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Morning journal and courier. [volume] (New Haven [Conn.]) 1848-1894, September 02, 1884, Image 1

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015483/1884-09-02/ed-1/seq-1/

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2c. per Copy.
$ 5 per Year.
THE LARGEST DAILY NEWSPAPER IJV THE CITY.
OFFICE, 400 STATE! STREET.
THE CARRIKGTON PUBLISHIKC CO.
SI
NEW HAVEN, CONN. TUESDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 2, 1884.
NO. 229
VOL. LIT.
i i
1 i
11
are selling Blankets
cheaper than the other
stores.
MY ANNUAL EXCURSION
TWICE A WEEK
TO SAVIN ROOK
FOR THE COLLECTION OF
Will Commence After July 1
WAIT FOR THE WAGON.
If you are going out of town
FOR THE SUMMER
MAKE ARRANGEMENTS AT MY OFFICE
To have j our Collars and Cuffs
Sent by Mall,
Thus Saving You Trouble.
THOMAS FORSYTH,
641 and 878 Chapel Street,
New Numbers.
Works near Neck Bridge. fr9
Horses and Carriages for Sale
and To Let.
Carriage Making in all its branchos. Repairing
and painting a specialty. Anyone wishing to buy
or sell an outfit wilt And it to thoir advantage to
give us a call.
CULLOM &. CO.
leant 108 FRANKLIN STREET.
REMOVAL.
We liave removed to our new
Building
Nos. 821-823 Grand Street,
Which is very spacious, well lighted, and four en
tire floors on which to display our new styles of
Furniture of all Kinds.
We are now carry a very large stock and will be
ble to meet the demands of our constantly increasi
ng trade.
THE SAME LOW PRICES
And liberal Terms as nave here
tofore been the feature of
of this establishment,
P. J. KELLLY& CO.,
Xos. 821 axxcI. 828
GRAND STREET.
STRAW HATS
50c to $3.00
MACKINAWS,
MANILLAS,
ALL THE LATEST.
MEN'S FURNISHINGS.
TRUNKS. TRUNKS.
KILBOURN & CP'S, 816 Chapel St.
GEORGE W. BUTTON,
ARCHITECT.
Fruit, Foreign and Domestic,
' ' WHOLESALE and RETAIL.
mtf J .075 Cftapel Street.
VAUtTS AND CESSFOOES.
Re sure your Vaults and Cess
pools are in good condition be
fore not weather gets here. Send
your address to
A. N. FARNHAM,
P. O. BOX 375 CITY, OR MAY BE LEFT AT R.
B. BRADDEY & CO.'S, 408 State street, ROBT
VEITCH & SON'S. a?4 Chapel street. m!5
FIRST-CLASS GROCERIES.
SPICES.
Canned goods. Fresh Fruit, all kinds, dally.
Choice Creamery Butter. A full line of Sea Food
all kinds in their season. Prices as low as the low
est. Orders taken and goods delivered.
EDWARD V. DIBJlND,
88Q State Street, eor. Clarfc.
au38
Li AY'S SPECIFIC iflLEDICIRE,
rRAD MARK tin Omt ExotWTRADE MARX
jp&SS tun tot SwnlBsl Wi.
ftZJi B,SpO.tWTllO,I.
.fS.lf-AlOT.1 Itmct
V M.OK.I7, Unll l-
JF ItnJc.P.liilnta. Baili.
Z plm.n..fVuk,P.m-
Ztirm! Ik. rqtmiMt N rack tk.1 tk,J .r. nu,l
"oi'icJLulKH.toH.lto, hmto u w-pp-j-j.
to inivou. ar Tb Spi.ic MMici. 1. M -J .U dretpfe
T-he Cray Medicine Co., Buffalo, N. Y.
kOia BY KICHABDSON CO
i. My
The School fModern Languages
WILL reopen Wednesday.October l,a. tn. Please
apply to - TH. HENESS,
236 Crown, corner College Street,
aul2 Stawtonovl Kew Haven. Conn.
Miss Wott's
English and French Family and Day
School lor Y oung Ladles.
S3 Wall street, New Haven, Conn. Th. 12th year be
gins Tuesday, Sept. 28. Circulars sent upon ap
plication. - -
CONSERVATORY OFf MUSIC,
MUSIC Vocal and Instrumental ana Tuning. .
ART. Drawing. Painting, Modeling and Portrait.
. ORATORY, literature and I (?' -HOME.
Eleeant accommodations for 600 lady studentj
jt-'ALI. TliltM begins Septum. Beautifully 111 a
Calendar free. Address . TOURJEE. Director. l
No. 847 Chapel street.
Fall term begins Monday
September 1st. Day and evening sessions. Appiy
for circular giving I
HOPKINS GRAMMAR SCHOOL.
Preparing Boys for the Classical and
Scientific Departments am
College.
Fall Term Opens Thursday, Sep
tember 18.
For particular information call on or address W.
T. OTTKHINil. IB Elm street. sel 8m
NEW HAVEN
CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC,
82 Church Street.
E. A. PARSONS, F. E. BRISTOL.
MRS. E. A. PARSONS.
S. A. WAAS, J- L. BRAND.
Fourteenth year commences Sept. 1.
For particulars inquire at the onlce or address
au30 3t K. A. PARSONS, Director.
Greenwich Academy.
Usual Literary Courses, with Musical Inst itute and
Commercial College. Founded 1802. Both
sexes. Influences decidedly religious. Home care
and comforts. Charmingly located on Nar ragan
sett Bay, and on direct route from New York to
Boston. iirand opportunities for salt water bathing
...i.l lio'tln,. Tei-rnn moderate. Ooens Sent. 1.
Catalogue free. . - . w n
y., T
WEST END INSTITUTE.
RS. CADY'S School for Young Ladies and
jti jnisses, and lwnueigiii Kru iui v. i. .n .....
commence the fifteenth year on THURSDAY, Sep
tember 85th. Pupils not otherwise connected with
the school may enter the classes in French, Paint
ing and Elocution, or may receive private instruc
.:.... -una nrvMiroiAi, nn-flecnmnlishert French ladv.
will have charge of the French. Circulars sent 6n
application at the school. No. 99 Howe st. a23 lm
IC.
F. A. FOWLER,
TEACHER OF
PIANO, ORGAN and HARMONY.
- AUSTIN BUILDING, 337 CHAPEL STREET,
Rooms 8 and 9.
A correct touch a soecialty. auSOtf
Miss Fannie C. Howe. '
CULTIVATION OF THE VOICE (Italian method)
and PIANO INSTRUCTION.
Charles T. Howe,
FLUTE AND PIANO INSTRUCTION,
102 CROWN STREET, NEAR TEMPLE STREET,
selgtf
SHORTHAND !
