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Morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven [Conn.]) 1848-1894, August 20, 1884, Image 3

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015483/1884-08-20/ed-1/seq-3/

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August 20, 1884.
VOL. LII.
mm
Sttg
Special gfoticeg.'
of onr fflite Dresses,
or our WMtB mtfl
of onr Parasols autt
of onr Sammer Gools
AT COST AND
Large assortment of Black and Colored Jerseys at great
ly reduced prices. These are fine goods, French made,
and good fitting.
TWINES, CARPET WARPS, SEINE TWINES.
Wicking and Cordage of all Kinds.
Shipping Tags, Tourist Tags, Pin Tags, Etc,
AT
G. J. MOFFATT'S
497, 400 and
1865 iQt!884
m& m m a&
PIANOS TO BENT !
A full set of
SECOND-HAND BAXD ESSTRUME3VTS
lor sale very cheap. A Large Stock of Drums for tlie Campaign al
ways on hand.
Rummer esoxts.
' BLOCK ISLAND, R. I.
Only Four and a half Hours From New
Haven.
OCEAX VIEW HOTEL,
MOIJL The palace hotel of the seashore.
pfjjgJijSj Magnificent fishing and bathing and dri v
! Sa3lng. Send for illustrated circular.
" N. BALL, Proprietor.
O. 8. MARDEN, Manager. Jy31 lro
COVE1
MORRIS COVE, NEW HAVEN.
The' Prettiest Seaside Resort in
the Vicinity.
The Fare Excellent. Term Moderate.
G. S. BARKENTIN,
PROPRIETOR,
NEW HAVEN.
MONEY ISLAND HOUSE,
Blum vniiiin) iwiin.
. This house has been refurnished and
fc : . umuui. A lfiree.
f rLioool dining room is one ol tne leaxures
auSSaSof the house.
No Mosquitoes ! Excellent View 1
FINE BATHING BEACH. .
The steam yacht BEATRICE will connect at the
Main Land every hour and for every train.
Also with the Philadelphia at
Pot Island.
Billiard Tables and a fine Bar.
Postofflce address
STONY GREEK, CONN.,
H. D. KILLAM, Proprietor.
au7tf
The Railroad Waiting Room.,
SAVIN ROCK.
Spacious restaurant rooms. Large Pavilion. A
good dinner for 50 cents. Parties will be guaranteed
Tust reception on all occasions. O. HOWlib,
m24 8rrT Proprietor.
OCEAN COTTAGE.
SAVIN ROCK SHORE.
Mrs. S. Holmes, Proprietress. The pleasantest
place on Savin Rock Shore, elegantly fitted through
out, now ready for summer boarders and transient
euests. Views from its rooms and verandas unsur
passed by any upon the coast. Bathing convenient
and f ree from danger. Having had long experience
in the business, cannot fail to please all who favoi
me with their patronage. Terms moderate. r.V.
Box 884. West Haven, Conn. Je"
Beach House.
Savin Rock, West HaYon, Ct.
The popular proprietor Sea View 1879-1880,
Austin House, New Haven, 1881-1882, Beach
House 1882.
WILL OPEN BEACH HOUSE
JUNE 1st, 1884
m23 3m
Railroad Grove Restaurant
. IN THE GROVE,
W. H. PUTNAM, PROPRIETOR, FORMERLY
PUTNAN & HALE.
The most delightful place on the shore. Meals
served at all hours. Roast Oysters, btewea C'lams,
, AiiTomnerance Drinks. HUlrnan's Celebrated
V 1 i
Ice Cream
je20 2m
SOUTH END HOUSE.
Now Open for the Season
It Has Deen rennea nu pcmiciii.
guests can be accommodated. The grounds are
s i 1 ..,;ki ..- eahincr Dinners a
specialty. Stage leaves South End at 7:20 a. m., 1,
4 ana i p. m. duub, . k. -
New Haven 9:80 a. m., 2:30, 5:15 and 8.ro. Satur-
. 11 TtsnmnirTllHlllllV Mitt T TWU1V 6VeU-
USJB Vklr a '- HI' . i.-ft j - .
ings at 8 o'clock.
JOHN SMITH, Proprietor,
SKEELE'S RESTAUBAT.
ft AVTfl ROCK HILL
NOW open iot im oowvu.
The finest Skating Rink on the Shore 100 feet long
m -i .. iflmu-1 sH-.r-Hnn$
and 40 reel wiae. r iyuik .
DINNFRS AND SUPPERS SERVED AT SHORT
trrm inn1
CHARLES SKEELES,
je 30 2m
SMALLPOX
CAN BE REMOVED
io?r cs o.,
London, Perfumers to Her Majesty the Queen, have
invetuea ana paieniea we wonu-naiu.iw
OIIUITKItATOIt,
Which removes Smallpox Marks of however long
standing. The application is simple and harmless,
causes no inconvenience and contains nothing inju
rious. Sena tor particulars.
SUPERFLUOUS HAIR.
LEON & CO.'S "Depilotory'
Removes Superfluous Hair in a few minutes without
Simple and harmless. Full directions sent by mad.
Price 1.
GEO. W. SHAW, Gen. Agt.,
$19 A TREMONT STREET, BOSTON, MASS.
m28eod&w
Cheapest place in the city to buy wood by Hie cord
hWcd7auartercordor Wrel. Orders by mad
or telephone will receive prompt iu.'uuuii,
NEW HAVEN WOOD YARD,
,r KAST ST.. OPP. MYRTLE.
' WiAATHS"
A FEW
h aeeommodated
krd and Dlessant rooms with
with flu
Lmodern
improvements. Locality second to
none in the city.
mWOOSfSt'LACE.
Special Notices.
of
BELOW COST,
Paper Warehouse, , .
SOI State Street.
ORGANS TO RENT !
uxcuvsxons.
LAKE PLEASANT !
i Spiritualists' Camp Meeting ! !
! The Largest In New England.
: REDUCED FARE.
: SPECIAL TRAINS.
Qliic Time. No Change of Cars.
MUSIC BY FITCHBURG
BAND OF 24 PIECES
AND
THE RUSSELL. ORCHESTRA.
SPECIAL TRAINS WILL BE RUN TWO SUNDAYS
Angnst 24th and 31st, 18S4.
Leave Union Depot, New Haven, 6 a. m., arriving
at Lake Pleasant at 9:50 a. m.
Returning, leave Lake Pleasant 4:15 p. m., arriv
ing in New Haven at 7:42 p. m.
Fare for the Round Trip 2.
Trains will stop for passengers at the following
points only: Cheshire, . Plantsville, Southington,
Plainville and Simsbury.
For list of Speakers, Public Test Mediums and
Entertainments see small bills.
' Lake Pleasant is situated in Montague, Mass., on
the Fitchburg railroad, about one hundred miles
rromjNew naven. inese trains wiu give an euei
lent opportunity to see the beauties of the New
Haven and Northampton Railroad, land passengers
on the Camp Ground without change of Cars in
time for the Morning Religious Exercises, returning
at the close of the Afternoon Exercises and reach
New Haven at an early hour in the evening.
E. A. RAY, S. 3. OPDYKE, Ja.,
General Ticket Agent, Superintendent.
aul6 ISt .
STARIN'S GLEN ISLAND.
America's Day Summer Resort !
TWO GRAND CONCERTS DAILY.
DILLER'S MILITARY RAND.
SUPERIOR DINNERS A LA CARTE.
Klein Deutschland !
THE STEAMER
JOHN H. STARIN,
capt. McAllister,
Will make the first trip TUESDAY, JULY 8th, and
from this date till the close of the season will make
TWO TRIPS WEEKLY
To Glen Island and Return.
Every Tuesday and. Thursday,
From Storm's Pier, foot of Brewery street (five
minutes' walk from Railroad Depot) at 8:30 a. m.
sharp. Returning leave GLEN ISLAND at 3:30 p.
m., arriving in New Haven in time to connect with
8 o clock train.
Excursion tickets (New Haven to Glen island and
return) - - - - - - 75c.
New Haven to New York and return' via Glen
Island and Pier 18, North river - - - $1.50.
Single tickets to Glen Island ... auo.
Fare from Glen Island to New Haven ' - 50c.
THOMAS WILL FURNISH THE MUSIC ON THE
4BOAT EVERY TRIP.
