Mrs. Ross to leave the carriage. The
lady proceeded to obey, but Mills whipped
up his horse in an endeavor to get away.
Captain Davis sprang to the horses head and
held him. Mills became so enraged that he
drew a revolver and when Mrs. Roes stepped
upon the ground it was to fall upon her
father's corpse, he having been shot through
the heart by Mills. The mur
derer fearing that the residents
of Pocomoke City would take the
law into their own hands drove to Princess
Anne and gave himself up. He is now in
jail.
LOCAL NEWS.
FAIR HAVEN.
Mrs. Captain Joseph Bowditch is visiting
with relatives at Shelter Island.
Misa Mav Holmes of Brooklyn. L. I., is
visiting with Mrs. Almenia Tuttle.
, Mrs. Rev. Erastus Blakeslee has returned
home from bar trip to Saratoga.
Professor J. G. Barnett is stopping for a
short time at East Haven River.
Some one tried last Friday night to break
into Bronson's saloon, but they did not suc
ceed. On Saturday Mr. W. H. Kelsey received
the congratulations of many of his friends
It was a boy.
Rev. E. E. Hall is ready to receive the
taxes now due on the account to settle the
affair with the town of East Haven.
Oysters are nearly out of the spawn, ond
from appearances now tho bivalves promise
to be nice this fall.
The funeral of the mother of Mr. Edgar
Page took place on Saturday. The burial
was at North Branford.
Quinnipiac Hose Co. N" 1 will go to Glen
Island on their annual pu.;. '.c and excursion
on Tuesday, August 12.
Some of the residents on Prospect street
have formed a croquet club. They think
that they are experts at the game and are
anxious to play with some of the crock cro
quet clubs.
F. H. Farren, on Saturday evening, in .driv
ing very fast collided with Mr. Webb Scran
ton's wagon in front of the Bradley block,
overturning Mr. Scranton's carriage and
throwing out the occupant, Mrs. Scranton.
Fortunatelv the ladv was not much hurt.
The accident drew a large crowd together
pretty quickly. Mr. Farren was taken
by the police to the station house.
Mr. Moses E. Robinson, of Elizabeth, N
J. , is visiting here for a short time. This is
Mr. Robinson's first visit here in about twelve
years, and he thinks there has been many
changes, especially on the west side ot tne
river, during that time.
Mr. C. S. Hemingwav and family wisited
with friends in Meriden over Saturday and
Sunday. To day they will return to their
home in Holyoke, Mass. Mr. H. and family
enjoyed their visit here very much and were
very loth to leave.
Tho public deeply symphatize with Mr.
and Mrs. Dwight Chipman in the loss of
their eldest son, who died yesterday morning
after a very short illness. The boy, who
was only twelve years old was up the river on
Wednesday, and to all appearances as well as
could be. Another son who has also been
quite sick was better yesterday, and it is
hoped that the little one may recover.
Death of a Well Known man.
John C. Hayden, for many years in the
sail making business on Long Wharf, died at
his residence in Brooklyn, N. Y., Friday
night. Mr. Hayden was a kind-hearted man
and had a host of friends. For the past fif
teen years he has lived in Brooklyn. He was
twice in command of the police department
of this city between 1855 and 1860. He was
also a member of the volunteer fire depart
ment and also an Odd Fellow. The remains
will be brought to this city to-day for inter
ment in the Evergreen cemetery.
Talks on the Green.
An inebriated individual walked up to the
crowd that collected to hear Ralph Beau
mont speak on the Green Saturday night,
and took it upon himself to deliver an ad
dress. The e. i. thought the existing state
of things in this country was bad. He
wanted everything crushed. Finally some
one crushed him and he subsided. Ralph
Beaumont arrived soon after. He spoke well
and attracted an audience of about 500 peo
ple, the address being upon "Live Issues."
Swordnsh and Sunflsh.