EVERY person should be able to write short
hand. It is becoming indispensable in business
in our courts and in newspaper offices, besides being
a valuable accomplishment in every day life. - It is
the best capital a young man can have. For young
ladies it opens a field both pleasant and profitable.
We will teach you by mail at reduced rates. Send
for our "Compendium of Self Instruction" and learn
this art at home. Hundreds have done it. You can
doit. J1.Q0 post paid. Circulars free.
COGSWELL'S
SCHOOL JILJBpNOGRAPHY,
STEW IIAVE3V,CO!3l.
Jy28
YALE BUSINESS COLLEGE.
New Haven, Conn.
BANKING DEPARTMENT.
OPENS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 1.
For further information call at the College.
Office No. 37 Insurance Building,
Or enclose three two cents stamps for new illus
trated catalogue giving full particulars. Address
aul8 K. CI. I.OVERIDBK.
8. k J. ft
57, 59 &01OMN&EST,
FURNITURE DEALERS
AND
UNDERTAKERS,
Have the finest Painted Bedroom Suits in the city.
New Parlor Suits, Walnut Bedroom Suits.
The best Spring Bed for the money.
Splint, Rattan, Cane and Rush .Seat Chairs in
great variety, as low as can be bought.
UNDERTAKING
promptly attended to, night or day, with care.
Bodies preserved without ice in the beat manner.
AlonfinlA irrpntflfnr Wasllhlim'a DoodoxlllS and
Disinfecting Fluid, , '
A new lot of Fnlrilnir Chairs and Stools to rent for
partieRjrJmipralBBMBMjy-i
TRUNKS. TRUNKS. TRUNKS,
BAGS ! BAGS ! BAGS !
A complete stock of Tourists'
Articles. The only exclusive trunk
tore in the city, Trunks, Bags
and Sample Cases made to order,
Repairing a specialty. Old trunks
taken in exchange. Good Goods
at Low prices at
CROFTJT & CO.'S,
210 Cliapel Street
BELOW THE BRIDGE.
ELECTRICITY IS LIFE,
Why will people cling to the absurijidea that they
must take medicine? Electricity will reaoh where
medicine has failed, as 15 years' experience has
proved, it you are troimiea witn uaiarrn, or weunu
gia, or Rheumatism, Throat or Lnng Troubles, Gen-
ELECTRICITY.
Go and see Dr. Cummings. His method differs
from all others. His success is wonderful.
LAdies treated successfully. Ladies can consult
with the Doctor's wife afternoons. Consultation
free.
DR. J. W. CUMMINGS,
Vo 4 Church Street,
oclS
WOOD'S BLOCK.
C. A. DOUGLASS,
TEACHER OF PIASfO,
295 Columbus Avenue.
au20 lmo
REMOVAL.
THE
NEW YORK BRANCH
LOAN OFFICE
NOW PERMAFENTLY LOCATED AT
42 Church Street.
10KEY LOANED.
Liberal advances made on all kinds of personal
property.
Unredeemed Pledges
. For sale at low prices.
Square Dealing With All.
SOLOMON FRY
............ rty
5 1
Mr
Jyio
PeoDle's Dry
n
BLANKETS
FROM
AUCTION.
We have received another large lot of Blankets from
Auction, and shall offer them on
MONDAY MORNING
at prices which we will GUARANTEE to be
O "W E3 3E3L
than equal value can foe bought for elsewhere in this
city.
A comparison solicited.
A GRAND EXHIBITION
of line Turkish-Rugs, Portias and Embroideries of Pal
ace Work sold at less than
AUCTION PRICES
bv native Armenians from the far East. This sale will
last but a few weeks. Ask
hundred rears old Rugs.
J
PROCTOR
NEW HAVEN.
LlffCOLff
SAFE DEPOSIT COMPANY
AND
STORAGE WAREHOUSE,
32 To 3S EAST 4 '21 STREET,
(Opposite Grand Central Depot.)
Hew York.
A BUILDING FIREPROOF THROUGHOUT
Now ready for the transaction of business. Boxes
rented at from $10 to $300 per year. Silver, Trunks
and packages stored under guarantee.
Private entrance. Reception and Toilet Rooms for
Ladies.
Vault, Coupon, Reception and Toilet Rooms on
the ground floor, and directly accessible to the
street. Rooms or space in the
FIREPROOF WAREHOUSE
for Furniture, Works of Art and Merchandise
rented by the month or year. Trunk stoarge a
SP6C WSPECTION INVITED.
THOS. L- JAMES," A. VAN SANTVOORD,
President. Vice President.
J. H- B. EDGAR, J. R. VAN WORMER,
Secretary. - Superintendent. '
PEACHES,
Oranges, Lemons, Bananas, Water
melons, Citron Melons, Apples,
Tomatoes, Sweet Potatoes
And Everything kept In a first-class
Grocery.
HARRY LEIGH,
670 Chapel Street.
Telephone.
I. S. MILLER, M. D.
318 Chapel Street, between Or
ange and Church Streets.
Residence, - - Tontine Hotel
NEW HAVEN, CONN.
OFFICE HOURS 8 to 12 a. m., 2 to 6 p. ni, 7 to
p. m.
SUNDAY 9 to 10 a. m.. S to 6 p. m. m7 3m
Mice. Notice.
Our store will be closed Wednesday. August 27,
from 8a.mto6p.rn.to enable our clerks to hold
their Third Annual pionio at Pawson Park via steam
er Ivernia..
PEACHES.
PEACHES.
baskets daily, and when they are cheaper we shall
handle more. We are selling as low as possible. If
you want some come and see us. We sold about 700
baskets last week.
100 fine cutting Watermelons at 30c each large
size.
Fine Ripe Tomatoes only 4c quart.
Evergreen Sweet Corn, large ears, only lc doz.
Uma Beans, natives, only 50c peckt
New Sweet Potatoes only 5pc pk.
New Early Rose P-Qtatoes only 85c bushel
25 Boxes Bright Juicy Lemons, only 10c a dozen.
Oereal Flakes, a verv nice article for Summer use.
at 13c a, package 3 for 85o.
Mixea uanay a i-w a pounu.
Wait until we advise you to buy your Peaches for
canning, and. you will save money.
D. M. WELCH & SON,
Nos. 28 and SO Congress Avenue.
Elastic Hose,
KNEE CAPS, ANKLETS AND
ARM PIECES.
Silk Abdominal Supporters.
For the relief of corpulency, enlarged veins and
weak joints. Since we cpnmen,ced the manufac
ture of the above, using only fresh imported stock.
we are able to furnish the best fitting and most dur
able goods that can be made. A fact that our regu
lar customers do not fail to appreciate.
OUR STOCK Of TRUSSES,
Manufactured especially for our retail trade, in
dudes almost every form of Truss of any value in
market, which with our facilities for making to or
der special appliances and long experience In the
treatment of Hernia, enables us to guarantee relief
and comfort to every one needing support.