No intoxicating drinks obtainable on this steamer.
Glen Island is omceredby efficient uniformed polic..
Ladies and Children unattended will find nothing to
martneir pleasure.
positively no tree list. j. m. v;uijvli;i,
je30tf Agent, Starin's Pier.
Acknowledged the finest excursion steamer eve
run from New Haven.
THE SUPERB STEAMER
PHILADELPniA,
(Capacity COO Passengers)
FOR
RRANFORD POINT
AND
THIMBLE ISLANDS.
DAILY.
Leave Belle Dock at 9:45 a. m. and 2:45 p. m.
Leave Islands at 12:15 and 5:15 p. la
Leave Branford Point at 1:05 and 6:05 p. m.
FARE EACH WAY - 25 CENTS.
Special low rates for excursions. For moonlight
sails this steamer is unexcelled. Address
jyl F. W. BXNMAN, City.
GOLD MEDAL, PARTS, 187th
BAKER'S
Brettt Cocoa.
Warranted nbaoltitely pure
Cocoa, from which the exoesa of
Oil haa been reicoved. It has three
timet the strength of Cocoa mixed
with Starch, Arrowroot or Sugar,
and Is therefore far more economi
cal. . It is delicious, nourishing,
strengthening, easily digested, and
admirably adapted for invalids as
well as for persons In health.
Sold by droesrs everywhere.
BAKER & CO., Dorchester, Mass.
t
8 7
f.
CIGARS
m
I am selling Cigars man
ufactured fYom fine qual
ity imported Tobacco at 5c
apiece.
HUGH J. REYNOLDS,
The Hungarian Wine Dealer,
Nos, 152 & 154 Crown St,
' -" - New Haven, Conn,
-IS
Office.
WE have a customer for a desirable office
1U For particulars call at
ntitvv o e ueuciBui.vuii.'c
anl9 759 Chapel Street.
FOB RENT,
ROOMS over No. 73 and No. 76 Orange
street. Two large Warerooms, about 74 by
zeet. une room, arjout oy aw ice
ler rooms. Central and desirable tor Dusineas
purposes. E. B. Bowurixjii,
74 Orange Street.
Office hours, 9 to 12 a. m. - aul8eodtf
FOR RENT.
fL. THE house No. 18 College street; fully fur
li;;; nished; very pleasant and convenient. For
kJL particulars Inquire of the agent.
H f HOADLEY,
aufitf Or on the premises.
Telephone Stock Wanted
In Exchange for Real Estate. Golden
opportunity to Unload.
MOUSES rOKL SALE.
Orchard St., $3,000, Greenwich Ave., $2,000.
Elm St., $4,500, Hamilton St., $4,500,
Kimoerly Ave., $3,500, Lloyd St, $3,000,
Davenport Ave., $3,000, Congress Ave., $4,500.
Dewitt St., $4,000, Kensington St., $6,000.
JT. KIEL RASSETT,
Beal Estate, 818 Chapel Street.
au7
FOR RENT.
jjfciV FIVE new tenements on Winter street at $10
ljuj and $11 per month.
One new tenement on Bright street for $11
per month.
FOR SALE.
A large number of one and two-family cottages
from $1,650 to $2,500 on easy installments.
S. . BLATCHLGY fc SONS,
1 6 Exchange Ball dine,
an!4 Corner Church and Chapel St a.
REAL ESTATE WANTED.
MA CHEAP piece of outside property; im
proved or unimproved. Will exchange city
property for it. Call at
R. E. BALDWIN'S
REAL ESTATE AGENCY, 818 CHAPEL STREET.
aul6daw
FOR SALE,
-HOUSE. Bant, and about two acres of land.
mweu s-uuKtxi wim cnuice rruii xirak, on
ries. Grapes, etc, in a good location, on easy-
terms.
A number of good lots in different parts of the
city; price low.
FOR KMT,
Two first-class houses on Howe street. Can be
seen at any time. Rent for $525 and $575.
Money to loan on Real Estate. Inquire at
NO. 70 CHURCH STREET, ROOM 2.
leSOfnce open evenings from 7 to 8.
I. F. COM STOCK.
aul6
FOR RENT.
MTO a good tenant, first floor of house 975
State street, at a low price. Also two tene
ments on Orchard street. Inquire at 146
Crown street. ' GLOSLN HALL.
jy2tf
FOR SALE,
MNO. 85 Pine street, near the corner of At
water, a new and substantially built cottage
house with seven rooms; well arranged foe
convenience and pleasant in its outlook and sur
roundings. The lot is 30x110. These premises are
located in a growing neighborhood and are in all re
spects a desirable home for a small family. A very
low price will buy it.
FOR RENT,
Eleven houses and thirty-one tenements. They
are located in different parts of the city.
Money to loan on First Mortgage Security in sums
to suit.
Western Farm Mortgages bearing 7 per cent, in
terest constantly on hand for sale. Beyond any
doubt they are desirable securities.
E"Open evenings.
HORACE P. IIO Vl)Li:V,
au5 HOADLEY BUILDING.
WILLIAM H. WHEELER,
REAL ESTATE AND RENTS.
The care and rental of real estate a specialty.
Unrented properties supplied with good tenants.
Money furnished on Real Estate and Collaterals at
short notice. Fire and Life Insurance risks placed
with sound and reliable companies only. Rents
wanted at once three whole houses for reliable ten
ants. Undivided attention to delinquent tenants.
Office 14 Phoenix Building, 818 Chapel street. Open
evenings. jy31tf
THOMAS O'BRIEN & CO
Real Estate and Loan Agents,
800 CHAPEEL STREET.
$50,000 to loan at S and 6 per oent. in sums to suit.
For sale, double house and lot, 60x150 on Chapel
street, for $7,500. Small house and large lot on Ver
non street for $3,500. Large two family house on
Orchard street, opposite Charles street, for $2,250
a bargain. A small honse and large lot on Congress
avenue; will be sold for much less than it is worth,
as the owner is leaving the city. Two houses on
Wallace street, near Grand, for sale very cheap.
Office open every evening. j2
FOR SALE,
MA FINE residence in West Haven on First
avenue, containing 11 roorns, also barn, hen
nery, bath house and all necessary outbuild
ings. In goal repair; well stocked with fruit trees
and grapevines. Lot, 840 feet front with a depth of
50 feet, the rear facing the harbor. Also a house
and lot on Water street. Lot 95 feet front, running
back to tlie channel 820 feet deep; a good location
for a business enterprise desiring a wharf privilege.
For price, &c., call on or address
WALTER A. MAIN,
j23 West Haven Conn.
FOR RENT,
THE Brick House 105 Martin street; has 8
Mii rooms; large yard; very convenient; $22 per
EULmonth. HENRY TROWBRIDGE.
jy23 2tawtf "
FOR RENT,
fv FOUR furnished houses in good locations.
Several houses and tenements.
T. G. Sloan A- Son,
Boom 3, Benedict Building.
I3F-0FEN EVENINGS.
au7
FOR RENT,
MFIVE rooms Fo. 553 State street, water clos
et, gas and water; and five rooms corner
South and Park streets. Inquire at No. 792
Chapel street. Room 2. JACOB HELLER.
my2
IN "VIEW of the opening of the new railroad to
West Haven there will be some call for
Building Lots,
I have a tract of land, finely situated, close by
West Haven Qreen, on Church street, 400 feet front
and 200 feet deep, which I will sell at $5 per front
foot, or will take less for the whole of it. There is
nothing else so favorably located that can be bought
nearly as low. EDWARD A. RAY.
a21tf
FOR SALE,
(f TWO family house on Sylvan avenue, $800
cash required. Two family house on Jackson
BUILstreet, $350 cash required.
rnBtf GEO- A, ROOT, 808 Chapel St.
A. M. HOLMES,
HOUSE MOVER,
HAS for rent the 2d floor of house No. 83
Houston St., $10 per month. Half of house
No. 4. Lewis St. 190 Clinton Ave., 1st floor,
10 ner month. Half of House 177 Meadow St.. $15
per month. 2d floor No. 12NewhallSt., $8 per month,
and two rents on Ivy St., for $8 per month each.
Also for sale houses 78 Woolsey St., 190 Clinton Ave.,
29 Auburn St., and Atwater St., on easy terms.
KSr Wanted Thirty more houses to rent.
ma4 OFFICE 59 CHURCH STREET.
