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Morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven [Conn.]) 1848-1894, July 30, 1884, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015483/1884-07-30/ed-1/seq-3/

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July 30, 1884.
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VOL. LII.
gpccial Notices.
irYUbon!
Will during tlili week make
very low price on all kind of
lammer Goodi.
Reduction In every part of tbe
tore. Nothing will be reserved.
A lot ofFrench Jcracy that sold
early In nchmoii caIIy at 98.50 ;
will close them out for 5.50.
The prices we have made on
Parasols during last week have
reduced the stock much, hut we
have a large stock still.
764 ctnd 768 Cliapel St.
HAMMOCKS.
THE MOST
AJso a Large Stock of Chinese Fans, Lanterns, Etc.
AT
G. J. MOFPATT'S
493, 497, 499 t,xSL
PIAXOS TO RENT !
sO 4 ,, I
1865 ft 1884
A foil set or
SECOND-HAND BASD INSTRUMENTS
tor sale very cheap. A Large Stock of Drums for tlie Campaign al
ways on liand.
O. LOOMIS.
goarcT and Moams.
BOARD An ROOMS.
A FEW gentlemen can be accommodated
ml with first-class board ana pleasant rooms witn
KiUiLmrxiRm imnrnvempnis. ioca
Lmodern improvements. Locality second to
none in trie city. Terms moderate, a
AddIV
at
je31m
35 WOOSTER PLACE.
GREAT
MIDSUHEB,
Closing-Out Sale I
-OF
CORSETS, HOOP SKIRTS
-AND
BUSTLES
IN OUR
COSSET DEPARTMENT,
BQlton & Neely,
SUCCESSORS
E. MAIiL,EY & CO.
BROILERS AND ROASTERS.
TURKEYS, LAMB,
SWEET BREADS,
CALVES' LIVERS.
Native Cucumbers, Squash, North Haven Tomatoes,
Green Corn, Watermelons,
and
A the latest Novelties in the eating line, constantly
on hand.
FRISBIE & HART,
350 and 352 State Street.
Jya
SPRING CHICKENS!
PRICE REDUCED.
Prime Beef. Mutton. Lamb, Veal, Fresh Pork.
FRESH SALMOS,
Halibut, Swordnsh. Bluefish. Sea Bass, Blackflsh,
Fresh Mackerel, Codfish, Haddock, Lobster, Bound
and Long Clams.
Stony Creek and Lighthouse Oysters opened to
order.
Sugar Cured Pork Hams, Breakfast Bacon, Smoked
and Dried Beef. Fulton Market Smoked and
Pickled Beef Tongues.
Native Squash. String Beans. Tomatoes, Cauliflow
ers, Cabbages, Beets, Cucumbers.
ILL AX LOW PRICES.
505 and 507 STATE STREET,
JUDSON BROTHERS,
PACKING AND PROVISION CO.
jys
BROADWAY CASH STORE,
100 BBLS. BEST NEW PROCESS FLOUR, only
$7 a barrel, or 90c a bag. This flour gives the best
satisfaction of any in market. Warranted to suit
everyone, or money returned. Fresh country Eggs
!Mc a dozen. Best New York State Elgin Creamery
Butter 28c lb, 4 lbs for $1. Fancy New Orleans Mo
lasses 60c a gallon. Very nice Porto Rico Molasses
45c a gallon. New Potatoes, large Long Island, 8c a
quart will be lower in a few days. Extra large
Beets 4c a bunch. Native Beans 35c a peck, 5c a
quart. Large Native Cabbage 5-7c each. Messina
Lemons 15c dozen. 8 lbs best Carolina Rice for 25c.
quarts best State Beans for 25c. 8 lbs Tapioca
for 25c. Macaroni in 1-lbpackages 15e. Rising Sun
Stove Polish Be each. Try 1 lb of our best JAVA
COFFEE, only 25c a lb. Also our TEAS cannot be
beat. Only 50e and 80c lb for the very best in mar
ket. Also
incat Sold at Wholesale Prices.
Come in: Come all! Come early!
PAIL JTENTE &. BROS.,
101 AND 107 BROADWAY.
33-2
Star oflrai ITnmAri have
been cared, are belnfs cured daily
by the use of Vegetine. We can
show testimonials or refer you to
the parties in proof of this.
Jyspepela and all the tmpleas-
ant 'fleet, of Indigestion are at once
reuevea o j we use 01 v egeune.
S It Tm and all diaeuiM
of the sUn disappear when Vege?
For TAtt anrl Kidney
Complaint you will find Vege
Uue a most valuable remedy.
Ah tin-cv tired I am " is
So often heard. An Impure con-
mtton or uie oiooa ww uwajB
nce this feeling and it is sure to be
reuevea oj ia uw Bnuv.
x i t who have used Vetretlne
and Die number of such Is large, are
loutt In its praise as a remedy for
diseases peculiar to their sex.
2ervma Sufferer yon can
nse nothing so sure to furnish yon
sleep ana rest as v egeuue.
Vegetine is sold by all Druggists.
THE PEOPLE LIKE IT!
What more refreshing and satisfying than a cup of
COFFEE UH ''JE.J
when the goods come from
Dawson's Popular Store,
f4- Sa.'-E3
Yale Bank . Building
Thev sell at low prices
AT DAWSON'S,
And Olve A Good Article.
COFFEES BOASTED PAILY.
Jys
1
wrTm
WW
is a
M-
mm
(S5)
MpccmX Notices.
Ask for Remnant. Many de
sirable lengths may be had at
half price.
White Made-up Dresses at 16w
er prices than costof simple mak
Ing.
White and Ecru Robes at great
ly reduced prices. Look at them,
Linen Lawns, Satlnes, Cham
brays, Gingham, Cambrics and
Prints, closing out at a reduced
prices.
HAMMOCKS.
X U Jb-L TtliE
Paper Warehouse,
SOI State Street,
ORGANS TO RENT !
IT' V V 'Y t A W tW T
INSTRUCTION IN RIDING
GIVEN BY
MRS. R. M. HOOKER.
Apply at the Rink, 381 Temple Street,
From 10:30 to 11:30 a. m, 3 to 5 p. m.
je!7 3m
kXCXXXSlOKS.
STARIN'S GLEN ISLAND.
America's Day Summer Resort !
TWO GRAND CONCERTS DAILY.
DILLER'S MILITARY BAND.
SUPERIOR DINNERS A LA CARTE.
Klein Deutschland !
THE STEAMER
JOHN H. STARIN,
j CAPT. McALLJSTER,
i Will make the first trip TUESDAY, JULY 8th, and
from this date till the close of the season will make
TWO TRIPS WEEKLY
To CJlen Island and Return.
Every Tuesday and Thursday,
From Staiin's Pier, foot of Brewery street (five
minutes' walk from Railroad Depot) at 8:30 a. m.
sharp. Returning leave GLEN ISLAND at 3:30 p.
m., arriving in New Haven in time to connect with
8 o'clock train.
Excursion tickets (New Haven to Glen Island and
return) - - 75c.
New Haven to New York and return via Glen
Island and Pier 18, North river - $1.50.
Single tickets to Glen Island - 50c.
Fare from Glen Island to New Haven - 50c.
THOMAS WILL FURNISH THE MUSIC ON THE
BOAT EVERY TRIP.
No intoxicatiner drinks obtainable on this steamer.
Glen Island is officered by efficient uniformed police.
Ladies and Children unattended will find nothing to
mar their pleasure.
positively no rree list. u. m. uuKKLlfl,
jeSOtf Agent, Starin s Pier.
Acknowledged the tiuest excursion steamer eve
run from New Haven.
THE SUPERB STEAMER
PHILADELPHIA,
(Capacity COO Passengers)
FOR
BRADFORD POINT
AND
THIMBLE ISLANDS.
DAILY.
Leave Belle Dock at 9:45 a m. and 2:45 p. m.
Leave Islands at 13:15 and 5:15 p. m.
Leave Branford Point at 1:05 and 6:05 t. m.
FARE EACH WAY 25 CENTS.
Special low rates for excursions. For moonlieht
sails this steamer is unexcelled. Address
jyl F. W. HINMAN, City.
BANKRUPT SALE.
The stock of goods belonging to the estate of M.