The Milford Post in its Block Island news
has the following: Last Monday the schooner
Rose Brothers,Captain John E. Rose, brought
in a swordfish which weighed when dressed
502 pounds. This was the largest fish taken
this season by about sixty pounds. His
flukes were more than a yard across. Thurs
day afternoon Captain Warren Ball, of the
Active, brought in a swordfish which dressed
396 pounds. On the same day a boat
brought in a eunfish, weighing 200 pounds.
This is an odd-looking creature. When
swimming his back resembles a swordnsh,
and his good looks often wins for him the
attention of the harpooner. But he is usu
ally jilted as soon as his real character be
comes known. His flesh resembles India
rubber in its tenderness. The creature was
viewed by crowds of people from the hotels.
The Salvation Army.
The hall of the Salvation Army was com
fortably crowded last evening, the small
boys being the predominant party present.
While one of the Army was engaged in
prayer, a woman in the audience was sudden
ly taken ill, and the services of a hack were re
quired to convey her to her home, No. 16
Oak street. Towards the latter part of the
services while one of the colored brethren
was speaking, the small boy began his cat
colls ond several of the larger ones chimed
in. The noise was so intolerable that the ser
vices of an officer was required to silence
the noise. A few men were told to quietly
pass out and the whole audience arose and
followed them, hoping to see the officer
march toward the precinct, but they were
disappointed. He only asked him to take
an airing.
HEAVY PENALTIES.
Two Young men Fined For Theft
and Burglary and Bound Over to the
Supreme Court.
Michael Murphy and William Foley are two
young roughs with very unhealthy police
records. Saturday they were before the City
court charged with a number of thefts and
with burglary at the shoe shop of J. N.
Cook on Church street. The cases against
them for theft were for taking a lot of rub
ber hose from Professor A. M. Wheeler and
another from Professor Benjamin Jepson.
They denied stealing the hose, but Murphy
claimed to know who did and gave the man's
name as Smith, who had gone to New York.
Detective Reilly said he found the hose at
John Pfuderer's on Union street as directed
by the accused.
Joseph N. Cook testified that he had lost
ten pairs of shoes and two pairs of boots.
There were several pairs on the attorney's ta
ble which he identified as his. He thought
Murphy had been in his store within a
month. The shoes stolen belonged to cus
tomers and were left to be repaired.
John Pfuderer testified to buying a pair
of shoes of Foley and also recognized a pair
of button shoes which he desired to sell. De
tective Reilly told how he had watched the
movements of the men for several days.
Murphy when arrested denied that Foley was
innocent.
Judge Studley after looking up the record
proceeded to find the young men guilty and
fix penalties. He sentenced Foley and
Murphy to pay a fine of $100 and be im
prisoned six months for stealing shoes;
for the theft of rubber hose by
Murphy, $7 fine and thirty days. For
the burglary at Cook's. Murphy was
bound over for trial to the October term of
the Superior court in $500, for the theft of
Professor Jepson's rope $7 fine and thirty
days, and for the theft of Mr. Wheeler's
hose $7 fine and thirty days. Murphy took
an appeal from the judgment on the thelt ot
the shoes, a bond of $200 being required on
the appeal. "Foley was also bound over for
the burglary at Cook's in $500 for trial.
GOLD MEDAL, PARIS, 187b.
BAKER'S
Breakfast Cocoa.
Warranted absolutely purs
Ceeoa, from which the excess of
Oil has been removed. It has threa
timet the ttrcxgth of Cocoa mixed
with Starch, Arrowroot or Sugar,
and is therefore far more economi
cal. It la delicious, nourishing;
strengthening, easily digested, and
admirably adapted for invalids aa
well as for persona in health.
Sold by Grocers everywhere.
fl. BAKER & CO., Dorchester, Mass.
FOR SALE,
MIN BRANFORD. a two-story house, barn
and other outbuildings, all nearly new; beau
tiful location; about 50 rods from the shore,
with one or six acres of land. Will be sold cheap.