HINMAN'S REAL ESTATE
AND LOAN AGENCY.
Money to loan at S per cent.
Property in all parts of the city for sale. Seashore
residences and lots at Savin Rock Shore and West
Haven. The beautiful Savin Rock, including sev
eral acres of natural grove. This is the finest loca
tion for a hotel or residence in the State and will be
sold at a bargain. L. B. HINMAN
my2 63Churcl; St."
E. Iff. HOOKER,
REAL ESTATE AGENT,
19 Exchange Building.
HOUSES FOR RENT AND FQR SALE.
THE CARE OF PROPERTY A SPECIALTY.
RENTS AND OTITEITBrLLS COLLECTED.
Jy2?
For Sale and Tp Rent.
tFOR RENT Block House No. 239 Orange
street. Perfect order. Possession at once.
Rent low to a crood tenant for a term of vears.
FOR SALE House No. 57 Pierpont street.
ijOts on nqwara avenue, uanocK ave
nue and in "The Annex.11
Money to loan In sums of $500 on -first Mortgage
at d per oent. inquire or
WILLIAM 0. ROBINSON. I No. 14 White's Build'g,
PHILIP ROBINSON, ( opposite P. O.
Moure iu to va a. m.. a to 5 p. m. ocawgstr
FOR RENT.
Several nice Houses.
Tenements For Rent.
A lot of first-class Tenements, $10 to $30 per month.
ISURANCE.
Fire insurance policies given iq the best companies
and none others.
Those who are changing their residences this
spring would do well to call. We will insure your
Furniture or Dwelling at the LOWEST POSSIBLE
tr.
Property placed in our hands will be. properly
taken care of.
Repairs made at lowest rates by competent work-
Rents Collected,
II. C. LONG'S AGENCY,
68 CHURCH STREET.
peiiEvornngsrtr)OSitestorace5tf
POTATOES. POTATOES. POTATOES.
Here yon go! The best in market for 25c and 30c
per pecx.
Meats to go with them at same price.
FLOfTR! JFfcOTJRn FLOIBIM
Good Flour a specialty at $7 per barrel, SScper
ig.
Steak 42c, 14o and 18c per pound.
BUTTE B I BUTTKRI BITTER J
GOOD I BETTER 1 1 BEST 1 1 1
23c. 96c. 3Sc.
I ATO. BOUND TO SELL.
Peaches every day.
(STTelephone. Goods delivered.
Call at
97 Whalley Avenue.
E. S. STEVENS.
PINE NEW SALT MACKEREL !
Fresh Salmon,
Spanish Slackerel,
Hard and Soft. Crabs,
Sea Bass, Blackfisn,
Lionsterg,
Round and Long Clams,
Etc., Etc., lite., , Etc., at
A. FQOTE & CO.'S,
Local Weather Record.
- FOR ACO. 19. 1884.
- : - 7:18 11:18 8:18 7:18 11:18
, . a. . p. u . r.. P.M.
Barometer -80.08 80.08 ' 80.07 80.08 80.07
Thermometer... 78 84 80 75 70
Humidity 87 67- ; 5 ; 82 92
Wind, in direction
and velocity in
miles per hour.. N8 SE2 SE 5 SB 8 .. ..
Weather Smk'y Hazy Hazy Hazy Clear
Mean bar., 80.03; mean temp., 75; mean humid
ity. 78.
Max. temp., 85; min. temp., 67; rainfall .0
inches.
Max. velocity of wind, 9 miles.
TOR ACO. 19, 1883.
Mean bar., 29.95; mean temp., 65; mean humid
ity, 92.
Max temp., 78; min. temp., 65.
J. H. SHERMAN, Sergt S. C. U. S. A.
A minus sign prefixed to thermometer readings-indicates
temperature below zero.
I A dash prefixed to rainfall figures Indicates
precipitation too small to measure.
BIRTHS.
SPENCER In Haddam, Aug. 14, a daughter to W.
E. and F. R. Spencer.
MERWIN In this city, Aug. 16, a daughter to J. J.
and Ida N. Merwin.
MARRIAGES.
RODMAN KELLOGG Di Northampton, Mass.,
Aug. 16, Dr. Charles G. Rodman, of Waterbury,
and Miss Louise M. Kellogg, of Northampton.
HEATHS.
DUNN In Elmira, Aug. 17, at the residence of her
son-in-law, F. H. Atkinson, Mrs. Eliza Thomson
Dunn, widow of the late Judge James Dunn, in
the 77 th year of her age.
AVERY In Milford, Aug. 19, Prentice P. Avery,
agpd 48 year.
Notice of funeral hereafter.
C. A. DOUGLASS,
TEACHER OF PIAHfO,
295 Columbus Avenue.
au20 lmo
LOST,
A GOLD BRACELET, wide chased band, no
guards, Saturday evening on Canal cars or in
depot. Finder will please leave at Package Office,
or 106 Crown street and obtain reward. a20 It
GREEN GINGER
OR preserving, just received. Litchfield Coun:
ty isuixer aiso uus oay received.
D. S. COOPER,
) 37S STATE STREET,
OIL PAINTINGS.
14x22, handsomely framed, $1.87; 22x36, in 4-inch
gilt frames, $2.87. Picture Frames and En
gravings at low prices
AT
NORTHROP'S,
697 ( HAPEL STREET.
au20 , Just below the Bridge.
P
IQNN. State Agricultural Society.
me inn Annual -r air ox saia oocieiy
will be held at Meriden,
I Sept. 16th, 17th, 18thnd 19th.
w All Entries for Speed close August 80th.
All entries for Cattle, Horses, Sheep' and Swine
under No. 1 to No. 8, and No. 16 to 9 inclusive, close
Saturday, Sept. 6, and all other entries must be
made on or before Sept. 13. Send for premium list.
H. C. HULL. Cor. Sec., Meriden, Conn.
au20,27daw23,30,sep3,10
PEACHES.
Plentier and cheaper than ever before. Peaches
by the bushel, basket or quart.
Mason's Improved Jars to put them in at $1.95 a
dozen.
Fine Branford Potatoes at 25c per peck.
Native Tomatoes and green Corn every day.
Best Columbia River Salmon 15c.
Armour Corned Beef, 2-lb can. 25c.
14U lbs Granulated Sugar $1.00.
16 lbs White Extra C Sugar $1.00.
Goods delivered in any, part of the city.
Telephone.
S. S. ADAMS,
743 CSr-x-o-xxd. Street.
Register copy.
au20
proposals.
Extension of West Jetty at Say.
brooK, Jonn.
Enqdieeb Offtos. I ! . S. Aqmv.
11 Insurance Building, New Haven, Conn., Aug. 11,
SEALED PROPOSALS for extending- the West
Jetty at Say brook. Conn., will be received at this
office until 10 o'clock a, in. on Monday, September
22, 1884.
Proposals must be made in triplicate. Specifica
tions, ulank forms and instructions to bidders may
be had on application at this office.
au20 6t Lieut. Col, of Engineers.
Constructing a DIKe In Thames
Kiver, tjonn.
Engineer OmeK. U. 8.- Army.
11 Insurance Building, New Haven, Conn., August
11, 1B84.
SEA I.KD PROPOSALS for constructing: a Dike
in Thames River. Conn., will be received at this of
fice until 10 o'clock a. in. on Monday, September 22;
1884.
ProDosals must be made in triulioate. Specifica
tions, blank forms and instructions to bidders may
be had on application at this ofrlee.
1 wtTiPtD1fnFlDTlHTI
au20 6t Lieut. Col, of Engineers.
Extending the Pile Hike at New
Haven, t'onn.
Engineer Office. U. S. Army,
11 Insurance Building, New Haven, Conn., August
11, 1884.
SEALED PROPOSALS for extending; the Pile
Dike at New Haven, Conn., will be received at this
office until 10 o'clock a. m. on Monday, September
22, 18.
Proposals must be made in triplicate. Specifica
tions, olank forms and instructions to bidders may
be had on application to this office.
au20 Ot Lieut. Col, of Engineers-.
Extension of the Greenport
Breakwater.
I - k . .... tt a A ......