Personal attention given to the selection and
roper adjustment of all appliances.
E. L "Washburn, M. D.,
84
AND
31 0:E2KrT3E33EV 9T
BENEDICT BDILDINa.
DEPOT CARS PASS THE POOH. JylO
A n At.h fir T?pd n o.ti on .
THE New Haven Butter Store has again redneed
to a great extent the Butter to such a price that
everybody must be satisfied with the price and qua!
itv Our trade has increased largely. We ean save
everybody 6 cents on the pound. Stores, hotels and
restaurants can be supplied by the tub or greater
quantity. Fresh Eggs as lew as the lowest In market
at wnoieswe u
116 Congress Avenue.
- . A. FEHLBERG
I VTTlf ti w -n
144 LEXINGTON AVENUE, NEAR 29th STREET,
NEW YORK.
Hours, 8 to 1 and 5 to 7.
Diseases of the Nervous system. Gem to Urinary
organs, impotence and sterility.
Goods
Sore
to see the three and four
TT CTTRE9 WHEN
aeUen. It to aaflx
ALL OTIEEI "MTSPIi
and speedy em
prenss FAIL, as it
and nun
dreds b.T
acts DIEECTLT
end At otrcB r
the KIDNET8,
IIVS and BOW
ELS, restoring
it Whs
XkhyslcdanB and
had
themto a healthy
tbemup
IT IS BOTH A "SAFE CURE"
and a " SPECIFIC."
It CURES all Diseases of tbo Kidneys,'
l.ivcr, Bladder and Urinary Organs;
Dropsy, Ciravel, Diabetes, Bright's
Disase9Nerron8 Diseases, Exces
ses, female Weaknesses,
Janndice, Biliousness, Head
ache, Soar Stomach, Dyspepsia.
Constipation, Piles, Pains in the
Back, Loins, or side, Retention or
Non. Retention of Urine.
$1.25 AT BKUGGISTS.
ra-TAKE NO OTHER.-W
send for Illustrated Pamphlet of Solid Teo
timmiiHlff of Absolute Cure,,
HUNT'S REMEDY CO.,
6 Providence, R.. I.
inanimiiHminmniidiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
Modern -Science
mi Skepticism
What has Skepticism done for the world ?
TTnt.hlnc rrnt to suireest doubts. It has even
suggested that Rheumatism cannot be cored.
Skepticism is as bad aa Rheumatism.
What has Science done for the world ?
A good many things; for Instance, It has
shown tliat Rheumatism can be cured.
It has shown that Neuralgia can be got rid of.
Modern science h asproved that Rheumatism is
a blood disease, and nas provided Atbxopboros
as the remedy which can completely cure it
It has proved that although the old doctors
failed to overcome Neuralgia, ATHXOPHORoscan
reach, it, and eradicate It from the system.
It has proved that though these tormenting
diseases were so slow and obstinate, they can
be overcome in a little while by means of
jfHKIopLoros 1
Dont be skeptical- If you have any doubts as
to what Atbxophoros can do, write to some of
those whom it has cured. For instance, Rev. 8.
R. Dennen, D. D., Pastor Third Congregational
Church, (of New Haven, Conn., the Rev. W. P.
Corbit, pastor George St. M. E. Church, of New
Haven, the Rev. J. E. Searles, pastor Wlllett St.
M. E. Church, Kew York city, Mr. Brommeu, the
well known candy manufacturer, of New York,
Es-Gov. Blgelow, of Connecticut, and many
others, equally well known.
If you cannot get Athxophobob of your druggist,
wo will send it express paid, on receipt of regular
price one dollar per bottle, we prefer that you buy
it from your druggist, but If he hasn't it, do not be
persuaded to try something- else, but order at once
irom us as directed.
AT HL0PH0R0S CO., 112 WALL ST., HEW YORK.
Mlllllt.l. .!..! IL R. Illllllllllllll
JUST OUT !
THE STAR CHORUS BOOK
Conventions, Choirs and Musical Societies.
By W. O. PEBSINS.
Price $1; Per Dez., $9.
The Star Chorus Book is one that a choir or soci
ety in want of good Sacred and Secular Choruses
Will CtiJCIiy WJUUl, uic m w. wiu uj
best. 108 pages, large octavo size. 36 Choruses about
half Secular, half Sacred. Organ or Piano accom
ranimpnta. For Mixed Voices.
Among me oacreti pieces win uc iuuiiu nwiyii
1 7 .. .1.. t.-: ,1 1tr.niqalc.n).ni n-oitu1
for the Lord," Handei's -'Hallelujah," and Rossi-
i's w nen xnou uomesc
Among the Secular Choruses are: Benedict's
Home." Stewart's "Bells of St. Michael's." Verdi's
Storm Kine." and Hatton's "Stars of the Summer
jMignt, -
THREE BfElV 9I1JSIC BOOKS
rhoralWonhip. ($l. or 9 per dozen. Bv
L. O. Emerson. For Choirs, Singing Classes and
Conventions.
Sons' Wonhlv. (35 cts.. or 3.60 per dozen). Bv
L. O. Emerson and W. F. Sherwin. For Sunday
Schools.
The Model Singer. (80 cts., or $ per dozen.)
By w. u. miniia ana 11. u. xowner. or uing-
lng class anu muvcuuuiu.
Any book mailed for retail price.
OLIVER DITSON & CO., Boston.
au.6tf
A FRIEND IN NEED.
DR. SWEET'S '
INFALLIBLE LINIMENT.
PnmATwl from the recipe of Dr. Stenhen Sweet.
of Connecticut, the great natural Bone-Setter. Has
been used for more than fifty years and is the best
known remedy for Rheumatism, Neuralgia, Sprains,
Bruises. Burns, Cuts, Wounds, and all external in
juries.
DODD'S NERVINE AND LNVIGORATOR.
Standard and reliable, and never fails to comfort
the aged and help every ooay wno uses it-
SOLD BY T.T. DRUGGISTS TRY IT.
nl3eod&wtf
MAGUIRB k CO
m
he ynvvml and (goxueizv.
The Oldest Dally Paper Published
in Connecticut.
THE CAEETNGTOJ PUBTJSHINQ CO.
COPIES XWO CENTS.
dlijvebzd bt carrtkrb in the cltt, 12
cents a Week, 43 cbbts a Month, $5.00 a
Year. The Sams Terms Bt Mail.
Bates of Advertising. .
SITUATIONS WANTED, one insertion 50c; each
subsequent insertion 25c. ,
WANTS, RENTS, and cither small advertisements
occupying not more than six lines, one insertion
75c; each subsequent insertion 85c.
One square (one inch) one insertion, $1.30: each
subsequent insertion, 40 cents; one week, $3.30; one
month, $10.00.
Yearly advertisements at the following rates:
One square, one year, $40; two squares, one year,
$70; three squares one year, $100.