B. Scott, insolvent debtor, Nos. 67 and 69 Center
street, is now offered for sale, as it is necessary to
close up the estate at once.
GEORGE R. C00LEY,
TIlUSTBIil.
jy2!Kf
SHORTHAND!
EVERY person should be able to write short
hand. It is becoming indispensable in business
in our courts and in newsmwr offices, besides heiner
a valuable accomplishment in every day life. It is
"if uc-i;iin a, y uiuig man can nave, r or young
ladies it opens a field both pleasant and profitable.
We will teach you by mail at reduced rates. Send
for our "Compendium of Self -Instruction''1 and learn
this art at home. Hundreds have done it. You can
doit. $1.00 post paid. Circulars free.
OOOSWELL'S
SCHOOL OF PHONOGRAPHY,
HfEW HA VEST, CO!.
A Training Class Tor Kintergart-
ncrti.
Will open in New Haven. Conn.. September 23. For
circulars address MISS ANGEUNE BROOKS, 15
nome i'iace, ivew Haven, conn.
jyj ziaw, tnara.m
FISTULA
AND
PILES,
Cured wltbont the use of
tbe Kntle.
Wsr. REED,(M. D., Harvard, 1842)
and ROBERT M. REED,)M. D., Har
vard 1876). Evann House. 175
Tremont St.. Boston treat
FISTI LA PILES and ALL
DISEASES OP THE REC
TUM, without detention from
business. Reference given. Send
f or oamotuets. Omce hours 11 .
m. to 4 oclock p. m. (except Sunday). a28eodly
Cheapest place in the citv to buv wood bv the cord.
half cord, quarter cord or barrel. Orders by mail
or teiepnone wui receive prompt anention,.
NEW HAVEN WOOD YARD.
no!4tfls
EAST ST.. OPP. MY RTLE.
District of New Haven, ss. Probate Court, i
.lulv 2S 1881. f
XT' STATE OF MERRITT B. SCOTT, of New
I1- Haven, in said Distnct.assieninif debtor.
The Court of Probate for the District of New
Haven hath limited and allowed three months from
the date hereof for the creditors of said estate, rep
resented insolvent, in which to exhibit their claims
thereto; and has appointed William A. Wright of
iiranxord, LX., Seymour u. oomis, or Kew Maven,
commissioners to receive and examine said claims:
and has ordered that said commissioners meet at
the office of Willaim A. Wright. No. 153 Church
street, in said New Haven, on the 29th day of Sep
tember and on the 28th dav of October. 1884. at 9
o'clock in the forenoon of each of said days, for the
purpose of attending on the business of said ap-
Certified from record,
SAMUEL A. YORK. .Tiiriew.
All persons indebted to said estate are requested
IAJ llk C imiiraimn U) UIl
GEORGE R. COOLEY,
jy29 6t Trustee.
FINE SHIRTS
TO ORDER
E. MERWIN'S SON
383 STATE STREET,
Established 1 57.
i. j a
LOTS FOR SALE,
M SIX valuable Building lots on Nash street,
between Eagle and Willow streets. Lots each
60x126. Terms easy. One-half or more can
remain.
Also a lot on Eagle street. 100 feet front, and
a large triangular piece or land mtne rear. or par
ticulars call at mcitwiM eaisuiieumce,
jy2 7SB Chapel .Street.
FOR SALE,
A SMALL BUSINESS PROPERTY on Head
giiilLstreet. Will make terms easy.
T. O. Sloan & Son,
Room 3, Benedict Building.
EBOPEN EVENINGS.
J
FOB RENT.
TO a Brood tenant, first floor of house 675
State street, at a low price. Also two tene-
i uieiiw vu vivwuu lurch ujuum ih
Crown street.
ULOSLN HALL.
THOMAS O'BRIEN & CO
Real Estate and Loan Agents,
800 CHAPEEL STREET.
$r,000 to loan at 5 and 0 per cent, fn sums to suit.
For sale, double house and lot. 60x150 on Chanel
street, for $7,500. Small house and large lot on Ver
non street for $3,500. Large two family house on
Orchard street, opposite Charles street, for $2,250
a bargain. A small honse and large lot on Congress
avenue; win oe soia tor mucn less tnan it is worm,
as the owner is leaving the city. Two houses on
w aiiace si-reei, near urana, ror Baie very cneap.
ty Office open every evening. j2
FOR SALE.
MA FINE residence in West Haven on First
avenue, containing 11 rooms, also barn, hen-
fifr- nery, oatn nouse and all necessary outbuild
ings, in good repair: well stocked with fruit trees
and grapevines. Lot, 340 feet front with a depth of
50 feet, the rear facing the harbor. Also .a house
and lot on Water street. Lot 95 feet front, running
oacK to trie cnannei ism ieet deep; a gooa locauon
ior a ousiness enterprise desiring a wnan privilege.
or price, c, can on or address
WALI t-K A. MN,
j23 West Haven Conn
For Sale and To Rent.
s FOR RENT Block House No. 239 Orange
E street. Ferrect order, possession at once.
Rent low to a erood tenant for a term of years.
FOR SALE -House No. 57 Piernont street.
iots on Howard avenue, iaiiocK ave
nue and in "The Annex."
Money to loan in sums of S-"500 on first Mortgage
at o per cent, inquire or
WILLIAM C. ROBINSON. ) No. 14 White's Build'g,
PHILIP ROBINSON, f opposite P. O.
Hours iu to a. m., to o p. m. oc, v datr
FOR RENT,
V FIVE rooms Fo. iw3 State street, water clos
il et, gas and water; and five rooms corner
lUL South and Park streets. Inquire at No. 792
Chapel street, Room 2. JACOB HELLER.
myz
BUILDING LOTS FOR SALE!
MONEY furnished to assist men in buiiding
&houses.
R. E. BALDWIN'S
REAL ESTATE AGENCY, 818 CHAPEL STREET.
j27daw
FOR SALE.
No. 250 James street, just north of Grand
;;j street, on a lot aaxiuu, a neany new seven
iiSLrooin house that can be occupied bv two small
families. The entire premises have been well cared
for and are in first-class order. Price $2,000.
FOR RENT.
The Grand Street Livery Stables (old number 182)
formerly occupied by Allen Seaman. The premises
are modern and desirable in all respects and in per
fect order. There are accommodations for thirtv-
six horses and ample storage for the carriage outfit.
A low price for the rental will be made to a respon
sible tenant.
FOR RENT.
Thirteen houses and thirty-one tenements in vari
ous parts of the city.
fdcrupen evenings.
HORACE P. HOADLEY,
jlO HOADLEY BUILDING.
N VIEW of the opening of the new railroad to
L West Haven there will be some call for
Building Lots.
I have a tract of land, finelv situated, close bv
West Haven Green, on Church street, 400 feet front
and 200 feet deep, which I will sell at $5 per front
foot, or will take less for the whole of it. There is
nothing else so favorably located that can be bought
nearly as low. EDWARD A. RAY.
axiti
REALTY EXCHAME!
Houses, Lots, llents, Loans.
For rent, houses, tenements and stores in good lo
calities.
For sale or exchange Property for businesspur
poses within four minutes' walk of postofflce. Fifty
choice lots on Kelsey and Ridge avenues, West
Haven. Call at once.
F. M. DENISOI.
Room 4, Glebe Building, corner Church and Chapel
streets.
ml9 OFFICE OPEN EVENINGS.
FOR SALE,
tA NUMBER of good lots in different parte
of the city; price low.
A line house with all the improvements, lo
cated in the center of the city; can be seen at any
time.
FOR BEST,
A number of good Houses and Tenements.
Money to loan in amounts to accommodate. Call
at
NO. 70 CHURCH STREET, ROOM 2. -
JOfflce open evenings from 7 to 8.
Li. F. COMSTOCK.
je28
FOR SALE.
tTWO family house on Sylvan avenue, $800
cash required. Two family house on Jackson
street, $350 cash required,
mtttf GEO. A. ROOT, 808 Chapel St.
A. M. HOLMES,
HOUSE MOVER,
tHAS for rent the 2d floor of house No. 83
Houston St., S10 per month. Half of hous
No. 4. Lewis St. 190 Clinton Ave., 1st floor.
10 oer month. Half of House 177 Meadow St., $15
per month. 2d floor No. 12 Newhall St., $8 per month,
and two rents on Ivy St., for $8 per month each.