1 , 1 1 1 n. r. jr r n. i, j. i j . 1111. i ,
11 Insurance Building. New Haven, Ct., Aug. 8, 1884.
SEALED PROPOSALS for extending the Green
port Breakwater will be received at this office until
10 o'clock a. m. on Monday, September 22, 1884.
Proposals must be made in triplicate. Specifica
tions, blank forms and instructions to. bidders may
be had on application at this office.
VV ALTKtt .uor - Itl. r. u, I.t. tut. oi raigineers.
aul9 at
Improving Channel at the Mouth
or Connecticut stiver.
Engineer Office. U. S. abut.
11 Insurance Building, New Haven, Conn., August
8, 18tH. ,
rp a T.ir.n PROPOSALS for imorovme the Chan
nel at the Mouth of the Connecticut River, will be
received at this office until 10 o'clock a. m., on Mon
day, September 22, 1884.
rToposais muse oe maue 111 1 1 1 ijm oiwauw
tions, olank forms and instructions to bidders may
be had on application to this office.
-A 1, 1 r,I muE .ixn
aulR Ot Lt. Ool. of Engineers.
Household Ammonia.
In the Toilet, Nursery, Laundry or House Cleaning
insures neaim, oeaut-y uu uc uuc
For sale by
J." D. DEWELL & CO.,
m27eod3ms and all Orocere. '
.LET HER GO AT THAT.
A LARGE dairy owner in York State has ship
Tw'd me one hundred and twenty tubs of NICE
TABLE BUTTER, and says, Sell these goods so as
to make quick returns, n you get seu vents m.
nnn nil offered, let her e-o at that. So here they
are. 20c per pound by the tub or single pound.
Onr Finest Creamery Hntter zse in.
4 1-zids. ior vi.uu.
Best Old Government Java Coffee, fresh roasted,
Fine Teas 20e, 30c, 40c and 50c lb. with china cup
and saucer Tree.
Flour 80.50 per barrel, and 85c. by tne tag.
' I,ehteh Coal.
Save 25e per ton by buying of the
Independent Coal Stealer,
GEO. W. H. HUGHES,
34 CHUKCH STREET.
aul9
FRUIT ! CHEAP. FRUIT
We offer 25 Boxes Bright Juicy Lemons, only 10c
a dozen. .
A lot of the largest and finest Cuban Watermel
ons we nave netu u Hmuuu. uwi wi, -" j
melon warranted to cut ripe. Price low for the
quality.
We are receiving about 100 baskets Peaches daily.
We think we handle as much as anyone in the busi
ness. Low prices do the business. So give us a
can.
25 bushels ripe Tomatoes (fine stock) only 4c qt.
Vegetables are low.
65 doz Sweet Corn (Saturday) 16c doz.
100 Native Cabboge, solid heads, at 6c each.
Native Squash at 2o eaoh.
Native Cucuubers 10c doz.
New Sweet Potatoes only 60c pk.
Fine Early Rose Potatoes only S 1 per bushel.
BVTTERI BUTTER !
Butter is much higher. We shall continue to sell
our Choice Creamery Butter at 25o lb 4 lbs for $1.
Try the new Wheat Baking Powder, the best arti
ele made. Try lt once and you will use no other.
Cheaper than Royal 12c quarter, 20c half and 35c
pound.
Remember Our Prices on Flour !
Washburne & Pillsbury's $6.75 per bbl delivered.
wlr.h,--kTeliGrht" 6.50 ner bbl delivered.
We think this Flour is equal to Washburn or Pills
bury. We guarantee It. Try a barrel and be
convinced. We are Bottom Prices for everything
in our line. Our business has-been heavier this
summer than any previous summer since we have
been in business,
"WHY IS IT ?"
D. M. WELCH 'Sc SON,
Nos. 28 and SO Congress Avenue.
aul6
REMOVAL.
THE '
NEW YORK BRANCH
L O A N O PPICE
NOW PERM AFENTLY LOCATED AT
- 42 Church Street.
M 0 KEY LOANED.
Liberal advances made on all kinds of personal
- property.
Unredeemed Pledges
For sale at low prices.
Square Dealing WUh All.
' ,; SOLOMON FRY,
News by Telegraph
FROM ALL QUARTERS.
AFTER WEEKS OF DELAY
Cleveland's letter Is
Made Public.
SILENT OH THE TARIFF
And On the Other Im
portant Issues.
THE BIRTH OF REPUBLICANISM.
Its Thirtieth Anniversary
Celebrated In Maine.
CLEVELAND'S LETTER
Given out After Many Weeks The
Text or the Document Wot
Much That Will Enlighten the Pub
lic as to the Candidate's Views on
the Issues. -
Albany, Aug. 19. Gentlemen: I have
received your communication dated July 38,
1884, informing me of my nomination to the
office of President of the United States by
the National Democratic convention lately
assembled at Chicago. I accept the nomina
tion with a grateful appreciation of the su
preme honor conferred and a solemn sense of
the responsibility which in its acceptance I
assume. I have carefully considered the
platform adopted by the convention and
cordially approve the same. So plain a
statement of Democratic faith and the prin
ciples upon which that party appeals to the
suffrages of the people needs no supplement
or explanation. It should be remembered
that the office of President is essentially ex
ecutive in its nature. The laws enacted by
the legislative branch of the government the
chief executive is bound faithfully to en
force. And when the wisdom of the politi
cal party which selects one of its members as
a nominee for that office has outlined its
policy and declared its principles, it seems
to me that nothing in the character of the
office or the necessities of the case requires
more from the candidate accepting snch
nomination than the suggestion of certain
well known truths so absolutely vital to the
safety and welfare of the nation that they
cannot be too often recalled or too seriously
enforced.
THE FUNCTIONS OF PARTIES.
We proudly call ours a government by the
people. It is not such when a class is toler
eted which arrogates to itself the manage
ment of public affairs, seeking to control the
people instead of representing them. Par
ties are the necessary outgrowth of our insti
tutions; but a government is not by the peo
ple when one party fastens its control upon
the country and perpetuates its power by
cajoling and betraying the people instead of
serving them. A government is not by the
people when a result which should represent
the intelligent will of free and thinking men
is, or can be determined by the shameless
corruption of their suffrages. When an elec
tion to office shall be the selection by the
voters of one of their number to assume for
time a ji-blic trust instead of his dedica
tion to the profession of politics, when the
holders of the ballot, quickened by a sense of
duty, shall avenge truth betrayed and pledges
broken, and when the suffrage shall be alto
gether free and uncorrupted, the full realiza
tion of a government by the people will be at
hand.
THE PRESIDENT SHOULD NOT BE RE-ELECTED.
And of the means to this end, not one
would in my judgment be more effective
than an amendment to the constitution dis
qualifying the President for re-election.
When we consider the patronage of this great
office, the allurements of power, the tempta
tion to retain public place once gained, and
more than all the availability a party finds in
an incumbent when a horde of office-holders
with a zeal born of benefits received, and
fostered by the hope of favors yet to come,
stand ready to aid with money and trained
political service, we recognize in the eligibili
ty of the President for re-election a serious
danger to that calm, deliberate and intelli
gent political action which' must characterize
a government of the people.
THE DIGNITY OF LABOR.
A true American sentiment recognizes the
dignity of labor and the fact that honor lies
in honest toil. Contented labor is an element
of national prosperity. Ability to work
constitutes the capital and the wage of labor,
the income of a vast number of onr popula
tion, and this interest should be jealously
protected. Our workingmen are not asking
unreasonable indulgence, but as intelligent
and manly citizens they seek the same con
sideration which those demand who have
other interests at stake. They should receive
their full share of the care and attention of
those who make and execute the laws to the
end that the wants and needs of the employ
ers and the employed shall alike be subserved
and the prosperity of the country, the com
mon heritage of both, be advanced.
PROTECTION AGAINST IMPORTED LABOR.
Asrelated to this subject, while we should
not discourage the immigration of those who
-come to acknowledge allegiance to our gov
ernment and add to our citizen population,
yet as a means of protection to our working
men a different rule should prevail concern
ing those who if they come, or are brought
to our land, do not intend to become Ameri
cans, bnt will injuriously compete with those
justly entitled to our fields of labor. In a let
ter accepting the nomination to the office of
Governor nearly two years ago I made the
following statement to which I have steadily
adhered: "The laboring classes constitute
the main part of onr population. They
should be protected in their efforts peaceably
to assert their rights; when endangered by
aggregated capital, and all statutes on this
subject should recognize the care of the State
for honest toil and be framed with a view of
improving the condition of the workingman."