Terms easy. For particulars inquire of
WM. MILES GRANNIS8, Fair Haven.
Or J. AUGUSTUS B LACKS TONE,2fl
alfi ldwtf Branford.Ji
i SITUATION an BrBt-cTaS't . , . .
L family; good city reference private
jyao T- xi tlABlL J u. vj
KEET.
WANTED,
AYOUNO man 14 to 16 years old to learn the
Drug business. Inquire at
. ALLJNG'S DRUG LTORE,
Jy28 2t Corner Grand and State Streets.
WASTED,
"T" ADIES and gentlemen with from $50 to $500 to
JLi handle one of the greatest inventions of the
age; grand chance to make a fortune; from $10 to
$2Saday sure; legitimate and honorable; no com
petition and no risk. Call or address
ROOM 4, KING'S IIOTF.L,
Jygggt ; era Chapel Street
WANTED.
TABLE Boarders. Also one room for rent.
Apply st
jyjiu ow riAi-r.ij bi KPiCT.
WANTED,
To BUT lot of Second-hand Furniture and Car
pets. Highest cash price paid. Orders by mail
promptly attended to at
jalf 88 CHURCH STREET.
Intelligence Ofllcc. '
EMPLOYMENT oince for males and females.
Help of different nationalities can be supplied to
private families, boarding houses, hotels and res
taurants. The proprietor of this establishment pays
great attention in the choice of girls ond women be
fore sending them to nil situations. Calls from the
country at any distance are promptly attended to.
Invalid and wet nurses at short notice. Male help
for families and farm hands always ready.
MRS. T. MULLIGAN,
a2Gtf 197 George, corner Temple street.
To Whom it may Concern !
MONEY liberally advanced in sums
to suit on all kinds of merchan
dise and personal property of ev
ery description at
EDWARD EKGEL'S
Old and Reliable Money Loan Office,
311 and 343 STATE STREET, New Haven, Conn.
All legal transactions strictly Confidential. ja5
MRS. DR. J. A. "WRIGHT,
Psychometrist and Clairvoyant,
Consultation on Business, Minerals, Health and al
Personal Matters.
Headings of Character by Handwriting1, Photograph
or Hair.
Price Gentlemen, $2; Ladies, $1.
Mrs. Wright can be consulted at her office, 98 Or
ange street, daily, 9 a. m. to 8 p. m. iu28tf
Summer Resorts.
Good Country Board
MIN a pleasant village six miles from Litch
field, Conn. Terms moderate. Good Fishing.
Special inducements to boys, clerks or students.
Address BOX 271,
Northfleld, Conn.
jySS6t
HOTEL SEA VIEW.
SAVIN ROCK - - "WEST HAVEN. CONN.
$3.00 per day: $10 to $20 par week
Shore dinners, fish and game suppers
J served at all hours.
SOUTHWICK & CO.,
jyldawlm
Proprietors.
5
COVE
HO USB
MORRIS COVE. NEW HAVEN.
Hotel Bus Runs as Follows:
Cove House to Belle Dock, 8:30 a. m., 1 p. m.
Cove House to 926 Chapel street Cp.m.
Belle Dock to Cove House, 9 a. m., 2 and 7:45 p. m.
926 Chapel stet to Cove House, 7:15 p. m.
Sundays.
Cove House to 96 Chapel street, 9 a. m. and 8 p. m.
92Q Chapel stree to Cove House. 10:30 a. m., 9 p. m.
G. S. BARKENTIN,
PROPRIETOR,
GROVE COTTAGE.
AT SAVIN ROCK, FORMERLY OCEAN COTTAGE
Summer Street, Wst Haven, Conn.
H. A. CONVERSE, proprietor of the Austin House,
New Haven, has fitted up and handsomely furnished
the above cottage. It is now open for guests. Beau
tifully situated adjoining the grovt and possessing
all the facilities for comfort and enjoyment, Grove
cottage affords a rare oppomity for sojourners at
theseashore. jell 2m
Tk Railroad Waiting Room.,
VVI ROCK.