Also for sale houses 78 Woolsey St., 190 Clinton Ave.,
29 Auburn St., and At water St., on easy terms.
JSWauted Thirty more houses to rent.
ma4 Of i? lCJc; on tiutuJi Biitr-M'.
HINMAN'S REAL ESTATE
AND LOAN AGENCY.
Money to loan at 5 per cent.
Pronertv in all rjarts of the citv for sale. Seashore
residences and lots at Savin Rock Shore and West
Haven. The beautiful Savin Rock, including sev
eral acres of natural grove. This is the finest loca
tion for a hotel or residence in the State and will be
sold at a bargain. . B. HINMAN
iyS do unurcn pit.
Si.HL. HOOKER,
REAL ESTATE AGEMT,
19 Exchange Building.
HOUSES FOR RENT AND FOR SALE.
THE CARE OF PROPERTY A SPECIALTY.
RENTS AND OTHER BILLS COLLECTED.
jyg
FOR RENT.
Several nice Houses.
Tenements For Rent.
A lot of first-class Tenements, $10 to $30 per month.
UK.A.JJ1.
Fire insurance policies given in the best companies
and none others.
Those who are changing their residences this
spring would do well to call. We will insure your
Furniture or Dwelling at the LOWEST POSSIBLE
RATES.
Property placed in our hands will be properly
taken care of.
Repairs made at lowest rates by competent work
men.
Rents Collected.
II. C. LOSC'S ACJEXCY,
63 CHURCH STREET.
Open Evenings. Opposite Postofflce. a25tf
- SEW EUGLANB- -'
CONSERVATORY OF' MUSIC.
M TTS1C. Vocal and Instrumental and Toning.
AKT. Drawing Painting, Modeling and Portrait tire.
OKATOKY. Jtratire and Luigiiuw
HOBl Elegant accommodations for 500 lady stadents
FALL fEBM begins Sept. nth. Beauufally III d
Calendar free. Address E. TOCRJEE, Director, i
FRAIHLUn MlliABE, BOSTON. MASS
DECORATIVE PAPER HANGINGS.
PAINTS, OILS, GLASS, ETC.
PLATT At THOMPSON,
64 and 66 Orange St. and 5 Center St.
jy25
CASH DOES IT.
My trade has more than doubled since I began to
seU for cash. But then, I sell so much cheaner
T.on ni. t ln t-i f Vi io -.
Round Steak 18c. Rack' 14c. Best Roast
oin 5e. Pork 1
; 18c.
FLOUR! FLOUR! FLOUR!
Never was flour so cheap at this store. The very
best 95e per bag $7 per bbl and god flour for 80c
per bag.
TEA ! TEA ! ! TEA '
40elbfor nice Jap; try it. I always kept "good
Coffee. It is now better and cheaper than ever
BUTTER ! BUTTER 1 1 BUTTER !
Good Butter. Best at Stic lb. Call and see me at
7 WHALLEY ATENCE.
E7Goods delivered anywhere. Telephone.
E. S. STEVENS,
Iy35
CREAMERY BUTTERED FLOUR
Makes delicious biscuits. Try a package 32c.
' Litchfield County Butter.
Simsbury CSreamery Butter.
Selected Smoked Halibut, just received.
D. S. COOPER,
Jy26
S78 STATE STBIET.
Local "Weather Record.
FOR JOLT 29, 1884.
7:18 11:18 8:16 7:18 11:16
Barometer 29.89 29.80 29.75 29.75 29.7
Thermometer... 62 04 82 59 68
Humidity 93 92 98 100 93
Wind, in direction
and velocitv in
Weather Rain Rain Rain Rain Cld
miles per hour. . N 9 NE 11 NE 15 NE 10 N 16
Mean bar., 29.79; mean temp., 00.; mean humid
Itv. 84.
Max. temp., 86.; min. temp., 57.; rainfall .68
incnes.
Max. velocity of wind, 17 miles.
FOR JVLT 29, 1888.
Mean bar., 29.88; mean temp., 87.; mean humid
ity, 90
Max temp., 78. ; min. temp., 61.
J. H. SHERMAN, Sorgt S. C. U. 8. A.
A minus sign prefixed to thermometer read
ings Indicates temperature below zero.
t A dash prefixed to rainfall figures Indicates
precipitation too small to measure.
MINIATURE AJLMANAC.
JULY 30.
Sun Rises, 4:49 I
Sun Sets, 7:lg
Moon Sets,
11:45
High Watbr,
4:55
BIRTHS.
KELREY In New Haven (Annex), July 26th, a son
to William H. and Lillian F. Kelsey.
MARRIAGES.
BENNETT ANDREWS In Cheshire, July 26th,
James Bennett, of South Meriden, and Miss Julia
C. Andrews, daughter of Horace Andrews, of
Cheshire.
DEATHS.
BABCOCK In this city. July 29, Sidney Babcock,
in the 88th year of his age.
FEE In this city, July. 28th, John Fee, sr., aged
68 years.
MARIXE LIST.
PORT OF NEW "HAVEN.
ARRIVED, JULY 29.
Sch W W Pharo, Randall, from Alexandria, Va.,
coal to Isaac Mills, of Springfield.
cn josepn arer, uavis, irom aiumore.
A Rare Chance.
S. A FIRST-CLASS house and barn on How-
Eard avenue, with all modern improvements,
for sale at a bargain: owner leaving the citv.
For particulars apply to S. B. OVIATT,
jyaii Jeoti a, unurcn street.
FOR RENT,
A FEW more fiate in new building corner
Whiting and Commerce streets; all the mod
ern improvements, besides speaking tubes, re
frigerators, etc. ; everything in first-class order and
.1 . 1. 1 . . T . . t , , T,. 1'11,I-L-I."T
mi eoair trp niapei street.
FOR RENT,
tIN West Haven, a convenient house of ten
rooms; two-story bay window, healthy loca---tion.
citv and well water: near church, school
and horse cars; to a careful and prompt tenant at
$13 per month. See H. H. RICHARDS, corner Main
street and First avenue, or West Haven Lumber
Yard. . jySOGt
LOST
YESTERDAY morning, in going from the cor
ner of Chanel and Franklin streets to the
office of Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor, a small Red
Morocco Pocketbook containing a sum of money.
A reward of $25 will be paid for its return to
TUTTLE, MOREHOUSE & TAYLOR'S,
jySO It 371 State street.
District of New Haven, ss. Probate Court, i
Julv 29. 1884. " f
ESTATE OF WILLIAM HALE, late of New
Haven, in said District, deceased.
PURSUANT to an order from the Court of Pro
late for said District, will be sold at public auction
to the highest bidde on the 8th day of August, A.
D. 1884, at 10 o'clock in the forenoon (unless previ
ously disposed of at private sale), the real estate of
said deceased, situated on the south side of Crown
street. New Haven, being about eighty-eight feet,
nine and three-fonrths inches front, by ninety-seven
reet aeep.
Sale to take nlace on the nremises in 'said New
Haven. Terms made known at the time of sale.
HENRY HALE,
jy30 It Administrator,'
COAL OF SUPERIOR QUALITY
For sale at my office and at the yard at a price 25c
per ton less than the combination dealers ask. My
Coal is shipped to me direct fi:om the Lehigh Valley
Mines, is free from slate and is in every respect the
best quality that comes to this port. .
I sell all grades of Flour at wholesale or retail.
and also by the bag, at prices that defy competi-
on. ?&4.:hi per oarrei ana upwaras.
BITTER ! BUTTER !
In tubs of 50 pounds down to 6-pound tubs, and also
Butter by the single pound or by the dollar's worth
from 15c to 25c per pound. Step in and see these
goods.
GEO. W. H. HUGHES,
Independent Coal Dealer,
84 Cli-urcla Street.
3.Y8
TO THE
LADIES!
Sea Foam makes the best cookery.
Its strength is double that of any other baking
powder.
It is on that account the cheapest.
One can of Sea Foam is worth three of any other
baking powder.
By the use of it your bread will be equal to Fifth
avenue.
Your food will be the best.
Your health will be preserved.
Your daily work made easier.
Bread will be whiter and richer.
You will save a great deal of money.
Your bread, biscuit and cakes will be always light
f Sea Foam is used.