A proper regard for the welfare of the work
ingman being inseparably connected with
the integrity of our institutions none of our
citizens are more interested than they in
guarding against any corrupting influences
which seek to pervert the beneficent pur
poses of our government, and none
should be more watchful of the artful ma
chinations of those who allure them to self
injury. '-
THE RIGHTS OF INDIVIDUALS.
In a free country the curtailment of the ab
solute rightsof the individual should only
be such as iPeesential to the peace and good
order of the community. The limit between
the proper subjects of governmental control
and those which can be more fittingly left
to the moral sense and self -composed re
straint of the citizen should be carefully
kept in view. Thus laws unnecessarily in
terfering with the habits .and customs of any
of our people which are not offensive to the
moral sentiments of the civilized world, and
which are consistent with good citizenship
and the public welfare, are unwise and vexa
tious. THE PROTECTION OF AMERICAN COMMERCE.
The commerce of a nation to a
great extent determines its suprem
acy. Cheat) and easy transportation should
therefore be liberally fostered. Within the
limits of the constitution the general govern
ment should so empower and protect its
water-ways as will enable the producers of
the country to reacn a pronwuie marsier,.
THE- CIVIL SERVICE. '
The neonle Day the wages of the public
employes and they are entitled to the fair
and honest work which the tooney they paid
should command. It is the duty of those
entrusted with the management of their affairs
to see that snch pubuc service is I ortncomincr.
The selection and retention of subordinates
in government employment should depend
upon their ascertained fitness and the value
of their work and they should be neither ex
pected npf allowed to do questionable party
service. " The interest of the people will be
better prqtecte4, the estimate of public
labor and duty will be immensely improved,
public employment will be open to all whs
can demonstrate their fitness to enter
it; the unseemly scramble for peace
under the government with the
consequent importunity which embitters
official life will cease, and the departments
will not be filled with those who conceive
it to be their first duty to aid the party to
which they owe their places, instead of ren
dering patient and honest return to. the peo
ple. I believe that the public temper is
such that the voters of the land are prepared
to support the party which gives the. best
promise of administering the government in
the honest, simple and plain man
ner which is consistent with its
character and purposes. They have
learned that mastery and concealment in the
management of their affairs cover tricks and
betrayal. The statesmanship they require
consists in honesty and frugality, a prompt
response to the needs of the people as they
arise, and the vigilant protection of all their
varied interests. If I should be called to the
chief magistracy of the nation by the suf
frages of my fellow-citizens I will
assume the duties of that high
office with a solemn determination
to dedicate every effort to the country's good
and with an humble reliance upon the favor
and support of the Supreme Being, who I be
lieve will always bless honest human en
deavor in the conscientious discharge of pub
lic duty. (Signed)
G rover Cleveland.
To Colonel William P. Vilas, chairman,
and D. P. Bestor and other members of the
notification committee of the Democratic
National convention.
Hendricks Letter Coming To -Nig; lit.
Indianapolis, Aug. 19. The letter of
Governor Hendricks accepting the vice-presidential
nomination will be given to the pub
lic to-morrow night. He was informed to
night by a United Press representative that
Governor Cleveland's letter was being tele
graphed over the country. H merely re
marked: "I shall be prepared to give mine
to the press to-morrow evening." It is un
derstood that it will be about a column and
a half in length.
ARCHBISHOP "WOOD'S SUCCESSOR.
Philadelphia Catholics Oreet The Ar
rival of Hi shop Ryan.
Philadelphia, Pa., Aug. 19. At 7:30
o'clock this evening the cathedral and other
Roman Catholic churches began ringing their
peal of welcome to Archbishop Eyan. The
various streets leading to the Broad street
station were thronged with people anxious
to catch a glimpse of the. distinguished pre
late who is to occupy the archiepiseopal
chair of the Philadelphia diocese. By 7:40
p. m. the sweltering mass was crowding and
pushing in the endeavor to elbow their way
into the depot. At 7:55 word was passed
that the train had arrived. The special of
ficers of the Pennsylvania depot and a squad
of policemen were trying to open a pathway
through, but they only succeeded in doing
so when they had stretched a rope across the
platform guarding the exit. In a few mo
ments Archbishop Ryan and his escort of
clergymen and laymen came into view,
the crowd cheering loudly and wav
ing their handkerchiefs wildly as he
passed through the depot to the open ba
rouche which was in waiting for him. He
took off his hat and bowed his acknowledg
ment of the welcome greeting which was ac
corded him. On entering the barouche he
stood for a few moments smiling pleasantly
and shaking hands with those who were
nearest him. The barouche was drawn by a
magnificent span of four horses. The crowd
gave way and he was driven quickly to the
archiepiseopal residence' at Eighteenth
and Summer streets, which was il
luminated in honor of its chief
occupant. The corridor of the house was
walled with high candelabra which were
ablaze with candles through which the Arch
bishop walked as he entered his new home
for the first time. The reception was private
and only those specially invited were per
mitted to enter. Admission to the cathedral
to-morrow morning, when the solemn service
of installation will be held, will be by ticket
and pewholders will have the preference of
places. Already a sufficient number of tick
ets have been distributed to fill the enormous
edifice.
Improvements in the Ohio River.
Washington, Aug. 19. Lieutenant Colo
nel W. E. Merrill has made his report to the
chief of engineers of river and harbor im
provements under his charge on the Ohio
river. No new contracts were entered into
and the work was continued in each instance
as far as the funds would permit. The
work in the vicinity of Pittsburg and Cin
cinnati is described at length. An interest
ing account of the floods of '83 and '84 is
also given. Eleven points.on'the river from
eight to nine hundred miles below Pittsburg
are to be improved during the current year,
and thirty-seven islands, bars, shoals, etc.,
mentioned as requiring attention in the
future. During the next fiscal year $1,000,
000 can be profitably expended on the Ohio
river; $619,082 are available for the present
year; $92,136 was expended during the past
year. For the operation and care of the
.Louisville ana Portland canal during tne next
year $88,340 is asked; for the improvement
of the falls on the Ohio $50,000; for im
provements on the Monongahela $48,901, and
for improvements on the Alleghany $65,000.
THE HOT WAVE.
Vegetation Drooping, The Rivera and
Streams Running Low and the Crops
Wasting Away.
Columbus, Ohio, Aug 19. The terrible
heat of the past ten days has had the effect
of drying up and withering the pastures. At
present vegetation of all kinds is in a droop
ing condition. It is feared the crops will
now fall short of the estimates given on the
1st inst. The rivers and streams are all
very low and a majority of springs are rapid
ly drying. The roadways throughout cen
tral Ohio are covered with several inches of
dust. The weather continues burning hot.
No rain has fallen for about four weeks.
The Excessive Heat In Chicago.
Chicago, HI., August 19. Dispatches are
now pouring into the board of trade operators
from various points in Illinois, Iowa and
Wisconsin concerning the threatened Sam-
age to the crops in consequence of the ex
treme heat and prolonged drouth. In this
city for the past few days the heat has been
excessive. The thermometer at times reaches
ninety-five degrees in the shade.
Precautions Against Yellow Fever,
Washington, Aug. 19. The United
States medical inspector at Nogaleg, Arizona,
stopped, quarantined and fuTigated twenty-
four passengers crossing the border from
Mexican yellow fever districts during the
past week. He reports the yellow fever dis
appearing in that locality.
.A Sad Drowning aVecldent.
Toledo, Ohio, Aug. 19. News has just
been received of a drowning accident on
Sunday evening last on the canal near Water-
ville. Willie Allia, son of CaptauT Allis of
the steam packet Masonic, fell overboard.
George Smith, an assistant engineer, seeing
the accident, immediately sprang overboard
to rescue tne Doy, out com were drowned.
Allis' body was found, but Smith's has not
yet been recovered.
CARRIED OPP BT A DOG.
The Body of a Nine Months' ld Child.
Pittsburg, Pa., Aug. 19. A number of
boys playing near the beach of the Ohio
river in Allegheny last night found the head
less remains of a child about nine months
old. One leg and arm separated from the
trunk bore evidence of having been torn
from the body by the wheels of a locomotive.