Obituary notices, in prose or verse, 15 cents per
line. Notices of Births, Marriages and Deaths, 50
cents each. Local Notices 20c per line.
Advertisements on second page one price and a
half.
Yearly advertisers are limited to their own imme
diate business, and their contracts do not include
Wants, To Let, For Sale, etc
Special rates furnished fci application for contracts
covering a considerable length of time, or a large
space.
THE WEEKLY JOURNAL
18 published
Every Thursday Mornino.
Single Copies 5 cents - $2.00 a year
Strictly in advance, - - - - 1.50 a year
All letters and inquiries in regard to subscriptions
or matters of business should be addressed
THE JOURNAL AND COURIER,
New Haven. Conn.
Notice.
We cannot accept anonymous or return rejected
communications. In all cases the name of the
writer will be required, not for publication, but as a
guarantee of good faith.
Tuesday, September a, 1884.
REPUBLICAN NOMINATIONS.
FOR PRESIDENT,
JAMES G. BLAINE, of Maine.
FOR VICE PRESIDENT,
JOHN A. LOGAN, of Illinois.
State 'Electoral Ticket.
BLECTORS-AT-LAKOE,
Theodore D. Woolsey, of New Haven.
Charles A. Williams, of -New London.
DISTRICT ELECTORS,
1st District I. Luther Spencer, of Suffield.
2d District Joseph E. Silliman, of Chester.
3d District James S. Atwood, of Plainfield.
4thDistrict Frederick Miles, of Salisbury.
Por State Officers.
FOR GOVERNOR, '
HENEY B. HAEEISON, of New' Haven.
FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR,
LOREIN A. COOKE, of Barkhamsted.
FOR SECRETARY OP STATE,
CHARLES A. RUSSELL, of Killingly.
FOR TREAsrRER,
V. B. CHAMBERLAIN, of New Britain.
FOR COMPTROLLER,
LUZERNE I. MUNSON, of Waterbnry.
THE DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION.
The Democratic State convention which is
to be held in Hartford to-day will be an in
teresting affair. What it will do nobody can
tell. Three weeks ago there was no doubt
that "the little giant" would be renominat
ed. But soon after the Hon. Henry B. Har
rison of this city was nominated by the Re
publicans the little giant declined to be hon
ored with a renomination. Some people do
not believe that he really does not want an
other chance, and they think that if the con
vention calls loudly and nnanini5usly for
him he will hear the call and bow in his most
graceful manner to the will of the people.
On the other hand he gets credit for sagacity
in seeing that the nomination of Mr. Harri
son does not make a renomination for him a
very valuable boon.
But if Governor Waller really means what
he says and will not take a renomination, the
convention will have quite a number of gen
tlemen to select from. Hon. William W.
Eaton would, it is thought, take the nomina
tion. His friend A. E. Burr of the Hartford
Times wants him to have it. He wonld
make a lively candidate, and could perhaps
endure the defeat that awaits the Democratic
nominee when "the sun goes down" on the
fourth day of November as well as any man.
Among others who have been mentioned are
George G. Sumner of Hartford, the present
lieutenant governor; A. E. Burr of Hart
ford, and Edward S. Cleveland of Hartford.
In New Haven there are Luzon B. Morris,
James Gallagher, Mayor Lewis and John R.
Leeds who are available. And there are sev
eral gentlemen in other parts of the State
who are willing to live and hold office for
their beloved country.
The candidates for the other places on the
ticket are not so numerous, but there are
enough to go around and some over. As
those who get the nominations seem likely
to be more unfortunate than those who "get
left" the latter will probably not have cause
for deep grief.
It is evident that if Governor Waller per
sists in declining to run Mr. Eaton's claims
will be strongly pushed. He has done a
great deal for the Democratic party, both in
war and in peace, and he ought to have the
nomination if he wants it. If he is nomi
nated the Republicans will try to welcome
him with their ballots to a hospitable po
litical grave.
EDITORIAL NOTES.
To-day the State election in Vermont takes
place. A big Republican majority is expect
ed.
Real estate is much depressed in Great
Britain. The "land question" may yet- find
an answer.
An official inquiry into the liquor traffic
which has been made in Switzerland has had
a rather unexpected and surprising result.
The report openly defends social drinking,
It declares that the practice of social drink
ing brings a cheerful temper into society, ef
faces the traces of daily labor, opens the heart
to other impressions and is intimately associ
ated with the development of public life,
The public house, it says, fosters intellectual
activity and is a remedy against misanthropy,
egotism, vanity, narrowness of ideas and ex
travagance of imagination. The man who
wrote this report evidently did not take a
very narrow view of things. If he were in
this country he would probably shine as a
Democratic politician.
New York elevators carried a hundred mil
lion people last year, or more than the ele
vated railroads. Passenger elevators came
into general use about eighteen years- ago,
and the American invention has since become
naturalized in all the civilized countries of
Europe,- and is in large demand in Australia
and Mexico. The largest elevators are those
of the Manhattan Storage company, measur
ing ten feet in width and twenty in length,
while the Produce Exchange system is the
most expensive, "the nine cars costing $69,-
800. The elevators in the great Mills build
ing have carried 23,000 persons in a single
day, the daily average being 12,000. The el
evator used for building the Washington
monument is nine feet square, runs to the
height of 525 feet, and has a lifting capacity
of ten tons. Bureaus of inspection in many
cities help to insure the safety of passenger
elevators, but constant care is necessary to
prevent accidents.
In Consul Stymour's report upon the credit
system in Canton, China, the following in
teresting incident is given: On the occasion
of a Chinese firm failing, with large indebt
edness to foreign merchants, under circum
stances that were deemed dishonorable, Han
qua (a merchant) called upon . half a , dozen
wealthy merchants to join him in paying off
the total indebtness of the insolvent Chinese
firm, and headed the subscription with $1,
000,000, remarking that "Chinese credit
must remain untarnished." This is the same
Hanqua who raised the portion of the six
millions of indemnity or "ransom" which
had to be paid by the Chinese authorities
within forty-eight hours to prevent the bom
bardment of Canton by the English. Han
qua cheerfully contributed $1,110,000, $100,
000 of which he gave in recognition of the fi
delity of his son, $200,000 in token of the af
fection of his beloved wife, and $800,000 as a
thank offering.for the prosperity that had in
variably attended him in his commercial en
terprises. This appears on public record.
The Charleston News and Courier says
that the sole intent and aim of the average
New Englander, in his commercial transac
tions, seems to be to palm off on the unsus
pecting purchaser of his wares the apparent
for the real, the imitation for the genuine,
the false for the true; in shortj that which
seems to be for that which is. In hunting
for the facts to sustain this charge, it is
found that it is based on the letter of a- Boa
ton provision dealer to a trade journal, in
which he says that it is customary for Bos
ton dealers to send mackerel to the Galveston
market wrongly labeled; thus "small 8's are
branded No. 2, and small 2's branded No. 1."