It is a new comfort for home.
It is pure, and not adulterated.
It is healthy for you and the children.
It is the perfection of science in cookery.
Your cookery will be always good.
You will always have a good cook.
It makes every cook a good one.
Your bread will never be sour.
Chemists who have analyzed Sea Foam commend
it.
Physicians who have experienced or witnessed its
health-promoting properties commend it.
AVholesalo grocers always commend it.
Retail merchants who have introduced it among
their customers and noted its wonderfully rapid sale
neer fail to commend it.
Husbands and fathers, whose wonder and delight
at the greatly improved and uniformly good quality
of the bread and pastry have led them to inquire
the cause, are loud in their commendation of it.
Housekeepers who have once used it will have no
other, and thus most strongly commend it.
Cooks whose best efforts with other powders have
failed ar ejubilant over Sea Foam.
All over the country it is
UNIVERSALLY COMMENDED.
Actually the ladies where Sea Foam has been in
troduced" are now as'noted for their excellent bread
and biscuits, corn cakes and other cookery as they
have always been for their beauty.
Nowhere in the world can be found better bread,
biscuit and cakes than is produced by these ladies.
There is a constant rivalry among them to see who
shall make the best.
And not only in this case, but Sea Foam adds to
their beauty, f or health brings beauty, and nothing
is more conducive to good health than light, nutri
tious bread, cakes and pastry, which Sea Foam
never fails to make.
Sea Foam is for sale by all first-class retail gro
cers in nearly every city. If your grocer hasn't it
in stock, and is an obliging man, he will get it for
you. If, however, you are unable to obtain it read
ily at home, send for circular and price list to
GANTZ, JONES t GO,
Manufacturers and Proprietors,
117 Dm street, N, t.
FOR SALE.
V- A DARK BAY draft Horse: weight 1,400;
sound andsrentle; Inquire at 19 Division
street of M. DA VIES,
yg9 at Gardener.
POTATOES. POTATOES.
New Potatoes, fine stock, 85c pk.
New Sweet Corn, 25c doz.
Best Lemons, 12c a doz.
Sperry & Barnes' Best Lard, lie lb.
New York Lard at vour own price.
Still aellin best Creamery Butter for 25c lb. 4 lhs
ior $1 ; in rous rac 10.
uooa uneese izc
Best Kerosene Oil 15c, 5 gals for 65c.
Best Old Government Java Coffee 28c potind.
A nice Oolong, Japan or Black Tea for 50c lb.
Cider Vinegar 25c gal.
Mjwnn's imnroved Fruit Jars S1.95 dozen.
I shall handle large lota of Peaches dally throneh
tne season.
r"Telepone.
S. S. ADAMS,
7-L5 G--?ixca. Street,
y89
THE BEST ETER PRODUCED,
IS THE
"EI6HMIE PATENT SHIRT,"
And can only oe naa oi
T. P. MERWISi,
KOT.K AOT5NT FOR NEW HAVEN.
Office at Residence. No. 28 College street. Postal
orders promptly tilled. Jyao
OIL PAINTINGS.
Just received, another consignment of those fine
Oil Paintings Ior
AT
NORTHROP'S,
69T CHIPEI. STREET.
I Jyas Just below the Bridge.
News by Telegraph
FROM ALL QUARTERS.
CLEVELAND NOTIFIED
Of His Nomination To
the Presidency.
POLITICIANS BY THE SCORE
Help the Committee In
Their "Work
A - MEETING IN THE EVENING
At Which Our Waller Is
a Talker.
CLEVELAND WILL ACCEPT.
So He Telia tbe Notification Committee
Addresses From Chairman Vilas
and tbe Committee Tbe Keply or
Governor Cleveland.
New York, July 29. At half-past three
o'clock the Albany Phalanx, headed by a
brass band, marched to the hotel to escort
the ratification committee to the executive
mansion. They heeded neither wind, rain
nor muddy streets- Their white plug hats,
the symbol of the club, were unprotected by
umbrellas. The committee men, however,
were not so courageous. They were willing
that the phalanx men should trudge through
the mud, but they preferred rtdmg
behind in carriages. A crowd followed with
umbrellas overhead. When the mansion
was reached the committee were ushered
into the west parlor. No attempt at decora
tion had been made. All there was beyond
the ordinary appointments was a bank of
choice flowers on the mantelpiece. The par
lor was uncomfortably crowded and the
gloomy day rendered it necessary to light the
chandelier. At each side of the fare-place
were the ladies of the household, Mrs. Hoyt
and Miss Cleveland, the Governor's sisters,
the Misses Hastings, his nieces,
Wra Folsom. wife of his former
law partner, and daughter and Mrs.
Lamont, wife of the Governor's secretary.
All were handsomely attired. Among the
throng of statesmen were Samuel J. Randall,
Governor Waller of Connecticut, Senator
Ransom of North Carolina, Hon. Perry Bel
mont, Senator Jonas of Louisiana, B. B.
Smalley of Vermont, Senator Murphy of New
York, S. Corning Judd of Illinois, Senator
Gorman of Md.,Hon. Erastus Corning, Amasa
P arker, Hon. William F. Vilas of Wiscon
sin, and others. While the committee'
awaited the Governor's appearance the band
outside played patriotic airs. Governor
Cleveland came into the room at 4 o'clock.
He was dressed as usual in a black frock
coat with high standing collar and broad
black necktie. He stood with his back to
the mantelpiece facing his visitors. No pre
liminary fuss was made. Colonel Vilas,
permanent chairman of the Democratic con
vention, stepped a pace or two in advance of
his fellows and read the following speech:
Grover Cleveland, Governor ot the btate ot
New York:
These eentlemen. my associates nere pres
ent, whose voice I am honored with author
ity to utter, are a committee appointed by
the national Democratic convention which
recently assembled in Chicago and charged
with the grateful duty of acquainting you,
oflicially, and in that solemn and ceremoni
ous manner which the dignity and importance
of the communication demand with the in
teresting results of its deliberations already
known to you through the ordinary chan
nels of news. Sir, that august body, con
vened by direct delegation from the Demo
ra.tin neoole of the several States and terri
tories of the republic, and deliberating under
the witness of the greatest assemoiy or rree- ,
men ever gathered to such a conference in ,
forethought of the election which the
constitution imposes upon them to make
during the current year, have nominated you
to the people of this United States to be
their President for the next ensuing term of
that crreat office, and with grave considera
tion of its exalted responsibilities have con
fidently invoked their suffrages to invest you
with its functions. Through this committee
the convention's high requirement is delivered
that you accept that candidacy. This choice
carries with it profound personal
respect and admiration, but it has
been in no manner the fruit
of these sentiments. The national
Democracy seek a President . nof in compli
ment for what he is or reward for what he
has done, but in a just expectation of what
he will accomplish as the true servant of a
free people, fit for their lofty trust. Always
of momentous consequence, they conceive
the public exigency to be now of transcend
ent importance; that a laborious reform in
administration as well as legislation is im
peratively necessary to the prosperity and
honor -of the republic and a
competent chief magistrate must be
of unusual temper and power. They have
observed with attention your execution of
the public trusts you have held, especially of
that with which you are now so honorably
invested. They place their reliance for the
usefulness of the services they expect to ex
act for the benefit of the nation upon the evi
dence derived from the services you have
performed for the State of New York. They
mvite tne electors to sucn prouis ciij
ter and competence to justify their confi
dence that in the natioti, as heretofore in the
State, the nublic business will be adminis
tered with commensurate intelligence and
ability, with single-hearted honesty and fidel
ity and with a resolute and daring fearless
ness which no faction, no combination,- no
power of wealth, no clamor can dismay or
qualify. Invoking the benediction of the
divine teacher of men, we extend from the
sovereignty of this nation his words in com
mendation and ratification of our choice:
"Well done, thou good and faithful servan
thou hast been faithful over a few things, I
will make thee ruler over many things." In
further fulfillment of our duty the. secretary
will now present the written communication
signed by the committee."
The earnest, eloquent manner in which Mr.