While the boys were examining the body a
large dog seized the trunk and made off with
it in the darkness. Prompt search was made
for this portion, but as yet no trace can be
found of it. Firm flesh proved the recent
death of the infant. The coroner empanelled
a jury this morning, but after receiving the
w wwucugu juijr, claiming m&L
not enough of the remains had been found
to hold an inquest.
Base Ball.
AT mfW YORK.
Buffalos 00010000 01
New Yorks 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 3
AT PROV1DENCK.
Providence. 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 04
Detroits o g o 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
AT BOSTON.
Chicagos 0 00001008 S
Bostons 10100000 2 4
OTHEBOAMKS.
' New York Brooklyns 1, Metropolitans II,
Washington Nationals 4, Wuniingtons 2.
Baltimore Palti mores 8, Yirg-inias 1 ,
IndianapolisColumbus 7, Indianapolis 5,
Louisville St. Louis 1, LouisvUles .
TEE CHOLERA COlWIPCCi.
A Ship Laden With the Plague En
Rout to New York.
Washington, Aug. , 19. The United
States consul at Barbadoes reports the Bri
tish ship Bracadaite to have sailed from St
Lucius on the 16th inst. for New York with
651 coolies on board from Calcutta, among
whom the eholera was raging. Eighteen
fatal cases are reported to have occurred on
the vessel. The Marine hospital service has
notified, the New York authorities and the
vessel will be stopped in time to prevent the
introduction of the disease.
Yesterday's Deaths Prom The Scourge.
Marseilles, August 19. Three deaths
from cholera have occurred here to-day.
A Case in England.
Birmingham, Aug. 19. The fatal case of
cholera reported to the coroner this morning
has created a great deal of excitement here.
Medical opinion is pretty evenly divided,
many eminent physicians contending that
cholera morbus and not Asiatic cholera
caused the man's death.
- No Insult to the British Plag.
London, Aug. 19. The report of an insult
to the British flag by a German war vessel
at Bacreida on the cold coast. West Africa.
is denied by the authorities.
One of the Cornwall Defendants.
Dublin, Aug. 19. The jury empanelled to
try the sanity of James Ellis French, one of
the defendants, in the Cornwall cases, failed
to agree to-day and were discharged. Corn
wall pleaded not guilty.
NOTES OF THE CAMPAIGN.
An Appeal to the New York Republi
cans. St. Louis, August 19. At a meeting of the
Republican city committee to-day a long ad
dress was presented from the resident members
of the State Central committee appealing for
united action with a view of putting one set
of candidates in the field at the congress
ional and State elections..
The Democratic Campaign Book.
Washington, Aug 18. The manuscript of
the Democratic campaign book is completed,
and will to-morrow be taken to New York
by Mr. Watson Boyle, assistant secretary of
the congressional committee, for the ap
proval of the National committee. It deals
in finance and fraud, and emphasizes all the
shortcomings and inconsistencies of the Re
publican candidate and of Butler.
A Town Taken By Tramps.
St. Paul, Minn., Aug 19. A special from
Casaelton, D. T., says eighty tramps took
possession of the place yesterday and drove
families out of their homes and committed
other excesses. Four were captured, but the
rest escaped.
The Team That Comes Here Thursday.
New York, Aug. 19. In a practice match
of the Sixty-ninth regiment at Creedmoor
to-day", Sergeant Frank Stuart scored 65,
Major Duffy 61, Captain Kerr 56, Sergeant
P. Carroll 56. The team goes to New Haven
on Thursday to shoot in the inter-State
match.
THE FLESH CUT OFF.
Private Whistler's Body Exhumed
and More Evidence Given of the
Awful Diet.
Delphi, Ind., Aug. 19. At the request of
relatives, the remains of Private Whistler
were exhumed this morning in the presence
of pernaps forty persons, who were quietly
gathered at the little country, churchyard,
Drs. Beck, Angell, Sharer and Smith offici
ating. The casket lid was removed, when a
Blight alcoholic odor was all that escaped.
The coffin was packed with cotton waste and
the corpse tightly wrapped in a sheet of mus
lin under which were three thicknesses of
woolen blankets. All was quickly removed,
when the dreaded truth was verified. The
body lay upon the left side, and
all the flesh was cut from the limbs
and back; the face, chest and ex
tremities being all that remained untouched.
The flesh had been carefully removed to the
very bones. No evidence of violence could be
found. The eyes were decayed; the face was
covered with shaggy red whiskers, and the
head with darkish red hair. Over the skull
was a close fitting cap, apparently made of a
knit undershirt, over which was a sealskin cap
with ears, and tied under the chin. There
were woolen bandages about the wrists
and ankles and considerable gravel upon the
chest. The feet and hands Beemed white and
swollen. Fecal matter contained evidences
of hair and fibrous substances. The remains
were fully identified by relatives . by the
teeth, a crippled finger and well preserved
features. Death was evidently caused by
starvation as no marks of violence or disease
were apparent. The sealskin cap and lock
of hair will be preserved.
STEAMERS GOING IT BLIND.
Seven Steamers and a Tug Figure In a
Complex Colliding Match In Boston
Harbor.
Boston, Mass., Aug. 19. The most com
plicated collision ever known in Boston har
bor occurred at 5 p. m. , seven excursion
steamers and a tug participating. A dense
fog prevailed. At 5 o'clock the Portland
steamer John Brooks with eighty passengers
when -off buoy 8 sighted the big Nantasket
steamer Twilight with five hundred passen
gers. Both boats whistled to stop and did
stop, but too late. The Brooks crashed into
the Twilight. A panic at once ensued
Women and children screamed. Four Twi
light passengers jumped to the Brooks,
thinking their own boat was sinking. In
swinging away from the Twilight the Brooks
narrowly escaped collision with the Portland
steamer Penobscot and the harbor steamer
Governor Andrew. Clearing these she struck
the Nantasket steamer Rose Standish, . scrap
ing her entire side and creating another
panic. Clearing the Standish the Brooks
nearly . ran down the propellor Balti
more, but . succeeded in getting " to
her dock without further damage
The Twilight started for Hull and in a few
minutes crashed into the Plymouth
excursion steamer Stamford with 250 pas
sengers, scraping her from bow to stern and
taking off nearly the whole side to the water's
edge. The wheel was crushed and the main
and rock shafts were broken, leaving her
helpless. Her passengers thought she was
sinking and were with difficulty restrained
from leaping into the water. The Twilight
did not stop to aid them, but kept on to
Hull. A tug towed the Stamford to her
wharf. The only person injured was an un
known lady from Somerville who was in a
stateroom on that side of the Stamford
which was struck. She was taken home un
conscious. A negro in a closet on the Stam
ford was knocked into the water and was
picked np unhurt. The Twilight lies at
Hull unable to get to Boston. The Empire
State was reported wrecked, but lies an
chored in Nantasket roads, waiting for the
fog to hit. The .Brooks, Twilight and Stam
ford are badly damaged and will be laid up
several days.
THE QUEEN OF THE TURF.
Forty Thousand Dollars the Price Paid
by Editor Bonner.
New York, Aug. 19. The great trotting
mare Maud S, who was sold by Mr. Vander
bilt to Robert Bonner for $40,000, arrived
here to-day and was at once taken to Mr.
Bonner's stable. Mr. Bonner appeared much
pleased with his purchase and this evening
in conversation with a representative of the
United Press said: "Yes, I now own Maud
S. I sent my check for $40,000 to Mr'
Vanderbilt to-day and the great mare is now
eating her evening meal in my stable. I
shall keep the mare here for several days
and then send her to be trained on the Char
ter Oak track at Hartford. Later in the fall
I shall give a free exhibition just to see how
fast she can trot. It is the opinion of good
judges that the mare can trot in 2:08 or bet
ter. I am. now of the same opinion and
when I am" satisfied that her performance
cannot be beaten I shall bring her down
again and nee her on the road." Mr. Bon
ner then took the representative of -the
United Press into the stables which adjoin
his house. A groom removed the blanket
from Maud S and Mr. Bonner with evident
pride patted the beautiful animal on the
neck saying: "Yes, she is a beauty, in per
fect health and condition too." The mare
seemed to understand that she was being
praised and pricked np her ears. Before
leaving the stable Mr. Bonner said tfiat Mr.
Vanderbilt had acted very liberally in this
matter, for in addition to sending a complete
set of blankets along with the mare he also
sent all her harness.