Spacious restaurant rooms. Large Pavilion. A
good dinner for 50 cents. Parties will be guaranteed
just reception on all occasions. O. HOWES,
n4 3m Proprietor.
OCEAN COTTAGE.
SAVIN 4lOCK SHORE.
Mrs. S. Holmes, Proprietress. The plcasantest
place on Savim Rock Shore, elegantly fitted through
out, now ready for summer boarders and transient
guests. Views from its rooms and verandas unsur
passed by any upon the coast. Bathing convenient
and free from danger. Having had long experience
in the business, cannot fail to please all who favor
me with their patronage. Terms moderate. P. O.
BoxJ!H4 , West Haven, Conn. jel3
Beach House.
Savin Kock, West Havon, Ct. .
The popular proprietor Sea View 1ST9-18S0,
Austin House, New Haven, 1881-1882, Beach
House 1!!.
WILL OPEN BEACH HOUSE
JUNE 1st., 1884
18t.
1884.
Osprey Beach.
Coney Island of Connecticut.
WILL OPEN JULY 1st.
The most spacious and best conducted day resort on
the Coast. The
Shore Dinners
Which made tins place famous in past years will bo
maintained throughout the season.
OCKFOIU) JEROME.
jeSOlm
Railroad drove Restaurant
I THE GROVE,
W. H. PUTNAM, PROPRIETOR, FORMERLY
PUTNAN & HALE.
The most delightful place on the shore. Meals
served at all hours. Roast Oysters, Stewed Clams,
etc. All Temperance Drinks. Hillman's Celebrated
Ice Cream. jeO 2m
BRANFORD POINT HOTEL,
BRANFORD, COlV.
SEASOX 1884.
tage and Carriages connect with all trains at
Branford Depot
Elegant Dining Room and Sum- -mcr
Pavilion.
DINNERS AND SUPPERS SERVED TO ORDER TO
PARTIES.
Telephone connects wtih the house.
Parties desiring information in regard to rooms.
rates, etc., address
jy7 lm Proprietor.
SOUTH ED HOUSE.
Now Open for the Season.
It has been refitted and permanent and transient
guests can be accommodated. The grounds are
spacious and good facilities for fishing. Dinners a
specialty. Stage leaves South End at 7:20 a. m., 1,
4 and 7 p. m. Sundays, D a. m. and 7 p. m. Leaves
New Haven 9:30 a. m., 2:80, 5:15 and 8 p. m. Satur
days at 9 p. m. Dancing Tuesday and Friday even
ings at o o ciock.
juilh iiu, i-ropricior.
je!2 3m
SKEELE'S RESTAUR AT.
SAVIN ROCK HILL.
Now open for the season. Increased attractions.
The finest Skating Rink on the Shore 10t feet. lmi
and 40 feet wide. Flying Horses, Rifle Range, Ex-
DINNFRS AND SUPPERS SERVED AT SHORT
JSUT1UK.
CHARLES SKEELES.
jeaogm
PTESFYL
I m ..! ..
a;
BEST THING KNOWN
WASHmGBLEAOHING
IN HARD OR SOFT, HOT OR COLD WATER. "
BATES LABOR, TIMK and SOAP AMAZ
INGLY, and gives tmivera satisfaction.
No family, rich or poor should be without It. "
Sold by all Grocers. BEWAKE of Imitations
well designed to mislead. PEARLINE Is tha
ONLY SAX'S! labor-saving compound, and
Sways bears the above symbol, and name ot
- JAMES PYLE. NEW YORK.
A PRIZE
Send six cents by postage and re
eeive free a costly box of goods
which will help all, of either sex, to.
, , V""" J" "Bub away man any.
thing else In the world. Fortunes await the workers
absolutely 'sure. At once Address TRUE & Co .
Augusta, Maine. XeTwit
CHO
F
il
PI
THE
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