Vilas spoke called for applause at the end of
his address. Mr. N. M. Bell then read the
committee's address as follows:
Str In accordance with a custom befitting
the nature of the communication, the under
signed, representing the several States and
Territories of the Union, were appointed a
committee by the national Democratic con
vention which assemDieu at. icago on ouiy
8 to perform the pleasant ofiSce, which by
this means we have the honor to execute, of
informing you of your nomination as the
candidate of the Democratic party in the en
suing election for the office of President of
the United States. A declaration of the prin
ciples upon which the Democracy go before
the people witn tne nope ui iuug auu
maintaining them in the government was
made in the convention and an engrossed
copy thereof is submitted in connection with
this communication for your consideration.
We trust the approval of your judgment will
follow an examination of this expression of
opinion and policy and upon the political
controversy now maae up we miiw vuur ac
ceptance of the exalted leadership to which
you have been chosen. The election of a
President is an event of the utmost
importance to the people of Amer
ica; prosperity, growth, happiness,
me and liberty even may depend
upon its wise ordering. Your unanimous
nomination is proof that the Democracy be
lieve your election win iuusi cuiuriuuw w
secure these objects. We assure you that in
the anxious responsibilities you must as
sume as a candidate you will have the stead
fast, cordial support of the friends of the
can ha von will represent; and in the execu
tion of the wishes of the high office which
we confidently expect from the wisdom of
th nation to be conferred upon you you
may securely rely for approving aid upon the
patriotism, honor and intelligence of this
tree people.
F.verv one was intent on Cleveland's reply.
In an easy, flowing, but earnest manner the
Governor said: "Mr. Chairman and gentle
men of the committee, yonr tormal an
nouncement doe- not, of course, convey to
me the first infojmation of the result of the
convention latelv held by the JUemocracy or
the nation. And yet, when, as I listen to
your message, I see about me representatives
from all oarta of the land, of the great party
which claiming to be the party of the people
asks them to entrust to it the administration
of their government, and when I consider
that under the influence of the stern reality
which present surroundings create, that I
have been chosen to represent the plans, pur
poses and the policy of the Democratic
party, I am profoundly impressed by the
solemnity of the occasion and by the respon
sibility of my position. Though I gratefully
appreciate it, I do not at this moment con
gratulate myself for the distinguish sd honor
wheh has been conferred upon me, because
my mind is full of an anxious desire to per
form well the part which has been assigned
to me. Nor do I at this moment forget that
the rights and interests of more than fifty
millions of my fellow citizens are
mvolved in our efforts to gain Dem
ocratic supremacy. This reflection pre
sents to my mind the consideration which
more than all others gives to the action of
my party in convention assembled its most
sober and serious aspect. The party and its
representatives which ask to be entrusted at
the hands of the people with the keeping of
an tnat concerns their welfare and their safe
ty should onlv ask it with the full annrecia-
tion of the sac redness of the trust and with a
firm resolve to administer it faithfully and
well (applause) I am a Democrat because
I believe that this truth lies at the foundation
of true Democracy (loud applause). I have
have kept the faith because I believe if right
ly and fairly administered and applied Demo
cratic doctrines and measures will show
. the happiness, contentment and prosperity
oi tne people. (Applause.) It in the con
test upon which we now enter we steadfastly
hold to the underlying principles of our
party creed, and at all times keep in view
the people's good, we shall be strong, be
cause we are true to ourselves and because
the plain and independent voters of the land
will seek by their suffrages to compass
their release from party tyranny where there
should be submission to the popular
will and their protection from party
corruption, while there should be devotion to
the people's interests. (Applause and cries
or -gooa! ) xneir thoughts lend a conse
cration to our cause; and we go forth not
merely to gain a partisan advantage, but
pledged to give to those who trust us the ut
most benefit of a pure and honest adminis
tration of national affairs. (Applause.) No
higher purpose or motive can stimulate us to
supreme effort or urge us to continu
ous and earnest labor and .effective
party organization. Let us not fail in this
and we may confidently hope to reap the full
reward of patriotic services well performed.
(Applause). I have thus called to mind some
simple truths, and trite though they are, it
seems to me we do well to dwell upon them
at this time. I shall soon, I hope, signify in
the usual formal manner my acceptance of
the nomination which has been tendered to
me. In the meantime I gladly welcome you
all as co-workers in a noble cause." (Loud
applause;.
There was a season of handshaking at the
close of the Governor's speech. Then the
sliding doors were thrown open, revealing a
well spread table in the back parlor. A
hearty welcome was given to all to refresh
themselves, which was generally accepted.
By 5:30 farewelli and Godspeeds were said
and the Governor was left alone with his
household. The notification committee were
subsequently entertained by the Fort Orange
ciuo.
Ratification meetings at Albany.
Albany, July 29. Two ratification meet
ings were held to-night. The speakers were
escorted to the Leland Opera House and
Music Hall by the phalanx. Both places
were packed. The speakers were Congress
man Dorsheimer, John E. Devlin, Governor
Waller of Connecticut, Colonel Vilas, Hon.
P. A. Collins, Colonel Hooker of Missouri,
Samuel J. Randall and others. Resolutions
condemnatory of the Republican party and
laudatory of the Democratic ticket were
passed. Great enthusiasm prevailed. The
outdoor meeting was abandoned on account
of the weather. Governor Hendricks will be
officially notified at Saratoga to-morrow.
A King Joins tbe Good Templars.
London, July 29. King Tawhiao and his
Maori chiefs were to-day initiated into the
order of Good Templars, Rev. Dr. Vibbert of
New Haven conducting the ceremonies.
A Big Horse Race Postponed.
Providence, R. I., July 29. The great race
between Jay-Eye-See and Phallas to beat
their record has been postponed to Friday
on account of the heavy track. Mr. Case re
fused to allow his horses to trot, knowing
tWlt unless they had a good day and track
they could not beat their record.
CAMPAIGN GOSSIP.
Beeeher'i Bread and Water XMet.
New York, July 29. A labor organization
in Brooklyn has caused to be printed and
circulated in pamphlet form as a campaign
document the sermon preached by Rev. Henry
Ward Beecher during the Pittsburg riots of
lo 7 in whicn ne was alleged to have advo
cated bread and water as a fit diet for labor
ing men.
Governor Waller Among tbe Speakers.
New York, July 29. Invitations have
been extended to the members of the Demo
cratic National and notification committees
now in Albany to be present at the Cleveland
and Hendricks notification meeting in Chick
ering Hall to-morrow night. Colonel Vilas
of Wisconsin, Senator Jones of Louisana,
and Governor Waller of Connecticut are ex
pected to speak at the meeting.
Tbe National Labor Committee.
Chicago, July 29. A meeting of the Na
tional committee of the National Labor party,
the convention of which was to be held to
morrow, took place to-night at the Briggs
House and a resolution to adjourn and meet
again in Chicago on June, 13 1888, was car
ried. This action caused much surprise as
all arrangements had been perfected for
holding the convention. Practically the pur
pose of the convention was carried out by the
adoption of a resolution which indorses both
the Republican and Democratic platforms
and advises the workingmen to vote as they
deem proper.
ACCIDENT TO A YACHT.
Tbe Elepbant Dismasted oflf Bartlett's
Reef.
New London, July 29. Information was
received here Monday evening that the yacht
Elephant of the Atlantic squadron was seen
dismasted about four o'clock in the afternoon
two miles southeast of Bartlett's reef. At
the lightship it was said the yacht was bound
west when disabled, but the crew seemed to
get her under control and headed towards
Greenport under scant sail. At 8 o'clock to
night Collector Tibbitta received a dispatch
from Commodore Hagins of the Atlantic
acht,club stating that he had been inform
ed of an accident to the yacht. A tug
was sent from here to find and assist her.
Wide Damage by Pierce Rains.
Cpmberland, Md., July 29. This section
has been visited by a terrific rain storm and
great damage, especially to railroad bridges,
besides loss of life, is reported. Three inches
of rain has fallen here since 3 p. m. yester
day. At FroBtburg, Tonaconing and Barton
the damage to property is serious. Last
night Mrs. McCormick and her daughter were
drowned in the flood; also two children of
Richard Moody, all of Barton.
A Surveying Party Drowned.
Colling wood, Ont., July 29. Information
has been received here that a surveying party
consisting of W. O. Johnston, John East
wood, R. J. Eardon and F. Bleakley have
been drowned in the Spanish river.
A REUNION OP VETERANS.
Soldiers of tbe Late War in Social
. meeting.