THIRTY YEARS OF LIFE.
A Grand Celebration of the Birthday
of Republicanism.
Strong, Maine, Aug. 19. The thirtieth
birthday of the Republican party was cele
brated here to-day with great eclat. The
largest crowd ever gathered in the county
was present. Four or five thousand people
rallied. Five hundred teams overtaxed the
stables and were hitched under the trees.
The whole town was decorated with flags,
streamers and banners on which were print
ed the original platform of the convention of
1854. The swarm from the surrounding
towns began their journey toward this Mecca
yesterday. Last evening the capacity of
nearly every house was tested, many of the
visitors stayed over night at Farmington and
Phillips. An innovation upon the long es
tablished custom of the Grand Army of the
Republic in not partaking in political cele
brations was made, six posts being represent
ed in full regalia and heading the procession
followed by forty-seven of the 288 delegates
present thirty years ago. Colonel Hill of the
First Maine regimerjfwas acting as marshal
of the day. Great banners were hung in the
conspicuous places bearing the fol-
lowing . inscriptions: "Platform 1854
Freedom or Slavery There .is no
escape from the alternative:" "We accept the
issue forced upon us;" "In the defence of
freedom we will co-operate with all of
whatever name or party;" "We are in favor
of the Maine law and its faithful execution;"
"We will support no man for office who is
not fully committed to these principles." A
Vender of Blaine badges and campaign songs
got ahead of the regular order of proceedings
and by judicious distribution of the printed
slips he got a crowd of two thousand seated
on the hillside. Then mounting the speak
er's stand he made a short stump speech and
sang lots of his songs while boys drove a
thriving trade among the audience selling
the books and badges.
The meeting was called to order at 1
o'clock by Hon. J. O, Porter. Prayer was
offered by Rev. Mr. Apsey of Cambridge,
Mass. A list of officers, including Congress
man Dinglev as president, was read. Mr.
Dingley then took the chair and made an ad
dress reviewing the growth of the party. A
letter was read from Anson P. Morrill, the
first Republican governor of Maine. Messrs.
Blaine and Hamlin and Governor Robie ar
rived at 2 o'clock and were escorted to the
grove. The whole audience arose when they
appeared and a scene or wild enthusiasm oc
curred. Three times three cheers were given.
Speeches followed by Mr. Blaine, Congress
man Dingley, Senator Frye, General John L.
Swift of Boston and others.
The Croquet Players of the Nation.
Norwich, Conn., Aug. 19. The National
Croquet association met to-day on the
grounds of the Norwich Croquet club and
commenced a series of games for the cham
pionship of the United States and two mal
lets of exquisite workmanship as first and
second prizes offered by the Norwich
club. By the rules of the game
each club represented selects a player who is
to play a game with each of the others and
then the winners will play down to
decide the championship. Eight clubs are
represented. The results ot to-day 8 games are
as follows: Ashlev. of Providence, beat Wel
lington, of Troy; Harland, of Norwieh, beat
strong, ot JNew London; JacoDs, or lieyport,
beat Walmbold, of Staten Island; Walmbold,
of Staten Island, beat Strong, of New Lon
don: Johnson, of Philadelphia, beat Read.
of New York, and Read, of New York, beat
Wellington, of Troy. The games will con
tinue throughout the week.
The Penalty for Miscegenation.
Madison, Ind., Aug. 19. In the circuit
court this afternoon Henry Thornton, col
ored, for violating the State law by marry
ing Miss Stout, white, was sentenced to the
state prison for three years ana nnea iuu.
A BUTLER PICNIC.
The
Labor Union of Providence at
Rocky Point.
Providence, R. I., Aug. 19. The first
annual excursion of the Rhode Island Central
Labor union took place to-day. Shortly
after 9 o'clock the line was formed on Ex
change Place and after parading the principal
streets received General Bu'ler at 11 o'clock
and embarked for Rocky Point The party
included Senator Blair of New Hampshire,
Hon. Louis F. Post of New York, Henry
Oscar Cole, ex-president of the International
Bricklayers' union of New York;
Secretary Howard of the Fall River
Spinners' union, and others. The
line was again formed and marched
around the grounds, when they broke ranks
for dinner. General Butler and party were
given an elegant dinner at the Mansion
House. After dinner the meeting was called
to order in the pavilion by President Myrick
Waites, of the R. I. C. L. U. After a brief
speech he read the letters of regret from
those unable to be present; thanked the
friends of the union and then introduced the
speaker of the afternoon, Gen. B. F. Butler.
The evening meeting was under the auspices
of the Greenback party. H. C. Russell, of
Providence, presided. There were speeches
by H. C. Baldwin and A. P. Tanner, of Con
necticut, and an address by General Butler,
whose speech of this noon was received with
wild enthusiastic applause. The gen
eral's address was most enthusi
astically received and warmly cheered
during the delivery, in the course of
which he plowed right and left through
both the old parties. He said that he had
never abandoned a principle, deserted a
friend, or forgot an enemy and was a Demo
crat until the Democrats spurned the work
ingmen. He urged all classes to unite in the
support of the laboring man's ticket. A let
ter from General West, the vice presidential
candidate, was read. General Butler drove
up to the city and took the midnight train
for Meriden, Conn., where he speaks to-morrow.
LOCAL NEWS.
SONS OF VETERANS.
First Annual meeting of the Con
necticut Division Encampment
Election of Officers and Address
es. At the rooms of Henry C. Merwin post, G.
A. R., the first annual meeting of the Con
necticut division encampment, Sons of Vet
erans, was held yesterday. Heretofore the
Connecticut division has been but a provi
sional organization and depended for the ap
pointment of its officers on the errand divi
sion of New England. Hereafter it will be a
permanent organization, electing its own of
ficers. Those present at yesterday's meeting
were Colonel William H. Pierpont, Lieuten
ant Colonel L. B. Brown, Quartermaster F,
D. Ldndsley, Adjutant E. Z. Dow of this
city, Inspector George E. Cox of Hartford.
The following were also entitled to vote for
the olhcers: Captain C. K. rarnham. Lieu
tenant A. H. Buckingham (the latter being
the delegate from the Nathan Hale post of
this city), Captain b. H. Mink, Delegate A.
C. Smith of the Forestville post. Captain N.
S. Leete and Delegate E. N. Knowles of
Guilford, Captain L. E. Seymour and Dele
gate John A. Hale of Hartford, Delegate D.
F. Fiord of Meriden, Captain W. P. Myers of
Norwich and Captain Henry Von Brock of
Stamford.
The report of the colonel shows seven
camps in this division and several more
about to organize. The election resulted as
follows: Colonel, E. Z. Dow ot JNew riaveii;
lieutenant colonel, W. P. Myers of Norwich;
major, L. E. Seymour of Hartford; chaplain,
G. C. Lewis of Meriden; surgeon, R. E.
Peck of New Haven; div. council, G. F.
Farnham, New Haven; N. S. Leete, Guilford;
Jno. A. Hale, Hartford; Henry Von Brock,
Stamford; R. O. Beach, Forestville; Thomas
Haggerty, Meriden. Delegates to grand divi
sion encampment, L. E. Seymonr,G. E. Cox,
of Hartford. Alternates, W. C. Car
ter, Meriden; S. H. Mink, Forestville;
Delegates to commandery-in-chief L. E.
Seymour of Hartford, E. F. Hill of New
Haven. Alternates A. C. Smith of Forest
ville, D. E. Ford of Meriden.
Appointments on staff Adjutant, F. J.
Linsley, New Haven; quartermaster, G. F.
Farnham, New Haven; inspecter, G. E. Cox,
Hartford.
Board of Health.
At a meeting of the Board of Health last
evening there was a discussion regarding the
ventilation of cesspools. Some doubt was
expressed in regard to the powers of the
Board to enforce proper ventilation.
Clerk Whedon said he did not believe that
one in a hundred sewers in the cy were
ventilated.
Dr. Lindsley said that all ventilating pipes
should reach to the top of the buildings.
Gas from cesspools was likely to enter
dwellings through the soil pipes where there
was no proper ventilation.
President Brewer thought it would be a
good plan to issue oirculars of instruction
and urge the ventilation of cesspools.