But the letter goes "on to say that this incor
rect marking is done at the order of the
Galveston purchasers and, consequently, so
far as the Boston merchant's relations with
his customers are concerned, he is guilty of
deception. The News and Courier had bet
ter turn its attention to the southern mer
chants, many of whom are doubtless quite as
sharp" as the hated Yankees.
A lady was arraigned before Judge Chitty
in London the other day to answer a charge
of having sent to one of the junior clerks in
Chambers a letter enclosing a check and con
veying promise of a sum of 200J for such
junior clerk and 1,000 or 1,200 for the
chief clerk, or a percentage in consideration
of a cause in which she was interested being
expedited. The lady, in answer to the
judge's questions, said she did not think
she had done anything wrong. She wished to
pay something for the trouble she was giv
ing the clerks. It was, she had found, a
very troublesome thing to get her case heard,
and she was anxious to have a case which
had been worrying her for seven years finally
settled. She was willing to give 4,000 to
have it settled. She, however, promised not
to repeat any offense she had been guilty of,
and apologized to the court. The judge said
that the offence was plainly bribery. It was
a most serious case; but, taking circumstan
ces into account, especially the offender's
sex, he would, on this occasion, accept, with
some hesitation, her apology. His lordship
then handed back the check to the lady, and
severely reprimanded her,adding,in the event
of her being guilty of such an offence again,
he wonld doubtless commit her to prison.
SIMILAR.
The churches, just now, resemble the
ocean. Tney are tuU or desert aisles. Bos
ton Transcript.
Why is Maud S. like a well-behaved medi
cal student? Because she takes no one's dust.
Burlington Free Press.
Monkeys in South Africa cut canes of spice
wood and suck the ends, yet some people do
not believe in Darwin. Indianapolis Jour
nal.
"Will the coming man be happier?" asks
a writer. It depends upon how late and in
what condition he gets home. New York
Jonrnal.
Adolphus Why is it, don't you know,
that all the young fellahs sit down on me so?
Mary Jane X don't Know, .uoliy, unless it
is that they like a soft seat. Boston Times.
The saloons in Philadelphia closed last
Snnday. We always said the Philadelphia
saloons would nave to close - some bunaay;
don't carry enough stock. Burlington Hawk
eye. It is impossible to convince a woman who
arrives five minutes late at a depot that
the'eugineer did not see her coming and
steam off just out of spite. Philadelphia
Call.
Citizen, desirous to feel the pnlse of the
masses of political issues, to bootblack artist
"Well, Johnnie, will Cleveland wmi"
Johnnie, contemptuously "Cleveland! naw!
Cleveland is fifth. Providence has a clear
lead now." Baltimore Day.
"Do you know, Mr. Dnder!" asked one
Newport girl of another. "I can't say that
I know him, but I have met him several
times." "Well, you ought to cultivate him."
"Why, is he anything much?" "I don't
know how he will be in the future, but now he
needs cultivation about as much as any man
I ever met." Then they smiled softly into
each other's eyes and went, their several
ways. Merchant Traveler.
"What do the papers mean?" asked a good
old lady at the south end. "I see they say
that all the ministers are coming ont tor
Cleveland or Blaine. Is it any kind of a new
religion or faith they have got up?
"No. it simply means tney are taking one
side or the other in pontics, ana nas no ret-
erence to religious belief at all."
"1 think they'd Detter orop pontics ana at
tend to church affairs. It makes them for
get their Creator. I haven't heard of one
coming out for the Lord since the days of
Moody and Kankey" -Boston lilobe.
ODE TO WOMAN.
Source of man's great happiness,
Her mission surely is to bless,
As mother, sister, sweetheart, wife,
She is the one true joy of life.
She carries heaven in her face;
A saintly beauty there we trace.
Her dainty graces we admire;
Her glances set our hearts afire.
Man's comforter in hours of woe
A wingless angel here below.
We hold her perfect till she flirts,
Or won't sew buttons on our shirts
Then from her high estate she falls.
And then she must look out for squalls.
Somerville Journal.
THE SCRimSCHON ART.
Whales' Teeth and. Walros Talks
Made Things of Beauty.
From the Philadelphia Times.
"The serimschon!" exclaimed round-faced,
dark-eyed, black-haired William Tevis, as he
rolled np a woodcock in his father's old game
shop, in the basement of 408 Walnut street,
yesterday. "The serimschon is the art beau
tiful. What is it? Sit down and I will tell
you. Not there Great Jnpiter! you almost
squatted in this pan of plovers. Sit down
in that armchair. It's one of dad's old
chairs, and it's as old as well,, all these
things 'round here are as old as cuss words,
And"
"But the serimschon?"
"Ah! The serimschon is the art of engra
ving on ivory or bone. I engrave xn egg
shells also, but that is a distinct branch of
the engraver's art. I don't know where the
name schrimchon came from and as to mean
ing, why, you can only define it by itself. It
is an art that is known to few except old sea
men. They take to it naturally if they have
patience, a steady hand and a gift of draw
ing. All that you need is a jack-knife and a
whale's tooth, a billiard ball, a bit of walrus
tusk, or a piece of ivory or bone of any sort
and a little India ink and Chinese vermiliion.
You first lay off your design in lead pencil.
Then you take your knife and carefully etch
it and rub in your coloring matter. The de
sign will last until the bone crumbles away."
"What do you draw?" -
"Anything from a bouquet to a one-eyed
bull. Young Bailors sometimes have their
sweethearts scrunschoned and young married
women have me . serimschon their husbands
on whales' teeth. The design does not sink
very deeply, and when love changes it is easy
enough to scratch out the old picture and put
in a new one. A pretty and sharp widow is
one of my best customers. She came to me
first about eight years ago. She had just
been married. Her husband was master of a
whaling ship and she htd him scrimschoned
on a walrus tusk. He was lost at sea. A
few months afterwards the woman was mar
ried again. She came back with the tusk
and had No. 1 scratched out and No. 2
scrimschoned in. She wept sadly as piece by
piece No 1 was whittled away. But all the
same she insisted that I should touch up No
2 so much that the picture didn't look a bit
like the original. She came back one day
and angrily told me to scratch off No.
mighty quick. 'What's the matter?' says I.
'Divorced,' says she, 'the odious creature.' I
didn't see her again for several months. Then
one dark day, in the midst of a dismal driz
zle, she came tripping down these steps and
into this cellar with a little bit of a fellow as
fragile as a soft-shell crab. 'Mr husband.
sir,' says she proudly. 'Glad to meet you,
sir,' says he, in a voice like the sound of a
tight fiddle-string. 'Can you serimschon
from nature?' says she. 'Yes, 'um,' says I.