Dayton, Ohio, July 29. A misty rain
fell this morning, yet the city was crowded
with strangers attending the grand soldiers'
reunion. Grand Army posts and ex-soldiers
from all sections of the State have been ar
riving all day and "were assigned quarters by
the committee. At the City Hall the ex-
prisoners of war held a reunion and received
the names of visitors. Regimental reunions
were held to-night at the fair grounds where
a monster camp-fire has been established. The
day was ushered in by a salute of thirteen
guns, and this afternoon the services were
continued at the fair erounda where Govern
or Bettilon delivered a welcome, to which
uenerai coert ienedy of ceufontaine re
sponded. General Rosecrans and party from
Washington arrived shortly after noon and
took rooms at the Beckel house.
THE WORLD'S PAIR.
American Officials Visiting Europe In
Its Interest.
Washington, July 29. Hon. John Eaton,
commissioner of education, sails by the Ore
gon from New York to-morrow. He will
make a hurried trip to London and Paris to
confer with the educational authorities of
Great Britain and France respecting exhibits
at the world's fair at New Orleans next . De
cember. Hon. Walter Fearn, special com
missioner to European governments, goes on
the same steamer with credentials from the
exposition commissioners and the Depart
ment of State to complete arrangements for
foreign governmental exhibits. Mr. E. M.
Pine, of Philadelphia, accompanies them as
commissioner of the exposition to see manu'
f actnrers of Europe who have announced
their intention to be represented at the
tair.
Tbe Buildings Por Tbe Expositions.
Washington, D. C, July 29. Hon. B. F.
Butterworth, commissioner of patents, and
commissioner on the part of the govern
ment to represent the Interior department at
the coming New Orleans, Louisville and Cin
cinnati exposition, has returned to Washing
ton from the last named cities where he has
been to see what is required for the recep
tion of the government exhibits. He reports
the exhibition buildings at Louisville and
Cincinnati large and commodious. He says
the government owin to small approprii
tions and lack of time is laboring under
great disadvantage. However, the govern
ment commissioners will push matters and
make the best showing they can for the time
and money they have to do it with. He
thinks the government can make the grand
est display at the New Orleans exposition
next winter that has ever been made by any
country.
Tbe Army of trie Tennessee.
St. Paul, Minn., July 29. General Sher
man is in St. Paul conferring with the local
committee relative to the reunion of the So
ciety of the Army of the Tennessee on Au
gust 13. All arrangements have been made
and the reunion will take place on the beau
tiful banks of Lake Minnetonka near the
Hotel Lafayette. Ladies will be admitted fo
the banquet. Those intending to be present
should promptly notiry lienerai J . u. San
born, chairman of the executive committee.
Senator Logan's Western Trip.
Washington July 29. Senator Logan,
who has just returned from his western trip,
declined to-day to talk about politics or the
political situation. When asked about his
western trip he merely replied that the sol
diers at Minneapolis met and had a pleasant
time and that he enjoyed the trip very
much.
THE CHOLERA.
Yesterday's Deatbs From tbe Scourge
Paris, July 29. There were twenty-three
deaths from cholera to-day at Marseilles and
eight at Aries. Seventeen cases of cholera
are reported at Panculieri, a small village of
Italy eighteen miles from Turin. No deaths
have yet occurred and the disease is of a
comparatively mild type.
Ten deaths from cholera occurred at Aix
to-day.
Visiting Wheelmen in ITIaine.
Augusta, Me., July 29. The vjsiting Chi
cago and Boston wheelmen, twenty-two in
number, arrived this afternoon in the midst
.of a drizzling rain storm. This evening a re
ception and dance is given them at the Au
gusta House. Several of the visitors took
advantage of the lull in the rain to take a
run over the city. They will be joined to
morrow by several wheelmen of Maine.
A Hotel C'lerK Absconds.
New York, July 29. Inspector Byrnes of
the Central police office was notified to-night
that William B. Bigelow, for many years
nigt clerk at the Grand Union Hotel, had ab
sconded to-day with the receipts of the res
taurant amounting to $800. About $20,000
worth of jewelry belonging to the guests of
the hotel which was m Bigelow s custody
was found intact.
DEMOCRATS IN CONFERENCE.
Tbe Meeting or tbe National Commit
tee. ' Albany, N. Y., July 29. The National
Democratic committee was in session until 12
o'clock. The chairman had been called away
by telegraph on private business, and on
motion of Dr. Miller, of Nebraska, the Hen.
John S. Barbour, of Virginia, presided. The
roll call showed Connecticut, Kentucky,
Michigan, Nevada, Dakota, ' New Mexico,
Utah and Wyoming unrepresented. Mr.
Charles J. Canada,of New York, was re-elected
treasurer, and Edward B. Dickinson, of
New York, was reappointed official steno
grapher. Dr. Dawson, of South Carolina,
presented the report of the committee on the
plan of the campaign. The report led to a
long discussion. It recommended among
other things that the chairman of the State
committees shall be called upon from time to
time for reports as to the condition of affairs
in their States, such reports to be accom
panied by an expression of the opinion and
judgment of the executive committee of the
State on all suggestions made. The great
object aimed at is a systematic method of
obtaining correct information, and each mem
ber was enjoined to keep himself abreast of
all political affairs in his State. It was re
commended further that the National com
mittee and the Congressional committee,
of which Senator Gorman is chair
man, should act in thorough accord. The
report was adopted. The question of proxies
called forth a long debate. It was finally de
cided that proxies shall be appointed by the
chairman and secretary subject to the ap
proval of the committee; in other words, the
chairman and secretary will act as a perman
ent committee on credentials. It was agreed
that all future meetings of the National and ,
Executive committees shall be called by the
chairman, due notification of the meetings to
be given the members. Mr. Thompson of
New York asked further time for the com
mittee on headquarters to report, which
was granted. The chairman (Mr. Barbour)
announced the executive committee as fol
lows: William H. Barnum, Connecticut, ex
officio; A. P. Gorhani, Maryland; W. W.
Ransom, JNorth Carolina; B. b . Jonas, Louis
iana; Hubert O. Thompson, New York;
William A. Wallace, Pennsylvania; John S.
Barbour, Virginia; William F. V lias,
Wisconsin; Austin H. Brown, Indiana; M.
M. riamm, Iowa; H. D. McHenry, Kentucky;
P. H. Kelly, Minnesota; Bradley B. Smalley,
Vermont; Alvah M. Sulloway, JNew
Hampshire; F. W. Dawson, South Carolina;
M. W. Armstrong, Ohio; Miles Ross, New
Jersey; S. Corning Judd, HI.; J. B. Barna
by, R. I.; John G. Prather, Mo. A sub
committee of five, who will attend to most
of the business of the campaign, is to be se
lected by the executive committee from their
own ranks. The executive committee will
meet at the Fifth Avenue Hotel, New York,
on Thursday. The committee then ad
journed to meet at 3 o'clock for the purpose
of accompanying the ratification committee
to the executive mansion.
A DEMOCRATIC BARBECUE.
Five' Tbousand Persons Fed in tbe
Woods.
Lexington, Ky. , July 29. The Democratic
barbecue here to-day was an immense affair.
Over ten thousand persons were present in
the grove. Preparations to feed the multi
tude had been in progress several days. Last
night about midnight fires were lighted in
the wood pits and after they had burned to
live coals the carcasses of scores of sheep
and hogs were skewered with hickory sticks
and laid across the pits to roast. Near the
pits were other fires for the making of the
"burgoo." Fifty men were engaged in pre
paring the feast and setting the tables, which
were five hundred feet long. Gus Janvert
superintended the burgoo, while
the veteran Jack Hostetter attended to
the barbecuing. In the center of the
park a platform was erected for speech mak
ing purposes and was surrounded by benches
for the thousands of listeners. Colonel W.
C. Breckenridge was called to the
chair and made some introductory re
marks, describing the origin of the Kentucky
barbecue and introducing the speakers who
had come with the Democrats here to coun
sel on the opening of the canvass. General
William Preston welcomed the guests and
gave a humorous sketch of his military ca
reer. He paid a high tribute to the Demo
cratic party and the newly elected stan
dard bearers. He introducedJHon. Durbin
Ward, of Ohio, who made a liberal speech.