Dr. Lindsley and Clerk Whedon referred
to the offensive odors proceeding from the
public urinals on Chapel and Court streets,
and thought they should be deodorized.
SHOES
& excellent SHOEfor 6oY8
WEAR for years. We make
II nothtnK else, and prodnce per
V faction of fit. dbmfort, food
f Mtyle, and the beet weariDg
boot that is made. Coat no more
than in generally charged for or
dinary ahoes, and will save 50
rr rant. In wear. 4o corns, no
- tmnlonB. Any dealer content with a fair profit will
confirm what we say. Give them a trial, and you wlU
Iw a pernanit friend of THE HUIaAR TIP.
Beware of Im.ta.tftena called by xuunee eo nearly
like Molar Tip to deceive. Trade-mark and "John
MuMitix. Co-," la frill, is on eole of each pain
J? J . .WAYS
101
WANTED.
A SITUATION by a respectable girl to do gener
al housework in a private family. Good city
references from last place. Can be seen for two
days at 131 MEADOW STREET.
uku it
WANTED,
A SITUATION bra German girl as cook : is well
fV qualified. Call at
auaoit SOU WOOSTER STREET.
WASTED,
A SITUATION to do general housework or sec
ond work in a private family. Good refer
ence. Can be seen for two days at
au201t 15 COLLIS STREET,
WANTED,
A SITUATION by a respectable young girl to do
general housework or second work in a small
private family. Good reference. Inquire at
au!9 8t 10 DOW STREET.
WANTED.
A FEW good insurance solicitors for New Ha
ven; also live, energetic men in all principal
cities and towns in Connecticut as agents for a pop
ular life and accident society. Liberal contracts
made with good parties. Apply or address
A. H. MOULTON, 811 Chapel street,
aulfttf New Haven. Conn.
WANTED,
T ADY Agents for tbe :'-Queen Protector", (new
J rubber undergarment for ladies), "Daisy Hose
Supporter.1 "Empress Dress Shield," "Tampico
Bosom Form," "Shoulder Brace," &c. ; we offer
better inducements than any other house in Amer
ica; goods sell in every house as fast as shown;
agents make $150 monthlv. Address with stamp
E. H. CAMPBELL CO.,
aulS lm 9 So. May Street. Chicago.
WANTED,
mTWO or three rooms in a good neighbor
hood for light househeeping for two perse ns;
rent must be moderate.
MERWIN'S REAL ESTATE OFFICE,
au4 759 Chapel Street.
WANTED.
TABLE Boarders. Also one room for rent.
Apply at
L jylltf 509 CHAPEL STREET.
WANTED,
To BUY lot of Second-hand Furniture and Car
pets. Highest cash price paid. Orders by mail
promptly attended to at
jalf 88 CHURCH STREET.
Intelligence Office.
PLOYMENT office for males and females.
Help of different nationalities can be supplied to
private families, boarding houses, hotels and res
taurants. The proprietor of this establishment pays
great attention in tne choice of girls and women be
fore sending them to fill situations. Calls from the
country at any distance are promptly attended to.
Invalid and wet nurses at short notice. Male help
for families and farm hands always ready.
MRS. T. MULLIGAN,
a26tf 197 George, corner Temple street.
To Whom it may Concern !
MONEY liberally advanced in sums
to suit on all kinds of merchan
dise and personal property of ev;
ery description at
EDWARD ENCiEL'S
Old and Reliable Money Loan Office,
341 and 343 STATE STREET, New Haven, Conn.
All legal transactions strictly Confidential. ja5
MES. DR. J. A. WMGHT,
Psycliometrist and Clairvoyant.
Consultation on Business, Minerals, Health and al
Personal Matters.
Readings of Character by Handwriting, Photograph
or Hair.
Price Gentlemen, $-2; Ladies, $1.
Mrs. Wright can be consulted at her office, 68 Or
ange street, daily, 9 a. m. to 8 p. in. mStf
Iguteytaiuwcttts.
pa nil 'c npcRA wnitcF cytra i
VIII I W Wl ira llWWWb Wmt I 1 1
Friday, Saturday and Saturday
Matinee, Aug; 22 and 23.
"THE LITTLE SPARKLE OF SUNSHINE,"
PATTI n.J35. !
In her new and original society comedy-drama in 4
acts, entitled
MIZI?ja.II !
Introducing entirely new songs. Duetts, Medleys,
Dances, etc.
Efficiently supported by a company of actors un
der the management of FRANK IRVING.
TED. D. MARKS - - - Business Manager
Reserved Seats on sale at Loomis Prices 25, 50,
75c andJfcJLOO. auli)5t
INSTRUCTION IN RIDING
GIVEN BY
MRS. R. M. HOOKER.
Apply at the Rink, 381 Temple Street,
From 10:30 to 11:30 a. m, 3 to 5 p. m.
jel7 3m
GREAT
MIDSUMEE
Closing-Out Sale !
OF-
CORSETS, HOOP SKIRTS
-AND
BUSTLES
- IN OUR
CORSET DEPARTMENT,
Bolton & Neely,
SUCCESSORS
12. MAL.M2Y & CO.
jyi4
HOW TO CURE
SKIN DISEASES,
Disfiguring Humors, Humiliating
Eruptions, Itching and Burn
ing Tortures.
SALT RHEUM or Eczema, Psoriasis, Scald
Head, Infantile or Birth Humors, and every
form of Itching, Scaly, Pimply, Scrofulous, Inher
ited, CotaRious and Copper-Colored Diseases of the
Blood, Skin and Scalp, with L.orh of Hair, are pos
itively cured by Cuticura Resolvent, the new
Blood Purifier, internally, and Ci'ticura and Cim
cura Soap, the great Skin Cures and Beautiflers, ex
ternally, when all known remedies and the best phy
sicians fail.
GREATEST ON EARTH.
CuncrRA Remedies are the greatest medicines on
earth. Had the worst case Salt Rheum in this coun
try. My mother had it twenty years, and in fact
died from it. I believe Cuticura would have saved
her life. My arms, breast and head were covered
for three years, which nothing relieved or cured un
til I used the CcTictrRA Resolvent internally and
Cuticura and Cuticura Soap externally.
J. W. Adams, Newark, O.
GREAT BLOOD MEDICINES.
The half has not been told as to the great curative
powers of the Cuticura Remedies. I have paid
hundreds of dollars for medicines to cure diseases of
the blood and skin, and never found anything yet to
equal the CCTxcura Remedies,
Chas. A. Williams.
Providence, B. I.
CURE IN EVERY CASE.
Your Cuticura Remedies outsell all other medi
cines I keep for skin diseases. My consumers and
patients say they have effected a cure in every in
stance, where other remedies have failed.
H. W. BROCK.WAY, M. D.,
Franklin Falls, N. H.
Sold by all druggists. Price: Cuticura, 50cts.;
Resolvent, $1: Soap, 25 ets.; Potter Drug and
Chemical Co., Boston, Mass.
Se nd Tor "How to Cure Skin Plnease.
Til1 4 TTTV lrr Sunburn, Tan, and Greasy
l-- U A X skin. Blackheads, Skin Blem
ishes, and Infantile humors, use Cuticura Soap, a
real Beautifier. aueltolStaw
MRS. M. E. COWI,ES, M. .,
CHRONIC DISEASES A SPECIALTY.
93 Olive Street.
OBlce hours 10 to 18 and 11 to 4. m!5 3m
IfflPOKTASIT INFORMATION.
To those in want
of Glassea:
Durant has p u r
cliased one of Dr.
1 Irocklin's Opthal
Tnoscopie test lenses
for testing the eyee.
? It is the best thine
fever invented. Call
and see it before go-
inz to an occulist.
You will save money
and be perfectly fit
ted. J. H. G. DURANT, 38 & 40 Chukch St.
W. A Strong,
DENTIST,
6 Hoadley Bntldlns?
. 1 TJ 1 ..rtl .
'V W ' ')'! '. 1 1L-.1. 1HH .T. 1
OFKK'K. HOURS TtUn n . . a n ,
" . !-." 0UU
days, 9 to 1 1 a. m.
PEACHES.
Oranges, Lemons, Bananas, Water
melons, Citron melons, Apples,
Tomatoes, Sweet Potatoes
And Everything kept In a first-class
Grocery.
HARRY LEIGH,
670 Chapel Street.
Telephone uW
aiu iiu'

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