'Then I would like to have you serimschon
my dear husband,' says she. 'I want to have
his face where I know it will last forever and
forever.' Did I serimschon him? Oh, yes.
But, poor man, he only lasted two months.
"It was less than six weeks after I had
heard of his death that my customer and the
walrus tusk were back again. She was
dressed up scrumptiously. She saw that I
was surprised not to find her in mourning.
'I I'm married again!' she says with a gig
gle. 'And if you would be so kind as to
scratch out this this picture and put in the
picture of my my present husband, whose
photograph I have here, I will be obliged to
yon.' Such a change and scratching of hus
bands had worn a hollow m the walrus tusk
and I was longer than usual in getting along
with No. 4. Just as I was putting in his left
ear my attention was called away by a scrap
ing of feet and austling of silk. I looked
up and there was my customer flouncing
down tks steps. I was not astonished; noth
ing that she could do would surprise me,
'Well?' says I. She paused a moment to take
her breath and gather her words. Then she
said: 'How far have you got with that
sorimschoh?' 'Just putting in the ears,' says
1. 'weu, mate tne ears big, enormous;
make them donkey's ears ,' she said, 'and on
the forehead scratch the words beast and
fraud.' 'Great heavens, ma'am,' says I,
'what's the matter?' 'He has gone back on
me,' she screamed. 'Your husband ? says I.
He was not my husband,' she answered; 'I
was too previous. He was only engaged to
me and now he has broken the engagement,
and they do say he is going to marry another.
But I'll sue him for breach of promise, sir.
He'll find that he can't lacerate my heart
with impunity.' "
"Did you finish the serimschon according
to order i"
'No. It's unfinished yet. I'm expecting
to see that woman come in here any day fast
married to No. 4. She set out to get him
and she'll succeed."
Balzac's Nose.
From the September Manhattan.
Every curious collector of the memorable
sayings of great men has probably enriched
his store with Cromwell's request to be paint
ed with all his warts. By the side of that
saying let there be placed what, in posing for
his bust, Balzac said to the sculptor, David
d'Angiers: "Be careful of my nose; my
nose is a world!" A truly remarkable world
this Balzac nose, which David is to hand
down so carefully to posterity, having a
deep, perpendicular furrow at its roof, being
square at the end, parted into two lobes, and
pierced by very open nostrils, whereto was
never seen the like in any mortal nose what
soever. A still more remarkable nose by
reason of being situated between such worlds
of eyes "black diamonds illuminated by
rich, golden reflection" wherein was a life,
a light, a magnetism, a sovereignty, a seer
like penetration, a Rabelaisian gayety never
seen in any other. But a most remarkable
nose for being placed near such a world of
a mind as few noses have enjoyed proximity
to since the original mold of humanity was
east and consecrated; on the conhnes ot
which world no man can linger without be
coming conscions that his world or nnna,
whether great or little, has received a fresh
impulse to orb itself more nearly into per-
tectness. Therefore 1 wish to draw near to
it for a moment before I evoked the general
past of which it was a part, confident that in
the end 1 shall have no apology to make to
any sympathetic souls who may consent to
bear me company.
Parisian Economies.
From the Philadelphia Times.
Paris is a city of the most striking and
queerest contrasts and its nooks and corners
are a constant study. There is no necessity
to travel very far to find out these social an
tipodes, for under the roof of a large apart
ment house they dwell in close but unknown
proximity. Le premier is often luxuriously
fitted np and inhabited by a millionaire, and
as you ascend style and comfort diminish in
an inverse ratio, .until, perhaps, le sixieme is
about to dispose of the last article of cloth
ing for a meal. The Parisians have one no
ticeable quality they always put the best
foot foremost, and excepting in cases of pro
fessional beggary, are very tenacious about
looking poor or shabby.
Nothing ever goes to waste in this citv of
extravagance and fashion, and a whole book
could be filled with a variety of ways in
which people not only make a living, but
amass a fortune. La Marchande de loi
lette" is a well-known character. Her shop
windows are familiar to habitues and aro al
ways curtained with shawls, laces and dress
es, which are relieved by articles of jewelry
and pawn tickets. These divinities are not
always claw-fingered and wrinkled, as might
be imagined, but aro often pretty, plump
and young though cela va sans dire they
are old in wickedness. Thev are on intimate
terms with the Ghetto, the Jewish quarter of
Paris, although not generally of the tribes of
Israel. Pawn brokeresses and nsureresses in
every sense of the word, thev scorn the im
putation and profess to keep within the strict
letter of the law. The marchande de toilette
will supply you with clothing, ball dresses,
diamonds, money tor a ball or funeral. 1 on
can hire from her a wardrobe for the season.
or she will purchase for you an India shawl
or an elegant dress from a store in one or tne
fashionable boulevards. She will procure
all these on reasonable terms, but is a relent
less creditor in the end.
The pawnbrokers of Paris and the Mont de
Piete, with its many pathetic stories, so that
its fluttering snorts seem full with pathos,
have been profusely written np, but there
are soi-distant honest pursuits and trades
men who never come to errief, and frequently
make fortunes on the refuse the debris of
the city. Only Bohemians and searchers into
human nature are conversant with this cor
ner of the city. Clothes descend to all grades
and all sorts of uses till they get to the shod
dy mill and are "reorganized." Some years
aeo there was a man in Paris worth over one
million dollars, made by selling "philoso
phers." What are "philosophers" Why
the uppers of cast-off shoes, whose soles
have become a fable. These are sold to cob
blers, the best of them made, over as new,
the worst used for repairing. They sell tor
from two to eight cents a pair. This dealer
in "philosophers," unlike most of his coun
trymen, always kept up a mean and slovenly
appearance, had shares m railway stocks,
loans and owned valuable real estate.
The chiffoniers rag-pickers are a well-
known class, and have often been made sub
jects for the artist's pencil and brush, their
very ugliness being a sort or picturesque
recommendation. Many of these are old
and decrepit and live in misery while they
leave a bank account behind at their decease.
Once in a while there have been stories told
of bonanzas coming to these "miserables" in
shape of silver or jewelry which has been
carelessly thrown out with the garbage. One
poor old soul found a valuable diamond, and
so anxious was he to preserve his secret and
secure his wealth that he sewed it carefully
in his dirty cap, which he wore day and
night. It was only accidentally found when
the poor wretch died, by a crony, who sus
pected something from his tenacity in always
keeping hold of his old cap. The further
history of the diamond is lost m oDsjeunty.