He thought if Thurman could have been
nominated Ohio would have been carried. As
it is the result is uncertain. He did not like
the Democratic platform. It was not strict
enough on the free trade plank. He pre
ferred Carlisle for President and Carlisle's
sentiments on the tariff for public purposes
only.
Base Ball.
AT CHICAGO.
2 0 0 8 1114 616
3 0 1 1 0 0 0 18
Chicagos.
Detrcuta...
AT BUFFALO.
Clevelands 0 000000000 00
Buflalos 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11
OTHE& GAMES.
Brooklyn Metropolitans 6, Brooklyns 1.
Philadelphia No games on account of rain.
New York The Providence and New York game
was postponed on account of rain.
Toledo Columbus S, Toledo 1.
Cincinnati Cincinnati 5, St. Louis 6 (thirteen
innings).
Louisville Indianapolis 1, Louisvilles 2.
A HORRIBLE TALE.
Tbe Brutal Treatment Dieted Out to a
Motber and Daugbter.
T Chattanooga, Tenn., July 29. Mrs. Julia
Buchanan and daughter Mary, aged seventeen,
live five miles from Spring City. Several
nights ago seven men after an insulting pro
posal compelled the ladies to accompany
them to the woods where they were compelled
to remain all night. The men alternately
outraged the mother and daughter, and in
resisting them both were bruised unmerci
fully. The next morning the women were
taken to the river, forced into a boat and
the whole party floated down the river to
Smith's Landing where the mother was taken
to the shore. Two of the men with her
daughter proceeded to near Birchwood,
Bradley county, where she was kept in cus
tody two days, making her escape while her
captors were asleep. The mother made
known what had occurred and war
rants were placed in the hands
of Marshal Razor, and he arrested one
James Gilhurst, who on a preliminary trial
confessed the crime and gave the names of
the parties associated with him. Yesterday
Henry Thomas was arrested in Bradley
county and taken to Spring City for trial.
Gilhurst was committed to jail at Washing
ton. The other five men whose names are
not divulged are still at large, but are known
to be close neighbors to Mrs. Buchanan.
This evening Miss Buchanan stated that after
arriving near Birchwood she got possession
of a knife and upon one of the men renewing
his assaults she stabbed him and made her
escape into the woods, leaving the man dead
on the ground. This statement is doubted
by some, but the girl swears to it and pro.
poses to accompany a party to find the
body.
TELEGRAPHIC JOTTINGS.
President Thomas Dickson, of the Dela
ware and Hudson Canal company, is serious
ly ill from an affection of the -heart at his
residence in Morristown, N. J.
The funeral of the late ex-Governor Walter
Harriman occurred at the Unitarian church
in Concord, N. H., at 2 o'clock yesterday af
ternoon. There was a large attendance of
the most prominent men of the State.
A large crowd witnessed the lacrosse game
played at the Staten Island cricket grounds
yesterday between the Caughnawaga Indians
and the New York team. The Indians won
by a score of three goals to two.
Oarsmen Beaten by Newspaper Itlen.
New York, July 29. The game of base
ball played at Oak Point to-day between the
press team selected from the various news
papers and a team of professional oarsmen on
which Ross, Teenier, Plaisted and others
played resulted in a victory for the press.
Kennedy of the times handled the bat like a
professional. Only five innings were played.
Press 21, oarsmen 11.
Sbot For Trespassing.
Albany, N. Y., July 29. This evening
Mrs. Francis Renther and Henry Long
were walking through Douglas Pratt's pota
to patch at Burt's farm near West Albany,
when Pratt shot both of them, Mrs. Reuther
receiving a severe flesh wound in the neck
and a slight wound in the forehead. Long
was shot in the arm, showing a compound
fracture. Neither was fatally injured. It is
supposed that Pratt shot them because they
were damaging his potatoes. He was ar
rested. THE ESTIMATES FOR IRELAND.
A Stormy Discnssion in tbe House of
Commons.
London, July 29. In the House of Com
mons to-night six hours were consumed in
the discussion of the adjourned Irish esti
mates. The Parnellites fought each item
tooth and nail. Mr. Sexton denounced the
crown prosecutor, Mr. Bolton, as a forger and
bankrupt and moved to disallow the amount
of his salary. Messrs. Labouchere, T. P.
O'Connor and T. D. Sullivan supported the
motion. Mr. Trevelyan, chief secretary
for Ireland, promised to take legal advice as
to the propriety of withholding Mr. Bolton's
compensation. Bolton is one of those impli
cated in the infamous practices lately shown
by Mr. O'Brien to be carried on by certain
government officials in Dublin. In the fur
ther consideration of the estimates Mr. O Con
nor moved to disallow the salary of Mr. John
Nash, solicitor general for Ireland, but this
was rejected by a vote of 136 to 29.
The entire session was stormy and
excited, the chairman rising almost incessant
ly in vain attempts to preserve order. The
estimates were finally adjourned again, the
consideration not having been completed.
LOCAL NEWS.
Personal.
Captain Sheridan, of Company E, Bridge
port, is better and hopes are entertained of
his recovery.
The Rev. John E. Bushnell, of Saybrook,
Conn. , a graduate of the Yale class of '84,
will be installed pastor of the Fairfield Con
gregational church this afternoon. The pub
lie services will be held about 2 p.m., and
Professor Barbour, of Yale, will deliver the
sermon.
George M. Human of the rubber mill in
Seymour will take his yearly cruise with his
two brothers from New Haven and Meriden
along the coast. He starts on Thursday for
the trip, which will consume perhaps a
month.
Police Notes.
Yesterday afternoon Mary Kelly and
daughter and Mrs. Ann O'Brien were arrested
for being engaged in a row in the yard of
their house on Oak street, near Factory
street. The fight was interrupted by Officer
Ahern and the belligerents were taken to the
poUce office. They are charged with intoxi
cation and breach of the peace.
Mary Kelly and Annie O'Brien, mother
and daughter, were arrested last evening for
breach of the peace. The daughter is also
charged with lascivious carriage.
James Kelly was arrested last evening for
stealing fruit from the premises of Samuel
Hallowell.
Michael Malone stole a box from the
freight house of the Consolidated railroad on
Long Wharf and was locked up for the of
fense. Hugh Dinnan and John Sullivan will have
to answer before the City court this morning
for a breach of the peace on Congress avenue
last evening. They were fighting among
themselves.
Patrick Doherty was arrested last evening
for begging from people on the streets.
John Byfield was arrested last evening on
a warrant charging him with injury o a
building known as "the Car Head lining
works," located on Thomas street. It is the
property of Charles L. English. It is said
that the accused was throwing stones at the
building and breaking the windows.
BOARD OF HEALTH.
Precautions Against tbe Appearance of
Cholera Other matters Considered.
A meeting of the Board of Health was held
last evening.
The standing committee were requested to
get the opinion of the corporation counsel as
to the powers of the Board to compel parties
owning privies that are a nuisance to con
nect them with sewers in streets where sew
ers are constructed.
Dr. Lindsley thought as a matter of cau
tion in case of cholera appearing in New
Haven a nurse should be secured and a place
found where a tent could at once be erected
for the reception of such cases. It was
merely a precautionary-measure, andjalthough
no occasion might arise where it would be
needed, yet it was best to be prepared for
such an emergency if it should arise.
Clerk Whedon thought the upper end of
Goffe street on the hill would be the best
place for a cholera hospital tent if one should
be needed.
Professor Brewer and Dr. Lindsley thought
the tent should be located nearer the alms
house as they would then have better care
and supplies.
The matter was referred to Health Officer
Lindsley, giving him power as he thought
best.
Dr. Bartlett said that objectionable matter
was being thrown over a fence on Union
street into the canal running alongside the
Consolidated railroad tracks. The matter
was referred to the inspectors to inquire and
report.
List of Advertised Letters.
List of letters remaining unclaimed in the New
Haven postofflce July SO, 1884:
GENTLEMEN'S LIST.
B Ed Blinn.
C John A Campbell.
P-C. Fogg.
H George F. Hull.
K W. B. Kibbee.
S A. Swiekardi.
T Carlton A. Thompson.
W Samuel A. Willford.
LADIES' LIST.
L Hiss Julia Laidley.
m Mrs. E. Matthews.
R Mrs. L. J. Raymond. - -
POLITICAL.
pair Haven Blaine and Logan Club.