It may nave been the nucleus or anotner ror
tune. As before mentioned, nothing is ever lost
in Paris; even the bread left at the restau
rant tables is toasted for soup or carried off
to a less high-toned establishment, where it
undergoes successful transformations for the
delectations of less delicate palates. What
will not a French cuisinier turn to savory
pottage? Though to do thexn justice the
French are no gourmands and are easily sat
isfied with a very slender menu if their
means are small. The wine shops of Paris
are a distinctive feature and ot all grades,
from those described in the old Rue bt. An
toine, where the spilling of a cask of red
wine set fire to the smoldering ashes of the
first revolution, to the stylish resorts on the
avenues and boulevards. Since the time of
the communists beer has become a common
beverage in some places. In a small drink
ing-shop much frequented by the communist
artist, Uustave (Jourbet, ana ms boon com
panions, an old habitue said he had seen
them drink forty glasses at a sitting. One
feature of a Paris wine-shop much needed in
this country is "1'ange" the aneeL This is
a placid-looking' individual, dressed 'in a
blouse or. loose shirt, who, when a customer
becomes either incapable or otherwise unrea
sonable, coolly empties his pockets, secures
his valuables and by persuasion or other arts
succeeds in conveying him home and placing
him and his belongings in charge of .his valet
or his wife, as the ease may be. "L'ange" is
of an impervious nature and obtuse to all
abuse or impoliteness. This guardian genius
often carries away the blessings of anxious
wives and mothers.
Parisians have a mania for collecting curi
osities, and they are the oddest assortments
to be found. Some of these are private and
others seen for a small compensation, if you
can only stumble upon them in out-of-the-way
places old clothes worn by celebrities,
wigs, chessmen, even buttons, trash of all
sorts venerated with antiquarian fervor. Old
paintings ore a great treasure, and the mar
velous quantity found in the collections is
wonderful. It has been suseested that some
of the old masters must have lived one thou
sand years to have painted all the pictures
ascribed to their names. The owner always
puts implicit faith in the genuineness of his
treasures, and jtn experienced, wary picture
dealer often realizes large sums on an "old
master," when he has vamped over a modern
daub by some trick of his trade. A French
paper tells of finding a skull of Cardinal
.Kichelieu, and another remarks, "No wonder
he. was a remarkable statesman, as several of
his craniums have been unearthed."
Among the odds and ends the second-hand
book places on the quays near Pont Neuf are
very interesting ana amusing, x on can turn
over books to your heart's content, and book
worms and students avail themselves of the
privilege. It was customary several years
ago to have auctions at night of these collec
tions. Sometimes casual purchasers have
found themselves possessed of treasures or
remarkable curiosities in literature. French
translations are very funny snd frequently
convey a different idea from that intended by
the author. The absurdity of some transla
tions of Shakespeare have been frequently
commented on. "Out, brief candle!" trans
lated "Partez! a la porte, petit morceau de
chandelle" "Begone! to the door,- small
piece of candle!"
lhe beggars of Pans have been written up
in a variety of ways, and though they have
been in a measure suppressed by the present
system of police, they are still an amusing
and interesting feature. They practice men
dicancy as a fine art, and instances have
been well authenticated of successful decep
tions carried on for years. One man with a
distressing nicer on his leg, who for a long
Lime eAc-iLeci uisgusi ana compassion, was
found to have two healthy members. He
had his limb painted and swathed to repre
sent disease in a manner that defied detec
tion, and a blind beggar with two disfigured
and swollen eyes had been for years "doc
tored" so as to carry out his deception. A
poor, lame and apparently distorted crip
ple was one day the butt of some aggra
vating gamins. Suddenly he raised the
crutch he always had beside him when
sitting apparently helpless and straighten-
mg himself up fled after his tormentors
and displayed to the astonished passers-by
a straight and active figure. It is almost
incredible the way these mendicants can
distort and disfigure themselves to excite
compassion, and many prefer it. to obtain
ing a livelihood in an honest way. There
are artists in "deformities" who make
money by their curious and repulsive art,
and some excel in their skill, and the beg
gar will counterfeit the same deformities
tor years with a persistency worthy ot a
better cause. There are classes and occu
pations belonging only to this metropolis,
and it is truly a stud' to find out the un
dertow, as it were, of this social current.
W heels within wheels anil every one dis
tinct in his quarter and occupation.
"THE BOSTON OF" CHINA."
Foo Cfaow, the Chinese City Bombard
ed by the French.
A New York Chinaman's Description of It.
Foo Chow is the Boston of China and one
of the finest cities of the world. I have
lived there for many years and am conse
quently much interested as to how it will
withstand the French bombardment. The
population of the city itself is at least 800,
000, and that of the suburbs about 400,000.
As a seat of learning it is pre-eminently dis
tinguished. No fewer than 3,200 literary
graduates a term that closely corresponds
to that ot "senior wrangler " at the Universi
ty of Cambridge in England or more than
a quarter of all the scholars in that part of
the empire reside in FooChow. It is also the
home of seven thousand "literary students,"
seedy but clever young fellows, who are sup
ported somewhat in the same manner as the
"poor scholars ' ot Ireland that is iv
teaching and similar scholastic pursuits.
Foo Chow has a considerable inland trade and
has greatly enlarged her commerce, especial
ly since the extirpation of pirates. As well
as I can remember, the imports of opium
last year exceeded 3,500,000, of food stuffs
$4,UUU,WU, and ot foreign goods jf.lo,00,(KW.
Special attention is paid to the tea trade, as
the Bohea leaf flourishes in the neighborhood
of Foo Chow. Perhaps the most important
industry is navigation. The Min river, which
is navigable for two hundred and fifty miles,
to a city called Shau-nai, where a canal con
nects it with a tributary of the Yang-tse-Ki-ang,
is the home of over fifty thousand boat
men. Thousands of fishermen also make a
good living by selling sharks' fins, birds' nest
soup, devil fish, dragon fish, gourami, sea
worm, greenfish and many other species of
fish.
The mendicants of Foo Chow are almost as
famous as its scholars. Indeed, I doubt if
any other city has so many professional beg
gars. The majority are members of two re
ligions societies that of "The Brothers of
the Heavenly Rest" and that of "The Asso
ciation of the Heavenly Flower. "
Foo Chow is finely paved with granite
blocks, and most of its streets are as clean as
Broadway, while none of them are as filthy
as Mott and Pell streets in this city. The
drainage is also admirable, considering that
the city is built on a spacious level plain and
is even to-day liable to be inundated by the
spring torrents. For this reason the city
walls are bnilt of extraordinary strength and
the gates in them are few and small. When
a heavy flood comes the gates can be bl icked
up with banks of earth in a few minutes and
the city made waterproof. There is never
much danger of a famine, as the food sup
ply is largely furnished by boats. The city
could certainly hold out for many months.
A suggestion was made to us by foreign en
gineers that it would be well to erect levees,
but we did not act on it, as experience has
taught us that the effect of levees is gradual
ly to raise the river bed, and thus to increase
the evil which they are intended to cure.
The municipal government of Foo Chow is
excellent, and the people are very orderly
and broad minded. Will you laugh when I
tell yon that the British consul lives in a.
splendid Buddhist temple, for which he pays
the priests 80 a year? A Taonist church "is
similarly occupied by an American merchant.
An assistant priest is the head gardener of
the British consul, while another acts as cook
for the American merchant. The people of
Foo Chow are inveterate opium smokers and
gamblers. There are actually over four hun
dred opium joints and five hundred gambling
dens in the city. Of course they are illegal,
but are supported chiefly by officials, in the
same manner as your policemen support the
saloons and drink in them on Sundays.
Crimes against property and individuals are
very rare.
The arsenal destroyed by the French was
about three miles down the river. It was
very similar to Woolwich in England. It
was started in 1851, but was of slight ac
count until 1866, when the government
changed its policy and began to employ for
eign talent in its military and naval affairs.
"Chinese" Gordon made several plans for
us and approved of many others. The en
tire control of the works was given to Eng
lish, French and American engineers, con
structors, forge masters, machinists and
metal workers, and their services were re
warded by large salaries. The best ma
chinery and the latest inventions were pur
chased and placed in the shops, and an
immense quantity of munitions of war was
accumulated. You can judge of the extent
of the works from the fact that the num
ber of natives employed has varied from
five hundred to three thousand and of Eu
ropeans from forty to one hundred. The
importance of Foo Chow as a manufactur
ing center must not be overlooked. Among
its products are paper, cotton, porcelain,
salted and dried pork, meats, fish and shell
fish, gelatine, glue, spices, tobacco, glass,
potash, lead, sweetmeats, copper, bronze
and steel. It is also' the center of the Yu
Nung mining country, which extends for
one hundred and fifty miles, and which is
fairly rich in veins of lead, silver and cop
per ore and in excellent iron beds. The
quality of the metals is good, though the
mode of working the mines is very primi
tive and insufficient. China would suffer
as much from the loss of Foo Chow and
the arsenal as America would from the loss
of Philadelphia and the navy yard, in case
of a war between America and a foreign
country. The indemnity demanded by
France is much less than the value of the
arsenal and the navy stationed there. As
for the munitions of war, I understand
that they have been removed to Fu Hing.
Miss Julia F. Parker, of JJartford, has
been engaged as a teacher in the High school
at Springfield. She is a graduate of Smith
college.
WILCOX & CO.
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OF
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WILCOX & CO.,
CHAP EL STREET.
DECORATIVE PAPER HANGINGS
PAINTS, OILS, GLASS, ETC.
PLATT & TIIOMPSOS,
64 and 66 Orange SI. and 5 Center St.
ivs
UNIVERSITY OF BUFFALO,
Laboratory of Chemistry,
Cor. Main and Virginia Streets,
BrFFALO, N. Y., May 28, 1SS3.
Messrs. A. Heller & Bro.:
Gentlemen I have carefully analyzed tlie sam
ple? of Hungarian Wines submitted to me by you,
and find them to be perfectly pure, uuwatvred, un
fortified, unadulterated in any sense. Tliey are,
moreover, most pleasing to the palate, and possess
qualities which render them very valuable as mild
sitmulants.
I am, gentlemen,
Yours most res)iect fully,
R. A. WITTHAUS, A. M., M. P.,
Prof, of Physiological Chemistry, University of
New York.
Prof, of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of
Buffalo.
Prof, of Chemistry and Toxicology, University of
Vermont.
I am Sole Agent in the New England States for
the importing house of A. HrIUr & Bro.. of Buda
Pest, Hungaiy, and New York.
HUGH J. REYNOLDS,
Nos. 152 & 154 Crown St.
Kew Haven, Conn.
V. B. TREWUELLl,
MANUFACTURER OF MATTRESSES.
Hair. Cotton, Husk Excelsior; also Feather Beds,
Pillows, Bolsters, etc. Renovating Mattresses a
Specialtv. Will call and deliver at residence in city,
rriees the Lowest. 81 EAST WATER STREET,
alTdtjm New- Haven, Conn.
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SUPERIOR STOCK
FERTILIZERS !
Including brands from the following well known
manufacturers.
Quimiipiac Fertilizer Co.,
II. J. Baker As Co.,
ltlaoes Form ti la an d Ier 11 v iaji
iiano Co.,
K. Frank oe,
J. B. King & o.,
JLcster Brow.
Our aim this season will be to a!l only goods that
we can guarantee, and to make our prices as low as
consistent with the quality.
Farmers and market gardeiiora intending pur
chases in this line should secure our lowest prices,
as we have made a marked reduction in Dry Fish
Guanos. Complete Manures.
Call on or address
& B: Bradley & Co.,
No. 406
jylO 2awaw
State Street.
OFF DAYS.
Thousands and thousands of men and women
have their off days they are not sick enough to
give up, relinquish their duties and go to bed, but
as one describes it:
"I feel so drowsy and weary my head aches."
"I never did havo a meaner feeling in my life.
"My stomach does not feel right."'
"Don't know what is the matter with me, But I
do not feel well "
"I have a half feeling of nausea."
"Too cold one minute and too warm the next,
"To use a slang phrase, 'I'm all broke up.'
The above and hundreds of similar expressions
are heard daily. With some there is a known
cause, others cannot account for the feeling. It
may originate from different reasons, hut from
whatever cause, nature requires assistance, and you
can immediately render the assistance and dispel
all these unpleasant symptoms by using Burdock
Blood Bitters. Take them immediately on the ap
pearance of the unpleasant feeling.
You will feel better in half-au-hour.
Take it any time before or after meals.
If before you will enjoy your meal better.
If after it will aid digestion.
It is a medicine you can take at any time with
good results; can be taken by the prattling child or
the feeble and tottering old man or woman. Com
posed of roots and herbs. There is nothing in its
composition ihat will injure the most delicate con
stitution pleasant in taste and effect; will do you
good.
BMoct BLOOD Bitters.
Not only to the suffes
Lasted by disease doe ;
irifm'fl Food supplo
hnent the proper medi
Icine and bring back
'strength ana comiorx,
but the delicate mother
will find its dailv use
ijust what Is needed to
cnectt aim supplement
the draiu made upon na
ture's forces. Try it, ,
mothers, and. be con,
vineed. Recipes to suit
different tastes accom
pany each can. Itdoes not tax tne aigesuve organs.
Wis Btrpntrtheniner to both invahds and children-
Sold by druggists, ac. up. WOOI-RICH
Whatsoever a Man Sowetli Hi at
also shall lie Reap.
Selfishness, Dishonesty and Low
Grade of Groceries and Meats
Cannot be found at
Jf A. WRIGHT'S,
Y48 State street, MerwIn'iBlock.
Oxford Chalybeate Water.
Orders for Oxford Spring Water tnay be left at
Apothecaries1 Hall, 801 Chapel street. It will be
found efficacious in diseases of the akin, kidneys and
liver and a tonic is cases of, general debility,
m3 4mo
Hwni wines
mMmi

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