A meeting of Fair Haven Republicans will he held
Thursday evening, July 31st, to form a Blaine and
Logan club for the Eleventh and Twelfth wards and
the Annex. All in favor of Blaine and Logan are
cordially invited. jy3t
Wlunts.
WANTED,
A SITUATION by a competent girl to do general
housework in a private family ; good reference
from last place. Inquire for two days at
Jy30 It 281 WHALLEY AVENUE.
wati:i.
A SITUATION by a girl to do general house
work In a small private family; good refer
ence if required from fast place. Call at
;)y30 lt iW CONGRESS AVENUE.
WANTED,
TWO experienced dress goods salesmen; good
salary and permanent position to right parties.
Apply Immediately. F. M. BROWN i CO.
Jy302t .
WANTED,
SITUATION as Orst-clam cook In a private
family; good city reference. Apply at
A
vm rjAmii.ivrt oiKr.i.
WANTED,
A YOUNG man 14 to 16 vears old to learn the
Drug business. Inquire at
A LIVING'S DRUG LTORE,
jy88 8t Corner Grand and State Streets.
WANTED,
T ADIES and gentlemen with from $.W to $500 to
JLi handle one of the greatest inventions of tli
age; grand chance to make a fortune; from $10 1
$35 a day sure; legitimate and honorable; no com
petition and no risk. Call or address
ROOM 4, KING'S HOTEL, -Jy28
2t 672 Chapel Street
WANTED.
M TABLE Boarders. Also one room for rent.
Apply at
jylltf 509 CHAPEL STREET.
WANTED,
To BUY lot of Second-hand Furniture and Car
pets. Highest cash price paid. Orders by mail
promptly attended to at
ja!7 CHURCH STREET.
Intelligence Ofllce.
EMPLOYMENT office for males and females.
Help of different nationalities can be supplied to
private families, boarding houses, hotels and res
taurants. The proprietor of thisestablishment pays
great attention in tne choice of girls and women be
fore sending them to fill situations. Calls from the
country at any distance are promptly attended to.
Invalid and wot nurses at short notice. Male help
ior laiiiuiee aim larm lianas always reaoy.
MRS. T. MULLIGAN. .
.1.1
a26tf
197 George, corner Temple street.
To Whom it may Coivcern !
MONEY liberally advanced in sums
to suit on all Kinds of merchan
dise and personal property of ev
ery description at
EDWARD ENGEL'S
Old and Reliable Money Loan Office,
311 and 343 STATE STREET, New Haven, Conn.
All lecal transactions strictly Confidential. Ja5
MRS. DR. J. A. WRIGHT,
Psychometrist and Clairvoyant.
Consultation on Business, Minerals, Health and al
Personal Matters.
Readings of Character by Handwriting, Photograph
or Hair.
Price Opntlemen, Ladies, $1.
Mrs. Wriffht can be consulted at her office, 9H Or
anpre street, daily, 9 a. m. to 8 p. m. inii8tf
jgitmrocv gcsovts.
(ood Country Board
MIX a pleasant village six miles from Litch
field, Conn. Terms moderate. Good Fishing
Special inducements to boys, t-Irrks or Rtudents.
Address BOX ST1,
NorthfieUl. Conn.
jy-W 6t
HOTEL. SEA VIEW.
SAVIN ROCK - - WEST HAVEN. CONN.
$3.00 per day: S!0 to $S0 prr week
Shore dinners, fish and game suppers
served at aH hours.
SOUTIIWICK &c CO.,
jyldawlm Proprietors.
COVE
HOUSE
MORRISICOVE, NEW HAVEN.
Hotel Bum fitting as Follows:
Cove House to Belle Dock, 8:30 a. m., 1 p. m.
Cove House to 926 Chapel street 6 p. m.
Belle Dock to Cove House, 9 a. m., 2 and 7 :45 p. m.
926 Chapel sttet to Cove House, 7:15 p. m
Sundays.
Cove House to 936 Chapel street, 9 a. m. and 8 p. m.
926 Chapel stree to Cove House. 10:30 a. m., 9 p. m.
G. S. BARKENTIN,
PROPRIETOR,
OROVK COTTAGE.
AT SAVIN ROCK, FORMERLY OCEAN COTTAGE
Summer Street, Wst Haven, Conn.
H. A. CONVERSE, proprietor of the Austin House,
New Haven, has fitted up and handsomely furnished
the above cottage. It is now open for guests. Beau
tifully situated adjoining the prov. and possessing
all the facilities for comfort and enjoynent. Grove
cottage affords a rare oppornity for sojourners at
the seashore. jel 2m
Thelailroad Waiting Room.,
SAVIX ROCK.
Spacious restaurant rooms. Large Pavilion. A
good diimer for 50 cents. Parties will be guaranteed
just reception on all occasions. O. HOWES,
m24 3m Proprietor.
OCEAI COTTAGE.
SAVIN ROCK SHORE.
Mrs. 8. Holmes. Proprietress. The nlensantest
place on Savia Rock Shore, elegantly fitted through
out, now ready for summer boarders and transient
guests. Views from its rooms and verandas unsur
passed by any upon the coast. Bathing convenient
and free'from danger. Having had long experience
in the business, cannot fail to please all who favor
me with their patronage. Terms moderate. P. O.
Box 284, West Haven, Conn. je.3
Beach House.
Savin Rock, West Haven Ct.
The popular proprietor Sea View 1870-160.
Austin House, New Haven, 1881-1882, Beach
House 1882.
WILL OPEN BEACH HOUSE
JUNE 1st., 1884
1SS4.
1884.
Osprey Beach.
Coney Island of Connecticut.
WILL OPEN JULY 1st.
The most spacious and best conducted day resort on
the Coast. The
Shore .Dinners
Which made this place famous in past years will be
maintained throughout the season.
OCKFOKD & JEROME.
jeSOlm "
Railroad Grove Restaurant
IX THE GROVE,
W. H. PUTNAM. PROPRIETOR, FORMERL?
PUTNAN HALE.
The most delichtful place on the shore. Meals
served at all hours. Roast Oysters, Stewed Clains,
etc. AH Temperance Drinks. Hillman's Celebrated
ice uream. jezu an
BRANFORD POINT HOTEL,
BRADFORD, C02-TV.
SEASON 1884.
tage and Carriages connect with all trains at
Branford Depot
Elegant Dining Room and Sum
mer Pavilion.
DINNERS AND SUPPERS SERVED TO ORDER TO
PARTIES.
Telephone connects wtih the house.
Parties desirisK information in resrard to roonm.
rates, etc., address
UEUKUE II. BROWNE,
jy71m Proprietor.
SOUTH END HOUSE.
Now Open Tor the Season.
It has been refitted and permanent and transient
guests can be accommodated. The grounds are
spacious and good facilities for fishing. Dinners a
specialty. Stae leaves South End at 7:20 a. m., 1,
4 and 7 p. in. Sundays, 9 a. m. and 7 p. m. Leaves
New Haven 9:30 a. m.. 2:30, 5:15 and 8 p. m. Satur
days at 9 p. m. Dancing Tuesday and Friday even
ings at n o ciock.
JOHN SMITH, Proprietor.
Jel2 3m
SKEEEE'S RESTAURAT.
SAVIN ROCK HELL.
Now open for te season. Increased attractions.
The finest Skating Rink on the Shore 100 feet long
and 40 feet wide. Flying Homes, Rifle Range, Ex
cellent Boating facilities.
DINNFRS AND SUPPERS SERVED AT SHORT
NOTICE.
CHARLES SK.EEI.ES.
ieapgrn
FOR SALE,
IN BRANFORD. a two-story house, barn
jj and other outbuildings, all nearly new; beau
ilLtiful location; about 50 rods from the shore
with one or six acres of land. Will be sold cheap'
Terms easy. For particulars inquire of
WE MILES GRANNISS. Fair Haven
Or J. AUGUSTUS BLACKS TONE,
a!8 ldwtf Branford.
A PRI7E cedfrS0anecJly,)S
fl I lll-L which will help all 'of either sfxto
more money right away than any
thing else In the world. Fortunes await the workers
absolutely sure. At once Address true & Co
Augmsta. Maine. feTwlt '
VARICOCELE ?J.Zr,
Q
CHO
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